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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EXTRACTION OF TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES WITH METHYL ETHYL KETONE, METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ACETOPHENONE OR MENTHONE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting tetravalent plutonium from an aqueous acid solution with methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or acetophenone and with the extraction of either tetravalent or hexavalent plutonium into menthone. (AEC)

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); West; Ryan M. (Madison, WI)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Engineering of bacterial methyl ketone synthesis for biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ketone synthesis for biofuels Ee-Been Goh†† 1,3 , Edward E.microbes for use as biofuels, such as fatty acid ethylother fatty acid-derived biofuels, such as fatty acid ethyl

Goh, Ee-Been

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Available Technologies: Bacterial Overproduction of Methyl Ketones ...  

u.s. department of energy • office of science • university of california. contact webmaster • comments • policy /privacy/security ...

6

INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR THE PARALLEL OPERATION OF MULTIPLE BENCH SCALE BIOTRICKLING FILTERS FOR WASTE AIR TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBKI vapors in air during passage through compost-based biofilters served an equivolume mixture of compost and polystyrene spheres. Acid-neutralizing components (probably limestone) were

7

Engineering of Bacterial Methyl Ketone Synthesis for Biofuels  

Published Ahead of Print 28 October 2011. €€ 10.1128/AEM.06785-11. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.€2012, 78(1):70. DOI: Harry R. Beller Ee-Been Goh, Edward E. K ...

8

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. July 1995 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) (CAS Reg. No. 108-10-1), a clear liquid with

9

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ketone Production from the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylate Salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MixAlco process uses an anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentation to convert lignocellulosic biomass to carboxylate salts. The fermentation broth must be clarified so that only carboxylate salts, water, and minimal impurities remain. Carboxylate salts are concentrated by evaporation and thermally decomposed into ketones. The ketones can then be chemically converted to a wide variety of chemicals and fuels. The presence of excess lime in the thermal decomposition step reduced product yield. Mixtures of calcium carboxylate salts were thermally decomposed at 450 degrees C. Low lime-to-salt ratios (g Ca(OH)2/g salt) of 0.00134 and less had a negligible effect on ketone yield. In contrast, salts with higher lime-to-salt ratios of 0.00461, 0.0190, and 0.272 showed 3.5, 4.6, and 9.4% loss in ketone yield, respectively. These losses were caused primarily by increases in tars and heavy oils; however, a three-fold increase in hydrocarbon production occurred as well. To predict ketone product distribution, a random-pairing and a Gibbs free energy minimization model were applied to thermal decompositions of mixed calcium and sodium carboxylate salts. Random pairing appears to better predict ketone product composition. For sodium and calcium acetate, two types of mixed sodium carboxylate salts, and two types of mixed calcium carboxylate salts, activation energy (EA) was determined using three isoconversional methods. For each salt type, EA varied significantly with conversion. The average EA for sodium and calcium acetate was 226.65 and 556.75 kJ/mol, respectively. The average EA for the two mixed sodium carboxylate salts were 195.61, and 218.18 kJ/mol. The average EA for the two mixed calcium carboxylate salts were 232.78, and 176.55 kJ/mol. In addition, three functions of conversion were employed to see which one best modeled the experimental data. The Sestak-Berggren model was the best overall. Possible reactor designs and configurations that address the challenges associated with the continuous thermal decomposition of carboxylate salts are also presented and discussed. Methods of fermentation broth clarification were tested. Flocculation showed little improvement in broth purity. Coagulation yielded broth of 93.23% purity. Filtration using pore sizes from 1 micrometer to 240 Daltons increased broth purity (90.79 to 98.33%) with decreasing pore size.

Landoll, Michael 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum organometallic species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes. The functional group is selected from groups represented by the formulas R(C.dbd.O)R' and R(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The active catalyst for the process has the form: [CpM(CO).sub.2 (PR*.sub.3) L].sup.+ A.sup.-, where Cp=.eta..sup.5 -R.sup..tangle-solidup..sub.m C.sub.5 H.sub.5-m and R.sup..tangle-solidup. represents an alkyl group or a halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =OR' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =CO.sub.2 R' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) and m=0 to 5; M represents a molybdenum atom or a tungsten atom; R*.sub.3 represents three hydrocarbon groups selected from a cyclohexyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.11), a methyl group (CH.sub.3), and a phenyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.5) and all three R* groups can be the same or different or two of the three groups can be the same; L represents a ligand; and A.sup.- represents an anion. In another embodiment, one, two or three of the R* groups can be an OR*.

Voges, Mark (Leverkusen, DE); Bullock, R. Morris (Wading River, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Methyl Ester Sulfonates Supplement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methyl Ester Sulfonates Supplement 18509 September 2006 Supplement September 2006.pdf Chemithon 3179

13

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES July 1995 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

14

Atmospheric Methyl Chloride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

steel flasks and methyl chloride concentrations were measured using an Electron Capture Gas Chromatograph. Concentrations are reported as mixing ratios in dry air. The...

15

Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide-Mediated Ketone Enolization: The Influence of Hindered Dialkyl Ethers and Isostructural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide-Mediated Ketone Enolization: The Influence of Hindered Dialkyl Ethers of the enolization of 2-methylcyclohexanone mediated by lithium hexameth- yldisilazide (LiHMDS; TMS2NLi) solvated- bine to make lithium hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS) one of the most important Bro¨nsted bases in organic

Collum, David B.

16

Modeling the Nanophase Structural Dynamics of Phenylated Sulfonated Poly Ether Ether Ketone Ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) Membranes as a Function of Hydration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solvated phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) membranes in the presence of hydronium ions were modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The characterization of the nanophase structure and dynamics of such membranes was carried out as a function of the water content lambda, where lambda is the number of water molecules per sulfonate group, for lambda values of 3.5, 6, 11, 25, and 40. Analysis of pair correlation functions supports the experimental observation of membrane swelling upon hydration as well the increase in water and hydronium ion diffusion with increasing lambda. While the average number of hydrogen bonds between hydronium ions and sulfonate groups is dramatically affected by the hydration level, the average lifetime of the hydrogen bonds remains essentially constant. The membrane is found to be relatively rigid and its overall flexibility shows little dependence on water content. Compared to Nafion, water and ion diffusion coefficients are considerably smaller at lower hydration levels and room temperature. However, at higher lambda values of 25 and 40 these coefficients are comparable to those in Nafion at a lambda value of 16. This study also shows that water diffusion in Ph-SPEEKK membranes at low hydration levels can be significantly improved by raising the temperature with important implications for proton conductivity.

Lins, Roberto D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

AKR1B10 induces cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin by reducing C13 ketonic group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daunorubicin, idarubicin, doxorubicin and epirubicin are anthracyclines widely used for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast, lung, and liver cancers, but tumor resistance limits their clinical success. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 (AKR1B10) is an NADPH-dependent enzyme overexpressed in liver and lung carcinomas. This study was aimed to determine the role of AKR1B10 in tumor resistance to anthracyclines. AKR1B10 activity toward anthracyclines was measured using recombinant protein. Cell resistance to anthracycline was determined by ectopic expression of AKR1B10 or inhibition by epalrestat. Results showed that AKR1B10 reduces C13-ketonic group on side chain of daunorubicin and idarubicin to hydroxyl forms. In vitro, AKR1B10 converted daunorubicin to daunorubicinol at V{sub max} of 837.42 {+-} 81.39 nmol/mg/min, K{sub m} of 9.317 {+-} 2.25 mM and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 3.24. AKR1B10 showed better catalytic efficiency toward idarubicin with V{sub max} at 460.23 {+-} 28.12 nmol/mg/min, K{sub m} at 0.461 {+-} 0.09 mM and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} at 35.94. AKR1B10 was less active toward doxorubicin and epirubicin with a C14-hydroxyl group. In living cells, AKR1B10 efficiently catalyzed reduction of daunorubicin (50 nM) and idarubicin (30 nM) to corresponding alcohols. Within 24 h, approximately 20 {+-} 2.7% of daunorubicin (1 {mu}M) or 23 {+-} 2.3% of idarubicin (1 {mu}M) was converted to daunorubicinol or idarubicinol in AKR1B10 expression cells compared to 7 {+-} 0.9% and 5 {+-} 1.5% in vector control. AKR1B10 expression led to cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin, but inhibitor epalrestat showed a synergistic role with these agents. Together our data suggest that AKR1B10 participates in cellular metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, resulting in drug resistance. These data are informative for the clinical use of idarubicin and daunorubicin. - Highlights: > This study defines enzyme activity of AKR1B10 protein towards daunorubicin, idarubicin, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. > This study pinpoints the chemical group-C13 ketone that AKR1B10 acts on. > This study identifies that the C14 group (methyl or hydroxyl) affects the substrate specificity towards AKR1B10. > This study defines the role of AKR1B10 in cellular metabolism and pharmacokinetics of anthracyclines. > This study demonstrates the role of AKR1B10 in cell resistance to anthracyclines in an in vitro cell culture model.

