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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other FAQs about Conversion & Equivalents. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? How do I compare heating fuels?

2

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly...

3

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors January 23, 2002 Washington, DC DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for...

4

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Conversion Calculators. Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors. Last reviewed: September 13, 2013. Other FAQs about Coal.

5

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Conversion Calculators. Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors. Last reviewed: September 13, 2013. Other FAQs about Prices.

6

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

7

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

8

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

9

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies ... What are the sources of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by type of fuel ...

10

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

11

Common Carbon Metric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Common Carbon Metric Common Carbon Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Common Carbon Metric Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, World Resources Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/Common-Carbon-Metric-for_Pilot_Testing_220410.p Common Carbon Metric Screenshot References: Common Carbon Metrics [1] "This paper is offered by the United Nations Environment Programme's Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative (UNEP-SBCI), a partnership between the UN and public and private stakeholders in the building sector, promoting sustainable building practices globally. The purpose of this

12

Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multiplying by 12/44. 9 Includes electric power sector use of ...

13

Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multiplying by 12/44. 8 Fuel ethanol minus denaturant. 2 Carbo ...

14

Carbon Intensity, - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Intensity using Market Exchange Rates (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Thousand Year 2005 U.S. Dollars) Loading...

15

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11002: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 Date: January 5, 2011 02 Date: January 5, 2011 Title: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year Originator: Andrea Chew & Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: January 25, 2011 A conventional mid-size gasoline car emits 0.45 kg of greenhouse gases (GHG) per mile. 1 One hundred (100) metric tons (t) of GHG per year are equivalent to emissions from 17 conventional gasoline cars. Item: The GHG emissions cited above are from an analysis record prepared by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Programs on life-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases and petroleum use for several light-duty vehicles. 1 For cars that are between 1 and 5 years old, the average mileage is approximately 13,000,

16

World Carbon Emissions by Region, 1990-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

•World carbon emissions are expected to reach 8.0 billion metric tons by 2010 and 9.8 billion metric tons by 2020 according to the IEO99 reference case projection ...

17

Figure 37. Carbon dioxide emissions from electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 37. Carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation in three cases, 2005-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide ...

18

Figure 18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases, 2005-2040 (million metric tons) Extended Policies No Sunset

19

Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million metric tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008...

20

World Carbon Emissions: IEO2000 vs. IEO99  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

If world energy consumption rises to the levels projected in the IEO2000 reference case, carbon emissions would grow to 8.1 billion metric tons in 2010 (or 40 percent ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions declined in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions in 2012 were the lowest in the United States since 1994, at 5.3 billion metric tons of CO 2 (see figure above).

22

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin February 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the Michigan Basin near Gaylord, Mich., in a deep saline formation, the Silurian-age Bass Island dolomite. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships

23

World Carbon Emissions: IEO2000 vs. IEO99  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: If world energy consumption rises to the levels projected in the IEO2000 reference case, carbon emissions would grow to 8.1 billion metric tons in 2010 (or 40 percent above the 1990 level) and 10.0 billion metric tons by 2020 (72 percent above the 1990 level). This year's forecasts are 129 million metric tons higher in 2010 relative to last year's forecast; and 192 million metric tons higher by 2020. The higher forecast for world carbon emissions can be attributed, in large part, to changes in the forecast for the FSU. Changes in the historical and projected carbon emissions for the FSU explain almost half of the increase between this year's IEO2000 and last year's report in 2010; and two-thirds of the difference in 2020. Historical data revisions

24

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

25

Figure 111. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 111. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases with three levels of emissions fees, 2000-2040 (million metric tons)

26

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2007, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 17 percent. In the IEO2010 Reference case, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from non-OECD countries in 2035 are about double those from OECD countries. Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, world energy use continues to be at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2010 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions29 grow from 29.7 billion metric tons in 2007 to 33.8 billion metric tons in 2020 and 42.4 billion metric tons in 2035 (Table 18).30

27

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

28

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

29

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

30

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for measuring ecosystem carbon oxidation state and oxidativemean oxidation number of carbon (MOC) - A useful concept forJ.F. & Barsanti, K.C. The Carbon Number-Polarity Grid: A

Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) publication. This resource could potentially store hundreds of years' worth of industrial greenhouse gas emissions, permanently preventing their release into the atmosphere, says the 2012 edition of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Capturing CO2 emissions from large power and

32

DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) publication. This resource could potentially store hundreds of years' worth of industrial greenhouse gas emissions, permanently preventing their release into the atmosphere, says the 2012 edition of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Capturing CO2 emissions from large power and

33

ARM - 2009 Performance Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Performance Metrics 9 Performance Metrics Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 2009 Performance Metrics Improve Climate Models - Develop a coupled climate model with fully interactive carbon and sulfur cycles, as well as dynamic vegetation to enable simulations of aerosol effects, carbon chemistry, and carbon sequestration by the land surface and oceans and the interactions between the carbon cycle and climate. In fiscal year 2009: Provide improved climate

34

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Index (click to jump links) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Emissions from Electricity Generation Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 115. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1990-2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2002 to 2025, to 8,142 million metric tons (Figure 115). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year from 2002 to 2025. Carbon dioxide emissions in the residential sector, including emissions

36

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

37

Transport mode and network architecture : carbon footprint as a new decision metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the tradeoffs between carbon footprint, cost, time and risk across three case studies of United States' perishable or consumer packaged goods firms and their transportation partners. Building upon ...

Andrieu, Nelly

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

39

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

40

carbon dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dioxide emissions dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Total annual carbon dioxide emissions by country, 2005 to 2009 (million metric tons). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords carbon dioxide emissions EIA world Data text/csv icon total_carbon_dioxide_emissions_from_the_consumption_of_energy_2005_2009million_metric_tons.csv (csv, 12.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

SciTech Connect

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Saving Tons at the Register  

SciTech Connect

Duct losses have a significant effect on the efficiency of delivering space cooling to U.S. homes. This effect is especially dramatic during peak demand periods where half of the cooling equipment's output can be wasted. Improving the efficiency of a duct system can save energy, but can also allow for downsizing of cooling equipment without sacrificing comfort conditions. Comfort, and hence occupant acceptability, is determined not only by steady-state temperatures, but by how long it takes to pull down the temperature during cooling start-up, such as when the occupants come home on a hot summer afternoon. Thus the delivered tons of cooling at the register during start-up conditions are critical to customer acceptance of equipment downsizing strategies. We have developed a simulation technique which takes into account such things as weather, heat-transfer (including hot attic conditions), airflow, duct tightness, duct location and insulation, and cooling equipment performance to determine the net tons of cooling delivered to occupied space. Capacity at the register has been developed as an improvement over equipment tonnage as a system sizing measure. We use this concept to demonstrate that improved ducts and better system installation is as important as equipment size, with analysis of pull-down capability as a proxy for comfort. The simulations indicate that an improved system installation including tight ducts can eliminate the need for almost a ton of rated equipment capacity in a typical new 2,000 square foot house in Sacramento, California. Our results have also shown that a good duct system can reduce capacity requirements and still provide equivalent cooling at start-up and at peak conditions.

Brown, Karl; Seigel, Jeff; Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 110. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2003 and 2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2003 to 2025, to 8,062 million metric tons (Figure 110). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year. New carbon dioxide mitigation programs, more rapid improvements in technology, or more rapid adoption of voluntary programs could result in lower emissions levels than projected here.

44

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

45

and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North America is currently a net source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, contributing to the global buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and associated changes in the earth’s climate. In 2003, North America emitted nearly two billion metric tons of carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. North America’s fossil fuel emissions in 2003 (1856 million metric tons of carbon ±10 % with 95 % certainty) were 27 % of global emissions. Approximately 85 % of those emissions were from the United States, 9 % from Canada and 6 % from Mexico. The conversion of fossil fuels to energy (primarily electricity) is the single largest contributor, accounting for approximately 42 % of North American fossil emissions in 2003. Transportation is the second largest, accounting for 31 % of total emissions. There are also globally important carbon sinks in North America. In 2003, growing vegetation in North America removed approximately 530 million tons of carbon per year ( ± 50%) from the atmosphere and stored it as plant material and soil organic matter. This land sink is equivalent to approximately 30 % of the fossil fuel emissions from North America. The imbalance between the fossil fuel source and the sink on land is a net release to the atmosphere of 1335 million metric tons of carbon per year ( ± 25%). Approximately 50 % of North America’s terrestrial sink is due to the regrowth of forests in the United

Lisa Dilling (co-lead; David M. Fairman; Richard A. Houghton; Gregg H. Marl; Adam Z. Rose; Thomas J. Wilbanks

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Metric Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST metric program encourages the use of the SI in all facets of education, including honing of worker skills. All Levels of Government. ...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

47

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy publication. November 20, 2012 DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology A promising post combustion membrane technology that can separate and capture 90 percent of the carbon dioxide from a pulverized coal plant has been successfully demonstrated and received Department of Energy approval to advance to a larger-scale field test. November 19, 2012 Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in

48

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

49

Metric Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: Metric Units, Elevation Converter, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (m), 0, m, ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Metric Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Smart Grid Metrics Monitoring our Progress Smart Grid Implementation Workshop Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team June 19, 2008 1 Conducted by the National...

51

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 5, 2009 November 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 A large-scale carbon dioxide storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. October 21, 2009 DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. October 13, 2009 Secretary Chu Announces Up To $55 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced

52

DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration

53

NETL: News Release - DOE Regional Partnerships Find Up To 3.5 Billion Tons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 DOE Regional Partnerships Find More Than 3,500 Billion Tons of Possible CO2 Storage Capacity Atlas Details Stationary Sources and Geologic Reservoirs in U.S. and Canada WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships have identified the powerplant and other stationary sources of more than 3.8 billion tons a year of the greenhouse gas CO2 in the United States and Canada and companion candidate storage capacity for more than 3,500 billion tons. The results are detailed in the new Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada which became available online today. MORE INFO Link to NETL's Carbon Sequestration Atlas web page Link to the Interactive Carbon Sequestration Atlas Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program

54

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In AEO2013, the 2030 values have fallen to 5,523 million metric tons for total energy-related CO 2 emissions, with 1,874 million metric tons (34 percent) ...

55

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success...

56

Energy Policy 36 (2008) 20632073 Implications of carbon cap-and-trade for US voluntary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

converted to $/metric ton assuming average regional CO2 emissions rate from eGRID (US EPA, 2004). 6 Data

57

EU Metric Directive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... View EU Metric Directive Commission Services Working Document PDF ... of European Union (EU) Meeting on Metric Directives (2005); Packaging ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Metric Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODERN GRID MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Smart Grid Metrics Monitoring our Progress Smart Grid Implementation Workshop Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team June 19, 2008 1 Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Many are working on the Smart Grid FERC DOE-OE Grid 2030 GridWise Alliance EEI NERC (FM) DOE/NETL Modern Grid Strategy GridWise Program GridWorks NW GridWise Testbed GridApps CERTS DOE-OE CEC PIER NYSERDA CPUC AMI Galvin Initiative EPRI Intelligrid PSERC NIST GWAC Utility AMI Open AMI CEC PIER EPACT05 Nat'al Labs EISA-2007 IEEE DOE Smart Grid Task Force 3 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

59

NEWTON's Metric System Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please select any link below. Search this page, using your web browser's search function. Please select any link below. Search this page, using your web browser's search function. Metric System References Do you have a great metric reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Metric (SI) References Metric (SI) References Having trouble with the metric system? Visit the National Institute of Standards and Technology's site about the rules and style conventions of the International System of Units (SI). The Metric System The Metric System Need another reference? Try this site provided by Wikipedia that discusses the metric system and its history in depth. Metric Converter Metric Converter Need to convert to Metric? OnlineConversion.com allows you to convert just about anything to just about anything else. This will let you easily from metric to US Standard notation, and vice versa.

60

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 DOE Project Injects 700 Tons of Carbon Dioxide Into Texas Sandstone Formation Researchers to Determine the Ability of Brine Formations to Sequester Greenhouse Gas WASHINGTON, DC - When scientists recently pumped 700 metric tons of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) a mile underground as a follow-up to a 2004 effort, they initiated a series of tests to determine the feasibility of storing the CO2 in brine formations, a major step forward in the U.S. Department of Energy's carbon sequestration program. MORE INFO Read the University of Texas at Austin press release 11.19.04 Techline : Frio Formation Test Well Injected with Carbon Dioxide The Frio Brine project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, is designed to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in nuclear reactors. The decision follows an exhaustive Administration review of non-proliferation programs, including alternative technologies to dispose of surplus plutonium to...

62

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Climate Change's Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006 and revised 1996 guidelines)—see http://www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/gl/invs6.html; ...

63

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Burning: Total 5: 1980. 3.06: 4.42: NA: 0.28: 0.45: 8.20: 10.52: 0.52: 11.04: 5.47: 2.87: 0.48: 0.04: 8.86: ... 4 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and ...

64

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual Energy Outlook ... 1984 forward, industrial and domestic wastewater. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

65

CYBER SECURITY METRICS AND MEASURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CYBER SECURITY METRICS AND MEASURES ... Keywords: cyber security; metrics; measures; software; computer systems; IT ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

COMISIÓN FEDERAL DE ELECTRICIDAD EFFORTS ON HIS CARBON STORAGE PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspectives Perspectives MEXICO Oscar JIMENEZ Federal Commission for Electricity oscar.jimenez03@cfe.gob.mx Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting (Featuring DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships) November 15-17, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA OUTLINE * PREVIOUS WORK * CURRENT ACHIEVEMENTS * FUTURE TASKS The energy sector is responsible for more than 70% (around 154 million metric tons) of CO 2 emissions in the country. POINT SOURCES Oscar Jiménez The electricity production industry is the largest contributor, and it does from a small number of stationary sources. SECTOR CO 2 EMISSIONS (metric tons) No. of SOURCES Electricity Generation 107,351,754 113 Oil & Petrochemical 47,556,986 273 Cement 26,016,726 60 Metallurgical, Iron & Steel 21,367,965

67

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expanded to provide measurement guidelines and next steps for three additional metrics; Green Energy Coefficient (GEC), Energy Reuse Factor (ERF), and Carbon Usage Effectiveness...

68

Monthly Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year: Coal Transportation Sector CO2 Emissions (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Natural Gas Transportation Sector CO2 Emissions (Million Metric Tons of Carbon ...

69

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multiplying by 12/44. 7 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and ...

70

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 Project Helping Further CCS Technology and Meeting G-8 Goals for Deployment Washington, D.C. -A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Link to SECARB web site The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern

71

COMISIÓN FEDERAL DE ELECTRICIDAD EFFORTS ON HIS CARBON STORAGE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

million metric tons) of CO 2 emissions in the country. POINT SOURCES Oscar Jimnez The electricity production industry is the largest contributor, and it does from a small...

72

Ton père et autre débris ; suivi de Entretien.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ce mémoire en création littéraire est constitué de deux parties. La première, Ton père et autres débris, est un récit composé de vingt-quatre tableaux divisés… (more)

Grenier, Jacques

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

74

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 17, 2008 November 17, 2008 DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration Atlas New Version Provides Additional Information on Carbon Dioxide Storage 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas II WASHINGTON, D. C.- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the release of its second Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada, which documents more than 3,500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential in oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams, and saline formations. Preliminary estimates suggest the availability of more than 1,100 years of CO2 storage for the United States and Canada in these geologic formations. "In the year since it was first published, the carbon sequestration atlas has proven to be an invaluable tool to the entire sequestration community," said Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy James Slutz. "The second edition will bolster our efforts to find environmentally sound, cost-effective methods to sequester carbon dioxide."

75

Metrics for enterprise transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to depict the role of metrics in the evolving journey of enterprise transformation. To this end, three propositions are explored: (i) metrics and measurement systems drive transformation, ...

Blackburn, Craig D. (Craig David), S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Performance Metrics for Proteomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Cancer (CPTC), NIST researchers are developing specific and quantitative metrics, implemented in a software pipeline, for evaluating sources ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Metric Conversion Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325 Metric Editorial Guide, 5th ed. (revised), 1993,

78

Metric Conversion Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325 Metric Editorial Guide , 5th ed. (revised), 1993,

79

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

80

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with industries. Paper, woolen, flour, and cotton mills, starch factories, slaughterhouses, distilleriesTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

82

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Billion-Ton' Study 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock potential nationwide. The report examines the nation's capacity to produce a billion dry tons of biomass resources annually for energy uses without impacting other vital U.S. farm and forest products, such as food, feed, and fiber crops. The study provides industry, policymakers, and the agricultural community with county-level data and includes analyses of

83

ARM - 2008 Performance Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Performance Metrics 8 Performance Metrics Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 2008 Performance Metrics Each year, the ARM Program must submit to DOE an overall performance measure related to scientific achievement. The overall performance measure includes specific metrics for reporting progress each quarter. This reporting process includes support documentation (usually a report or data file) appropriate for the metric. Overall Performance Measures

84

Property:OpenEI/CETSI/Metrics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metrics Metrics Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OpenEI/CETSI/Metrics Property Type Text Description Environmental aspects and performance metrics associated with the resource. Pages using the property "OpenEI/CETSI/Metrics" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A An Overview of Existing Wind Energy Ordinances + The objective of these communities is to facilitate and regulate the development of Wind Energy Conversion Systems. Animal Farm Powers Village + The plant will produce 350 kilowatts per hour, "enough to supply 175 homes with electricity). C City of Aspen Climate Action Plan + The Climate Action Plan calls for greenhouse gas reductions of 30 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050 from its 2004 baseline. Performance metrics are quantified by tons of CO2-e reduced. Based on a 2007 update to the baseline emissions inventory, the community achieved emissions reductions of 68,380 tons. The energy and environmental achievements as of the Plan's adoption in 2007 are outlined as updates within the Plan. To date, there has been no progress report on the Climate Action Plan per se, however the City's environmental achievements are described in the biennial Sustainability Report available at: http://www.aspenpitkin.com/Portals/0/docs/City/GreenInitiatives/enviro_sustainability_report_2008.pdf

85

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to move into the construction phase. Led by the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), a member of DOE's Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, the Illinois-ICCS project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide

86

Carbon Capture and Storage Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Carbon Capture and Storage Research Atlas IV Now Available Carbon storage atlas estimates at least 2,400 billion metric tons of U.S. CO2 storage resource. Read more Industrial CCS Learn how DOE is capturing and storing CO2 from industrial plants. Read more Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships A nationwide network of federal, state and private sector partnerships are determining the most suitable carbon storage solutions for their region. Read more Key Programs and Initiatives Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE has created a nationwide network of federal, state and private sector partnerships to determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage and sequestration in different areas of the country.

87

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to move into the construction phase. Led by the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), a member of DOE's Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, the Illinois-ICCS project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide

88

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

89

Metrics and Measures - SAMATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For instance, weather reports give hurricane intensity on ... 2006] proposed a metric for static analysis tools. ... depending on whether the tool claims to ...

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

Metric in Sports: Bicycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bicycling. Tour de France. ... Up-to-date information on the Tour de France 2011 can be found at the official site. Metric Biking Events. ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

INEAP Metrics Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Opportunities of the Current Usage of Metrics; ... consumption of non-local, non-renewable, non-recyclable ... recycled materials, water, energy and fuels ...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

93

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report supports the conclusion of the original 2005 Billion-Ton Study with added in-depth production and costs analyses and sustainability studies. The 2011 report uses more...

94

EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complex Level Complex Level July, 2013 Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2013 Lifecycle Values 2013 Target 2014 Target Pu packaged for long-term disposition Number of Containers 5,089 5,089 5,089 5,089 eU packaged for disposition Number of Containers 8,198 8,016 8,016 8,016 Pu/U residues packaged for disposition Kilograms of Bulk 107,828 107,828 107,828 107,828 DU & U packaged for disposition Metric Tons 736,801 32,452 45,317 76,817 Liquid Waste eliminated Thousands of Gallons 91,907 5,340 6,260 6,812 Liquid Waste Tanks closed Number of Tanks 239 11 11 13 HLW packaged for disposition Number of Containers 24,183 3,802 4,077 4,283 SNF packaged for disposition Metric Tons of Heavy Metal 2,450 2,128 2,128 2,128

95

Metrics White Paper Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metrics White Paper March 2010 Introduction Through the years, Unidata has conducted metrics, strategic partners, presentations, scientific papers, budgets, proposals, and other instances where or tools from Unidata's web site. Determining the classification of data to be captured, ad hoc committees

96

Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.  

SciTech Connect

In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

Hamada, Michael S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A. (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ARM - 2007 Performance Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Performance Metrics 7 Performance Metrics Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 2007 Performance Metrics A Single Column Model (SCM) represents the evolution of the atmosphere in a single grid box of a Global Climate Model (GCM). This illustration represents the observing strategy of ARM, which takes continuous atmospheric observations from fixed sites in three climate regimes around the world. A Single Column Model (SCM) represents the evolution of the atmosphere in a

99

Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated Recovery Act funds to more than 25 projects that capture and sequester CO2 emissions from industrial sources - such as cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, paper mills, and manufacturing facilities - into underground formations. Large-Scale Projects Three projects are aimed at testing large-scale industrial carbon capture

100

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 107. Carbn dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2004 and 2030 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Production of charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure  

SciTech Connect

With its wide range of properties, charcoal finds many commercial applications for domestic cooking, refining of metals (steel, copper, bronze, nickel, aluminum and electro-manganese), production of chemicals (carbon disulfide, calcium carbide, silicon carbide, sodium cyanide, carbon black, fireworks, gaseous chemicals, absorbents, soil conditioners and pharmaceuticals), as well as production of activated carbon and synthesis gas. In 1991, the world production of charcoal was 22.8 million cubic meters (3.8 million metric tons) as shown in Table 1. Brazil is the world`s largest charcoal producer --- 5.9 million cubic meters or one million metric tons was produced in 1991, most of which is used in steel and iron industry. African countries produced 45% of the world total amount of charcoal, where 86% of the wood-based energy is for domestic use, most of which is inefficiently used. Charcoal is produced commercially in kilns with a 25% to 30% yield by mass on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Until recently, the highest yield of good quality charcoal reported in the literature was 38%. In this paper, and ASME code rated experimental system is presented for producing charcoal and activated carbon from biomass.

Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

STAR METRICS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAR METRICS STAR METRICS May 4, 2011 - 4:47pm Addthis Energy continues to define Phase II of the STAR METRICS program, a collaborative initiative to track Research and Development...

103

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 26, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions East South Central EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

104

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 30, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 75.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

105

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source- Middle Atlantic Source- Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 22, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

106

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 25, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

107

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 23, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions East North Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

108

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source, New England Source, New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 21, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England- Reference Case (xls, 73.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

109

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 24, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA west north central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

110

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 27, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

111

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 28, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Mountain Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

112

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Pacific Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 29, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Pacific Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific- Reference Case (xls, 74.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

113

Progress Summary: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the in the Illinois Basin Illinois Basin for geological carbon for geological carbon sequestration sequestration Small Small - - scale (a few thousand tons, truck scale...

114

Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy's Commercial Building Initiative Page 1 Energy's Commercial Building Initiative Page 1 January 2009 Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology To clarify how the terms are used in the Department of Energy's Performance Metrics Research Project, a list of terms related to performance metrics are defined and include examples and comments. Visit www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/performance_metrics.html to learn more. Baseline - a standard reference case used as a basis for comparison Examples: a simulation model of an ASHRAE 90.1 compliant building, control building, measurement of energy consumption prior to application of an energy conservation measure Comments: Establishing a clearly defined baseline very important and is often the most difficult task. Defining a repeatable baseline is essential if the work is to be compared to results of other

115

Appendix B Metric  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Metric Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 1992 through 1996 in metric units of measure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this table have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 1992 through 1996. A brief documentation for the thermal conversion factors follows: * Marketed Production. The conversion factor is calcu- lated by adding the total heat content of dry production to the total heat content of extraction loss and dividing the resulting sum by the total quantity of dry production and extraction

116

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Related Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 8. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1980-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Absent the application of CCS technology (which is not expected to come into use without changes in current policies that are not included in the reference case), CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption and carbon content, with coal having the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and liquid fuels in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the coal share of total energy use increases from 23 percent in 2006 to 26 percent in 2030, while the share of

117

Cyber threat metrics.  

SciTech Connect

Threats are generally much easier to list than to describe, and much easier to describe than to measure. As a result, many organizations list threats. Fewer describe them in useful terms, and still fewer measure them in meaningful ways. This is particularly true in the dynamic and nebulous domain of cyber threats - a domain that tends to resist easy measurement and, in some cases, appears to defy any measurement. We believe the problem is tractable. In this report we describe threat metrics and models for characterizing threats consistently and unambiguously. The purpose of this report is to support the Operational Threat Assessment (OTA) phase of risk and vulnerability assessment. To this end, we focus on the task of characterizing cyber threats using consistent threat metrics and models. In particular, we address threat metrics and models for describing malicious cyber threats to US FCEB agencies and systems.

Frye, Jason Neal; Veitch, Cynthia K.; Mateski, Mark Elliot; Michalski, John T.; Harris, James Mark; Trevino, Cassandra M.; Maruoka, Scott

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Who Pays a Price on Carbon?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expenditures Fuel oil and other fuel 60 Source: Consumeremissions Fuel oil and other fuel 0.75 Source: Authors’oil Healthcare Other expenditures Total emissions Mean household emissions (metric tons of CO 2 per household) Source:

Grainger, Corbett A.; Kolstad, Charles D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

HigHligHts NETL News Release, "Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO 2 Injection into Michigan Basin." The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), has commenced a two-month field test that will inject up to 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into a saline formation some 3,200 to 3,500 feet below the Earth's surface. The Core Energy-owned, Antrim gas field location advantageously provides the project with a DTE Energy-owned gas processing plant that supplies the CO 2 ; an eight-mile CO 2 pipeline previously used for enhanced oil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

SciTech Connect

The growing investment by governments and electric utilities in energy efficiency programs highlights the need for simple tools to help assess and explain the size of the potential resource. One technique that is commonly used in this effort is to characterize electricity savings in terms of avoided power plants, because it is easier for people to visualize a power plant than it is to understand an abstraction such as billions of kilowatt-hours. Unfortunately, there is no standardization around the characteristics of such power plants. In this letter we define parameters for a standard avoided power plant that have physical meaning and intuitive plausibility, for use in back-of-the-envelope calculations. For the prototypical plant this article settles on a 500 MW existing coal plant operating at a 70percent capacity factor with 7percent T&D losses. Displacing such a plant for one year would save 3 billion kW h per year at the meter and reduce emissions by 3 million metric tons of CO2 per year. The proposed name for this metric is the Rosenfeld, in keeping with the tradition among scientists of naming units in honor of the person most responsible for the discovery and widespread adoption of the underlying scientific principle in question--Dr. Arthur H. Rosenfeld.

Brown, Marilyn; Akbari, Hashem; Blumstein, Carl; Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard; Calwell, Chris; Carter, Sheryl; Cavanagh, Ralph; Chang, Audrey; Claridge, David; Craig, Paul; Diamond, Rick; Eto, Joseph H.; Fulkerson, William; Gadgil, Ashok; Geller, Howard; Goldemberg, Jose; Goldman, Chuck; Goldstein, David B.; Greenberg, Steve; Hafemeister, David; Harris, Jeff; Harvey, Hal; Heitz, Eric; Hirst, Eric; Hummel, Holmes; Kammen, Dan; Kelly, Henry; Laitner, Skip; Levine, Mark; Lovins, Amory; Masters, Gil; McMahon, James E.; Meier, Alan; Messenger, Michael; Millhone, John; Mills, Evan; Nadel, Steve; Nordman, Bruce; Price, Lynn; Romm, Joe; Ross, Marc; Rufo, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant; Schipper, Lee; Schneider, Stephen H; Sweeney, James L; Verdict, Malcolm; Vorsatz, Diana; Wang, Devra; Weinberg, Carl; Wilk, Richard; Wilson, John; Worrell, Ernst

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Smart Grid Characteristics, Values, and Metrics | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characteristics, Values, and Metrics Smart Grid Characteristics, Values, and Metrics DOE Smart Grid Implementation Worksho Smart Grid Characteristics, Values, and Metrics More...

123

Metric Properties of Euclidean Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a survey on nondiscrete euclidean buildings, with a focus on metric properties of these spaces.

Kramer, Linus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analyses of sweep-up, ejecta, and fallback material from the 4250 metric ton high explosive test ''MISTY PICTURE'  

SciTech Connect

The MISTY PICTURE surface burst was detonated at the White Sands Missle range in May of 1987. The Los Alamos National Laboratory dust characterization program was expanded to help correlate and interrelate aspects of the overall MISTY PICTURE dust and ejecta characterization program. Pre-shot sampling of the test bed included composite samples from 15 to 75 m distance from Surface Ground Zero (SGZ) representing depths down to 2.5 m, interval samples from 15 to 25 m from SGZ representing depths down to 3m, and samples of surface material (top 0.5 cm) out to distances of 190 m from SGZ. Sweep-up samples were collected in GREG/SNOB gages located within the DPR. All samples were dry-sieved between 8.0 mm and 0.045 mm (16 size fractures); selected samples were analyzed for fines by a contrifugal settling technique. The size distributions were analyzed using spectral decomposition based upon a sequential fragmentation model. Results suggest that the same particle size subpopulations are present in the ejecta, fallout, and sweep-up samples as are present in the pre-shot test bed. The particle size distribution in post-shot environments apparently can be modelled taking into account heterogeneities in the pre-shot test bed and dominant wind direction during and following the shot. 13 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Wohletz, K.H.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Rawson, G.; Mazzola, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year  

SciTech Connect

The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Intensity using Market Exchange Rates (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Thousand Year 2005 U.S. Dollars) Loading...

128

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual energy-related carbon emissions (metric tons of carbon dioxide),,,, Year,coal,natural gas,petroleum,total ...

129

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Consumption of Energy (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Person) Loading...

130

On Multi-Metric Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Smarandache multi-space is a union of $n$ spaces $A_1,A_2,..., A_n$ with some additional conditions holding. Combining Smarandache multi-spaces with classical metric spaces, the conception of multi-metric space is introduced. Some characteristics of a multi-metric space are obtained and Banach's fixed-point theorem is generalized in this paper.

Linfan Mao

2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Metrics And The Software Designer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will focus on these key topics in an effort to propose a means by which software designers can become effective contributors in the process of metrics collection analysis and reporting. METRICS AND THE SOFTWARE DESIGNER 4 2. KEY TOPICS FOR METRICS USAGE BY DESIGNERS

John T. Kalisz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Metric adjusted skew information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the concept of Wigner-Yanase-Dyson skew information to something we call ``metric adjusted skew information'' (of a state with respect to a conserved observable). This ``skew information'' is intended to be a non-negative quantity bounded by the variance (of an observable in a state) that vanishes for observables commuting with the state. We show that the skew information is a convex function on the manifold of states. It also satisfies other requirements, proposed by Wigner and Yanase, for an effective measure-of-information content of a state relative to a conserved observable. We establish a connection between the geometrical formulation of quantum statistics as proposed by Chentsov and Morozova and measures of quantum information as introduced by Wigner and Yanase and extended in this article. We show that the set of normalized Morozova-Chentsov functions describing the possible quantum statistics is a Bauer simplex and determine its extreme points. We determine a particularly simple skew information, the ``lambda-skew information,'' parametrized by a lambda in (0,1], and show that the convex cone this family generates coincides with the set of all metric adjusted skew informations. Key words: Skew information, convexity, monotone metric, Morozova-Chentsov function, lambda-skew information.

Frank Hansen

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dilution Refrigeration of Multi-Ton Cold Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilution refrigeration is the only means to provide continuous cooling at temperatures below 250 mK. Future experiments featuring multi-ton cold masses require a new generation of dilution refrigeration systems, capable of providing a heat sink below 10 mK at cooling powers which exceed the performance of present systems considerably. This thesis presents some advances towards dilution refrigeration of multi-ton masses in this temperature range. A new method using numerical simulation to predict the cooling power of a dilution refrigerator of a given design has been developed in the framework of this thesis project. This method does not only allow to take into account the differences between an actual and an ideal continuous heat exchanger, but also to quantify the impact of an additional heat load on an intermediate section of the dilute stream. In addition, transient behavior can be simulated. The numerical model has been experimentally verified with a dilution refrigeration system which has been designed, ...

Wikus, P; CERN. Geneva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Metric Selection for Ecosystem Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

managers identify the best metrics to evaluate and select the recommended restoration plan, monitor and assess progress toward achieving project objectives, and, if necessary, inform adaptive management decisions. Performance metrics, or measurable system components used to estimate and track the state of critical aspects of the project, are often the basis for project decision making and furthering scientific understanding. As such, ecosystem restoration planners should take time to carefully select an appropriate and effective metric set. To help planners with this task, this technical note accomplishes the following: 1. Reviews current USACE ecosystem restoration planning and monitoring policy, regulations and guidelines. 2. Explains the importance of metric selection and its roles during planning and post-construction monitoring and assessment. 3. Reviews common options for identifying and selecting metrics including conceptual modeling, historical precedence, and best professional judgment. 4. Presents two metric evaluation methods, screening and multi-criteria decision analysis. 5. Discusses metric application to ecosystem restoration project planning and monitoring.

Matteo Convertino; Kelsie Baker; Connie Lu; John T. Vogel; Kyle Mckay; Igor Linkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Learn more about how the Office of Fossil Energy's carbon capture, utilization and storage program is benefiting the economy and the environment. Acting Assistant Secretary Smith Acting Assistant Secretary Smith Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary and Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy What does this project do? More than 90% of the CO2 at the facility (approx. 1M metric tons of CO2 per year) will be delivered for sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Oil production at a Texas oil field will increase from 1.6 to 3.1 million barrels annually, and the CO2 will be stored underground.

136

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic metrics and optimal paths David A. Sivak ? andmanifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within theconnection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism,

Sivak, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

WebMetrics: Technical Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VUG Home Page NIST Web Metrics Technical Overview. Technical Overview. NIST Logo. Good usability is critical to the success of a website. ...

139

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

140

VOC Exposure Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 VOC Exposure Metrics ... and "Sick Building Syndrome" Figure1: The elevated odds ratios (above unity) in this figure suggest that exposures to VOCs from water-based points and solvents are associated with a variety of sick building symptions (* indicates the OR is significant at p < 0.05; ** for p < 0.01). The indoors is often regarded as safe haven from problems associated with outdoor air pollution, but a growing number of reports have suggested that exposures in indoor environments may lead to health problems. One area in which evidence has been accumulating is the relationship between working in office buildings (as opposed to industrial exposure conditions) and a variety of health effects, such as eye, nose, and throat irritation and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Normalization of Process Safety Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is aimed at exploring new process safety metrics for measuring the process safety performance in processing industries. Following a series of catastrophic incidents such as the Bhopal chemical tragedy (1984) and Phillips 66 explosion (1989), process safety became a more important subject than ever. These incidents triggered the development and promulgation of the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard in 1992. While PSM enables management to optimize their process safety programs and organizational risks, there is an emerging need to evaluate the process safety implementation across an organization through measurements. Thus, the process safety metric is applied as a powerful tool that measures safety activities, status, and performance within PSM. In this study, process safety lagging metrics were introduced to describe the contribution of process related parameters in determining the safety performance of an organization. Lagging metrics take process safety incidents as the numerator and divide it by different process-related denominators. Currently a process lagging metric (uses work hours as denominator) introduced by the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) has been used to evaluate the safety performance in processing industries. However, this lagging metric doesn't include enough process safety information. Therefore, modified denominators are proposed in this study and compared with the existing time-based denominator to validate the effectiveness and applicability of the new metrics. Each proposed metric was validated using available industry data. Statistical unitization method has converted incident rates of different ranges for the convenience of comparison. Trend line analysis was the key indication for determining the appropriateness of new metrics. Results showed that some proposed process-related metrics have the potential as alternatives, along with the time-based metric, to evaluate process safety performance within organizations.

Wang, Mengtian

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration Offset Programs: Strengths, Difficulties, and Suggestions for Their Potential Use in AB 32's Cap and Trade Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

five times that of carbon dioxide. 63 Manure managementgreenhouse gas emissions. Carbon dioxide is perhaps the mostin millions of tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO 2

Bernadett, Lauren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Application guide for 25-ton solar system (unitized)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arkla has developed a unitary solar system for air conditioning, heating and service hot water loads in commercial buildings of up to 25 tons cooling requirement. A semi-exploded view shows the basic elements of the Arkla system. These elements, listed below, are described in individual sections of the guide in sufficient detail to enable a competent designer to duplicate the Arkla unitary system in a site built system. The elements are: (1) collectors with summary procedure guide; (2) storage/receiver; (3) pumps/piping/valves; (4) controls; (5) chiller; (6) cooling tower; (7) gas boiler back-up; (8) central air handling unit; and (9) service and DHW. Any successful solar HVAC system requires careful analysis of the integration of the elements. This is particularly true due to the large year-round variation in the temperature of the solar HW available. Several items of this nature are discussed in the element sections. Consequently, the designer should review this entire guide before proceeding to individual elements particularly A and B. This guide presumes that the monthly (and design) hot water loads have been determined for the heating, cooling, and service-DHW water Btu requirements. In addition to these normal calculations, an hourly profile for a typical day each month should be made. The hourly profile is necessary to maximize the solar fraction for a given amount of collector surface in conjunction with the size of the storage system; that is, the coincidence, or lack of, sunshine to the instantaneous demands.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nonlinearity of Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled climate–carbon models have shown the potential for large feedbacks between climate change, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and global carbon sinks. Standard metrics of this feedback assume that the response of land and ocean carbon uptake ...