Zhong Linlin [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, Simmons Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Shen Honglin [Department of Pediatrics, The Affiliated Shenzhen Nanshan Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, 89 Taoyuan Road, Nanshan District, Shenzhen 518052 (China); Huang Chenfei [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, Simmons Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Jing, Hongwu [670 Wiese Road, Cheshire, CT 06410 (United States); Cao Deliang, E-mail: dcao@siumed.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, Simmons Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Experimental study of the oxidation of methyl oleate in a jet-stirred reactor  

SciTech Connect

The experimental study of the oxidation of a blend containing n-decane and a large unsaturated ester, methyl oleate, was performed in a jet-stirred reactor over a wide range of temperature covering both low and high temperature regions (550-1100 K), at a residence time of 1.5 s, at quasi atmospheric pressure with high dilution in helium (n-decane and methyl oleate inlet mole fractions of 1.48 x 10{sup -3} and 5.2 x 10{sup -4}) and under stoichiometric conditions. The formation of numerous reaction products was observed. At low and intermediate temperatures, the oxidation of the blend led to the formation of species containing oxygen atoms like cyclic ethers, aldehydes and ketones deriving from n-decane and methyl oleate. At higher temperature, these species were not formed anymore and the presence of unsaturated species was observed. Because of the presence of the double bond in the middle of the alkyl chain of methyl oleate, the formation of some specific products was observed. These species are dienes and esters with two double bonds produced from the decomposition paths of methyl oleate and some species obtained from the addition of H-atoms, OH and HO{sub 2} radicals to the double bond. Experimental results were compared with former results of the oxidation of a blend of n-decane and methyl palmitate performed under similar conditions. This comparison allowed highlighting the similarities and the differences in the reactivity and in the distribution of the reaction products for the oxidation of large saturated and unsaturated esters. (author)

Bax, Sarah; Hakka, Mohammed Hichem; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frederique [Laboratoire Reactions et Genie des Procedes, Nancy Universite, CNRS, ENSIC, BP 20451, 1 rue Grandville, 54001 Nancy (France)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Lithium Ephedrate-Mediated Addition of a Lithium Acetylide to a Ketone: Solution Structures and Relative Reactivities of Mixed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ephedrate-Mediated Addition of a Lithium Acetylide to a Ketone: Solution Structures-1301 ReceiVed April 30, 1997. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 26, 1997 Abstract: Addition of lithiumLi and 13C NMR spectroscopies reveal lithium cyclopropylacetylide in THF to be a dimer

Collum, David B.

20

Controlling DNA Methylation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling DNA Methylation Though life on earth is composed of a diverse range of organisms, some with many different types of tissues and cells, all these are encoded by a molecule we call DNA. The information required to build a protein is stored in DNA within the cells. Not all the message in the DNA is used in each cell and not all the message is used all the time. During cell differentiation, the cells become dedicated for their specific function which involves selectively activating some genes and repressing others. Gene regulation is an important event in the developmental biology and the biology of various diseases, but a more complex process. Controlling DNA Methylation Though life on earth is composed of a diverse range of organisms, some with many different types of tissues and cells, all these are encoded by a molecule we call DNA. The information required to build a protein is stored in DNA within the cells. Not all the message in the DNA is used in each cell and not all the message is used all the time. During cell differentiation, the cells become dedicated for their specific function which involves selectively activating some genes and repressing others. Gene regulation is an important event in the developmental biology and the biology of various diseases, but a more complex process. In the bacteria there are distinct enzymes while one is capable of cleaving DNA, the other protects DNA by modification. The complementary function provided by the set of enzymes offers a defense mechanism against the phage infection and DNA invasion. The incoming DNA is cleaved sequence specifically by the class of enzymes called restriction endonuclease (REase). The host DNA is protected by the sequence specific action of matching set of enzymes called the DNA methyltransferase (MTase). The control of the relative activities of the REase and MTase is critical because a reduced ratio of MTase/REase activity would lead to cell death via autorestriction. However too high a ratio would fail to provide protection against invading viral DNA. In addition a separate group of proteins capable of controlling R-M proteins have been identified in various restriction-modification (R-M) systems which are called C proteins (Roberts et al., 2003).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal Hazard Analysis of Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide Ron-Hsin Chang, Chi-Min Shu and Po-Yin Yeh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Additional requirements for the Qualified Person are set forth in NFPA 70E Article 110.6 (D)(1). A person can and according to the applicable codes (OSHA, NFPA 70E, etc.). DEFINITIONS A Competent Person is an individual and NFPA, has received safety training on the hazards involved with electricity, and by virtue of training

Chen, Shu-Ching

22

Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran. Battelle ...

23

Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Contact PNNL About This Technology ...

24

PULSE COLUMN DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

A stagewise approach was used in a theoretical analysis of pulse columns. In the analysis the column was arbitrarily divided into discrete stages comprising that part of the column between two adjacent perforated plates. The operation of the pulse column was described mathematically using material balance equations, and a design method was derived which used two stage lines and two operating lines, one set for the pulse generator upstroke and one set for the downstroke. Assuming equilibrium contact, the effect of recycle in a pulse column was shown to cause a large decrease in the separation obtained as the pulse frequency was increased. Hold-up studies were made using isoamyl alcohol- water, and methyl isobutyl ketone water. The hold-up per cycle of the dispersed phase for both systems was found to be equal to the interstage flow per cycle of the dispersed phase. Hold-up behavior at high frequencies was different for the two systems. Extraction runs were also made using the system methyl isobutyl ketone - acetic acid-water. The effects of recycle were found to result in a drop in column separation efficiency with increased pulse frequency. It was found to be theoretically possible for a column to operate in a pinched-in region even though this is not apparert from an examination of the superficial flow ratio of the two streams being fed to the column Techniques for sampling interstage flow streams in a colurm operating in the mixer-settler region are described. (J.R.D.)

Burkhart, L.E.; Fahien, R.W.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Combustion characterization of methylal in reciprocating engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methylal, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}, also known as dimethoxy-methane, is unique among oxygenates in that it has a low autoignition temperature, no carbon-carbon bonds, and is soluble in middle distillate fuels. Because of these properties, methylal has been shown to be a favorable fuel additive for reducing smoke in diesel engines. Recent measurements of ignition delay times indicate that methylal has a cetane number in the range of 45-50, which is compatible with diesel fuels. Engine tests have shown that adding methylal to diesel fuel significantly reduces smoke emissions. Gaseous emissions and combustion efficiencies obtained with methylal/diesel fuel blends remain essentially the same as those measured using neat diesel fuel. Lubricity measurements of methylal/diesel fuel blends with a ball on cylinder lubrication evaluator (BOCLE) show that methylal improves the lubricity of diesel fuel. Even though additions of methylal lower the fuel viscosity, the results of the BOCLE tests indicate that the methylal/diesel fuel blends cause less pump wear than neat diesel fuel. The one drawback is that methylal has a low boiling point (42{degrees}C) and a relatively high vapor pressure. As a result, it lowers the flash point of diesel fuel and causes a potential fuel tank flammability hazard. One solution to this increased volatility is to make polyoxymethylenes with the general formula of CH{sub 3}O(CH{sub 2}O){sub x}CH{sub 3} where x > 2. The molecules are similar to methylal, but have higher molecular weights and thus higher viscosities and substantially lower vapor pressures. Therefore, their flash points will be compatible with regular diesel fuel. The polyoxymethylenes are expected to have combustion properties similar to methylal. It is theorized that by analogy with hydrocarbons, the ignition quality (i.e., cetane number) of the polyoxymethylenes will be better than that of methylal.

Dodge, L.; Naegeli, D. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas, Carrollton, Kentucky EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via...

28

Methylal and Methylal-Diesel Blended Fuels from Use In Compression-Ignition Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas-to-liquids catalytic conversion technologies show promise for liberating stranded natural gas reserves and for achieving energy diversity worldwide. Some gas-to-liquids products are used as transportation fuels and as blendstocks for upgrading crude derived fuels. Methylal (CH{sub 3}-O-CH{sub 2}-O-CH{sub 3}) also known as dimethoxymethane or DMM, is a gas-to-liquid chemical that has been evaluated for use as a diesel fuel component. Methylal contains 42% oxygen by weight and is soluble in diesel fuel. The physical and chemical properties of neat methylal and for blends of methylal in conventional diesel fuel are presented. Methylal was found to be more volatile than diesel fuel, and special precautions for distribution and fuel tank storage are discussed. Steady state engine tests were also performed using an unmodified Cummins 85.9 turbocharged diesel engine to examine the effect of methylal blend concentration on performance and emissions. Substantial reductions of particulate matter emissions h ave been demonstrated 3r IO to 30% blends of methylal in diesel fuel. This research indicates that methylal may be an effective blendstock for diesel fuel provided design changes are made to vehicle fuel handling systems.

Keith D. Vertin; James M. Ohi; David W. Naegeli; Kenneth H. Childress; Gary P. Hagen; Chris I. McCarthy; Adelbert S. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Martian Methyl Chloride. A lesson in uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MSL Lander Curiosity has recently detected methyl halides coming from heated samples of Martian soil. This is reminiscent of similar findings in the Viking Lander spacecraft. In the 1970s a consensus developed quickly explaining the methyl halides as contamination originating from the spacecraft, and ignoring lines of evidence that the two compounds originated from Mars, and that they could not have originated from the proposed spacecraft chemistry. I discuss why this consensus developed from the understanding of biochemistry and geochemistry of 1976, despite its implausibility. Subsequent explanations for the Viking methyl halides are more plausible but still not proven. The Curiosity rover results are also being explained as a result of on-spacecraft chemistry. I urge caution in this interpretation, in light of the historical Viking example: it is better to leave unexplained data unexplained than to lock in an explanation that precludes future developments.