Kirsten Zickfeld; Michael Eby; H. Damon Matthews; Andreas Schmittner; Andrew J. Weaver

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 201  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons carbon dioxide per person" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",31.54590416,29.56352198,30.5739632,30.56483509,30.96927578,31.14605742,31.33283758,31.52225314,29.78727412,25.44798199,28.06679306,-0.1102872527,-3.479111105 "Alaska",70.60324067,68.51009907,67.8551127,67.17588806,70.92646205,72.04509462,67.81012638,64.8863351,57.56413017,54.58358965,54.63289567,-0.2261984697,-15.97034499 "Arizona",16.64049197,16.65546102,16.08173855,15.97087112,16.77174168,16.18743942,16.15392734,16.06780183,15.87052371,14.3654833,14.36549251,-0.1367146759,-2.274999466

147

Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by state (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carbon intensity of the economy by state (2000 - 2010)" Carbon intensity of the economy by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons energy-related carbon dioxide per million dollars of GDP" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",1058.711976,985.9830444,997.7398528,980.4829779,950.0822539,936.4496611,935.6825335,938.4848601,889.0206564,785.4772247,861.2952959,-0.1864687321,-197.4166798 "Alaska",1298.328591,1216.063856,1175.487563,1199.290881,1223.852261,1270.682404,1148.488204,1084.165172,961.0592359,850.2898059,859.7252518,-0.337821521,-438.6033395 "Arizona",479.5818378,474.991173,460.4738058,446.205915,465.2665852,433.7092206,418.4239106,416.7348091,426.892719,409.9336342,419.7764202,-0.1247032579,-59.80541762

148

Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" "million metric tons carbon dioxide" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,," 2000 to 2010 " "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",140.4264977,131.9521389,136.7103146,137.2323195,139.6896437,141.493798,143.9716001,146.076107,139.2224128,119.7962734,132.7462762,-0.05469211069,-7.680221558 "Alaska",44.32104312,43.40375114,43.56121812,43.5078746,46.76217106,48.06229125,45.79367017,44.11576503,39.46205329,37.91867389,38.72718369,-0.1262122693,-5.593859429 "Arizona",85.96984024,88.33838336,87.66914741,89.29026566,96.58329461,96.7032775,100.0087541,102.1950438,103.1458188,94.63481918,95.91303514,0.1156591064,9.943194897

149

Table 3. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Alabama",2.103862865,76.71236863,2.835897119,17.71721059,33.37693698,132.7462762 "Alaska",2.497277997,3.042968925,1.789261448,16.61816292,14.7795124,38.72718369 "Arizona",2.373783271,54.37078005,2.325955921,4.76376875,32.07874715,95.91303514 "Arkansas",2.566776983,32.30865878,2.320262268,8.646911643,20.27679552,66.11940519 "California",15.93482613,43.49564577,28.92778352,67.46363514,213.9882899,369.8101805 "Colorado",4.150125234,39.85763155,7.82954551,14.90850811,29.73188961,96.47770002

150

Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,,,," Shares " "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas" "Alabama",67.81545193,35.95576449,28.97505976,132.7462762,0.5108651925,0.2708608145,0.218273993 "Alaska",1.364880388,19.58916888,17.77313443,38.72718369,0.03524347131,0.5058247724,0.4589317562 "Arizona",43.2377726,34.82066125,17.85460129,95.91303514,0.4508018387,0.3630440972,0.1861540641 "Arkansas",27.72445786,23.82768621,14.56726112,66.11940519,0.4193089424,0.3603735717,0.2203174859 "California",5.157135123,241.2575077,123.3955377,369.8101805,0.01394535736,0.6523820067,0.3336726359

151

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpassing that goal. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds More Documents & Publications EIS-0355: Record of Decision EIS-0355: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0355: Final Environmental Impact Statement

152

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) October 8, 2013 - 2:22pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER - Existing Heating Efficiency * COP - Existing IPLV Efficiency * IPLV - New Capacity ton 10 tons New Cooling Efficiency EER 10.1 EER New Heating Efficiency COP 3.2 COP New IPLV Efficiency IPLV 10.4 IPLV Energy Cost $ per kWh $0.06 per kWh

153

Cleanroom Energy Efficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key metrics and benchmarks to evaluate the efficiency ofEfficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks Paul A. Mathew, WilliamEfficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks Paul A. Mathew, Ph.D,

Mathew, Paul A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effectiveness of various error metrics in SCEPTRE.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate accuracy of error metrics in SCEPTRE and produce useful benchmarks, identify metrics that do not work well, identify metrics that do work well, and produce easy to reference results.

Olson, Aaron

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Experimental comparison of software metrics (abstract only)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software complexity metrics attempt to objectively measure the difficulty involved in creating and maintaining a program. This experiment will compare five complexity metrics as measures for reading comprehension of programs. The metrics compared are ...

Beth Clark

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Function points as a universal software metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Function point metrics are the most accurate and effective metrics yet developed for software sizing and also for studying software productivity, quality, costs, risks, and economic value. Unlike the older "lines of code" metric function points can be ...

Capers Jones

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Daylight metrics and energy savings  

SciTech Connect

The drive towards sustainable, low-energy buildings has increased the need for simple, yet accurate methods to evaluate whether a daylit building meets minimum standards for energy and human comfort performance. Current metrics do not account for the temporal and spatial aspects of daylight, nor of occupants comfort or interventions. This paper reviews the historical basis of current compliance methods for achieving daylit buildings, proposes a technical basis for development of better metrics, and provides two case study examples to stimulate dialogue on how metrics can be applied in a practical, real-world context.

Mardaljevic, John; Heschong, Lisa; Lee, Eleanor

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year: Production 1: Waste Coal Supplied 2: Trade: Stock Change 4,5: Losses and

159

Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Metrics Performance Metrics Tiers to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software

160

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective System Performance (ESP) Metric High performancerefers to this metric as the ESP (Effective Peak TFlop/sSystem Performance) 4 . ESP 5 has several characteristics

Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric WilliamSSP) metric developed by NERSC for its procurements. Theis important. One system at NERSC consistently slowed down

Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terminology Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology This document provides the terms and definitions used in the Department of Energys Performance Metrics Research...

163

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings Title Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2213E Year of...

164

Conversion to the Metric System  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix C Conversion to the Metric System Public Law 100–418, the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988, states: “It is the declared policy of the United ...

165

Segmental alternations and metrical theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on phonological alternations that are influenced or constrained by word-internal prosody, i.e. prominence and foot structure, and what these alternations can tell us about metrical theory. Detailed ...

Vaysman, Olga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CarbonPlanet, 2007, Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Country,In this discussion of greenhouse gas emissions and energyGreenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Portugal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions (Million Metric Tons of CO?) Previous Year . Latest Year : History Portugal Europe World. Rank . Portugal: Total from ...

168

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

169

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

170

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reached another milestone today for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, having shipped 5 million tons of tailings from the massive pile located in Moab, Utah, to the engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The pile comprised an estimated 16 million tons total when DOE's Remedial

171

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) - a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site - has achieved a major cleanup milestone. Since beginning operations in 1996, workers supporting the Richland

172

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? With continued developments in biorefinery capacity and technology, the feedstock resources identified in the report could produce about 85 billion gallons of biofuels -- enough to replace approximately 30 percent

173

Metric spaces with unique pretangent spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which an arbitrary metric space $X$ has a unique pretangent space at the marked point $a\\in X$. Key words: Metric spaces; Tangent spaces to metric spaces; Uniqueness of tangent metric spaces; Tangent space to the Cantor set.

Dovgoshey, Oleksiy; Kugukaslan, Mehmet

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Security metrics for source code structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software security metrics are measurements to assess security related imperfections (or perfections) introduced during software development. A number of security metrics have been proposed. However, all the perspectives of a software system have not ... Keywords: code quality and security., metrics, security metrics

Istehad Chowdhury; Brian Chan; Mohammad Zulkernine

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

data center energy sustainability metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data centers represent an increasingly popular construction project type, supported by the continued growth in internet-based services. These facilities can, however, consume large amounts of electricity and—especially if growth trends continue—put strain on utility grids and energy resources. Many metrics have been proposed to evaluate and communicate energy use in data centers. In many cases, the goal is that these metrics will be used to develop energy conscious behavior and perhaps data center sustainability ratings or building codes to reduce average energy use. In this paper, we examine one of the more popular metrics, Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE), and discuss its shortcomings toward effectively communicating energy sustainability. Our inference is that PUE is an instantaneous representation of electrical energy consumption that encourages operators to report the minimum observed values of PUE. Hence, PUE only conveys an understanding of the minimum possible energy use. Instead we propose the use of energy-based metrics or average PUE over a significant time period—e.g., a year—to better understand the energy efficiency of a data center and to develop sustainability rating/ranking systems and energy codes. Keywords-Data centers; energy efficiency metrics; sustainability standards; Power Usage Effectiveness

Jumie Yuventi; Roshan Mehdizadeh; Jumie Yuventi; Roshan Mehdizadeh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

177

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

178

CDIAC::Carbon Emission::Time Series Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 2013 version of this database presents a time series recording 1° The 2013 version of this database presents a time series recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of million metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1751-2010. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional, and national annual estimates for 1751 through 2010 were published earlier (Boden et al. 2013). Those national, annual CO2 emission estimates were based on statistics about fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption, and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The national annual estimates were combined with gridded 1° data on

179

Interpreting the C-metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic properties of the C-metric are well known. It describes a pair of causally separated black holes which accelerate in opposite directions under the action of forces represented by conical singularities. However, these properties can be demonstrated much more transparently by making use of recently developed coordinate systems for which the metric functions have a simple factor structure. These enable us to obtain explicit Kruskal-Szekeres-type extensions through the horizons and construct two-dimensional conformal Penrose diagrams. We then combine these into a three-dimensional picture which illustrates the global causal structure of the space-time outside the black hole horizons. Using both the weak field limit and some invariant quantities, we give a direct physical interpretation of the parameters which appear in the new form of the metric. For completeness, relations to other familiar coordinate systems are also discussed.

J. B. Griffiths; P. Krtous; J. Podolsky

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) Carbon Intensity SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro- leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total 371.7 131.1 93.5 87.3 56.8 3.1 17.16 20 Food and Kindred Products 24.4 9.8 9.1 W W 0.1 20.44 21 Tobacco Products W 0.1 W W W W W 22 Textile Mill Products 8.7 5.5 1.7 0.6 1.0 * 28.21 23 Apparel and Other Textile Products W 1.3 0.4 W W W W 24 Lumber and Wood Products 4.9 3.4 0.7 W W 0.2 9.98 25 Furniture and Fixtures 1.6 1.1 0.3 * 0.1 0.1 23.19 26 Paper and Allied Products 31.6 11.0 8.3 4.3 7.8 0.3 11.88

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpass- ing that goal. "Although shipping 2 million tons was the original Recovery Act goal, we are planning to exceed this goal by shipping about 300,000 tons more using savings resulting from efficiencies we've gained in our first 2 years of moving tailings," Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler said. The project is using $108 million from the Recovery Act to move the tailings from the banks of the Colorado River by rail to a permanent

182

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and Grand County Council Vice Chair Lynn Jackson is on the right. At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab's uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal

183

A Concept for a Scalable 2 kTon Liquid Argon TPC Detector for Astroparticle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-module configuration and to its large liquid nitrogen consumption (~1 liquid m3 /hour), the 300-ton geometry purity (UHP) liquefied noble gas and for coping with the engineering and safety issues related

McDonald, Kirk

184

Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Paul Mathew,efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to trackalso use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Paul Mathew,efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to trackalso use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 193 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables

188

Local discriminative distance metrics ensemble learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of distance metric learning is to incorporate abundant discriminative information to keep all data samples in the same class close and those from different classes separated. Local distance metric methods can preserve discriminative ... Keywords: Distance metrics learning, Local learning

Yang Mu; Wei Ding; Dacheng Tao

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy and momentum in multiple metric theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the expressions for canonical energy, momentum, and angular momentum for multiple metric theories. We prove that although the metric fields are generally interacting, the total energy is the sum of conserved energies corresponding to each metric. A positive energy theorem is given as a result.

Talshir, Idan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy and momentum in multiple metric theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the expressions for canonical energy, momentum, and angular momentum for multiple metric theories. We prove that although the metric fields are generally interacting, the total energy is the sum of conserved energies corresponding to each metric. A positive energy theorem is given as a result.

Talshir, Idan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Performance Metrics Tiers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Metrics Tiers Performance Metrics Tiers Performance Metrics Tiers The performance metrics defined by the Commercial Buildings Integration Program offer different tiers of information to address the needs of various users. On this page you will find information about the various goals users are trying to achieve by using performance metrics and the tiers of metrics. Goals in Measuring Performance Many individuals and groups are involved with a building over its lifetime, and all have different interests in and requirements for the building. Although these interests differ, the value in using metrics reflects a small number of driving factors: Controlling energy costs and energy consumption Minimizing environmental impacts Enhancing the image through marketing Improving load forecasting, energy management, and reliability.

192

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removes More Than One Ton of Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ... NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food Posted By Office of Public Affairs Contributing to DOE/NNSA's efforts to support the Office of Personnel

193

Metric selection for evaluating human supervisory control of unmanned vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad metric classes were proposed in the literature in order to facilitate metric selection for evaluating human-autonomous vehicle interaction. However, there still lacks a systematic method for selecting an efficient set of metrics from the many metrics ... Keywords: AHP, analytic hierarchy process, experiments, human supervisory control, metric quality, metrics

Birsen Donmez; M. L. Cummings

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Arabidopsis TRM1TON1 Interaction Reveals a Recruitment Network Common to Plant Cortical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microtubules via its C-terminal TON1 interaction motif. Interestingly, three motifs of TRMs are found in CAP350, a human centrosomal protein interacting with FOP, and the C-terminal M2 motif of CAP350 is responsible., 2006). CAP350 has also been proposed to specifically stabilize Golgi-associated microtubules

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet July 11, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons -- a type of subatomic particle -- traveling at the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001. In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 50-ton device by truck requires meticulous precision -- just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.

196

2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

197

Selecting Metrics for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Key decisions about land-use practices and dynamics in biofuel systems affect the long-term sustainability of biofuels. Choices about what crops are grown and how are they planted, fertilized, and harvested determine the effects of biofuels on native plant diversity, competition with food crops, and water and air quality. Those decisions also affect economic viability since the distance that biofuels must be transported has a large effect on the market cost of biofuels. The components of a landscape approach include environmental and socioeconomic conditions and the bioenergy features [type of fuel, plants species, management practices (e.g., fertilizer and pesticide applications), type and location of production facilities] and ecological and biogeochemical feedbacks. Significantly, while water (availability and quality) emerges as one of the most limiting factors to sustainability of bioenergy feedstocks, the linkage between water and bioenergy choices for land use and management on medium and large scales is poorly quantified. Metrics that quantify environmental and socioeconomic changes in land use and landscape dynamics provide a way to measure and communicate the influence of alternative bioenergy choices on water quality and other components of the environment. Cultivation of switchgrass could have both positive and negative environmental effects, depending on where it is planted and what vegetation it replaces. Among the most important environmental effects are changes in the flow regimes of streams (peak storm flows, base flows during the growing season) and changes in stream water quality (sediment, nutrients, and pesticides). Unfortunately, there have been few controlled studies that provide sufficient data to evaluate the hydrological and water quality impacts of conversion to switchgrass. In particular, there is a need for experimental studies that use the small watershed approach to evaluate the effects of growing a perennial plant as a biomass crop. Small watershed studies have been used for several decades to identify effects of vegetation type, disturbance, and land use and agriculture practices on hydrology and water quality. An ideal experimental design to determine the effects of conversion to switchgrass on surface water hydrology and quality would involve (1) small catchment (5-20 ha) drained by a perennial or ephemeral stream, (2) crop treatments including conversion from row crops to switchgrass; pasture to switchgrass (other likely scenarios); controls (no change in vegetation), (3) treatments to compare different levels of fertilization and pesticide application, (4) riparian treatments to compare riparian buffers with alternative cover types, and a treatment with no buffer, and (5) 3-4 replicates of each treatment or BACI (before-after, control-intervention) design for unreplicated treatments (ideally with several years of measurements prior to the imposition of treatments for BACI design). Hydrologic measurements would include soil moisture patterns with depth and over time; nitrogen and phosphorus chemistry; soil solution chemistry - major anions and cations, inorganic and organic forms of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus; precipitation amount and chemical deposition; stream discharge; and streamwater chemistry. These water quality metrics would need to be put into context of the other environmental and social conditions that are altered by growth of bioenergy feedstocks. These conditions include farm profits and yield of food and fuel, carbon storage and release, and a variety of ecosystem services such as enhanced biodiversity and pollinator services. Innovations in landscape design for bioenergy feedstocks take into account environmental and socioeconomic dynamics and consequences with consideration of alternative bioenergy regimes and policies. The ideal design would be scale-sensitive so that economic, social, and environmental constraints can be measured via metrics applicable at relevant scales. To develop a landscape design, land managers must consider (1) what are the environmental im

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cyber Security Metrics and Measures abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paul E. Black, Karen Scarfone, and Murugiah Souppaya, Cyber Security Metrics and Measures, in Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991. The Potential for Electricity Efficiency Improvementswww.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html>. FigureA STANDARD METRIC FOR ELECTRICITY SAVINGS Jonathan Koomey*,

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Metric Week Begins 10/10/10!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Begun by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics on May 10, 1976, approximately one year after the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 ...

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DEFINING A STANDARD METRIC FOR ELECTRICITY SAVINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEFINING A STANDARD METRIC FOR ELECTRICITY SAVINGS Jonathan Koomey*, Hashem Akbari, Carl Blumstein, Marilyn Brown, Richard Brown, Chris Calwell, Sheryl Carter, Ralph Cavanagh,...

202

Argonne TDC: Phase Metrics - Argonne National Laboratory  

A magneto-optical imaging capability developed by Argonne, Phase Metrics, and the Institute of Solid State Physics (Moscow, Russia) could be the key to developing ...

203

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fossil Fuel, 1970-2020 (Billion Metric Tons Carbon Equivalent). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center...

204

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

145 Table 4.3 - Projections of Renewable Electricity Carbon Dioxide Emissions Savings (Million Metric Tons Carbon Equivalent per Year) Data Sources Projections 2006 2010 2015 2020...

205

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Consumption of Energy (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Person) ... Puerto Rico 9.982 9.890 9 ...

206

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Figure 7. Projected...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Projected U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1990-2025 (million metric tons carbon equivalent). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy...

207

Three-dimensional metrics as deformations of a constant curvature metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any three-dimensional Riemannian metric can be locally obtained by deforming a constant curvature metric along one direction. The general interest of this result, both in geometry and physics, and related open problems are stressed.

B. Coll; J. Llosa; D. Soler

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

The carbon dioxide emissions game: Playing the net  

SciTech Connect

Concern about rising concentrations of carbon dioxide in the earth`s atmosphere has led to calls for the United States and other countries to reduce carbon emissions. These concerns resulted in the signing of the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. The Framework calls for nations to develop action plans for limiting emissions of carbon and other greenhouse gases. In December 1992, in accordance with the Framework, the US Government released for public comment its National Action Plan for Global Climate Change (US Department of State, 1992). The Action Plan detailed steps for reducing carbon emissions by 93 to 130 million metric tons (MMT) by 2000. Some of the steps included in the Action Plan were reforming regulations, setting energy standards, promoting research and development of new energy technologies, expanding the use of alternative-fueled vehicles, and planting trees to sequester carbon. This paper explores the economic implications of implementing a much larger tree-planting program than the one presented in the Action Plan. Whereas the Action Plan estimated that 5 to 9 MMT of carbon (MMTC) could be sequestered in 2000 (with perhaps threefold increases in sequestration in later years when trees are growing the fastest), the program being considered in this analysis annually sequesters as much as 231 MMTC during its peak years. Our analysis focuses on how much the costs of stabilizing US carbon emissions at 1990 levels are reduced when economic criteria alone determine the number of trees that will be used. Our results show that when the focus is shifted from stabilization of gross emissions to net emissions the cost reductions are dramatic, about 20 to 80 percent depending on the assumed cost of trees. Political and institutional obstacles to the formation of such a cost effective response are explored in the conclusions.

Richards, K.R.; Edmonds, J.A.; Rosenthal, D.H.; Wise, M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

DEVELOPMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGIES: WHAT CONTRIBUTION FROM THE CARBON MARKET?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Climate Energy Package, the European Union pledged to achieve goals in reducing greenhouses gases and developing renewable energies. It has imposed objectives that are differentiated by country for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and the development of renewable energies. Some of the emissions reductions must be achieved thanks to a mechanism in which all the Member States participate. The European Union Exchange Trading Scheme (EU ETS) covers approximately 40 % of the European greenhouse gas emissions produced by five major industrial sectors including electric power generation. The development of renewable energies has been left up to each Member State. To keep its commitments in terms of renewable energies, each Member State can employ a variety of economic incentive mechanisms: calls for tenders, feed-in tariffs or "green certificates". This edition of Climat Report describes two national policies that utilise different instruments: price support mechanisms in France and definition of quantitative targets in the United Kingdom. This report evaluates these policies for the generation of electric power from renewable sources in terms of cost per metric ton of carbon avoided to compare them with the price of the carbon allowance under the EU ETS. The results demonstrate that the cost of national policies significantly differs from one country to another, but in each case, is above the price of the European carbon allowance.

Cécile Bordier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Storing syngas lowers the carbon price for profitable coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation systems with carbon capture and sequestration have desirable environmental qualities but are not profitable when the carbon dioxide price is less than approximately $50 per metric ton. We examine whether an IGCC facility that operates its gasifier continuously but stores the syngas and produces electricity only when daily prices are high may be profitable at significantly lower CO{sub 2} prices. Using a probabilistic analysis, we have calculated the plant-level return on investment (ROI) and the value of syngas storage for IGCC facilities located in the U.S. Midwest using a range of storage configurations. Adding a second turbine to use the stored syngas to generate electricity at peak hours and implementing 12 h of above-ground high-pressure syngas storage significantly increases the ROI and net present value. Storage lowers the carbon price at which IGCC enters the U.S. generation mix by approximately 25%. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Carbon and Energy Savings from Combined Heat and Power: A Closer Look  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze and update our estimates of CHP's potential for U.S. manufacturers. Typical efficiencies of available CHP technologies are used to estimate their energy use and carbon emissions. In calculating the baseline against which CHP is compared, we take into account efficiency improvements in both the industrial sector and in the electricity-producing sector. We find that manufacturers save energy and reduce their carbon emissions substantially if they replace all retiring boilers stocks and new additions to the stock (from 1994 to 2010), with existing cost-effective CHP technologies. Carbon equivalent (=12/44 carbon dioxide) emissions would be reduced by up to 70 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) per year in 2010, (18%-30% manufacturer's projected emissions), and energy use reduced by up to 7 Exajoule (EJ). These estimates also take into account growth in manufacturing, as forecast by AEO-98, and expected improvements in CHP, boilers, and electric generating technologies. However, without policy innovation, actual CHP installed by U.S. manufacturers will likely fall far short of our estimates.

Roop, J. M.; Kaarsberg, T.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III). The updated preliminary estimate, based on current emission rates, documents 1,800 billion to more than 20,000 billion metric tons of CO2 storage potential in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal areas. This suggests the availability of approximately

214

Information flow metrics analysis in object oriented programming and metrics validation process by RAA algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent data flow metrics and control flow metrics had no main concern which to be handled by a compiler. Nowadays similar hardware and multithreaded coding is increased. Consequently, both data flow and control flow become more important in analyses ... Keywords: Ant colony algorithm, Information flow metrics, Object oriented information flow, Object oriented programming, Rule accuracy algorithm, Rule induction

Abdul Jabbar; Subramani Sarala

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Implementing the data center energy productivity metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As data centers proliferate in size and number, the endeavor to improve their energy efficiency and productivity is becoming increasingly important. We discuss the properties of a number of the proposed metrics of energy efficiency and productivity. ... Keywords: Energy, data center, metrics, productivity

Landon H. Sego; Andrés Márquez; Andrew Rawson; Tahir Cader; Kevin Fox; William I. Gustafson, Jr.; Christopher J. Mundy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Modular Robot Motion Planning Using Similarity Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order for a modular self-reconfigurable robotic system to autonomously change from its current state to a desired one, it is critical to have a cost function (or metric) that reflects the effort required to reconfigure. A reconfiguration sequence ... Keywords: group, metric, modular robots, morphing, optimal assignment, pattern matching

Chih-Jung Chiang; Gregory S. Chirikjian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collection and Reporting for Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Joe Paladino November 19, 2009 Investments Transformation Results * Equipment Manufacturing * Customer Systems * Advanced Metering Infrastructure * Electric Distribution Systems * Electric Transmission Systems * Integrated and/or Crosscutting Systems Customer Empowerment * Job Creation and Marketplace Innovation * Reduced Peak Load and Consumption * Operational Efficiency * Grid Reliability and Resilience * More Distributed and Renewable Energy * Lower Carbon Dioxide Emissions Advanced Grid Functionality An Opportunity for Transformation Primary Intent Is to Determine SGIG Program Impact Secondary Intent Is to Learn (to Address Uncertainty) Project-Based Cost/Benefit Analysis SGIG Program - Building the

220

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than 120 manufacturers that are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve their bottom lines. Through the Department's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better Plants), over 1,750 plants across the United States have saved about $1 billion in energy costs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954, Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov Emerald Laija, EPA (509) 376-4919, Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, recently cleaned up 77 waste sites at Hanford to meet two Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones before the end of 2011. The waste sites were located in the D and H Reactor Areas at Hanford along

222

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17. 5 tons/day of methanol  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17.5 tons/day of methanol in addition to 125 million cu ft/day of pipeline-quality substitute natural gas (SNG), making the facility the first commercial producer of methanol-from-coal in the United States, according to the consortium building the $1.5 billion facility in Beulah, North Dakota. As originally conceived, the plant would have used 17 tons/day of purchased methanol to clean the raw-gas product stream of impurities, primarily sulfur. But based on the cost of transporting methanol to the plant site and storing it for use, the consortium decided it was more economical to produce its own methanol from lignite. The construction started in July 1980, and the facility is to come on stream in 1984.

Not Available

1980-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

224

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

SciTech Connect

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

SAPHIRE 8 Quality Assurance Software Metrics Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review of software metrics is to examine the quality of the metrics gathered in the 2010 IV&V and to set an outline for results of updated metrics runs to be performed. We find from the review that the maintenance of accepted quality standards presented in the SAPHIRE 8 initial Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of April, 2010 is most easily achieved by continuing to utilize the tools used in that effort while adding a metric of bug tracking and resolution. Recommendations from the final IV&V were to continue periodic measurable metrics such as McCabe's complexity measure to ensure quality is maintained. The four software tools used to measure quality in the IV&V were CodeHealer, Coverage Validator, Memory Validator, Performance Validator, and Thread Validator. These are evaluated based on their capabilities. We attempted to run their latest revisions with the newer Delphi 2010 based SAPHIRE 8 code that has been developed and was successful with all of the Validator series of tools on small tests. Another recommendation from the IV&V was to incorporate a bug tracking and resolution metric. To improve our capability of producing this metric, we integrated our current web reporting system with the SpiraTest test management software purchased earlier this year to track requirements traceability.

Kurt G. Vedros

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy-Momentum Distribution in Weyl Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we evaluate energy and momentum density distributions for the Weyl metric by using the well-known prescriptions of Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, Papaterou and M$\\ddot{o}$ller. The metric under consideration is the static axisymmetric vacuum solution to the Einstein field equations and one of the field equations represents the Laplace equation. Curzon metric is the special case of this spacetime. We find that the energy density is different for each prescription. However, momentum turns out to be constant in each case.

M. Sharif; Tasnim Fatima

2005-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Presentation...

228

Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Title Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3392E Year of...

229

Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Title Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3393E Year...

230

Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Title Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

231

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 4-10-08 Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiencybenchmarking database. The benchmarks for standard, good andefficiency metrics and benchmarks for laboratories, which

Mathew, Paul; Rumsey Engineers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to their 2005 level (5,997 million metric tons) by the end of the AEO2013 projection period.6 Growth in demand for transportation fuels is moderated by rising fuel prices and new, stricter federal CAFE standards for model years 2017 to 2025, which reduce transportation emissions from 2018 until they begin to rise near the end of the projection period. Transportation emissions in 2040 are 26 million metric tons below the 2011 level. Largely as a result of the inclusion of the new CAFE standards in AEO2013, transportation-related CO2 emissions in 2035 are 94 million metric tons below their level in the AEO2012 Reference case. State RPS requirements and abundant low-cost natural gas help shift the

235

Spatial Error Metrics for Oceanographic Model Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common problem with modern numerical oceanographic models is spatial displacement, including misplacement and misshapenness of ocean circulation features. Traditional error metrics, such as least squares methods, are ineffective in many such ...

Sean B. Ziegeler; James D. Dykes; Jay F. Shriver

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 Page 1 Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency Global Taskforce Reaches Agreement on Measurement Protocols for PUE - Continues Discussion of Additional Energy Efficiency Metrics February 28th, 2011 The data center has become an increasingly important part of most business operations in the twenty-first century. With escalating demand and rising energy prices, it is essential for the owners and operators of these mission critical facilities to assess and improve their performance with energy efficiency metrics. However, even with the global presence of many companies, these metrics are often not applied consistently at a global level. To address these inconsistencies, a group of global leaders has been meeting regularly to agree

237

Metrics of Risk Associated with Defects Rediscovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software defects rediscovered by a large number of customers affect various stakeholders and may: 1) hint at gaps in a software manufacturer's Quality Assurance (QA) processes, 2) lead to an over-load of a software manufacturer's support and maintenance teams, and 3) consume customers' resources, leading to a loss of reputation and a decrease in sales. Quantifying risk associated with the rediscovery of defects can help all of these stake-holders. In this chapter we present a set of metrics needed to quantify the risks. The metrics are designed to help: 1) the QA team to assess their processes; 2) the support and maintenance teams to allocate their resources; and 3) the customers to assess the risk associated with using the software product. The paper includes a validation case study which applies the risk metrics to industrial data. To calculate the metrics we use mathematical instruments like the heavy-tailed Kappa distribution and the G/M/k queuing model.

Miranskyy, Andriy V; Reesor, Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Does General Relativity Require a Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nexus between the gravitational field and the space-time metric was an essential element in Einstein's development of General Relativity and led him to his discovery of the field equations for the gravitational field/metric. I will argue here that the metric is in fact an inessential element of this theory and can be dispensed with entirely. Its sole function in the theory was to describe the space-time measurements made by ideal clocks and rods. However, the behavior of model clocks and measuring rods can be derived directly from the field equations of General Relativity using the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann (EIH) approiximation procedure. Therefore one does not need to introduce these ideal clocks and rods and hence has no need of a metric.

James L. Anderson

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Clean Cities Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

Document provides Clean Cities coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.

Johnson, C.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5003: Carbon Displacement Using Net-Zero Carbon Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Date: January 4, 2006 3 Date: January 4, 2006 Title: Carbon Displacement Using Net-Zero Carbon Sources Originator: Elvin Yuzugullu Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: April 4, 2006 Item: "... if 175 billion kWh of grid electricity (10% of the growth of the electric generation market in 2025) is replaced by fuel cells operating on hydrogen at 50% LHV efficiency, about 10.5 million tons of hydrogen would be needed. If this hydrogen were made from a non-carbon (e.g. nuclear) or net-zero carbon (e.g. biomass, coal with carbon sequestration) source, then it could potentially displace about 27.5 million tons of carbon." Calculations/References: Analysis by TIAX for DOE, August 24, 2005: * "10.5 million tons of hydrogen" Required H 2 = 175 billion kWhe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evidential structures and metrics for network forensics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of forensics evidence is an essential step in proving the malicious intents of an attacker or adversary and the severity of the damages caused to any network. This paper takes a step forward showing how security metrics can be used to sustain ... Keywords: CVSS, NFR, common vulnerability scoring system, evidential database, evidential structure, network attacks, network evidence, network forensic readiness, network forensics, security metrics

Ahmad R. Amran; Raphael C-W. Phan; David J. Parish; John N. Whitley

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

244

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation proposes a suite of metrics for evaluating the performance of solar power forecasting.

Zhang, J.; Hodge, B.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H.; Banunarayanan, V.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

LANNDD -A line of liquid argon TPC detectors scalable in mass from 200 Tons to 100 KTons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to its large liquid nitrogen consumption (~1 liquid m3/hour), the 300-ton geometry and construction required for a detector based on an ultra high purity (UHP) liquefied noble gas and for coping

McDonald, Kirk

248

Cleanroom Energy Efficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cleanrooms are among the most energy-intensive types of facilities. This is primarily due to the cleanliness requirements that result in high airflow rates and system static pressures, as well as process requirements that result in high cooling loads. Various studies have shown that there is a wide range of cleanroom energy efficiencies and that facility managers may not be aware of how energy efficient their cleanroom facility can be relative to other cleanroom facilities with the same cleanliness requirements. Metrics and benchmarks are an effective way to compare one facility to another and to track the performance of a given facility over time. This article presents the key metrics and benchmarks that facility managers can use to assess, track, and manage their cleanroom energy efficiency or to set energy efficiency targets for new construction. These include system-level metrics such as air change rates, air handling W/cfm, and filter pressure drops. Operational data are presented from over 20 different cleanrooms that were benchmarked with these metrics and that are part of the cleanroom benchmark dataset maintained by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Overall production efficiency metrics for cleanrooms in 28 semiconductor manufacturing facilities in the United States and recorded in the Fabs21 database are also presented.

International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative; Mathew, Paul A.; Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Beasley, James

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Implementing the Data Center Energy Productivity Metric  

SciTech Connect

As data centers proliferate in both size and number, their energy efficiency is becoming increasingly important. We discuss the properties of a number of the proposed metrics of energy efficiency and productivity. In particular, we focus on the Data Center Energy Productivity (DCeP) metric, which is the ratio of useful work produced by the data center to the energy consumed performing that work. We describe our approach for using DCeP as the principal outcome of a designed experiment using a highly instrumented, high performance computing data center. We found that DCeP was successful in clearly distinguishing between different operational states in the data center, thereby validating its utility as a metric for identifying configurations of hardware and software that would improve (or even maximize) energy productivity. We also discuss some of the challenges and benefits associated with implementing the DCeP metric, and we examine the efficacy of the metric in making comparisons within a data center and among data centers.

Sego, Landon H.; Marquez, Andres; Rawson, Andrew; Cader, Tahir; Fox, Kevin M.; Gustafson, William I.; Mundy, Christopher J.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annex A Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report A.iii Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... A.1 Metric #1: The Fraction of Customers and Total Load Served by Real-Time Pricing, Critical Peak Pricing, and Time-of-Use Pricing ........................................................................................ A.2 Metric #2: Real-Time System Operations Data Sharing ...................................................................... A.9 Metric #3: Standard Distributed Resource Connection Policies .......................................................... A.18 Metric #4: Regulatory Recovery for Smart Grid Investments ............................................................. A.23

251

NETL: News Release - DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 18, 2010 DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project Project to Capture, Store 400,000 Tons of CO2 Per Year Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy has...

252

Questions and Answers - How many atoms would it take to create a ton?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there in the world? there in the world? Previous Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Could you please explain density?) Could you please explain density? How many atoms would it take to create a ton? There's a lot more to this question than first appears. There are many types of atoms and each of them has its own mass, so the answer varies depending on which atom you are talking about. Since even a tiny bit of matter has many atoms, it has become customary to use the unit "mole" to signify a standard number of atoms, namely, it is Avogadro's number which (almost) equals 6*1023, or 600,000 billion billon. If you look up the periodic table of elements, one of the numbers usually listed is the atomic mass which is the mass (in grams) of one mole of those atoms. Let's use

253

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Background studies for a ton-scale argon dark matter detector (ArDM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ArDM project aims at operating a large noble liquid detector to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the universe. Background sources relevant to ton-scale liquid and gaseous argon detectors, such as neutrons from detector components, muon-induced neutrons and neutrons caused by radioactivity of rock, as well as the internal $^{39}Ar$ background, are studied with simulations. These background radiations are addressed with the design of an appropriate shielding as well as with different background rejection potentialities. Among them the project relies on event topology recognition, event localization, density ionization discrimination and pulse shape discrimination. Background rates, energy spectra, characteristics of the background-induced nuclear recoils in liquid argon, as well as the shielding performance and rejection performance of the detector are described.

L. Kaufmann; A. Rubbia

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Discussion for Metrics and Benefits Data Collection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs Joe Paladino Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy OE Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting March 10, 2011 140 ARRA-Funded Smart Grid Projects 1 Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems SGIG/SGDP/RDSI Areas of Smart Grid Technology Deployment Customer Systems Advance Metering Infrastructure Electric Distribution Systems Electric Transmission Systems * Displays * Portals * Energy management * Direct load controls * Smart meters * Data management * Back office integration * Switches * Feeder optimization * Equipment monitoring * Energy Storage * Wide area monitoring and visualization * Synchrophasor Technology * Energy Storage Customer Systems Equipment Manufacturing

256

Projective Space Codes for the Injection Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of error control in random linear network coding, it is useful to construct codes that comprise well-separated collections of subspaces of a vector space over a finite field. In this paper, the metric used is the so-called "injection distance", introduced by Silva and Kschischang. A Gilbert-Varshamov bound for such codes is derived. Using the code-construction framework of Etzion and Silberstein, new non-constant-dimension codes are constructed; these codes contain more codewords than comparable codes designed for the subspace metric.

Khaleghi, Azadeh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

avoid up to 106 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory...

258

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Consumption (1980 - 2010) (Million Metric Tons of CO2) Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector

259

Climate VISION: News and Events - Forest - Secretary Veneman...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

to sequester one million metric tons of carbon equivalent by 2012. The Department's biomass energy initiatives also help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by assisting land and...

260

Improving AMBER, an MT evaluation metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent paper described a new machine translation evaluation metric, AMBER. This paper describes two changes to AMBER. The first one is incorporation of a new ordering penalty; the second one is the use of the downhill simplex algorithm to tune the ...

Boxing Chen; Roland Kuhn; George Foster

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Performance Metrics Research Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

NREL began work for DOE on this project to standardize the measurement and characterization of building energy performance. NREL's primary research objectives were to determine which performance metrics have greatest value for determining energy performance and to develop standard definitions and methods of measuring and reporting that performance.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Cohesion and coupling metrics for ontology modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, an increasing number of ontologies and semantic web applications have been developed and used. A conscious effort has been made to develop methods to modularize ontologies. These methods contribute to building a new ontology. However, ... Keywords: Cohesion, Coupling, Metrics, Modularity, Ontology

Sunju Oh; Heon Y. Yeom; Joongho Ahn

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

Johnson, C.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2010. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

Johnson, C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

APC: a performance metric of memory systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the infamous "memory wall" problem and a drastic increase in the number of data intensive applications, memory rather than processor has become the leading performance bottleneck of modern computing systems. Evaluating and understanding memory ... Keywords: measurement methodology, memory metric, memory performance measurement

Xian-He Sun; Dawei Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rated Efficiency Meet ASHRAE 90.1 NPLV kW/ton Cooling TowerEfficiency Cooling Tower Approach Chilled Water Pumping

Mathew, Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The potential role of a carbon tax in U.S. fiscal reform  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines fiscal reform options in the United States with an intertemporal computable general equilibrium model of the world economy called G-Cubed. Six policy scenarios explore two overarching issues: (1) the effects of a carbon tax under alternative assumptions about the use of the resulting revenue, and (2) the effects of alternative measures that could be used to reduce the budget deficit. We examine a simple excise tax on the carbon content of fossil fuels in the U.S. energy sector starting immediately at $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) and rising at 4 percent above inflation each year through 2050. We investigate policies that allow the revenue from the illustrative carbon tax to reduce the long run federal budget deficit or the marginal tax rates on labor and capital income. We also compare the carbon tax to other means of reducing the deficit by the same amount. We find that the carbon tax will raise considerable revenue: $80 billion at the outset, rising to $170 billion in 2030 and $310 billion by 2050. It also significantly reduces U.S. CO2 emissions by an amount that is largely independent of the use of the revenue. By 2050, annual CO2 emissions fall by 2.5 billion metric tons (BMT), or 34 percent, relative to baseline, and cumulative emissions fall by 40 BMT through 2050. The use of the revenue affects both broad economic impacts and the composition of GDP across consumption, investment and net exports. In most scenarios, the carbon tax lowers GDP slightly, reduces investment and exports, and increases imports. The effect on consumption varies across policies and can be positive if households receive the revenue as a lump sum transfer. Using the revenue for a capital tax cut, however, is significantly different than the other policies. In that case, investment booms, employment rises, consumption declines slightly, imports increase, and overall GDP rises significantly relative to baseline through about 2040. Thus, a tax reform that uses a carbon tax to reduce capital taxes would achieve two goals: reducing CO2 emissions significantly and expanding short-run employment and the economy. We examine three ways to reduce the deficit by an equal amount. We find that raising marginal tax rates on labor income has advantages over raising tax rates on capital income or establishing a carbon tax. A labor tax increase leaves GDP close to its baseline, reduces consumption very slightly and expands net exports slightly. Investment remains essentially unchanged. In contrast, a capital tax increase causes a significant and persistent drop in investment and much larger reductions in GDP. A carbon tax falls between the two: it lowers GDP more than a labor tax increase because it reduces investment. However, its effects on investment and GDP are more moderate than the capital tax increase, and it also significantly reduces CO2 emissions. A carbon tax thus offers a way to help reduce the deficit and improve the environment, and do so with minimal disturbance to overall economic activity.