Bains, William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

COOLANT STABILIZED WITH KETONE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

sion). U. S. Patent 3,009.88l. Nov. 2l, l06l. A method is given for inhibiting radiolytic damage to a polyphenyl composition undergoing nuclear irradiation, the polyphenyl composition initially consisting essentially of polyphenyls having 2 to 4 phenyl rings. The method comprises adding approximately 5 mole% anthraquinone to the polyphenyl composition. (AEC)

Burr, J.G.; Strong, J.D.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

Association Behavior of Poly (methyl methacrylate-b-methacrylic acid-b-methyl methacrylate) in Aqueous Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABA type tri-block amphiphilic polyelectrolyte consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-block-methacrylic acid-block-methyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-b-MAA-b-MMA)) was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization technique ...

Yao, Jia

32

An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents opposed-flow diffusion flame data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and uses the experiments to validate an improved skeletal mechanism consisting of 648 species and 2998 reactions. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

Hu, Haiyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL] [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL] [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Structural Basis for Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme  

SciTech Connect

The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes RlmN and Cfr methylate 23S ribosomal RNA, modifying the C2 or C8 position of adenosine 2503. The methyl groups are installed by a two-step sequence involving initial methylation of a conserved Cys residue (RlmN Cys{sup 355}) by SAM. Methyl transfer to the substrate requires reductive cleavage of a second equivalent of SAM. Crystal structures of RlmN and RlmN with SAM show that a single molecule of SAM coordinates the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Residue Cys{sup 355} is S-methylated and located proximal to the SAM methyl group, suggesting the SAM that is involved in the initial methyl transfer binds at the same site. Thus, RlmN accomplishes its complex reaction with structural economy, harnessing the two most important reactivities of SAM within a single site.

Boal, Amie K.; Grove, Tyler L.; McLaughlin, Monica I.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Booker, Squire J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU); (Penn)

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Structural Analysis of a Ni-Methyl Species in Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase from Methanothermobacter marburgensis  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.2 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Ni-methyl species that is a proposed catalytic intermediate in methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), the enzyme that catalyzes the biological formation of methane. The methyl group is situated 2.1 {angstrom} proximal of the Ni atom of the MCR coenzyme F{sub 430}. A rearrangement of the substrate channel has been posited to bring together substrate species, but Ni(III)-methyl formation alone does not lead to any observable structural changes in the channel.

Cedervall, Peder E.; Dey, Mishtu; Li, Xianghui; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Hedman, Britt; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Wilmot, Carrie M. (Michigan); (SLAC); (UMM)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

7, 1164711683, 2007 VOC ratios as probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, and [isobutane]/[n-butane] and [methyl ethyl ketone]/[n-5 butane] are used to study the extent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A 57: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas, Carrollton, Kentucky EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas, Carrollton, Kentucky SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to advance Oxyhydrochlorination technology to an integrated engineering-scale process. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 27, 1996 EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas September 27, 1996 EA-1157: Final Environmental Assessment Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for

39

Lithium Methyl Carbonate as a Reaction Product of Metallic Lithium and Dimethyl Carbonate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemically synthesized lithium methylcarbonate (CH 3 OCOmolecular structures of lithium methyl carbonate (CH 3 OCO 2FTIR study also suggests that lithium methyl carbonate has

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Yang, Hui; Ross Jr., Philip N.; Xu, Kang; Jow, T. Richard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

High-throughput sequencing of cytosine methylation in plant DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to that in flowering plants around repeat regions [15]. The green algae Chlorella sp. NC64A and Volvox carteri show very little methylation in non-CpG contexts in genes, and greatly reduced or absent non-CpG methylation at repetitive regions, with Volvox carteri... showing greatly reduced methylation in all contexts compared to other plant species [15]. Similarly, the distributions of methyla- tion in the green algae Chlamydomonas, while not wholly divergent from those in flowering plants [49], show much lower levels...

Hardcastle, Thomas J

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96 % of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65 % across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

Joseph A. Bedell; Muhammad A. Budiman; Andrew Nunberg; Robert W. Citek; Dan Robbins; Joshua Jones; Elizabeth Flick; Theresa Rohlfing; Jason Fries; Kourtney Bradford; Jennifer Mcmenamy; Michael Smith; Heather Holeman; Bruce A. Roe; Graham Wiley; Ian F. Korf; Pablo D. Rabinowicz; Nathan Lakey; W. Richard Mccombie; Jeffrey A. Jeddeloh; Robert A. Martienssen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Control of mercury methylation in wetlands through iron addition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mason, R. P. ; Flegal, A. R. , Mercury speciation in the SanP. ; Flegal, A. R. , Decadal mercury trends in San FranciscoP. G. ; Nelson, D. C. , Mercury methylation from unexpected

Sedlak, David L; Ulrich, Patrick D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The comparison of sulfide CoMo/?-Al2O3 and NiMo/?-Al2O3 catalysts in methyl palmitate and methyl heptanoate hydrodeoxygenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrodeoxygenation of methyl palmitate and methyl heptanoate as the model compounds of bio-oil in the presence of sulfided CoMo/?-Al2O3 and NiMo/?-Al2O3 catalysts was studied at the temperature ... Keywords: CoMoS/?-Al2O3, NiMoS/?-Al2O3, biofuels, hydrodeoxygenation, methyl heptanoate, methyl palmitate

Irina V. Deliy; Evgenia N. Vlasova; Alexey L. Nuzhdin; Galina A. Bukhtiyarova

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

46

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Contribution of Iron-Reducing Bacteria to Mercury Methylation in Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND R. P. MASON. 2006. Mercury methylation by dissimilatoryPRUCHA, AND G. MIERLE. 1991. Mercury methylation by sulfate-AND J. M. SIEBURTH. 1993. Mercury biogeochemical cycling in

Fleming, Emily J.; Nelson, D C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Network-based classification of recurrent endometrial cancers using high-throughput DNA methylation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DNA methylation, a well-studied mechanism of epigenetic regulation, plays important roles in cancer. Increased levels of global DNA methylation is observed in primary solid tumors including endometrial carcinomas and is generally associated with silencing ... Keywords: DNA methylation, Steiner tree, cancer recurrence, classification, protein-protein interaction network, random walk

Jianhua Ruan; Md. Jamiul Jahid; Fei Gu; Chengwei Lei; Yi-Wen Huang; Ya-Ting Hsu; David G. Mutch; Chun-Liang Chen; Nameer B. Kirma; Tim H. Huang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

SYNTHESIS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. The research team has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, we are currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter (January-March/99), in-situ formaldehyde generation and condensation with methyl propionate were tested over various catalysts and reaction conditions. The patent application is in preparation and the results are retained for future reports.

Makarand R. Gogate; James J. Spivey; Joseph R. Zoeller; Richard D. Colberg; Gerald N. Choi; Samuel S. Tam

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure Pamela J Sykes, Michelle R Newman, Benjamin J Blyth and Rebecca J Ormsby Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 Australia. (pam.sykes@flinders.edu.au). Our goal is to study the mechanisms involved in biological responses to low doses of radiation in vivo in the dose range that is relevant to population and occupational exposures. At high radiation doses, DNA double-strand breaks are considered the critical lesion underlying the initiation of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, at the very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks

52

"Seeing" Mercury Methylation in Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury in the environment can easily reach toxic levels. In a process called methylation, Hg is transformed into a form that can be accumulated in the muscle and fatty tissue of fish. Accumulated levels of methylmercury become higher as the fish grow, and levels are magnified up the food web as larger fish eat smaller fish, a process called biomagnification. As a result, mercury concentrations in fish can be millions of times higher than in surrounding waters [1]. Fish advisories have been set to limit consumption of certain fish higher up on the food web, especially for pregnant women and small children (see Figure 1). Mercury in the environment can easily reach toxic levels. In a process called methylation, Hg is transformed into a form that can be accumulated in the muscle and fatty tissue of fish. Accumulated levels of methylmercury become higher as the fish grow, and levels are magnified up the food web as larger fish eat smaller fish, a process called biomagnification. As a result, mercury concentrations in fish can be millions of times higher than in surrounding waters [1]. Fish advisories have been set to limit consumption of certain fish higher up on the food web, especially for pregnant women and small children (see Figure 1). figure 1 Figure 1. Mercury health risks Health advisory from the CALFED Science Program to limit consumption of fish, in order to avoid excessive accumulation of Hg. Methylated Hg is biomagnified up the food chain, attaining high levels in some types of sportfish. http://science.calwater.ca.gov/images/scinews_hg_da_lg.jpg

53

Nonradiometric and radiometric testing of radioiodine sorbents using methyl iodide  

SciTech Connect

A nonradiometric test of adsorbents and adsorbers with normal methyl iodide (CH/sub 3//sup 127/I) is desirable. Use of methyl radioiodide (CH/sub 3//sup 131/I) requires special precautions and facilities and results in bed contamination. However, first it must be established to what extent the removal of CH/sub 3//sup 127/I by adsorbents is indicative of the removal of CH/sub 3//sup 131/I. An experimental apparatus was built and used to simultaneously measure the penetrations of CH/sub 3/I molecules and the radioisotope in CH/sub 3//sup 131/I through charcoal absorbent beds. Gas chromatography with electron capture detection was used to measure CH/sub 3/I. Radioiodine was measured using charcoal traps within NaI scintillation well crystals. Real time (5-min interval) radioiodine measurement provided immediate penetration results directly comparable to the real time penetrations of methyl iodide. These penetrations were compared for typical charcoal adsorbents with these impregnants: (a) 5% KI/sub 3/, (b) 5% KI/sub 3/ + 2% TEDA, (c) 5% TEDA, and (d) metal salts (Whetlerite). Differences between CH/sub 3/I and CH/sub 3//sup 131/I penetrations observed for the two iodized charcoals were attributed to isotope exchange reactions. Equivalent penetrations were observed for non-iodized adsorbents and for iodized ones at initial time. First order rates were confirmed for reactions with TEDA and for isotope exchange. This was one more confirmation of the lack of a challenge concentration effect on efficiencies at low test bed loadings. In addition to other removal mechanisms, reversible physical adsorption was observed with all charcoals.