McKibbin, Warwick [Australian National Univ. (Australia); The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Morris, Adele [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Wilcoxen, Peter [Syracuse University, NY (United States); The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Cai, Yiyong [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australian National Univ. (Australia)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 pro- vide an additional benchmark. F O R T H E Table 3.Performance Metrics & Benchmarks Notes A performance MetricBTU/sf-yr). A performance Benchmark is a particular value of

Mathew, Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

New Categorical Metrics for Air Quality Model Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional categorical metrics used in model evaluations are “clear cut” measures in that the model’s ability to predict an “exceedance” is defined by a fixed threshold concentration and the metrics are defined by observation–forecast sets that ...

Daiwen Kang; Rohit Mathur; Kenneth Schere; Shaocai Yu; Brian Eder

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Metrics: How to Improve Key Business Results, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrics are a hot topic. Executive leadership, boards of directors, management, and customers are all asking for data-based decisions. As a result, many managers, professionals, and change agents are asked to develop metrics, but have no clear idea ...

Martin Klubeck

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Performance Metrics for Soil Moisture Retrievals and Application Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quadratic performance metrics such as root-mean-square error (RMSE) and time series correlation are often used to assess the accuracy of geophysical retrievals (satellite measurements) with respect to true fields. These metrics are related; ...

Dara Entekhabi; Rolf H. Reichle; Randal D. Koster; Wade T. Crow

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Numerical Consistency of Metric Terms in Terrain-Following Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerically integrating the equations of motion in terrain-following coordinates, care must be taken in treating the metric terms that arise due to the sloping coordinate surfaces. In particular, metric terms that appear in the advection and ...

Joseph B. Klemp; William C. Skamarock; Oliver Fuhrer

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

On the history of fourth order metric theories of gravitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the history of fourth order metric theories of gravitation from its beginning in 1918 until 1988.

R. Schimming; H. -J. Schmidt

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Financial Metrics Data Collection Protocol, Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

Brief description of data collection process and plan that will be used to collect financial metrics associated with sustainable design.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Wang, Na

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

2012 Proceedings of the Performance Metrics for Intelligent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Special Publication 1136 2012 Proceedings of the Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems (PerMI '12) Workshop ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Universal Connection and Metrics on Moduli Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a class of metrics on gauge theoretic moduli spaces. These metrics are made out of the universal matrix that appears in the universal connection construction of M. S. Narasimhan and S. Ramanan. As an example we construct metrics on the c_{2}=1 SU(2) moduli space of instantons on R^4 for various universal matrices.

Fortune Massamba; George Thompson

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tangent spaces to metric spaces and to their subspaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a tangent space at a point of a general metric space and metric space valued derivatives. The conditions under which two different subspace of a metric space have isometric tangent spaces in a common point of these subspaces are completely determinated.

Dovgoshey, O

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

0 Annual 0 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-52714 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson Prepared under Task No. VTP.20020 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-52714 October 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

279

Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

1 Annual 1 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-56091 December 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson Prepared under Task No. VTP2.0020 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-56091 December 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

280

Performance metrics and life-cycle information management for building performance assurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is influenced by chiller and cooling tower efficiencies andyr) Chiller (kW/ton) Cooling Tower (kW/ton) Cooling Load (

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NETL: Carbon Storage - Small-Scale Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Field Tests Small-Scale Field Tests Carbon Storage Small-Scale Field Tests The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting a number of small-scale field tests (injection of less than 500,000 million metric tons of CO2 per year) to explore various geologic CO2 storage opportunities within the United States and portions of Canada. DOE's small-scale field test efforts are designed to demonstrate that regional reservoirs have the capability to store thousands of years of CO2 emissions and provide the basis for larger volume, commercial-scale CO2 tests. The field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The data gathered during these small-scale tests provides valuable information regarding specific formations that have historically not been evaluated for the purpose of CO2 storage. The Carbon Storage Program strategy includes an established set of field test objectives applicable to the small-scale projects:

282

Null limits of the C-metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The C-metric is usually understood as describing two black holes which accelerate in opposite directions under the action of some conical singularity. Here, we examine all the solutions of this type which represent accelerating sources and investigate the null limit in which the accelerations become unbounded. We show that the resulting space-times represent spherical impulsive gravitational waves generated by snapping or expanding cosmic strings.

J. Podolsky; J. B. Griffiths

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

283

Transmission System Reliability Performance Metrics Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmission availability has become the significant indicator of overall transmission system operational health, due to increased utilization of the transmission system, growth of deregulated energy wholesale markets, and decreased investment in new transmission assets. Availability trends reflect the increasing dependence upon transmission assets from a technical and market perspective. Presently availability metrics lack comparability due to the non-standardization of underlying data collection method...

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

On the Metric of Space-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maxwell's equations are obeyed in a one-parameter group of isotropic gravity-free flat space-times whose metric depends upon the value of the group parameter. An experimental determination of this value has been proposed. If it is zero, the metric is Minkowski's. If it is non-zero, the metric is not Poincare invariant and local frequencies of electromagnetic waves change as they propagate. If the group parameter is positive, velocity independent red shifts develop and the group parameter plays a role similar to that of Hubble's constant in determining the relation of these redshifts to propagation distance. In the resulting space-times, the velocity dependence of Doppler shifts is a function of propagation distance. If the group parameter and Hubble's constant have the same order of magnitude, observed frequency shifts in radiation received from stellar sources can imply source velocities quite different from those implied in Minkowski space. In these space-times, electromagnetic waves received from bodies in galactic Kepler orbits undergo frequency shifts which are indistinguishable from shifts currently attributed to dark matter and dark energy in Minkowski space, or to a non-Newtonian physics.

Carl E. Wulfman

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likelycould be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baselinemitigation in the year 2030 (in tons of CO 2 equivalent) as

Letschert, Virginie E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density between the 2003 and 2009 did not affect the biomass estimates. Overall, LiDAR data coupled with field reference data offer a powerful method for calculating pools and changes in aboveground carbon in forested systems. The results of our study suggest that multitemporal LiDAR-based approaches are likely to be useful for high quality estimates of aboveground carbon change in conifer forest systems.

Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE Uranium Leasing Program - Lease Tract Metrics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Leasing Program -- Lease Tract Metrics Uranium Leasing Program -- Lease Tract Metrics Lease Tract Lessee Lease Date Bid (%) Reclamation Bond a Total Acres Acres Excluded b Comment C-JD-5 Gold Eagle Mining, Inc. 04/30/08 12.00 37,000 150.71 C-JD-5A Golden Eagle Uranium, LLC 06/27/08 20.10 5,000 24.54 C-JD-6 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 14.20 19,000 530.08 C-JD-7 c Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 27.30 1,206,000 493.01 C-JD-8 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 36.20 4,000 954.62 C-JD-8A No bids received - remains inactive N/A N/A N/A 77.91 C-JD-9 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 24.30 72,000 1,036.50 C-SR-10 Golden Eagle Uranium, LLC 06/27/08 13.10 5,000 637.64 C-SR-11 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 11.67 43,000 1,303.22 200.25 Summit Canyon area excluded from lease tract C-SR-11A Golden Eagle Uranium, LLC 06/27/08 14.30 5,000 1,296.81 C-SR-12 Colorado Plateau Partners 06/27/08

290

Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based on the two case studies and evaluation of the seven assessments, the security ideals demonstrated their value in guiding security thinking. Further, the final set of core technical metrics has been demonstrated to be both usable in the control system environment and provide significant coverage of standard security issues.

Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Workshop Objectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Carbon Management Carbon Management * Forest or grassland 50,000 km 2 2 area of Vermont + Just what is a Gigaton of Carbon? 1 Gt C 1 billion metric tons C 10 15 g C...

293

Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) MISSION: The mission of the Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) is to support the effective and efficient implementation of the Department of Energy's human capital initiatives and functions through the strategic integration of corporate human capital performance metrics and the budget of the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (HC). FUNCTIONS: Human capital performance measurement and strategic functions at the DOE and interagency levels include: Provides analytical support and strategic advice to internal and external HC stakeholders on the appropriate and effective use of performance metrics as a key to effective strategic human capital management.

294

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hours (full cooling) Electrical Power Chain dP1 UPS Peak20 Electrical Power ChainBenchmarking Guide 6. Electrical Power Chain Metrics ID P1

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency The United States of America, European Union and Japan Reach Agreement on Guiding Principles for Data Center Energy...

297

About nonlinear contractive conditions on cone metric spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we shall show that nonlinear contractive conditions on TVS-cone metric spaces can be reduced to nonlinear contractive conditions on usual metric spaces. Our results extend the results of Du (2010) [W.S. Du, A note on cone metric fixed point theory and its equivalence, Nonlinear Anal. 72 (2010), 2259-2261] and results of Abdeljawad and Rezapour [T. Abdeljawad, Sh. Rezapour, Some fixed point results in TVS-cone metric spaces, Fixed Point Theory (to appear 2012)].

Olaru, Ion

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: The Oil Security Metrics Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Full Title: The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Research and...

299

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, February 2, 2010 Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

300

How Does Your Data Center Measure Up? Energy Efficiency Metrics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Does Your Data Center Measure Up? Energy Efficiency Metrics and Benchmarks for Data Center Infrastructure Systems Title How Does Your Data Center Measure Up? Energy Efficiency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enterprise performance measurement system : metric design framework and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing metric selection methodologies and performance measurement frameworks provide practicing managers with good checklists and tools to evaluate and design their enterprise performance measurement systems (EPMS) and ...

Teo, Kai Siang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Proposed Rules Would Allow Metric Only Labeling for Some ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the FPLA to allow manufacturers to label their products with US customary units (inch/pound/pint, etc.) and metric units (centimeter/kilogram/liter, etc ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose This guide describes energy efficiency metrics andEnergy Use Intensity 28 Laboratory Benchmarking Guidethe energy benchmarking approach describe in this guide can

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose This guide describes energy efficiency metrics andthe energy benchmarking approach describe in this guide candesigners and energy managers. This guide also builds on

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose This guide describes energy efficiency metrics andfor Reheat Energy Use Factor Cleanroom Benchmarking Guidethe energy benchmarking approach describe in this guide can

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Forecast error metrics for Navy inventory management performance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research establishes metrics for determining overall Navy secondary inventory forecasting accuracy when compared to actual demands at the Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP). Specifically,… (more)

Jackson, Kenneth J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Grid Performance Metrics Using Model-less Algorithms Pete Sauer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Grid Performance Metrics Using Model-less Algorithms Pete Sauer and Alejandro D. Domnguez-Garca Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at...

308

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012a. “Analysis & Projections - Models & Documentation. ”Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions MetricsGovernment purposes. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NIST Offers US Interpretations of Recent SI (Metric) Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... It “Americanizes” the SI to cover correct US usage of metric units, such as the accepted spelling of “meter” and “liter.” In addition, the revised guide ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

NIST Offers US Interpretations of Recent SI (Metric) Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The 2008 edition of NIST Special Publications (SP) 330, The International System of Units (SI), cover correct US usage of metric units, such as the ...

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commercial buildings. These include daylight factors, illu- minance levels, lamp and ballast efficacy, lighting power density, etc. There are two key metrics for which the...

312

Non-perturbative scalar gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from the Ponce de Leon metric in the STM theory of gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study our non-perturbative formalism to describe scalar gauge-invariant metric fluctuations by extending the Ponce de Leon metric.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Energy Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-60274 December 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

314

Boundary conditions for metric fluctuations in Lifshitz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the quantisation of linearised fluctuations of the metric and matter fields about a Lifshitz background, exploring the possibility of alternative boundary conditions, allowing the slow fall-off modes to fluctuate. We find that for $z >2$, slow fall-off modes for some of the linearised fluctuations are normalizable, which opens up the possibility of considering alternative boundary conditions. Analysing stability, we find that alternative boundary conditions for the momentum density are allowed, but alternative boundary conditions for the energy density lead to an instability of the type we recently discovered in a similar analysis for scalar fields on a fixed Lifshitz background. Our investigation is in the context of the simple massive vector model, but we would expect the conclusions to be more general.

Andrade, Tomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Metrics correlation and analysis service (MCAS)  

SciTech Connect

The complexity of Grid workflow activities and their associated software stacks inevitably involves multiple organizations, ownership, and deployment domains. In this setting, important and common tasks such as the correlation and display of metrics and debugging information (fundamental ingredients of troubleshooting) are challenged by the informational entropy inherent to independently maintained and operated software components. Because such an information 'pond' is disorganized, it a difficult environment for business intelligence analysis i.e. troubleshooting, incident investigation and trend spotting. The mission of the MCAS project is to deliver a software solution to help with adaptation, retrieval, correlation, and display of workflow-driven data and of type-agnostic events, generated by disjoint middleware.

Baranovski, Andrew; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Hesselroth, Ted; Mhashilkar, Parag; Levshina, Tanya; /Fermilab

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are relatively insensitive to coal prices though they can beof coal plants are relatively insensitive to fuel priceprice on carbon emissions will be put in place that significantly raises the marginal cost of coal

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

CIM: A Reliable Metric for Evaluating Program Phase Classifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CIM: A Reliable Metric for Evaluating Program Phase Classifications Sreekumar V. Kodakara, Jinpyo Interval of estimated Mean (CIM), a metric based on statistical sampling theory, to evaluate the quality of estimated Mean (CIM) correctly estimates the quality of phase classification with a meaningful statistical

Minnesota, University of

318

Integration using invariant operators:Conformally flat radiation metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method is presented for obtaining the general conformally flat radiation metric by using the differential operators of Machado Ramos and Vickers (a generalisation of the GHP operators) which are invariant under null rotations and spin and boosts. The solution is found by constructing involutive tables of these derivatives applied to the quantities which arise in the Karlhede classification of metrics.

S. B. Edgar; J. A. Vickers

1998-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

Scalar Metric fluctuations in space time matter inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Ponce de Leon background metric, which describes a 5D universe in an apparent vacuum: $\\bar{G}_{AB}=0$, we study the effective 4D evolution of both, the inflaton and gauge-invariant scalar metric fluctuations, in the recently introduced model of space time matter inflation.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Diving decompression models and bubble metrics: Modern computer syntheses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative summary of computer models in diving applications is presented, underscoring dual phase dynamics and quantifying metrics in tissue and blood. Algorithms covered include the multitissue, diffusion, split phase gradient, linear-exponential, ... Keywords: Bubble metrics, Computer algorithms, Decompression models, Dive computers, Diver staging

B. R. Wienke

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ideal based cyber security technical metrics for control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the world's critical infrastructure is at risk from attack through electronic networks connected to control systems. Security metrics are important because they provide the basis for management decisions that affect the protection of the ... Keywords: control system security, cyber security metrics

Wayne Boyer; Miles McQueen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Phantom dark energy with tachyonic instability: metric perturbations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the behavior of metric perturbations in a recently proposed model of phantom dark energy with tachyonic instability at long wavelengths. We find that metric perturbations exponentially grow in time, starting from very small values determined by vacuum fluctuations, and may become sizeable at late times. This property may be of interest for phenomenology.

S. Sergienko; V. Rubakov

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

323

Metrics for Evaluating Conventional and Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

With numerous options for the future of natural gas, how do we know we're going down the right path? How do we designate a metric to measure and demonstrate change and progress, and how does that metric incorporate all stakeholders and scenarios?

Mann, M. K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Metrics for Evaluating Conventional and Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

With numerous options for the future of natural gas, how do we know we're going down the right path? How do we designate a metric to measure and demonstrate change and progress, and how does that metric incorporate all stakeholders and scenarios?

Mann, M. K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Long-run Implications of a Forest-based Carbon Sequestration Policy on the United States Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economic impacts of a government-funded, forest-based sequestration program were analyzed under two different payment schemes. The impacts were obtained by developing a regional, static CGE model built to accommodate a modified IMPLAN SAM for a determined region in the United States for 2008. The IMPLAN SAM was modified to accommodate the more conventional factors of production (labor, capital and land) and to account for land heterogeneity using the Major Land Resource Areas (MLRA). The regional aggregation considered included the Southern, Northeastern, Southwestern and Midwestern regions. The two policy scenarios considered consisted of two CO2-offset payment schemes: 1) the government compensates the generation of CO2-offsets only by the land converted to a carbon graveyard and 2) the government additionally compensates the CO2 offsets generated as a by-product by the existing commercial logging activity. By doing an analysis of the model with different budget magnitudes under the two scenarios, two different CO2-offset supply schedules were obtained with their respective CO2-offset price and quantity sets. For a budget allocation of $6.9 billion, approximately 1 billion metric tons of CO2 offsets (15% of U.S. 2008 total GHG emissions) were produced in the first scenario versus 0.8 billion metric tons (11% of U.S. 2008 GHG net emissions) in the second one. Fifty million acres were diverted out of agriculture and commercial forestry land to the carbon graveyard mainly in the Northern, Western and Central Great Plains in the first scenario. Twenty two million acres were diverted out of agricultural land to the carbon graveyard and commercial logging mainly in the Northern and Western Great Plains; and the Eastern and Western boundaries of the Appalachian Mountains in the second scenario. Both scenarios resulted in higher land and agricultural commodity prices, lower consumption of agricultural commodities by households, lower agricultural exports and higher imports. The payment structure of the second scenario benefited the commercial logging industry, increasing its production and exports, and decreasing its imports. The non-agricultural sectors mostly impacted by the two policy scenarios were the manufacturing, construction and government employment sectors.

Monge, Juan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we identify and describe 24 practical diagnostics that are ready now to evaluate residential commissioning metrics, and that we expect to include in the commissioning guide. Our discussion in the main body of this report is limited to existing diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. Appendix C describes the 83 other diagnostics that we have examined in the course of this project, but that are not ready or are inappropriate for residential commissioning. Combined with Appendix B, Table 1 in the main body of the report summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of all 107 diagnostics. We first describe what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Our intent in this discussion is to formulate and clarify these issues, but is largely preliminary because such a practice does not yet exist. Subsequent sections of the report describe metrics one can use in residential commissioning, along with the consolidated set of 24 practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now to evaluate them. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies by LBNL staff and others in more than 100 houses. These studies concentrate on evaluating diagnostics in the following four areas: the DeltaQ duct leakage test, air-handler airflow tests, supply and return grille airflow tests, and refrigerant charge tests. Appendix A describes those efforts in detail. In addition, where possible, we identify the costs to purchase diagnostic equipment and the amount of time required to conduct the diagnostics. Table 1 summarizes these data. Individual equipment costs for the 24 practical diagnostics range from a few hundred dollars to many thousands of dollars. The higher costs are associated with infrared thermography and state-of-the-art automated diagnostic systems. Most tests can be performed in one hour or less, using equipment priced toward the lower end of the cost spectrum.

Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evaluating N-gram based evaluation metrics for automatic keyphrase extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a feasibility study of n-gram-based evaluation metrics for automatic keyphrase extraction. To account for near-misses currently ignored by standard evaluation metrics, we adapt various evaluation metrics developed for machine ...

Su Nam Kim; Timothy Baldwin; Min-Yen Kan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Overcoming the l1 non-embeddability barrier: algorithms for product metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common approach for solving computational problems over a difficult metric space is to embed the "hard" metric into L1 which admits efficient algorithms and is thus considered an "easy" metric. This approach has proved successful ...

Alexandr Andoni; Piotr Indyk; Robert Krauthgamer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Weighting and Bayes Nets for Rollup of Surveillance Metrics  

SciTech Connect

The LANL IKE team proposes that the surveillance metrics for several data stream that are used to detect the same failure mode be weighted. Similarly, the failure mode metrics are weighted to obtain a subsystem metric. E.g., if there n data streams (nodes 1-n), the failure mode (node 0) metric is obtained as M{sub 0} = w{sub 1}M{sub 1} + {hor_ellipsis} + w{sub n}M{sub n}, where {Sigma}{sub i=1}{sup n} w{sub i} = 1. This proposal has been implemented with Bayes Nets using the Netica/IKE software by specifying an appropriate conditional probability table (CPT). This CPT is calculated using the same form as (1), where the data stream metrics for the true (T) and false (F) states are replaced by 1 and 0, respectively. Then using this CPT, the failure mode metric calculated by Netica/IKE equals (1). This result has two nice features. First, the rollup Bayes nets is doing can be easily explained. Second, because Bayes Nets can implement this rollup using Netica/IKE, then data marshalling (allocating next year's budget) can be studied. A proof that the claim 'failure mode metric calculated by Netica/IKE equals (1)' for n = 2 and n = 3 follows as well as the sketch of a proof by induction for general n.

Henson, Kriste [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sentz, Kari [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in data centers. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing data centers - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, data center designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior data center benchmarking studies supported by the California Energy Commission. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the LBNL data center benchmarking database that was developed from these studies. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including facility designers and energy managers. This guide also builds on recent research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Save Energy Now program.

Mathew, Paul; Ganguly, Srirupa; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

CarbonSolve | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarbonSolve CarbonSolve Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CarbonSolve Agency/Company /Organization: CarbonSolve Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.carbonsolve.com Web Application Link: www.carbonsolve.com Cost: Paid CarbonSolve Screenshot References: CarbonSolve[1] Logo: CarbonSolve The CarbonSolve platform is designed to address a broad spectrum of needs, and makes possible for organizations to transform their sustainability objectives - including carbon, water, waste, employee engagement, or supply chain related initiatives into measureable metrics and trackable processes. Overview The CarbonSolve platform is designed to address a broad spectrum of needs, and makes possible for organizations to transform their sustainability

335

Measuring solar reflectance-Part I: Defining a metric that accurately...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain Title Measuring solar reflectance-Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain Publication Type...

336

Metrics of Software Evolution as Effort Predictors - A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite its importance, cost estimation in the context of continuing software evolution has been relatively unexplored. This paper addresses this omission by describing some models that predict effort as a function of a suite of metrics of software evolution. ...

Juan F. Ramil; Meir M. Lehman

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks for laboratories, at the whole buildingBuilding Site Energy BTU/sf-yr). A performance Benchmark isBenchmarks Good Practice ID Building B1 Name Unit Building Site Energy

Mathew, Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Islands of Reliability for Hybrid Topological-Metric Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Islands of Reliability for Hybrid Topological-Metric Mapping Shlomo Saul Simhon TR-CIM-99-6319 Telex: 05 268510 FAX: (514) 398-7348 Email: cim@cim.mcgill.ca #12;ABSTRACT This thesis describes

Dudek, Gregory

339

Nonlinear Gravity Theories in the Metric and Palatini Formalisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nonlinear gravity theories in both the metric and the Palatini (metric-affine) formalisms. The nonlinear character of the gravity lagrangian in the metric formalism causes the appearance of a scalar source of matter in Einstein’s equations that can be interpreted as a quintessence field. However, in the Palatini case no new energy sources appear, though the equations of motion get modified in such a way that usual matter can lead to repulsive gravity at very low densities. Thus, the Palatini formalism could provide a mechanism to explain the recent acceleration of the universe without the necessity of dark energy sources. We also show that in contrast to the metric formalism where only the Einstein frame should be considered as physical, the Palatini formalism allows both the Einstein and the Jordan frames to be physically acceptable.

Gonzalo J. Olmo A; William Komp A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nonlinear Gravity Theories in the Metric and Palatini Formalisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nonlinear gravity theories in both the metric and the Palatini (metric-affine) formalisms. The nonlinear character of the gravity lagrangian in the metric formalism causes the appearance of a scalar source of matter in Einstein's equations that can be interpreted as a quintessence field. However, in the Palatini case no new energy sources appear, though the equations of motion get modified in such a way that usual matter can lead to repulsive gravity at very low densities. Thus, the Palatini formalism could provide a mechanism to explain the recent acceleration of the universe without the necessity of dark energy sources. We also show that in contrast to the metric formalism where only the Einstein frame should be considered as physical, the Palatini formalism allows both the Einstein and the Jordan frames to be physically acceptable.

Gonzalo J. Olmo; William Komp

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Towards Efficient Supercomputing: Searching for the Right Efficiency Metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of supercomputing has traditionally been in the execution time. In early 2000 s, the concept of total cost of ownership was re-introduced, with the introduction of efficiency measure to include aspects such as energy and space. Yet the supercomputing community has never agreed upon a metric that can cover these aspects altogether and also provide a fair basis for comparison. This paper exam- ines the metrics that have been proposed in the past decade, and proposes a vector-valued metric for efficient supercom- puting. Using this metric, the paper presents a study of where the supercomputing industry has been and how it stands today with respect to efficient supercomputing.

Hsu, Chung-Hsing [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Generalized Banach contraction in probabilistic metric/normed spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the generalization of B-contraction and C-contraction due to Sehgal and Hicks respectively. We also study some properties of C-contraction in probabilistic metric space.

Lafuerza-Guillen, Bernardo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Analyses Of Two End-User Software Vulnerability Exposure Metrics  

SciTech Connect

The risk due to software vulnerabilities will not be completely resolved in the near future. Instead, putting reliable vulnerability measures into the hands of end-users so that informed decisions can be made regarding the relative security exposure incurred by choosing one software package over another is of importance. To that end, we propose two new security metrics, average active vulnerabilities (AAV) and vulnerability free days (VFD). These metrics capture both the speed with which new vulnerabilities are reported to vendors and the rate at which software vendors fix them. We then examine how the metrics are computed using currently available datasets and demonstrate their estimation in a simulation experiment using four different browsers as a case study. Finally, we discuss how the metrics may be used by the various stakeholders of software and to software usage decisions.

Jason L. Wright; Miles McQueen; Lawrence Wellman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Modified gravity from the quantum part of the metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that if a metric in quantum gravity can be decomposed as a sum of classical and quantum parts then Einstein quantum gravity looks approximately like modified gravity with a nonminimal interaction between gravity and matter.

Vladimir Dzhunushaliev; Vladimir Folomeev; Burkhard Kleihaus; Jutta Kunz

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low IRRs up to the reinvestment rate and high IRRs down to the reinvestment rate (McKinsey & Co. 2004). The IRR and MIRR metrics are likely to be used to evaluate commercial...

346

Performance metrics for soil moisture retrievals and application requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quadratic performance metrics such as root-mean-square error (RMSE) and time series correlation are often used to assess the accuracy of geophysical retrievals (satellite measurements) with respect to true fields. These ...

Entekhabi, Dara

347

Issues and Uncertainties Affecting Metrics for Aviation Impacts on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrics such as radiative forcing and global warming potential have proven to be useful tools in climate policy–related studies, including evaluation of the effects of aviation on climate, to relate different emissions to one another in order to ...

Don Wuebbles; Piers Forster; Helen Rogers; Redina Herman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

PARABOLIC COMPARISON PRINCIPLE AND QUASIMINIMIZERS IN METRIC MEASURE SPACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARABOLIC COMPARISON PRINCIPLE AND QUASIMINIMIZERS IN METRIC MEASURE SPACES JUHA KINNUNEN AND MATHIAS MASSON Abstract. We give several characterizations of parabolic (quasisuper)- minimizers prove a version of com- parison principle for super- and subminimizers on parabolic space-time cylinders

Kinnunen, Juha

349

Applying Software Engineering Metrics to Land Surface Parameterization Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to model validation techniques and intermodel comparison projects, the authors propose the use of software engineering metrics as an additional tool for the enhancement of “quality” in climate models. By discriminating between ...

A. Henderson-Sellers; A. J. Pitman; B. Henderson-Sellers; D. Pollard; J. M. Verner

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis of Solar Cell Quality Using Voltage Metrics: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The highest efficiency solar cells provide both excellent voltage and current. Of these, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) is more frequently viewed as an indicator of the material quality. However, since the Voc also depends on the band gap of the material, the difference between the band gap and the Voc is a better metric for comparing material quality of unlike materials. To take this one step further, since Voc also depends on the shape of the absorption edge, we propose to use the ultimate metric: the difference between the measured Voc and the Voc calculated from the external quantum efficiency using a detailed balance approach. This metric is less sensitive to changes in cell design and definition of band gap. The paper defines how to implement this metric and demonstrates how it can be useful in tracking improvements in Voc, especially as Voc approaches its theoretical maximum.

Toberer, E. S.; Tamboli, A. C.; Steiner, M.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel million metric tons carbon dioxide Shares State Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Al...

352

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2012 Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Large-Scale Test to Inject 1 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide in a Saline Formation...

353

Schwarzschild-de Sitter Metric and Inertial Beltrami Coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under consideration of coordinate conditions, we get the Schwarzschild-Beltrami-de Sitter (S-BdS) metric solution of the Einstein field equations with a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. A brief review to the de Sitter invariant special relativity (dS-SR), and de Sitter general relativity (dS-GR, or GR with a $\\Lambda$) is presented. The Beltrami metric $B_{\\mu\

Li-Feng Sun; Mu-Lin Yan; Ya Deng; Wei Huang; Sen Hu

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Software Metrics Knowledge and Databases for Project Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿Construction and maintenance of large, high-quality software projects is a complex, error-prone, and difficult process. Tools employing software database metrics can play an important role in efficient execution and management of such large ... Keywords: Knowledge-based tools for software project management, efficiency and robustness in large-scale software development, knowledge abstraction from raw data, software metrics databases, test and evaluation, cost-effective project management.

Raymond A. Paul; Tosiyasu L. Kunii; Yoshihisa Shinagawa; Muhammad F. Khan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into Plant Energy Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy costs continue to rise across the process industry, many plants have responded by developing improved energy monitoring and reporting programs. At the center of such programs are typically spreadsheet or database applications that pull information, such as fired heater excess oxygen and steam vent rates, from the plant data historian and generate summary reports that compare and trend actual performance relative to targets. On average, plants can expect to reduce overall energy costs by up to 10% through improved management of plant variables, or metrics, that influence energy consumption. Energy metrics can generally be classified into three categories: Equipment, Utility System, and Process. Examples of each type of metric will be given in the paper. As a percentage of the overall savings sited above, the energy savings through stewardship and optimization of Equipment, Utility System and Process metrics are generally 50%, 40% and 10%, respectively. Plants have generally done a good job of stewarding the 90% of savings available through Utility and Equipment related energy metrics, primarily because target setting is fairly straightforward. However, the 10% of savings available from Process metrics, such as tower reflux ratios, pumparound rates, and steam stripping ratios, are typically missing from energy management systems due to the difficulty in first identifying them, and second in determining the optimum targets. Target setting is most difficult because with process metrics, yield considerations must be included in the target setting process. It is quite easy, for example, to save energy by cutting tower reflux rates. But too much reduction will sacrifice yield performance. Even at elevated energy prices, even the smallest reduction in yield will typically offset any energy savings that might have been captured. Therefore, in order to effectively incorporate Process energy metrics into the plant energy management system, knowledge of both energy and yield parameters is required. This paper will explore an effective methodology for determining what process unit energy metrics are important, how to effectively set their targets, and how to incorporate them into an effective energy management system. In terms of how to identify process energy metrics, the paper will discuss which energy intensive processes should be examined first, such as crude distillation and cat cracking. In terms of target setting, the paper will describe how process engineering experience is combined with simulation to develop meaningful targets that characterize the point where yield and energy are simultaneously optimized. Finally, the work process required

Davis, J. L.; Knight, N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Use of metrics in an effective ALARA program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting an processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific {open_quotes}indicators.{close_quotes} To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. Justification is needed to defend the indicators selected and maybe even stronger justification is needed for those indicators that are available, but not chosen as a metric. Historically, the many different sources of information resided in a plethora of locations. Even the same type of metric had data located in different areas and could not be easily totaled for the entire Site. This required the end user to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that a customer can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer`s most frequently asked questions. IL is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally, it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, {open_quotes}user friendly,{close_quotes} software and contains information from RIR`s, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics. These include quarterly performance indicator reports, monthly radiological incident reports, monthly external dose history and goals tracking reports, and the future use of performance indexing.

Bates, B.B. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Exploration Cost and Time Metric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Cost and Time Metric Exploration Cost and Time Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Exploration Cost and Time Metric Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Geothermal Phase: Prepare a Plan Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, Resource assessment Resource Type: Application prototype, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: openei.org/apps/xct_metric/ Country: United States Web Application Link: openei.org/apps/xct_metric/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program  

SciTech Connect

ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include; external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting and processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific ``indicators``. To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. This required the end users to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that customers can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer`s most frequently asked questions. It is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, ``user friendly``, software and contains information from RIR`s, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics.

Bates, B.B. Jr.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Metrics Evolution in an Energy Research & Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All technology programs progress through three phases: Discovery, Definition, and Deployment. The form and application of program metrics needs to evolve with each phase. During the discovery phase, the program determines what is achievable. A set of tools is needed to define program goals, to analyze credible technical options, and to ensure that the options are compatible and meet the program objectives. A metrics system that scores the potential performance of technical options is part of this system of tools, supporting screening of concepts and aiding in the overall definition of objectives. During the definition phase, the program defines what specifically is wanted. What is achievable is translated into specific systems and specific technical options are selected and optimized. A metrics system can help with the identification of options for optimization and the selection of the option for deployment. During the deployment phase, the program shows that the selected system works. Demonstration projects are established and classical systems engineering is employed. During this phase, the metrics communicate system performance. This paper discusses an approach to metrics evolution within the Department of Energy's Nuclear Fuel Cycle R&D Program, which is working to improve the sustainability of nuclear energy.

Brent Dixon

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

per ton of CO2-was extended to include emissions associated with offshore oil and gas production. The day is not far off when other countries, possibly including the U.S.,...

363

Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990  

SciTech Connect

Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

Rothman, A.B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Property:ExplorationCostPerMetric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationCostPerMetric ExplorationCostPerMetric Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationCostPerMetric Property Type String Description the unit ratio denominator for exploration cost Allows Values 100 feet cut;30 foot core;compound;day;element;foot;hour;mile;point;process;sample;sq. mile;station;Subject;well Subproperties This property has the following 107 subproperties: A Active Seismic Methods Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Analytical Modeling B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Cation Geothermometers Chemical Logging Conceptual Model Core Holes Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array)

366

Property:ExplorationTimePerMetric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationTimePerMetric ExplorationTimePerMetric Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationTimePerMetric Property Type String Description the unit ratio denominator for exploration time Allows Values job;10 mile;10 stn;100 mile;sq. mile;foot Subproperties This property has the following 121 subproperties: A Active Seismic Methods Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Analytical Modeling B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Cation Geothermometers Chemical Logging Compound and Elemental Analysis Conceptual Model Core Holes Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques

367

Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasting solar energy generation is a challenging task due to the variety of solar power systems and weather regimes encountered. Forecast inaccuracies can result in substantial economic losses and power system reliability issues. This paper presents a suite of generally applicable and value-based metrics for solar forecasting for a comprehensive set of scenarios (i.e., different time horizons, geographic locations, applications, etc.). In addition, a comprehensive framework is developed to analyze the sensitivity of the proposed metrics to three types of solar forecasting improvements using a design of experiments methodology, in conjunction with response surface and sensitivity analysis methods. The results show that the developed metrics can efficiently evaluate the quality of solar forecasts, and assess the economic and reliability impact of improved solar forecasting.

Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H. F.; Banunarayanan, V.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ORNLecon.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydropower's Contribution to Carbon Dioxide Hydropower's Contribution to Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction James E. Francfort Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory November 1997 The annual carbon dioxide emissions currently avoided by the use of hydropower in electricity generation is 142 million metric tons, and it has a carbon tax value of $7.1 billion. Developing the identified additional hydropower capacity can yield an additional 34 million tons annually of avoided carbon dioxide emissions, with a value of $1.7 billion in carbon taxes (Table 1). The total annual avoided emissions can exceed 176 million metric tons, with a value of $8.8 billion. Table 1. Hydropower's contribution to avoiding carbon dioxide emissions Avoided annual carbon dioxide emissions (metric tons) Potential carbon tax value

369

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heater: $75 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $1.50 - $3 /gallon, plus $50 Tri-State G&T incentive Resistive Heat: $8 /kW Electric Thermal Storage: $50 /unit or $12 /kW Air-Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150 /ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150 /ton Terminal Unit: $85 Motors: $8 - $13 /hp (CPL and Tri-State Combined Rebate) Provider Carbon Power and Light, Inc.

370

Full list of Portfolio Manager custom reporting metrics | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full list of Portfolio Manager custom reporting metrics Full list of Portfolio Manager custom reporting metrics Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

371

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, February 2,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency, February 2, 2010 Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

372

Primer Control System Cyber Security Framework and Technical Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a control system cyber security framework and a set of technical metrics to aid owner-operators in tracking control systems security. The framework defines seven relevant cyber security dimensions and provides the foundation for thinking about control system security. Based on the developed security framework, a set of ten technical metrics are recommended that allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture.

Wayne F. Boyer; Miles A. McQueen

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Inhomogeneous parabolic equations on unbounded metric measure spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inhomogeneous semilinear parabolic equations with source term f independent of time u_{t}={\\Delta}u+u^{p}+f(x) on a metric measure space, subject to the conditions that f(x)\\geq 0 and u(0,x)=\\phi(x)\\geq 0. By establishing Harnack-type inequalities in time t and some powerful estimates, we give sufficient conditions for non-existence, local existence, and global existence of weak solutions. This paper generalizes previous results on Euclidean spaces to general metric measure spaces.

Kenneth J. Falconer; Jiaxin Hu; Yuhua Sun

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Carbon reduction emissions in South Africa  

SciTech Connect

This project is a feasibility study for a control system for existing backup generators in South Africa. The strategy is to install a system to enable backup generators (BGs) to be dispatched only when a large generator fails. Using BGs to provide ''ten minute reserve'' will save energy and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by an estimated nearly 500,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Temchin, Jerome

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore, steel production by virtue of its sulfur aluminum alloys and is used in oxide form in dry cell batteries. The overall level and nature of manganese consumption in batteries was denoted by the expansion on schedule of domestic capacity for production

Torgersen, Christian

376

Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

Lykins, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benchmarks that are based on the actual measured energy use of comparable buildings.energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks for laboratories, which have been developed and applied to several laboratory buildings –building targets be evaluated against empirical benchmarks that are based on the measured energy

Mathew, Paul; Rumsey Engineers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fuzzy Logic-based Mobility Metric Clustering Algorithm for MANETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile ad-hoc network, MANET is a collection of wireless mobile nodes dynamically forming a temporary communication network without using any existing infrastructure or centralized administration. To reduce routing overhead, computational complexity ... Keywords: Cluster, Fuzzy Clustering, Fuzzy Logic, MANET, Mobility Metric

P. Venkateswaran; Mousumi Kundu; Srishti Shaw; Kanika Orea; R. Nandi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Fisher-Rao Metric for Paracatadioptric Images of Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a central paracatadioptric imaging system a perspective camera takes an image of a scene reflected in a paraboloidal mirror. A 360° field of view is obtained, but the image is severely distorted. In particular, straight lines in the scene project ... Keywords: Central projection, Fisher-Rao metric, Hough transform, Line detection, Paraboloidal mirror, Paracatadioptric system, Sobel operator, Trace transform

Stephen J. Maybank; Siohoi Ieng; Ryad Benosman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Density-metric unimodular gravity: Vacuum maximal symmetry  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the vacuum maximally symmetric solutions of recently proposed density-metric unimodular gravity theory. The results are widely different from inflationary scenario. The exponential dependence on time in deSitter space is substituted by a power law. Open space-times with non-zero cosmological constant are excluded.

Abbassi, A.H., E-mail: ahabbasi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14155-4838, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbassi, A.M., E-mail: amabasi@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation Using Attention-Mediation Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Humanity now finds itself faced with a range of highly complex and controversial challenges--such as climate change, the spread of disease, international security, scientific collaborations, product development, and so on--that call upon us to bring ... Keywords: Argumentation, Deliberation, Metrics

Mark Klein

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Robust Metric Inequalities for the ?-Robust Network Loading Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

classical NLP and give the state of the art of metric inequalities. ... routed between the nodes of G. Every commodity consists of an ordered source-target pair (sk, tk) ... with a unit cost ?e for e ? E. The number of capacity units installed at edge e ...