Wood, G.O.; Valdez, F.O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Durability of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) Lenses Used in Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation reports the findings of NREL's screen test to characterize the durability of poly (methyl methacrylate) lenses used in concentrated photovoltaics.

Miller, D.; Gedvilas, L.; To, B.; Kennedy, C.; Kurtz, S.

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Outlook Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives:Research Plant Pathologist, Crops Pathology and GeneticsS Jack Kelly Clark pecialty crop farms and nurseries in

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DISCOVERY OF METHYL ACETATE AND GAUCHE ETHYL FORMATE IN ORION  

SciTech Connect

We report on the discovery of methyl acetate, CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}, through the detection of a large number of rotational lines from each one of the spin states of the molecule: AA species (A{sub 1} or A{sub 2}), EA species (E{sub 1}), AE species (E{sub 2}), and EE species (E{sub 3} or E{sub 4}). We also report, for the first time in space, the detection of the gauche conformer of ethyl formate, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCOH, in the same source. The trans conformer is also detected for the first time outside the Galactic center source SgrB2. From the derived velocity of the emission of methyl acetate, we conclude that it arises mainly from the compact ridge region with a total column density of (4.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The derived rotational temperature is 150 K. The column density for each conformer of ethyl formate, trans and gauche, is (4.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Their abundance ratio indicates a kinetic temperature of 135 K for the emitting gas and suggests that gas-phase reactions could participate efficiently in the formation of both conformers in addition to cold ice mantle reactions on the surface of dust grains.

Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Lopez, A.; Caro, G. M. Munoz [Department of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon-Ajalvir, km. 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Kleiner, I.; Nguyen, H. V. L., E-mail: terceromb@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: lopezja@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: munozcg@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: isabelle.kleiner@lisa.u-pec.fr, E-mail: nguyen@pc.rwth-aachen.de [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, CNRS/IPSL UMR7583 et Universites Paris Diderot et Paris Est, 61 av. General de Gaulle, F-94010 Creteil (France)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Chemotactic antifouling properties of methyl caproate: its implication for ship hull coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antifouling (AF) activity of methyl caproate was evaluated by using both laboratory assays and field investigations. It showed strong repellent activity against common fouling organisms (marine bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis, Roseobacter gallaeciensis ... Keywords: Ulva pertusa, antifouling, chemotaxis, fouling resistance, hybrid CDP, marine bacteria, methyl caproate, zinc pyrithione

Haridatta Bhatta Rai; Sang Mok Jung; M. Sidharthan; Ji Hyun Lee; Chi Young Lim; Young-Kyu Kang; Chang Yeon; N. S. Park; H. W. Shin

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Use of the electrically-driven emulsion phase contactor in chemical and biochemical processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrically driven liquid-liquid contactor has been developed to enhance the efficiency of chemical and biochemical processes. A uniform electric field is utilized to induce a drop dispersion- coalescence cycle, producing high surface area for interfacial mass transfer under continuous-countercurrent-flow conditions. The mass- transport capability of this system has been analyzed by observing the extraction of acetic acid from water (dispersed phase) into methyl isobutyl ketone. Results showed that, due to increased efficiency of mass transfer, the electrically-driven device could be an order of magnitude smaller than a conventional contactor accomplishing the same level of separation. In the case of biochemical processes within non-aqueous environments, a biocatalyst (enzymes or bacteria) is introduced in the aqueous (dispersed) phase. The biocatalyst uses nutrients and other reactants to selectively transform species transferred from the continuous (organic) phase to the interior of the drops. An example of such system that has been investigated is the oxidation of p-cresol dissolved in toluene by aqueous-phase horseradish peroxidase.

Tsouris, C; DePaoli, D.W.; Scott, T.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

Moens, L.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

60

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350 and 375 C to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan. 2 figs.

Moens, L.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH).sub.2 is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH).sub.2 is added in an excess amount needed.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Initial laboratory studies into the chemical and radiological aging of organic materials in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex  

SciTech Connect

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated over many years from plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct bearing on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. The major portion of organic materials that have been added to the tanks consists of tributyl phosphate, dibutyl phosphate, butyl alcohol, hexone (methyl isobutyl ketone), normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriadetic acid (HEDTA), other complexants, and lesser quantities of ion exchange polymers and minor organic compounds. A study of how thermal and radiological processes that may have changed the composition of organic tanks constituents has been initiated after a review of the open literature revealed little information was available about the rates and products of these processes under basic pH conditions. This paper will detail the initial findings as they relate to gas generation, e.g. H{sub 2}, CO, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and to changes in the composition of the organic and inorganic components brought about by ``Aging`` processes.

Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Babad, H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350.degree. and 375.degree. C. to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

US Food and Drug Administration survey of methyl mercury in canned tuna  

SciTech Connect

Methyl mercury was determined by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 220 samples of canned tuna collected in 1991. Samples were chosen to represent different styles, colors, and packs as available. Emphasis was placed on water-packed tuna, small can size, and the highest-volume brand names. The average methyl mercury (expressed as Hg) found for the 220 samples was 0.17 ppm; the range was <0.10-0.75 ppm. Statistically, a significantly higher level of methyl mercury was found in solid white and chunk tuna. Methyl mercury level was not related to can size. None of the 220 samples had methyl mercury levels that exceeded the 1 ppm FDA action level. 11 refs., 1 tab.

Yess, J. [Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects of methyl palmitate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methyl palmitate (MP) has been shown earlier to inhibit Kupffer cells and rat peritoneal macrophages. To evaluate the potential of MP to inhibit the activation of other macrophages, RAW cells (macrophages of alveolar origin) were treated with varying concentrations of MP (0.25, 0.5, 1 mM). Assessment of cytotoxicity using MTT assay revealed that 0.25 and 0.5 mM are not toxic to RAW cells. MP was able to inhibit the phagocytic function of RAW cells. Treatment of cells with MP 24 hours prior to LPS stimulation significantly decreased nitric oxide release and altered the pattern of cytokines release; there was a significant decrease in TNF-{alpha} and a significant increase in IL-10 compared to the controls. However, there is a non-significant change in IL-6 level. Furthermore, phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (I{kappa}B{alpha}) protein was significantly decreased in RAW cells treated with 0.5 mM MP after LPS stimulation. Based upon the in-vitro results, it was examined whether MP treatment will be effective in preventing bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in-vivo. Bleomycin given by itself caused destruction of the lung architecture characterized by pulmonary fibrosis with collapse of air alveoli and emphysematous. Bleomycin induced a significant increase in hydroxyproline level and activated NF-{kappa}B, p65 expression in the lung. MP co-treatment significantly ameliorated bleomycin effects. These results suggest that MP has a potential of inhibiting macrophages in general. The present study demonstrated for the first time that MP has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effect that could be through NF-kB inhibition. Thus MP like molecule could be a promising anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drug. - Research Highlights: >Methyl palmitate is a universal macrophage inhibitor. >It could be a promising nucleus of anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drugs. >The underlying mechanism of these effects could be through NF-kB inhibition.

El-Demerdash, Ebtehal, E-mail: ebtehal_dm@yahoo.com

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Novel syngas-based process for methyl methacrylate  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel are developing a novel process for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the research on propionate synthesis step. The resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis, which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis process is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-SI-P and Ta metal oxide catalysts for condensation reactions of propionates with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields, acid-base properties, in situ condensation in a high- temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory reactor operating data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Zoeller, J.R. [Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, TN (United States); Choi, G.N. [Bechtel, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tam, S.S. [Bechtel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Tischer, R.E. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Srivastava, R.D. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Synthesis of Methyl Methacrylate from Coal-Derived Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last month, RTI has finalized the design of a fixed-bed microreactor system for DME partial oxidation reactions. RTI incorporated some design changes to the feed blending system, so as to be able to blend varying proportions of DME and oxygen. RTI has also examined the flammability limits of DME-air mixtures. Since the lower flammability limit of DME in air is 3.6 volume percent, RTI will use a nominal feed composition of 1.6 percent in air, which is less than half the lower explosion limit for DME-air mixtures. This nominal feed composition is thus considered operationally safe, for DME partial oxidation reactions. RTI is also currently developing an analytical system for DME partial oxidation reaction system.