383

Metrics based performance control over text mining tools in bioinformatics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioinformatics is a field of biology merging with few other sciences like information technology and statistics which involves in the discovery of new tools for data analysis and interpretation of accurate result. Some of the areas in which bioinformatics ... Keywords: bioinformatics, performance control, performance evaluation, software metrics, text mining

Jayanthi Manicassamy; P. Dhavachelvan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide spectrum of laboratory owners, ranging from universities to federal agencies, have explicit goals for energy efficiency in their facilities. For example, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) requires all new federal buildings to exceed ASHRAE 90.1-2004 1 by at least 30 percent. The University of California Regents Policy requires all new construction to exceed California Title 24 2 by at least 20 percent. A new laboratory is much more likely to meet energy efficiency goals if quantitative metrics and targets are explicitly specified in programming documents and tracked during the course of the delivery process. If efficiency targets are not explicitly and properly defined, any additional capital costs or design time associated with attaining higher efficiencies can be difficult to justify. The purpose of this guide is to provide guidance on how to specify and compute energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks for laboratories, at the whole building as well as the system level. The information in this guide can be used to incorporate quantitative metrics and targets into the programming of new laboratory facilities. Many of these metrics can also be applied to evaluate existing facilities. For information on strategies and technologies to achieve energy efficiency, the reader is referred to Labs21 resources, including technology best practice guides, case studies, and the design guide (available at www.labs21century.gov/toolkit).

Mathew, Paul

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

MESUR: USAGE-BASED METRICS OF SCHOLARLY IMPACT  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of scholarly communication items is now largely a matter of expert opinion or metrics derived from citation data. Both approaches can fail to take into account the myriad of factors that shape scholarly impact. Usage data has emerged as a promising complement to existing methods o fassessment but the formal groundwork to reliably and validly apply usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact is lacking. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded MESUR project constitutes a systematic effort to define, validate and cross-validate a range of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact by creating a semantic model of the scholarly communication process. The constructed model will serve as the basis of a creating a large-scale semantic network that seamlessly relates citation, bibliographic and usage data from a variety of sources. A subsequent program that uses the established semantic network as a reference data set will determine the characteristics and semantics of a variety of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact. This paper outlines the architecture and methodology adopted by the MESUR project and its future direction.

BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wireless capacity with oblivious power in general metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capacity of a wireless network is the maximum possible amount of simultaneous communication, taking interference into account. Formally, we treat the following problem. Given is a set of links, each a sender-receiver pair located in a metric space, ...

Magnús M. Halldórsson; Pradipta Mitra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation’s finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation’s balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

389

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Overview Figure 110. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2035. figure data Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2011 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions increase from 30.2 billion metric tons in 2008 to 35.2 billion metric tons in 2020 and 43.2 billion metric tons in 2035. Much of the growth in emissions is attributed to developing, non-OECD nations that continue to rely heavily on fossil fuels to meet fast-paced growth in energy demand. Non-OECD emissions total 28.9 billion metric tons in 2035, or about 73 percent above the 2008 level. In comparison, OECD emissions

390

Campus Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Campus Carbon Calculator Campus Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Campus Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air-Cool Planet Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.cleanair-coolplanet.org/toolkit/inv-calculator.php The Campus Carbon Calculator(tm), Version 6.4, is now available for download. Version 6.4 includes new features, updates and corrections - including greatly expanded projection and solutions modules, designed to aid schools that have completed greenhouse gas inventories in developing long term, comprehensive climate action plans based on those inventories. The new modules facilitate analysis of carbon reduction options, determining project payback times, net present value, cost per ton reduced,

391

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

392

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

A novel multi-scale intensity metric for evaluation of tropical cyclone intensity forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a new Multi-Scale Intensity (MSI) metric for evaluating Tropical Cyclone (TC) intensity forecasts is presented. The metric consists of the resolvable and observable, low wavenumber intensity represented by the sum of amplitudes of ...

Tomislava Vukicevic; Eric Uhlhorn; Paul Reasor; Bradley Klotz

395

Aligning tool set metrics for operation in a Multi Technology High Mix Low Volume manufacturing environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ireland Fab Operations (IFO) is transitioning and leading the way within Intel to Multi- Technology High Mix Low Volume (MT-HMLV) manufacturing. To avoid errors in estimating metrics, specific capacity tool set metrics for ...

Naughton, Alyson B. (Alyson Bourne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Complexity results on labeled shortest path problems from wireless routing metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrics to assess the cost of paths through networks are critical to ensuring the efficiency of network routing. This is particularly true in multi-radio multi-hop wireless networks. Effective metrics for these networks must measure the cost of a wireless ... Keywords: Approximation algorithms, Labeled paths, Shortest paths, Wireless routing metrics

Charles B. Ward; Nathan M. Wiegand

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Custom Reporting: Full List of Available Information and Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Custom Reporting: Custom Reporting: Full List of Available Information and Metrics Cost Performance Metrics Units Energy Cost Dollars Energy Cost Intensity Dollars National Median Energy Cost Dollars Total Water Cost (All Water Types) Dollars Indoor Water Cost (All Water Types) Dollars Indoor Water Cost Intensity (All Water Types) Dollars/ft2 Outdoor Water Cost (All Water Types) Dollars Investment in Energy Projects, Cumulatve Dollars Investment in Energy Projects, Cumulatve Dollars/ft2 Water/Wastewater Investment in Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars/GPD Estimated Savings from Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars Estimated Savings from Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars/ft2 Water/Wastewater Estimated Savings from Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars/GPD Electricity (Grid Purchase) Cost Dollars

398

Advanced Space Propulsion Based on Vacuum (Spacetime Metric) Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theme that has come to the fore in advanced planning for long-range space exploration is the concept that empty space itself (the quantum vacuum, or spacetime metric) might be engineered so as to provide energy/thrust for future space vehicles. Although far-reaching, such a proposal is solidly grounded in modern physical theory, and therefore the possibility that matter/vacuum interactions might be engineered for space-flight applications is not a priori ruled out. As examples, the current development of theoretical physics addresses such topics as warp drives, traversable wormholes and time machines that provide for such vacuum engineering possibilities. We provide here from a broad perspective the physics and correlates/consequences of the engineering of the spacetime metric.

Harold E. Puthoff

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Aspects of metric-like higher-spin geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the higher-derivative equations obtained setting to zero the divergence of the higher-spin curvatures in metric-like form, showing their equivalence to the second-order equations emerging from the tensionless limit of open string field theory, propagating reducible spectra of particles with different spins. This result can be viewed as complementary to the possibility of setting to zero a single trace of the higher-spin field strengths, yielding an equation known to imply Fronsdal's equation in the compensator form. We review the general context and results obtained in the investigation of metric-like higher-spin geometry, the structure of the corresponding non-local actions, together with their links to more conventional, local forms including a recently proposed one for higher-spin theories with transverse gauge invariance.

Francia, D. [Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, piazza del Viminale 1, I-00184 Roma, Italy and Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

400

Applicability of the linearly perturbed FRW metric and Newtonian cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued that the effect of cosmological structure formation on the average expansion rate is negligible, because the linear approximation to the metric remains applicable in the regime of non-linear density perturbations. We discuss why the arguments based on the linear theory are not valid. We emphasise the difference between Newtonian gravity and the weak field, small velocity limit of general relativity in the cosmological setting.

Syksy Rasanen

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Colliding Wave Solutions in a Symmetric Non-metric Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is given to generate the non-linear interaction (collision) of linearly polarized gravity coupled torsion waves in a non-metric theory. Explicit examples are given in which strong mutual focussing of gravitational waves containing impulsive and shock components coupled with torsion waves does not result in a curvature singularity. However, the collision of purely torsion waves displays a curvature singularity in the region of interaction.

Ozay Gurtug; Mustafa Halilsoy

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methanol production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing fuel grade methanol from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 100 tons per day of methanol with a HHV of 9784 Btu per pound. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to methanol are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $34,830,000 - September 1980 basis. Methanol production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood costs include delivery to the plant. For utility financing, the methanol production costs are, respectively, $1.20, $1.23, $1.30, and $1.44 per gallon for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $1.60, $1.63, $1.70, and $1.84 per gallon for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method include a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency of the plant is 52.0%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

404

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7 FIG_CO2IDX1 FIG_CO2IDX2 FIG_CO2SEC GRAF Total (Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide) 1992 Source: EIA 1995 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation

405

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from... http:energy.govfescience-innovation...

406

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power: Effective...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions annually...

407

Richard Birdsey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Million metric tons Cyr Products Biomass Debris Soil Heath 2001, reported in EPA GHG Inventory 15% of U.S. CO 2 emissions Confidence in Carbon Estimates at Regional Scale Fair...

408

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21, 2011 CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois Large-Scale Test to Inject 1 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Formation Washington, D.C. - The Midwest Geological...

409

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix B: feasibility study of methanol production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing fuel grade methanol from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle. PNL obtained this information from laboratory and process development unit testing. The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to methanol. Plant production is 997 tons per day of methanol with a HHV of 9784 Btu per pound. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to methanol are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $120,830,000 - September 1980 basis. Methanol production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood costs include delivery to the plant. For utility financing, the methanol production costs are respectively $.45, $.48, $.55, and $.69 per gallon for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $.59, $.62, $.69, and $.83 per gallon for the corresponding wood costs. Both calculation methods include a return on equity capital in the costs. The thermal efficiency of the plant is 52.9%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NDP-030/R6 (Table 4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4. Factors and units for calculating CO2 emissions from fuel 4. Factors and units for calculating CO2 emissions from fuel production and trade data CO2i = (Pi) (FOi) (Ci) From primary and secondary gas fuel production and trade1 CO2g = CO2 emissions in 106 metric tons of carbon Pg = annual production or consumption in thousands of 1012 joules FOg = 0.98 + 1% Cg = carbon content in 106 tons per thousand 1012 joules = 0.0137 + 2% From crude oil and natural gas liquids production in the global-total accounts2 CO2l = CO2 emissions in 106 metric tons of carbon Pl = annual production or consumption in 106 tons FOl = 0.918 + 3% Cl = carbon content in tons C per ton fuel = 0.85 + 1% From primary and secondary liquid fuel production and trade in the national accounts when non-energy liquid products are specifically subtracted3

412

Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Carbon sCanning system Background Vegetation and soils serve as carbon storage sinks for the approximately 2 billion tons of carbon absorbed annually by the global biosphere. While global warming is promoted by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere, it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration in the terrestrial ecosystem. However, a better understanding and monitoring of the underground carbon processes is necessary for evaluating various strategies for terrestrial carbon sequestration and quantification of the carbon stores for carbon credits. Description Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a multi-elemental scanning instrument for determining carbon analysis in soil. The method is based on inelastic

414

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Total¹ 1949-2011 Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1949-2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Biomass¹ Source, 2011 302 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multi- plying by 12/44. 3 Based on chained (2005) dollars. Sources: Tables 1.5, 11.1, and 11.2a-11.2e. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Billion Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide² Real³ Gross Domestic Product Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

415

Energy Emission by Quantum Systems in an Expanding FRW Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bound quantum mechanical systems not expanding with the comoving frame of an expanding, flat FRW metric are found to release energy at a rate linearly proportional to the local Hubble constant ($H_{o}$) and the systems' binding energy ($E_{b}$); {\\em i.e.}, $\\dot{E} = H_{o} E_{b}$. Three exemplary quantum systems are examined. For systems with early cosmological condensation times | notably hadrons | time-integrated energy release could have been significant and could account for an appreciable fraction of the dark matter inventory.

D. P. Sheehan; V. G. Kriss

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Microsoft Word - DOE_ANNUAL_METRICS_2009Q3.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14404 14404 Third Quarter 2009 Modeling Program Metric: Coupled model comparison with observations using improved dynamics at coarse resolution Quantifying the impact of a finite volume dynamical core in CCSM3 on simulated precipitation over major catchment areas July 2009 Peter J. Gleckler and Karl E. Taylor Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research 
 2
 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty,

417

Metrics for the National SCADA Test Bed Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program is providing valuable inputs into the electric industry by performing topical research and development (R&D) to secure next generation and legacy control systems. In addition, the program conducts vulnerability and risk analysis, develops tools, and performs industry liaison, outreach and awareness activities. These activities will enhance the secure and reliable delivery of energy for the United States. This report will describe metrics that could be utilized to provide feedback to help enhance the effectiveness of the NSTB Program.

Craig, Philip A.; Mortensen, J.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems.  

SciTech Connect

The High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] is the most widely recognized and discussed metric for ranking high performance computing systems. However, HPL is increasingly unreliable as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important science and engineering applications. In this paper we describe a new high performance conjugate gradient (HPCG) benchmark. HPCG is composed of computations and data access patterns more commonly found in applications. Using HPCG we strive for a better correlation to real scientific application performance and expect to drive computer system design and implementation in directions that will better impact performance improvement.

Heroux, Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

User's Guide to the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this user guide is to provide a brief description of the functionality of the Energy Charting and Metrics (ECAM) tool, including the expanded building re-tuning functionality developed for Pacific Northwest National laboratory (PNNL). This document describes the tool's general functions and features, and offers detailed instructions for PNNL building re-tuning charts, a feature in ECAM intended to help building owners and operators look at trend data (recommended 15-minute time intervals) in a series of charts (both time series and scatter) to analyze air-handler, zone, and central plant information gathered from a building automation system (BAS).

Taasevigen, Danny J.; Koran, William

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

Carbon Sequestration Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science July 2001 Focus Area Overview Presentation Mission and Scope Program Relationships Scientific Challenges Research Plans Facility Plans Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area New Projects Contribute to Sequestration Science Systems Integration Virtual Simulation of CO 2 Capture Technologies Cleanup Stream Gas Gasification Gasification MEA CO 2 Capture Facility Oxygen Membrane 3 km 2 inch tube 800m - 20 °C, 20 atm Liquid CO 2 , 100 tons ~1 kg CO 2 / s = 5 MW ^ CO 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels CO 2 Sequestration Aquifer H 2 O Flue gas H 2 O CH 4 CH 4 CO 2 Oil field Oil well Power plant CH 4 Coal - bed Aquiclude H 2 O CO 2 /N 2 CO 2 N 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 Water Rock , 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels Combustor Oxygen Membrane Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF sub 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2-1/2-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a safetime,'' for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Newvahner, R.L. (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, OH (United States)); Pryor, W.A. (PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one-tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 2.16 MM Scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per Scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $26,680,000 - September 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood prices represent the cost of unchipped wood delivered to the plant site. For utility financing, the gas production costs are, respectively, $14.34, $14.83, $15.86, and $17.84 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $18.76, $19.26, $20.28, and $22.31 per MM Btu for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for char is 57.4%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

424

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

425

Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Arizona State University. Prototype carrier 10 ton air-cooled solar absorption chiller. Final evaluation report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype air-cooled 10 ton solar absorption chiller was disassembled and inspected after having been field-tested for three consecutive cooling seasons. Included in the inspection were some flow visualization experiments which revealed some problems in the absorber header design. The objectives of this evaluation project were to determine possible causes for the frequent crystallization and generally below-design performance of the chiller during the testing period. The major conclusions reached were that a combination of leaks and of poor (50%) flow distribution in the absorber could account for most of the chiller's poor performance.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Metrics for Availability Analysis Using a Discrete Event Simulation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The system performance metric 'availability' is a central concept with respect to the concerns of a plant's operators and owners, yet it can be abstract enough to resist explanation at system levels. Hence, there is a need for a system-level metric more closely aligned with a plant's (or, more generally, a system's) raison d'etre. Historically, availability of repairable systems - intrinsic, operational, or otherwise - has been defined as a ratio of times. This paper introduces a new concept of availability, called endogenous availability, defined in terms of a ratio of quantities of product yield. Endogenous availability can be evaluated using a discrete event simulation analysis methodology. A simulation example shows that endogenous availability reduces to conventional availability in a simple series system with different processing rates and without intermediate storage capacity, but diverges from conventional availability when storage capacity is progressively increased. It is shown that conventional availability tends to be conservative when a design includes features, such as in - process storage, that partially decouple the components of a larger system.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Haire, Marvin Jonathan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency (February 2, 2010)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency The United States of America, European Union and Japan Reach Agreement on Guiding Principles for Data Center Energy Efficiency Metrics February 2, 2010 As business demands and energy costs for data centers rise, owners and operators have focused on the energy efficiency of the data center as a whole, frequently using energy efficiency metrics. However, the metrics are not always applied clearly and consistently at a global level. To address these inconsistencies, a group of global leaders met on February 2, 2010 to agree on data center energy efficiency measurements, metrics, and reporting conventions. Organizations represented were the U.S. Department of Energy's Save Now and Federal Energy Management Programs,

429

EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 PowerPoint presentation by Joe Paladino from the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability before the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) on metrics and benefits analysis for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act smart grid programs including the Smart Grid Investment Grants and the Smart Grid Demonstration Program. Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs More Documents & Publications Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2012 - Tuesday,

430

Conceptual Soundness, Metric Development, Benchmarking, and Targeting for PATH Subprogram Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate the conceptual soundness of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) program's revised goals and establish and apply a framework to identify and recommend metrics that are the most useful for measuring PATH's progress. This report provides an evaluative review of PATH's revised goals, outlines a structured method for identifying and selecting metrics, proposes metrics and benchmarks for a sampling of individual PATH programs, and discusses other metrics that potentially could be developed that may add value to the evaluation process. The framework and individual program metrics can be used for ongoing management improvement efforts and to inform broader program-level metrics for government reporting requirements.

Mosey. G.; Doris, E.; Coggeshall, C.; Antes, M.; Ruch, J.; Mortensen, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 PowerPoint presentation by Joe Paladino from the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability before the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) on metrics and benefits analysis for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act smart grid programs including the Smart Grid Investment Grants and the Smart Grid Demonstration Program. Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs More Documents & Publications Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2012 - Tuesday, June 12, 2012 Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid

432

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sun, Y. et al. Size-resolved aerosol chemistry on Whistlerwith a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer duringBasis Set: 1. Organic-Aerosol Mixing Thermodynamics. Atmos.

Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that they play in human health, biogeochemical cycles and the Earth's climate. ...

Kroll, Jesse

434

Performance measures framework for unmanned systems (PerMFUS): models for contextual metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the development of the Performance Measures Framework for Unmanned Systems (PerMFUS), we have established a multiple-axis performance metrics model for the unmanned systems (UMS). This model characterizes the UMS performance requirements by the missions ... Keywords: ALFUS, HSI, UMS, autonomy, collaboration, communication, contextual autonomy, contextual metrics, energy, environment, goal, human-system interaction, measure, metrics, mission, mobility, perception, performance, power, robot, sensing, task, terminology, test, unmanned system

Hui-Min Huang; Elena Messina; Adam Jacoff; Robert Wade; Michael McNair

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush

Rollins, Andrew M.

436

Office of HC Strategy Budget and Performance Metrics (HC-50) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy Budget and Strategy Budget and Performance Metrics (HC-50) Office of HC Strategy Budget and Performance Metrics (HC-50) Mission Statement and Function Statement The Office of Human Capital Strategy, Budget, and Performance Metrics provides strategic direction and advice to its stakeholders through the integration of budget analysis, workforce projections, and performance metrics in support of the goals and missions of the Department of Energy. Functions: Promotes business partnerships with Departmental elements to define and design HCM implementation strategies in alignment with Departmental mission, goals, and objectives. Provides strategic direction and advice through analysis of budget, workforce projections, and performance to respond to congressional mandates, administration goals, Departmental priorities and mission needs.