Gerald N. Choi; James J. Spivey; Jospeh R. Zoeller; Makarand R. Gogate; Richard D. Colberg; Samuel S. Tam

1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Dispersion Morphology of Poly(methyl acrylate)/Silica Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect

Nearly monodisperse poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) and spherical SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NP, d = 14 {+-} 4 nm) were co-cast from 2-butanone, a mutually good solvent and a displacer of adsorbed PMA from silica. The effects of NP content and post-casting sample history on the dispersion morphology were found by small-angle X-ray scattering supplemented by transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of the X-ray results show that cast and thermally annealed samples exhibited a nearly random particle dispersion. That the same samples, prior to annealing, were not well-dispersed is indicative of thermodynamic miscibility during thermal annealing over the range of NP loadings studied. A simple mean-field thermodynamic model suggests that miscibility results primarily from favorable polymer segment/NP surface interactions. The model also indicates, and experiments confirm, that subsequent exposure of the composites to the likely displacer ethyl acetate results in entropic destabilization and demixing into NP-rich and NP-lean phases.

D Janes; J Moll; S Harton; C Durning

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

A High-Volume Cryosampler and Sample Purification System for Bromine Isotope Studies of Methyl Bromide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system was developed for collecting from the ambient atmosphere the methyl halides CH3Cl and CH3Br in quantities sufficient for chlorine and bromine isotope analysis. The construction and operation of the novel cryogenic collection system (...

Brett F. Thornton; Axel Horst; Daniel Carrizo; Henry Holmstrand; Per Andersson; Patrick M. Crill; Örjan Gustafsson

72

Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) in the Norwestern Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) are a distinctive class of marine organic compounds. They are naturally produced, they have a unique carbon structure, they are highly halogenated, and they bioaccumulate in ...

Pangallo, Kristin C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermomechanical properties of polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane- poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMA) containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles (d [approx.] 1.5 nm) were subjected to heological, mechanical, and morphological tests to determine the effects that ...

Kopesky, Edward Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Dissolution and swelling of bituminous coal in n-methyl-pyrrolidone.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research detailed herein examined the extraction and swelling of a bituminous coal in the super solvent n-methyl-pyrrolidone. Correlations were developed to describe the extraction and… (more)

Stoffa, Joseph M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A unique regulatory phase of DNA methylation in the early mammalian embryo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNA methylation is highly dynamic during mammalian embryogenesis. It is broadly accepted that the paternal genome is actively depleted of 5-methylcytosine at fertilization, followed by passive loss that reaches a minimum ...

Chan, Michelle M.

76

A High-Volume Cryosampler and Sample Purification System for Bromine Isotope Studies of Methyl Bromide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system was developed for collecting from the ambient atmosphere the methyl halides CH3Cl and CH3Br in quantities sufficient for chlorine and bromine isotope analysis. The construction and operation of the novel cryogenic collection system (...

Brett F. Thornton; Axel Horst; Daniel Carrizo; Henry Holmstrand; Per Andersson; Patrick M. Crill; Örjan Gustafsson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Extinction and Ignition of Methyl Decanoate in Laminar Nonpremixed Flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl decanoate is a large methyl ester that can be used as a surrogate for biodiesel. In this experimental and computational study, the combustion of methyl decanoate is investigated in nonpremixed, nonuniform flows. Experiments are performed employing the counterflow configuration with a fuel stream made up of vaporized methyl decanoate and nitrogen, and an oxidizer stream of air. The mass fraction of fuel in the fuel stream is measured as a function of the strain rate at extinction, and critical conditions of ignition are measured in terms of the temperature of the oxidizer stream as a function of the strain rate. It is not possible to use a fully detailed mechanism for methyl decanoate to simulate the counterflow flames because the number of species and reactions is too large to employ with current flame codes and computer resources. Therefore a skeletal mechanism was deduced from a detailed mechanism of 8555 elementary reactions and 3036 species using 'directed relation graph' method. This skeletal mechanism has only 713 elementary reactions and 125 species. Critical conditions of ignition were calculated using this skeletal mechanism and are found to agree well with experimental data. The predicted strain rate at extinction is found to be lower than the measurements. In general, the methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Seshadri, K; Lu, T; Herbinet, O; Humer, S; Niemann, U; Pitz, W J; Law, C K

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

78

Synthesis of Methyl Methacrylate From Coal-Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter(April-June, 1998), RTI has modified the reactor system including a new preheater and new temperature settings for the preheater. Continuous condensation of formaldehyde with propionic acid were carried out over 10% Nb O /SiO at 300°C without 2 5 2 interruption. Five activity and four regeneration cycles have been completed without plugging or material balance problems. The results show that 10% Nb O /SiO deactivates slowly with time 2 5 2 but can be regenerated, at least four times, to 100% of its original activity with 2% O in nitrogen 2 at 400°C. The cycles continue with consistent 90-95% of carbon balance. The reaction is scheduled to complete with 6 activity cycles and 5 regenerations. Used catalysts will be analyzed with TGA and XPS to determine bulk and surface coke content and coke properties. RTI will start the investigation of effects of propionic acid/formaldehyde ratio on reaction activity and product selectivity over 20% Nb O /SiO catalysts.

Ben W.-L. Jang; Gerald N. Choi; James J. Spivey; Jospeh R. Zoeller; Richard D. Colberg; Samuel S. Tam

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal catalytic conversion of the used isobutyl isoprene rubber into valuable hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan MR, Mabood F. Catalytic conversion of waste tyres intoJ, Jan MR, Mabood F. Conversion of waste tires into liquidbest method for maximum conversion into useful product, and

Rasul Jan, M.; Jabeen, Farah; Shah, Jasmin; Mabood, Fazal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal catalytic conversion of the used isobutyl isoprene rubber into valuable hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuous ?ow reactor for thermal degradation of polymers.Qian J. Studies of the thermal degradation of waste rubber.10.1007/s10973-009-0577-3 Thermal catalytic conversion of

Rasul Jan, M.; Jabeen, Farah; Shah, Jasmin; Mabood, Fazal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SYNTHESIS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter (July-September, 1998), the project team has completed the continuous condensation of formaldehyde with propionic acid over 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} at 300 C. Six activity and five regeneration cycles have been completed. The results show that 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} deactivates slowly with time but can be regenerated to its original activity with 2% O{sub 2} in nitrogen over night at 400 C. We have investigated the effects of regeneration, propionic acid/formaldehyde ratio (PA/HCHO = 4.5/1 to 1.5/1) and reaction temperature(280-300 C) on reaction activity and product selectivity over 20% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. The regeneration effect on 20% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} is similar to the effect on 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2}. The regeneration can bring the deactivated catalyst to its original activity. However, the selectivity to MAA decreases with regeneration while the selectivity to DEK and CO{sub 2} increases. When PA/HCHO ratio is decreased from 4.5/1 to 2.25/1 then to 1.5/1 at 300 C the MAA yield decreases but the MAA selectivity first increases then decreases. Decreasing the reaction temperature from 300 C to 280 C decreases the MAA yield from 39.5% to 30.7% but increases the MAA selectivity from 73.7% to 82.2%. The results indicate that both temperature and PA/HCHO ratio are important parameters to optimize the economic of the condensation between propionic acid and formaldehyde.

BEN W.-L. JANG; GERALD N. CHOI; JAMES J. SPIVEY; JOSPEH R. ZOELLER; RICHARD D. COLBERG

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geometric and Electronic Structures of the Ni(I) and Methyl-Ni(III)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Geometric and Electronic Structures of the Ni(I) and Methyl-Ni(III) Intermediates of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) from methanogenic archaea catalyzes the terminal step in biological methane synthesis. Using coenzyme B (CoBSH) as the two-electron donor, MCR reduces methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-SCoM) to form methane and the heterodisulfide product, CoBS-SCoM. MCR contains an essential redox active nickel tetrapyrrolic cofactor called coenzyme F430 at its active site, which is active in the reduced Ni(I) state (MCRred1). All of the biologically generated methane, amounting to 1 billion tons per annum globally, is formed by MCR. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that anaerobic methane oxidation is also catalyzed by MCR and occurs by a reversal of the methane synthesis reaction. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, trapping 20 times more heat than CO2. In addition, methane is also an important and clean fuel as it produced the least amount of CO2 per unit of heat released. Thus, it is critically important to understand the mechanism of formation of the smallest hydrocarbon in nature.

83

Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

Moberly, James G [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DOEEA-1157 ENVIRONlMENTAL ASSESSMENT METHYL CHLORIDE VIA OXYHYDROCHLOFUNATION OF METHANE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57 57 ENVIRONlMENTAL ASSESSMENT METHYL CHLORIDE VIA OXYHYDROCHLOFUNATION OF METHANE: A BUILDING BLOCK FOR CHEMICALS AND FUELS FROM NATURAL GAS DOW CORNING CORPORATION CARROLLTON, KENTUCKY SEPTEMBER 1996 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PITTSBURGH ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER CUM ~~~~~~~~ DOEEA-1157 ENVIRONlMENTAL ASSESSMENT METHYL CHLORIDE VIA OXYHYDROCHLORINATION OF METHANE: A BUILDING BLOCK FOR CHEMICALS AND FUELS FROM NATURAL GAS DOW CORNING CORPORATION CARROLLTON, KENTUCKY SEPTEMBER 1996 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PITTSBURGH ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Image are produced from the best available original document. &E/,Etq --,/s7 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE PROPOSED METHYL CHLORIDE V

85

Two poplar methyl salicylate esterases display comparable biochemical properties but divergent expression patterns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Two poplar methyl salicylate esterases display comparable biochemical properties but divergent expression patterns Nan Zhao a , Ju Guan a , Farhad Forouhar b , Timothy J. Tschaplinski c , Zong-Ming Cheng a , Liang Tong b , Feng Chen a, * a Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 252 Ellington Plant Science Bldg., 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA b Department of Biological Sciences, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 3 June 2008 Received in revised form 27 October 2008 Available online 10 January 2009 Keywords: Black cottonwood Populus trichocarpa Methyl esterase SABP2 Methyl salicylate Salicylic acid Gene family Molecular modeling a b s t r a c t Two genes encoding proteins

86

Methylation of the ATM promoter in glioma cells alters ionizing radiation sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Glioblastomas are among the malignancies most resistant to radiation therapy. In contrast, cells lacking the ATM protein are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. The relationship between ATM protein expression and radiosensitivity in 3 glioma cell lines was examined. T98G cells exhibited normal levels of ATM protein, whereas U118 and U87 cells had significantly lower levels of ATM and increased (>2-fold) sensitivity to ionizing radiation compared to T98G cells. The ATM promoter was methylated in U87 cells. Demethylation by azacytidine treatment increased ATM protein levels in the U87 cells and decreased their radiosensitivity. In contrast, the ATM promoter in U118 cells was not methylated. Further, expression of exogenous ATM did not significantly alter the radiosensitivity of U118 cells. ATM expression is therefore heterogeneous in the glioma cells examined. In conclusion, methylation of the ATM promoter may account for the variable radiosensitivity and heterogeneous ATM expression in a fraction of glioma cells.

Roy, Kanaklata [Division of Genomic Stability and DNA Repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Lilin [Division of Genomic Stability and DNA Repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Makrigiorgos, G. Mike [Division of Genomic Stability and DNA Repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Price, Brendan D. [Division of Genomic Stability and DNA Repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: brendan_price@dfci.harvard.edu

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

The methylation of benzoic and n-butyric acids by chloromethane in Phellinus pomaceus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetics of carboxylic acid methylation by chloromethane (CH3Cl) in myceliaaf the fungus Phellinus pomaceus were examined. Substantial incorporation of C2H3- into ester was observed within 5 min of addition of C2H3Cl to washed mycelia in the presence of the non-physiological acceptor butyric acid, rendering it unlikely that CH3Cl was converted to a diffusible intermediate before acting as methyl donor. The rate of methyl butyrate biosynthesis attained a maximum of 0.14 pmol g-l h-l at 1-5 mM-butyric acid, with higher concentrations causing increasing inhibition. Exogenous CH3Cl did not affect methyl butyrate production implying that the rate of CH3Cl biosynthesis did not limit methylation. However, C2H3-incorporation from exogenous C2H3Cl into methyl butyrate rose sharply from 20 to 60 % between 1.5 and 4 mM-butyric acid, suggesting inhibition of CH3Cl biosynthesis by the acid, an interpretation supported by the rapid decline in gaseous CH3Cl release by mycelia between 1.5 and 2 mM-butyric acid. With the natural acceptor benzoic acid as substrate a significant increase in the rate of ester biosynthesis was obtained in the presence of exogenous CH3Cl. Ester biosynthesis was maximal (0.18 pmol g-l h-l) at 0.5 mM-benZOiC acid but fell extremely rapidly with increasing concentration. As with butyric acid supraoptimal concentrations halted CH3Cl release and increased C2H3-incorporation from exogenous C2H3Cl. Studies on C2H3-incorporation from exogenous C2H3Cl into ester revealed a linear relationship between the logarithm of the percentage C2H3-incorporation and the logarithm of C2H3Cl

Kieran J. Mcnally; David B. Harper. *t

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Lo g 2 (F ol d hy pe rm et hy la tio n) in tu m or -n or m al p ai rs 0 35 -0.25 2.0 -0.25 2.0 0 1.0 LNCaP PrEC CpG density Phast Cons A B Tumor-Normal pairs sorted by extent of hypermethylation Additional #31;le 9. ... mammalian and vertebrate species (indicated by high phastCons scores > 0.8; [27]) compared with what would be expected by ran- dom chance (Figure 5A). Additionally, we found that the methylated and differentially methylated regions had a highly significant...

Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Wu, Zhijin; Haffner, Michael C; Esopi, David; Aryee, Martin J; Badrinath, Raghav; He, Tony L; Morgan, James D; Carvalho, Benilton S; Zheng, Qizhi; De Marzo, Angelo M; Irizarry, Rafael A; Nelson, William G

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

Stepwise DNA Methylation Changes Are Linked to Escape from Defined Proliferation Barriers and Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization  

SciTech Connect

The timing and progression of DNA methylation changes during carcinogenesis are not completely understood. To develop a timeline of aberrant DNA methylation events during malignant transformation, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model of transformation. To acquire immortality and malignancy, the cultured finite lifespan HMEC must overcome two distinct proliferation barriers. The first barrier, stasis, is mediated by the retinoblastoma protein and can be overcome by loss of p16(INK4A) expression. HMEC that escape stasis and continue to proliferate become genomically unstable before encountering a second more stringent proliferation barrier, telomere dysfunction due to telomere attrition. Rare cells that acquire telomerase expression may escape this barrier, become immortal, and develop further malignant properties. Our analysis of HMEC transitioning from finite lifespan to malignantly transformed showed that aberrant DNA methylation changes occur in a stepwise fashion early in the transformation process. The first aberrant DNA methylation step coincides with overcoming stasis, and results in few to hundreds of changes, depending on how stasis was overcome. A second step coincides with immortalization and results in hundreds of additional DNA methylation changes regardless of the immortalization pathway. A majority of these DNA methylation changes are also found in malignant breast cancer cells. These results show that large-scale epigenetic remodeling occurs in the earliest steps of mammary carcinogenesis, temporally links DNA methylation changes and overcoming cellular proliferation barriers, and provides a bank of potential epigenetic biomarkers that mayprove useful in breast cancer risk assessment.

Novak, Petr; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

Experimental and Computational Thermochemical Study of 2-and 3-Thiopheneacetic Acid Methyl Esters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biodiagnostics, electronic and optoelectronic devices, and conductive polymers. The present study reports acid methyl esters. The enthalpies of combustion and vaporization were measured by a rotating-bomb of the compounds studied was carried out. Calculated enthalpies of formation, using atomization and isodesmic

Chickos, James S.

91

Methyl Bromide o Bromomethane, monobromomethane, isobrome, Brom-o-Gas, Bromomethane, Celume,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bromide produced in the U.S. goes into pesticidal formulations (as of 1996) Total use of 711,175 lb in 2009, 78% on imported and 22% on exported material under Plant Protection and Quarantine oversight of exports requiring MB fumigation in 2005-2009 $2.2 billion/year o Methylating solvent, low-boiling solvent

Toohey, Darin W.

92

Headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of methyl bromide in food ingredients  

SciTech Connect

A headspace gas chromatographic (GC) method, which can be automated, has been developed for determination of methyl bromide. This method has been applied to wheat, flour, cocoa, and peanuts. Samples to be analyzed are placed in headspace sample vials, water is added, and the vials are sealed with Teflon-lined septa. After an appropriate equilibration time at 32 degrees C, the samples are analyzed within 10 h. A sample of the headspace is withdrawn and analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). Methyl bromide levels were quantitated by comparison of peak area with a standard. The standard was generated by adding a known amount of methyl bromide to a portion of the matrix being analyzed and which was known to be methyl bromide free. The detection limit of the method was 0.4 ppb. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.5% for wheat, 8.3% for flour, 3.3% for cocoa, and 11.6% for peanuts.

DeVries, J.W.; Broge, J.M.; Schroeder, J.P.; Bowers, R.H.; Larson, P.A.; Burns, N.M.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Double chromodomains cooperate to recognize the methylated histone H3 tail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chromodomains are modules implicated in the recognition of lysine-methylated histone tails and nucleic acids. CHD (for chromo-ATPase/helicase-DNA-binding) proteins regulate ATP-dependent nucleosome assembly and mobilization through their conserved double chromodomains and SWI2/SNF2 helicase/ATPase domain. The Drosophila CHD1 localizes to the interbands and puffs of the polytene chromosomes, which are classic sites of transcriptional activity. Other CHD isoforms (CHD3/4 or Mi-2) are important for nucleosome remodelling in histone deacetylase complexes. Deletion of chromodomains impairs nucleosome binding and remodelling by CHD proteins. Here we describe the structure of the tandem arrangement of the human CHD1 chromodomains, and its interactions with histone tails. Unlike HP1 and Polycomb proteins that use single chromodomains to bind to their respective methylated histone H3 tails, the two chromodomains of CHD1 cooperate to interact with one methylated H3 tail. We show that the human CHD1 double chromodomains target the lysine 4-methylated histone H3 tail (H3K4me), a hallmark of active chromatin. Methylammonium recognition involves two aromatic residues, not the three-residue aromatic cage used by chromodomains of HP1 and Polycomb proteins. Furthermore, unique inserts within chromodomain 1 of CHD1 block the expected site of H3 tail binding seen in HP1 and Polycomb, instead directing H3 binding to a groove at the inter-chromodomain junction.