437

Building Cost and Performance Metrics: Data Collection Protocol, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes the process for selecting and applying the building cost and performance metrics for measuring sustainably designed buildings in comparison to traditionally designed buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Solana, Amy E.; Spees, Kathleen L.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Gauge invariant metric fluctuations in the early universe from STM theory of gravity: nonperturbative formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a nonperturbative quantum field formalism to describe scalar gauge-invariant metric flucturations in the early universe from a 5D apparent (Ricci flat) vacuum.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decision making beyond energy technology. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSA New Metric for Energy Technology Corinne Reich-Weiser ,INTRODUCTION Alternative energy technologies such as solar,

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

TECHNICAL NOTE: ENERGY METRICS FOR CLEAN ENERGY MINISTERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 TECHNICAL NOTE: ENERGY METRICS FOR CLEAN ENERGY MINISTERIAL INITIATIVES Global Efficiency Challenge End-use energy efficiency is a large and largely-untapped low-cost energy resource. The International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook 2009 estimates (in their "450 Scenario") that cost-effective energy efficiency measures could reduce global annual primary energy demand by 14% and oil demand by 15% (about 5.5 billion barrels) below business-as-usual by 2030. These measures would require an average incremental investment of $185 billion/year over the next decade and $630 billion/year over 2021-2030, and have a net present value of $8.6 trillion at a 3% discount rate.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Meaningful Energy Efficiency Performance Metrics for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective energy performance benchmarking should include a consideration of production rate, product specifications, feedstock mix, and process type, in addition to thermodynamics and economics. Unfortunately, there is no accepted industry standard for developing Energy Efficiency (EE) performance metrics for the chemical process industries, and published literature on the subject is extremely sparse. This paper will present a comprehensive system of EPIs as applied in a complex multi-product multi-plant organization in the oil and gas industry. Four categories of EPIs are recommended: • By equipment • By process unit • By product • By business unit. It will be shown how each type of EPI fulfills a specific business objective in the organization. Successes and failures are described, and recommendations are provided. The principles and practices outlined in this paper are generally applicable, and will hopefully lead to a standard methodology for EE performance reporting.

Kumana, J. D.; Sidhwa, N. R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Context-based metrics for evaluating changes to web pages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The web provides a lot of fluid information but this information changes, moves, and even disappears over time. Bookmark lists, portals, and paths are collections where the building blocks are web pages, which are susceptible to these changes. A lot of research, both in industry and in academia, focuses on organizing this vast amount of data. In this thesis, I present context-based algorithms for measuring changes to a document. The methods proposed use other documents in a collection as the context for evaluating changes in the web pages. These metrics will be used in maintaining paths as the individual pages in paths change. This approach will enhance the evaluations of change made by the currently existing Path Manager, in the Walden's Paths project that is being developed in the Center for the Study of Digital Libraries at Texas A&M University.

Dash, Suvendu Kumar

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Metric deformation and boundary value problems in 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel perturbative method, proposed by Panda {\\it et al.} [1] to solve the Helmholtz equation in two dimensions, is extended to three dimensions for general boundary surfaces. Although a few numerical works are available in the literature for specific domains in three dimensions such a general analytical prescription is presented for the first time. An appropriate transformation is used to get rid of the asymmetries in the domain boundary by mapping the boundary into an equivalent sphere with a deformed interior metric. The deformed metric produces new source terms in the original homogeneous equation. A deformation parameter measuring the deviation of the boundary from a spherical one is introduced as a perturbative parameter. With the help of standard Rayleigh-Schr{\\"o}dinger perturbative technique the transformed equation is solved and the general solution is written down in a closed form at each order of perturbation. The solutions are boundary condition free and which make them widely applicable for various situations. Once the boundary conditions are applied to these general solutions the eigenvalues and the wavefunctions are obtained order by order. The efficacy of the method has been tested by comparing the analytic values against the numerical ones for three dimensional enclosures of various shapes. The method seems to work quite well for these shapes for both, Dirichlet as well as Neumann boundary conditions. The usage of spherical harmonics to express the asymmetries in the boundary surfaces helps us to consider a wide class of domains in three dimensions and also their fast convergence guarantees the convergence of the perturbative series for the energy. Direct applications of this method can be found in the field of quantum dots, nuclear physics, acoustical and electromagnetic cavities.

Subhasis Panda; S. Pratik Khastgir

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Metrics for Assessment of Smart Grid Data Integrity Attacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an emerging consensus that the nation’s electricity grid is vulnerable to cyber attacks. This vulnerability arises from the increasing reliance on using remote measurements, transmitting them over legacy data networks to system operators who make critical decisions based on available data. Data integrity attacks are a class of cyber attacks that involve a compromise of information that is processed by the grid operator. This information can include meter readings of injected power at remote generators, power flows on transmission lines, and relay states. These data integrity attacks have consequences only when the system operator responds to compromised data by redispatching generation under normal or contingency protocols. These consequences include (a) financial losses from sub-optimal economic dispatch to service loads, (b) robustness/resiliency losses from placing the grid at operating points that are at greater risk from contingencies, and (c) systemic losses resulting from cascading failures induced by poor operational choices. This paper is focused on understanding the connections between grid operational procedures and cyber attacks. We first offer two examples to illustrate how data integrity attacks can cause economic and physical damage by misleading operators into taking inappropriate decisions. We then focus on unobservable data integrity attacks involving power meter data. These are coordinated attacks where the compromised data are consistent with the physics of power flow, and are therefore passed by any bad data detection algorithm. We develop metrics to assess the economic impact of these attacks under re-dispatch decisions using optimal power flow methods. These metrics can be use to prioritize the adoption of appropriate countermeasures including PMU placement, encryption, hardware upgrades, and advance attack detection algorithms.

Annarita Giani; Miles McQueen; Russell Bent; Kameshwar Poolla; Mark Hinrichs

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Figure 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Total¹ 1949-2011 Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1949-2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Biomass¹ Source, 2011 302 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multi- plying by 12/44. 3 Based on chained (2005) dollars. Sources: Tables 1.5, 11.1, and 11.2a-11.2e. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Billion Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide² Real³ Gross Domestic Product

446

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project June 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a cooperative agreement with NRG Energy Inc. (NRG) for the Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year. The project, which will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was selected under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a collaboration between the federal government and private industry working toward low-emission, coal-based power generation technology. The project team aims to demonstrate that post-combustion carbon capture

447

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project June 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a cooperative agreement with NRG Energy Inc. (NRG) for the Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year. The project, which will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was selected under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a collaboration between the federal government and private industry working toward low-emission, coal-based power generation technology. The project team aims to demonstrate that post-combustion carbon capture

448

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about carbon tetrachloride.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Potential for Energy-Efficient Technologies to Reduce Carbon Emissions in the United States: Transport Sector  

SciTech Connect

The world is searching for a meaningful answer to the likelihood that the continued build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in the earth`s climate. If there is to be a solution, technology must play a central role. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the potential for cost-effective technological changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector by the year 2010. Other papers in this session address the same topic for buildings and industry. U.S.transportation energy use stood at 24.4 quadrillion Btu (Quads) in 1996, up 2 percent over 1995 (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1997, table 2.5). Transportation sector carbon dioxide emissions amounted to 457.2 million metric tons of carbon (MmtC) in 1995, almost one third of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA,1996a, p. 12). Transport`s energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions are growing, apparently at accelerating rates as energy efficiency improvements appear to be slowing to a halt. Cost-effective and nearly cost-effective technologies have enormous potential to slow and even reverse the growth of transport`s CO{sub 2} emissions, but technological changes will take time and are not likely to occur without significant, new public policy initiatives. Absent new initiatives, we project that CO{sub 2} emissions from transport are likely to grow to 616 MmtC by 2010, and 646 MmtC by 2015. An aggressive effort to develop and implement cost-effective technologies that are more efficient and fuels that are lower in carbon could reduce emissions by about 12% in 2010 and 18% in 2015, versus the business-as- usual projection. With substantial luck, leading to breakthroughs in key areas, reductions over the BAU case of 17% in 2010 and 25% in 2015,might be possible. In none of these case are CO{sub 2} emissions reduced to 1990 levels by 2015.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A mapping study to investigate component-based software system metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A component-based software system (CBSS) is a software system that is developed by integrating components that have been deployed independently. In the last few years, many researchers have proposed metrics to evaluate CBSS attributes. However, the practical ... Keywords: Component-based software system, Software components, Software metrics, Software quality, Systematic mapping study

Majdi Abdellatief; Abu Bakar Md Sultan; Abdul Azim Abdul Ghani; Marzanah A. Jabar

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Solving similarity joins and range queries in metric spaces with the list of twin clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The metric space model abstracts many proximity or similarity problems, where the most frequently considered primitives are range and k-nearest neighbor search, leaving out the similarity join, an extremely important primitive. In fact, despite the great ... Keywords: General metric spaces, Indexing methods, Similarity joins

Rodrigo Paredes; Nora Reyes

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

CM-tree: A dynamic clustered index for similarity search in metric databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repositories of unstructured data types, such as free text, images, audio and video, have been recently emerging in various fields. A general searching approach for such data types is that of similarity search, where the search is for similar objects ... Keywords: Clustering methods, Database indexing, Metric access methods, Metric spaces, Similarity search

Lior Aronovich; Israel Spiegler

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Toward alternative metrics of journal impact: a comparison of download and citation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We generated networks of journal relationships from citation and download data, and determined journal impact rankings from these networks using a set of social network centrality metrics. The resulting journal impact rankings were compared to the ISI ... Keywords: digital libraries, impact metrics, journal impact ranking, social network analysis, usage analysis

Johan Bollen; Herbert Van de Sompel; Joan A. Smith; Rick Luce

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Toward alternative metrics of journal impact: A comparison of download and citation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We generated networks of journal relationships from citation and download data, and determined journal impact rankings from these networks using a set of social network centrality metrics. The resulting journal impact rankings were compared to the ISI ... Keywords: Digital libraries, Impact metrics, Journal impact ranking, Social network analysis, Usage analysis

Johan Bollen; Herbert Van de Sompel; Joan A. Smith; Rick Luce

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

New measurements reveal weaknesses of image quality metrics in evaluating graphics artifacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable detection of global illumination and rendering artifacts in the form of localized distortion maps is important for many graphics applications. Although many quality metrics have been developed for this task, they are often tuned for compression/transmission ... Keywords: global illumination, image quality metrics (IQM), noticeable and objectionable distortions, perceptual experiments

Martin ?adík; Robert Herzog; Rafa? Mantiuk; Karol Myszkowski; Hans-Peter Seidel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Deep and wide metrics for HPC resource capability and project usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper defines and demonstrates application of possible quantitative metrics for the qualitative notions of "deep" and "wide" HPC system use along with the related concepts of capability and capacity computing. By summarizing HPC workloads according ... Keywords: TeraGrid, capability, capacity, deep, high-performance computing, measurement, metrics, wide

David Hart

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

On improving temporal and spatial mobility metrics for wireless ad hoc networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work shows that two well-known spatial and temporal mobility metrics for wireless multi-hop networks have limitations, possibly resulting in misleading results. Based on the concept of spatial dependence among nodes including transient periods of ... Keywords: Mobile ad hoc network, Mobility metric, Mobility model, Network simulation, Spatial dependence, Temporal dependence

Elmano Ramalho Cavalcanti; Marco Aurélio Spohn

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Review of performance metrics for green data centers: a taxonomy study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data centers now play an important role in modern IT infrastructures. Although much research effort has been made in the field of green data center computing, performance metrics for green data centers have been left ignored. This paper is devoted to ... Keywords: Data center, Green computing, Performance metrics

Lizhe Wang; Samee U. Khan

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

MEASURING THE IMPACT OF ADDITIONAL RAIL TRAFFIC USING HIGHWAY & RAILROAD METRICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are then illustrated by simulating shared corridor operations with freight and passenger trains. TRANSPORTATION METRICS1 MEASURING THE IMPACT OF ADDITIONAL RAIL TRAFFIC USING HIGHWAY & RAILROAD METRICS Samuel L. Sogin of Illinois Urbana, IL, USA ABSTRACT Long term demand for freight movements in North America is expected

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

460

Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metric tons carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

462

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Faithful transformation of quasi-isotropic to Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates: A prerequisite to compare metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate how one should transform correctly quasi-isotropic coordinates to Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates in order to compare the metric around a rotating star that has been constructed numerically in the former coordinates with an axially symmetric stationary metric that is given through an analytical form in the latter coordinates. Since a stationary metric associated with an isolated object that is built numerically partly refers to a non-vacuum solution (interior of the star) the transformation of its coordinates to Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates, which are usually used to describe vacuum axisymmetric and stationary solutions of Einstein equations, is not straightforward in the non-vacuum region. If this point is \\textit{not} taken into consideration, one may end up to erroneous conclusions about how well a specific analytical metric matches the metric around the star, due to fallacious coordinate transformations.

G. Pappas; T. A. Apostolatos

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

464

Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Understanding Motivations for Facebook Use: Usage Metrics, Network Structure, and Privacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the links between motives for using a social network service and numerical measures of that activity. Specifically, it identified motives for Facebook use by employing a Uses and Gratifications (U&G) approach and then investigated the extent to which these motives can be predicted through usage and network metrics collected automatically via the Facebook API. In total, 11 Facebook usage metrics and eight personal network metrics served as predictors. Results showed that all three variable types in this expanded U&G frame of analysis (covering social antecedents, usage metrics, and personal network metrics) effectively predicted motives and highlighted interesting behaviors. To further illustrate the power of this framework, the intricate nature of privacy in social media was explored and relationships drawn between privacy attitudes (and acts) and measures of use and network structure. Author Keywords Uses and gratifications; social network sites; social networks; Facebook; privacy; computer-mediated communication.

Tasos Spiliotopoulos; Ian Oakley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and Commercialization. The activities performed during the feasibility assessment phase include laboratory scale experiments; fuel performance code updates; and analytical assessment of economic, operational, safety, fuel cycle, and environmental impacts of the new concepts. The development and qualification stage will consist of fuel fabrication and large scale irradiation and safety basis testing, leading to qualification and ultimate NRC licensing of the new fuel. The commercialization phase initiates technology transfer to industry for implementation. Attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance include improved reaction kinetics with steam and slower hydrogen generation rate, while maintaining acceptable cladding thermo-mechanical properties; fuel thermo-mechanical properties; fuel-clad interactions; and fission-product behavior. These attributes provide a qualitative guidance for parameters that must be considered in the development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. However, quantitative metrics must be developed for these attributes. To initiate the quantitative metrics development, a Light Water Reactor Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held October 10-11, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the structure and outcome of the two-day workshop. Questions regarding the content can be directed to Lori Braase, 208-526-7763, lori.braase@inl.gov.

Lori Braase

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

How Does Your Data Center Measure Up? Energy Efficiency Metrics and Benchmarks for Data Center Infrastructure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Up? Energy Efficiency Metrics and Benchmarks for Data CenterUp? Energy Efficiency Metrics and Benchmarks for Data CenterHigh Med/High Figure 4. Benchmarks for Return Temperature

Mathew, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

From Dark Energy and Dark Matter to Dark Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is nowadays clear that General Relativity cannot be the definitive theory of Gravitation due to several shortcomings that come out both from theoretical and experimental viewpoints. At large scales (astrophysical and cosmological) the attempts to match it with the latest observational data lead to invoke Dark Energy and Dark Matter as the bulk components of the cosmic fluid. Since no final evidence, at fundamental level, exists for such ingredients, it is clear that General Relativity presents shortcomings at infrared scales. On the other hand, the attempts to formulate more general theories than Einstein's one give rise to mathematical difficulties that need workarounds that, in turn, generate problems from the interpretative viewpoint. We present here a completely new approach to the mathematical objects in terms of which a theory of Gravitation may be written in a first-order (a' la Palatini) formalism, and introduce the concept of Dark Metric which could completely bypass the introduction of disturbing concepts as Dark Energy and Dark Matter.

S. Capozziello; M. De Laurentis; M. Francaviglia; S. Mercadante

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Characterizing Application Runtime Behavior from System Logs and Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale systems are heavily shared resource environments where a mix of applications are launched concurrently competing for network and storage resources. It is essential to characterize the runtime behavior of these applications for provisioning system resources and understanding the impact of application s performance when competing for resources. In this paper, we study the use of zero- and low-overhead system logs and other system metric data for characterizing the runtime behavior of several applications. We present our preliminary work on estimating individual application s I/O demands by observing file system usage pattern over multiple runs, and interpreting application s network utilization characteristics by observing link-layer error logs. We also present preliminary findings on using such information in making context-sensitive scheduling decisions that minimize potentially negative interactions between applications competing for shared resources. Our analysis is based on four months of system log data collected on one of the world s largest supercomputing facilities, the Jaguar XT5 petaflop system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Gunasekaran, Raghul [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Vuduc, Richard [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chow, Edmond [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

Dr. Steven D. Dietz

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

472

Saving Tons at the Register  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brown, and Max H. Sherman Conference Name Proceedings of the 1998 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Effciency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA Volume 1 Pagination 367-383 Publisher...

473

Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation  

SciTech Connect

The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

Doughty, C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Metrics on unitary matrices and their application to quantifying the degree of non-commutativity between unitary matrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By studying the minimum resources required to perform a unitary transformation, families of metrics and pseudo-metrics on unitary matrices that are closely related to a recently reported quantum speed limit by the author are found. Interestingly, this ... Keywords: eigenvalue perturbation theory, measurement of non-commutativity, metrics for unitary matrices, quantum information processing

H. F. Chau

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Mapping and Embedding of Two Metrics Associated with Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Ordinary Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we build a mapping between two different metrics and embed them in a flat manifold. One of the metrics represents the ordinary matter, and the other describes the dark matter, the dark energy, and the particle-antiparticle asymmetry. The latter was obtained in a recent paper. For the mapping and embedding, we use two new formalisms developed and presented in two previous papers, Mapping Among Manifolds and, Conformal Form of Pseudo-Riemannian Metrics by Normal Coordinate Transformations, which was a generalization of the Cartan's approach of Riemannian normal coordinates.

de Siqueira, A C V V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Mapping and Embedding of Two Metrics Associated with Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Ordinary Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we build a mapping between two different metrics and embed them in a flat manifold. One of the metrics represents the ordinary matter, and the other describes the dark matter, the dark energy, and the particle-antiparticle asymmetry. The latter was obtained in a recent paper. For the mapping and embedding, we use two new formalisms developed and presented in two previous papers, Mapping Among Manifolds and, Conformal Form of Pseudo-Riemannian Metrics by Normal Coordinate Transformations, which was a generalization of the Cartan's approach of Riemannian normal coordinates.

A. C. V. V. de Siqueira

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

477

Grid Reliability Performance Metrics Using Phasor Data and Model-less Algorithms,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability Performance Metrics Using Reliability Performance Metrics Using Phasor Data and Model-less Algorithms, Prototype Development and Field Test Carlos Martinez - Advanced Systems Researchers (ASR) cmartinez@asresearchers.com June 27-28 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Project Objective LOAD-GENERATION CONTROL RELIABILITY PERFORMANCE REALTIME MONITORING GRID RELIABILITY PERFORMANCE PHASOR BASED AND MODELESS REALTIME MONITORING RESEARCH, PROTOTYPE AND FIELD TEST ALL APPLICATIONS IN PRODUCTION PROJECT OBJECTIVES 3 Project Analytics Approach 4 Accomplishments to be Completed in FY 2013 * Deliver to MISO the Extended Prototype Functional Specification * Complete Research, Test and Validation of Grid Post- Disturbance Reliability Metrics

478

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility August 24, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy issued the following statement in support of today's groundbreaking for construction of the nation's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage (ICCS) facility in Decatur, Illinois. Supported by the 2009 economic stimulus legislation - the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - the ambitious project will capture and store one million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year produced as the result of processing corn into fuel-grade ethanol from the nearby Archer Daniels Midland biofuels plant. Since all of

479

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility August 24, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy issued the following statement in support of today's groundbreaking for construction of the nation's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage (ICCS) facility in Decatur, Illinois. Supported by the 2009 economic stimulus legislation - the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - the ambitious project will capture and store one million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year produced as the result of processing corn into fuel-grade ethanol from the nearby Archer Daniels Midland biofuels plant. Since all of

480

Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

Kisholoy Goswami

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

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