Flanagan, John F.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Cymborowski, Marcin; Clines, Katrina L.; Kim, Youngchang; Minor, Wladek; Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh (ANL/SBC); (UV)

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters): Experiments and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters and reduced exhaust emissions have led to the emergence of new fuels and combustion devices. Over the past ten years, considerable effort has gone into understanding combustion phenomena in relation to emerging fuel

95

Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame K Abstract Diamond growth in low pressure combustion flames was studied using a safer, more economical and chemical kinetic time scales in the combustion reactor. 1 Present Address: 3M Corporation, Bldg. 60-1N-01

Dandy, David

96

Enhanced diisobutene production in the presence of methyl tertiary butyl ether  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the liquid phase reaction of isobutene in the presence of resin cation exchange resins with itself in a C[sub 4] hydrocarbon stream to form dimers, the formation of higher polymers, oligomers, and co-dimer by-products is suppressed by the presence of 0.0001 to 1 mole per mole of isobutene of methyl tertiary butyl ether. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Thermochemistry of radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction from 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and butanal Ewa Papajak, Prasenjit Seal, Xuefei Xu, and Donald G. Truhlar Citation: J. Chem. Phys. 137, 104314 abstraction from 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal Ewa Papajak, Prasenjit Seal, Xuefei Xu- propanol, and butanal. Electronic structure calculations for all conformers of the radicals were car- ried

Truhlar, Donald G

98

Scaling properties of diffusive electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons functionalized with methyl-groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of the electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons functionalized with methyl-groups. Our numerical simulations are based on the Green's function approach and the tight-binding description of graphene. In the ... Keywords: Electronic transport, Functionalization, Graphene nanoribbons

Alessandro Cresti

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Structure-Based Mechanistic Insights into DNMT1-Mediated Maintenance DNA Methylation  

SciTech Connect

DNMT1, the major maintenance DNA methyltransferase in animals, helps to regulate gene expression, genome imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. We report on the crystal structure of a productive covalent mouse DNMT1(731-1602)-DNA complex containing a central hemimethylated CpG site. The methyl group of methylcytosine is positioned within a shallow hydrophobic concave surface, whereas the cytosine on the target strand is looped out and covalently anchored within the catalytic pocket. The DNA is distorted at the hemimethylated CpG step, with side chains from catalytic and recognition loops inserting through both grooves to fill an intercalation-type cavity associated with a dual base flip-out on partner strands. Structural and biochemical data establish how a combination of active and autoinhibitory mechanisms ensures the high fidelity of DNMT1-mediated maintenance DNA methylation.

Song, Jikui; Teplova, Marianna; Ishibe-Murakami, Satoko; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

State Restrictions on Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

By the end of 2005, 25 States had barred, or passed laws banning, any more than trace levels of MTBE in their gasoline supplies, and legislation to ban MTBE was pending in 4 others. Some State laws address only MTBE; others also address ethers such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME). AEO2006 assumes that all State MTBE bans prohibit the use of all ethers for gasoline blending.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

Filby, Evan E. (Rigby, ID)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Durability of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Lenses Used in Concentrating Photovoltaic Technology (Revised) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology recently gained interest based on its expected low levelized cost of electricity, high efficiency, and scalability. Many CPV systems employ Fresnel lenses composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to obtain a high optical flux density on the cell. The optical and mechanical durability of these lenses, however, is not well established relative to the desired surface life of 30 years. Our research aims to quantify the expected lifetime of PMMA in key market locations (FL, AZ, and CO).

Miller, D. C.; Carloni, J. D.; Pankow, J. W.; Gjersing, E. L.; To, B.; Packard, C. E.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

CORRELATION OF DNA METHYLATION WITH MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN MARINE ORGANISMS: A CASE STUDY OF NOAA MUSSEL WATCH TISSUE SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) obtained from the NOAA Mussel Watch program were screened for DNA methylation, a type of epigenetic response to stressors. Oysters were collected from sites in the Gulf of Mexico having high mercury contamination (measured by NOAA) and from sites with little to no measurable mercury. Assessment of anthropogenic stressors such as mercury in the coastal environment has traditionally relied upon species diversity indices or assays to determine lethal doses. However, these indices fail to examine sub-lethal impacts such as gene expression. A ‘global’ DNA methylation kit, recently introduced by Sigma-Aldrich, was used to spectrophotometrically compare the degree of methylation in DNA extracted from contaminated oysters and non-contaminated oysters. DNA methylation was higher in oysters from pristine sites than in oysters from contaminated sites.

Brinkmeyer, Robin; Taylor, Robert; Germ, Kaylyn E.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimal estimation of the surface fluxes of methyl chloride using a 3-D global chemical transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl chloride (CH3Cl) [CH subscript 3 Cl] is a chlorine-containing trace gas in the atmosphere contributing significantly to stratospheric ozone depletion. Large uncertainties in estimates of its source and sink magnitudes ...

Xiao, Xue

105

Instrumental methods of analysis of sulfur compounds in synfuel process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1983  

SciTech Connect

Task 1. Methods development for the speciation of the polysulfides. The contributions of this project to the electrochemical analysis of sulfides and polysulfides are reviewed and summarized. Electrochemical reduction at the dropping mercury electrode (DME) is the method of choice for the determination of polysulfidic sulfur. Total sulfidic sulfur can conveniently be quantitated in mixtures of sulfides and polysulfides, by measuring diffusion currents engendered by the anodic depolarization of the DME in the presence of the moieties HS/sup -/ and S/sub x//sup 2 -/. Task 2. Methods development for the speciation of dithionite and polythionates. In a solvent consisting of 40% ethanol-60% water, electrocapillary curves substantiated the adsorption of ethanol at the dropping mercury electrode. The potentials where adsorption occurred paralleled a shift of 1 volt in the polarographic half potential of the reaction: S/sub 4/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/ + 2e = 2S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/. Task 3. Total accounting of the sulfur balance in representative samples of synfuel process streams. Two H-Coal liquefaction sour water samples were analyzed representing different stages in the PETC clean-up procedures. One specimen was a sample stripped of H/sub 2/S and ammonia; the other, resulting from a different batch, was stripped and subsequently extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone. The stripped effluent contained less than 0.001 M concentrations of sulfide, polysulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfate. On the other hand, sulfate accounted for 90% of the total sulfur present in the stripped and extracted sample; the remainder consisted of sulfidic and polysulfidic sulfur as well as thiosulfate. 13 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Jordan, J.; Sexton, E.; Talbott, J.; Yakupkovic, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Methylation status and transcriptional expression of the MHC class I loci in human trophoblast cells from term placenta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of the various molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be used by human trophoblast cells to down-regulate expression of HLA class I genes, we chose to investigate the methylation of DNA, generally associated with inhibition of transcription. We analyzed the methylation status of different HLA class I loci in villous and extravillous cytotrophoblast cells and in vitro-differentiated syncytiotrophoblast, purified from human term placenta, as well as in the human trophoblast-derived JAR and JEG-3 cell lines. We then compared methylation status and transcriptional activity. An inverse relationship was established between JAR and JEG-3: HLA-A, -B, and -G are methylated and repressed in JAR, whereas in JEG-3, HLA-A is methylated and repressed but HLA-B and -G are partially methylated and transcribed. HLA-E is unmethylated and transcribed in both cell lines. Apart from HLA-E, which is always unmethylated and transcribed, no such relationship exists for the other class I loci in trophoblast cells. Whereas nonclassical HLA-G and classical HLA-A and -B class I genes are undermethylated in both cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast, they are clearly transcribed in the former but minimally transcribed in the latter subpopulation. Thus, the down-regulation of class I gene expression in the in vitro-differentiated synctiotrophoblast is unlikely to be caused by DNA methylation. Furthermore, there is no detectable expression of any class I molecule at the cell surface of either trophoblast cell subpopulation, suggesting a negative control on translation and/or on the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane. 50 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Guillaudeux, T.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Girr, M. [University Hospital Center Purpan, Toulouse (France)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

In-cylinder pressure characteristics of a CI engine using blends of diesel fuel and methyl esters of beef tallow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cummins N14-410 diesel engine was operated on 12 fuels produced by blending methyl tallowate, methyl soyate, and ethanol with no. 2 diesel fuel. Engine in-cylinder pressure data were used to evaluate engine performance. Peak cylinder pressures for each fuel blend at all engine speeds were lower than peak pressure for diesel fuel with the exception of the 80% diesel, 13% methyl tallowate, and 7% ethanol; and the 80% diesel, 6.5% methyl tallowate, 6.5% methyl soyate and 7% ethanol blends. The indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) values for all fuel blends were less than for diesel fuel. The differences in IMEP values correlated with differences in power output of the engine. Similarly, maximum rates of pressure rise for most fuel blends were less than for diesel fuel. It was concluded that the fuel blends used in this study would have no detrimental long-term effects on engine performance, wear, and knock. 6 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Ali, Y.; Hanna, M.A.; Borg, J.E. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Autoignition measurements and a validated kinetic model for the biodiesel surrogate, methyl butanoate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autoignition of methyl butanoate has been studied at 1 and 4 atm in a shock tube over the temperature range 1250-1760 K at equivalence ratios of 1.5, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.25 at fuel concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%. These measurements are complemented by autoignition data from a rapid compression machine over the temperature range 640-949 K at compressed gas pressures of 10, 20, and 40 atm and at varying equivalence ratios of 1.0, 0.5, and 0.33 using fuel concentrations of 1.59 and 3.13%. The autoignition of methyl butanoate is observed to follow Arrhenius-like temperature dependence over all conditions studied. These data, together with speciation data reported in the literature in a flow reactor, a jet-stirred reactor, and an opposed-flow diffusion flame, were used to produce a detailed chemical kinetic model. It was found that the model correctly simulated the effect of change in equivalence ratio, fuel fraction, and pressure for shock tube ignition delays. The agreement with rapid compression machine ignition delays is less accurate, although the qualitative agreement is reasonable. The model reproduces most speciation data with good accuracy. In addition, the important reaction pathways over each regime have been elucidated by both sensitivity and flux analyses. (author)

Dooley, S.; Curran, H.J.; Simmie, J.M. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Characterization of the Deltaproteobacteria in Contaminated and Uncontaminated Surface Stream Sediments and Identification of Potential Mercury Methylators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial communities were examined in surface stream sediments at five contaminated sites and one control site near Oak Ridge, TN in order to identify bacteria that could be contributing to mercury methylation. The phylogenetic composition of the sediment bacterial community was examined over three quarterly sampling periods (36 samples) using 16s rRNA pyrosequencing. Only 3064 sequences (0.85 % of the total community) were identified as Deltaproteobacteria by the RDP classifier at the 99% confidence threshold. Constrained ordination techniques indicated significant positive correlations between Desulfobulbus spp., Desulfonema spp. and Desulfobacca spp. and methyl mercury concentrations in the contaminated sites. On the contrary, the distribution of organisms related to Byssovorax was significantly correlated to inorganic carbon, nitrate and uranium concentrations. Overall, the abundance and richness of Deltaproteobacteria sequences were higher in the sediments of the site, while the majority of the members present at the contaminated sites were either known metal reducers/methylators or metal tolerant species.

Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Green chemistry : dense carbon dioxide and water as environmentally benign reaction media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) was investigated in scCO?, and the cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was studied in an scCO?/liquid water environment. Nitrogen chemistry, specifically the synthesis of nitrogen ...

Allen, Andrew J. (Andrew John), 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The EMC Specimen Preparation Laboratory The Electron Microscopy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCRA waste: F003, U159, ignitable. Methyl ethyl ketone RCRA waste: F005, U159, D035 (TCLP > 200 mgl), ignitable. MICRO cleaning solution Mineral oil 5 mgm 3 (mist) 5 mgm 3...

112

Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of acetic anhydride from methyl acetate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for producing acetic anhydride by the reaction of methyl acetate, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that contains an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized phosphine groups, some of which phosphine groups are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the phosphine groups being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for consecutive runs without loss in activity. Bifunctional catalysts for use in carbonylating dimethyl ether are also provided.

Ramprasad, Dorai (Allentown, PA); Waller, Francis Joseph (Allentown, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH{sub 3}OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH{sub 3}OOH with CF{sub 3}O{sup -} clustering chemistry. CH{sub 3}OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is {+-}80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is estimated to be better than {+-}40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

St Clair, Jason M.; McCabe, David C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Crounse, John D. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Steiner, Urs [Varian, Inc., Santa Clara, California 95051 (United States); Wennberg, Paul O. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Generation kinetics of color centers in irradiated poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)  

SciTech Connect

The transient absorbance of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) irradiated with gamma rays at elevated temperatures has been investigated. The absorbance in the ultraviolet and visible range increases with gamma ray dose. A bathochromic shift in transmission spectra emerges significantly upon irradiation. A first-order generation model is proposed to analyze the kinetics of color centers during annealing. The activation energy of the color center increases with increasing gamma ray dose. The equilibrium behavior of color centers in PMP is similar to that of vacancies in metals, and the formation energy of color centers in PMP decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. However, annealable color centers are not observed in this study.

Peng, J. S.; Li, C. L.; Lee, Sanboh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chou, K. F. [Department of Biomechanical Engineering Yuanpei University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Mesoscale simulation of shocked poly-(4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) foams.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon foams are commonly used in HEDP experiments, and are subject to shock compression from tens to hundreds of GPa. Modeling foams is challenging due to the heterogeneous character of the foam. A quantitative understanding of foams under strong dynamic compression is sought. We use Sandia's ALEGRA-MHD code to simulate 3D mesoscale models of pure poly(4-methyl-1-petene) (PMP) foams. We employ two models of the initial polymer-void structure of the foam and analyze the statistical properties of the initial and shocked states. We compare the simulations to multi-Mbar shock experiments at various initial foam densities and flyer impact velocities. Scatter in the experimental data may be a consequence of the initial foam inhomogeneity. We compare the statistical properties the simulations with the scatter in the experimental data.

Schroen, Diana Grace; Flicker, Dawn G.; Haill, Thomas A.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Methyl Chloride from Direct Methane Partial Oxidation: A High-Temperature Shilov-Like Catalytic System  

SciTech Connect

The intention of this study is to demonstrate and evaluate the scientific and economic feasibility of using special solvents to improve the thermal stability of Pt-catalyst in the Shilov system, such that a high reaction temperature could be achieved. The higher conversion rate (near 100%) of methyl chloride from partial oxidation of methane under the high temperature ({approx} 200 C) without significant Pt0 precipitation has been achieved. High concentration of the Cl- ion has been identified as the key for the stabilization of the Pt-catalysts. H/D exchange measurements indicated that the over oxidation will occur at the elevated temperature, developments of the effective product separation processes will be necessary in order to rationalize the industry-visible CH4 to CH3Cl conversion.

Yongchun Tang; John (Qisheng) Ma

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

117

Raman spectra of bilayer graphene covered with Poly(methyl methacrylate) thin film  

SciTech Connect

The Raman spectra of bilayer graphene covered with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were investigated. Both the G and 2D peaks of PMMA-coated graphene were stiff and broad compared with those of uncovered graphene. This could be attributed to the residual strain induced by high-temperature baking during fabrication of the nanodevice. Furthermore, the two 2D peaks stiffened and broadened with increasing laser power, which is just the reverse to uncovered graphene. The stiffness is likely caused by graphene compression induced by the circular bubble of the thin PMMA film generated by laser irradiation. Our findings may contribute to the application of PMMA in the strain engineering of graphene nanodevices.

Xia Minggang [MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Center on Experimental Physics, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Su Zhidan; Zhang Shengli [MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Structural basis of SETD6-mediated regulation of the NF-kB network via methyl-lysine signaling  

SciTech Connect

SET domain containing 6 (SETD6) monomethylates the RelA subunit of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The ankyrin repeats of G9a-like protein (GLP) recognizes RelA monomethylated at Lys310. Adjacent to Lys310 is Ser311, a known phosphorylation site of RelA. Ser311 phosphorylation inhibits Lys310 methylation by SETD6 as well as binding of Lys310me1 by GLP. The structure of SETD6 in complex with RelA peptide containing the methylation site, in the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, reveals a V-like protein structure and suggests a model for NF-{kappa}B binding to SETD6. In addition, structural modeling of the GLP ankyrin repeats bound to Lys310me1 peptide provides insight into the molecular basis for inhibition of Lys310me1 binding by Ser311 phosphorylation. Together, these findings provide a structural explanation for a key cellular signaling pathway centered on RelA Lys310 methylation, which is generated by SETD6 and recognized by GLP, and incorporate a methylation-phosphorylation switch of adjacent lysine and serine residues. Finally, SETD6 is structurally similar to the Rubisco large subunit methyltransferase. Given the restriction of Rubisco to plant species, this particular appearance of the protein lysine methyltransferase has been evolutionarily well conserved.

Chang, Yanqi; Levy, Dan; Horton, John R.; Peng, Junmin; Zhang, Xing; Gozani, Or; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory-MED); (Stanford)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

Black, B.E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Krassimira Botcheva, John J. Dunn and Carl W. Anderson Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA The effects of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on humans results largely from changes in gene expression mediated by the activation of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins (transcription factors) as well as changes to other chromosomal proteins and perhaps to DNA. To develop a molecular understanding of the consequences of exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation, it will be necessary to understanding where radiation-activated transcription factors bind in whole genomes and how

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Synthesis of methyl methacrylate from coal-derived syngas: Quarterly report,, October 1-December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of three steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, Eastman developed two new processes which have resulted in two new invention reports. One process deals with carbonylation of benzyl ether which represents a model for coal liquefaction and the second focuses on the acceleration of carbonylation rates for propionic acid synthesis, via use of polar aprotic solvents. These two inventions are major improvements in the novel Mo-catalyzed homogeneous process for propionic acid synthesis technology, developed by Eastman. Over the last quarter, RTI completed three reaction cycles and two regeneration cycles as a part of long-term reaction regeneration cycle study on a 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, for vapor phase condensation reaction of formaldehyde with propionic acid.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Durability of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Lenses Used in Concentrating Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology has recently gained interest based on their expected low levelized cost of electricity, high efficiency, and scalability. Many CPV systems use Fresnel lenses made of poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) to obtain a high optical flux density. The optical and mechanical durability of such components, however, are not well established relative to the desired service life of 30 years. Specific reliability issues may include: reduced optical transmittance, discoloration, hazing, surface erosion, embrittlement, crack growth, physical aging, shape setting (warpage), and soiling. The initial results for contemporary lens- and material-specimens aged cumulatively to 6 months are presented. The study here uses an environmental chamber equipped with a xenon-arc lamp to age specimens at least 8x the nominal field rate. A broad range in the affected characteristics (including optical transmittance, yellowness index, mass loss, and contact angle) has been observed to date, depending on the formulation of PMMA used. The most affected specimens are further examined in terms of their visual appearance, surface roughness (examined via atomic force microscopy), and molecular structure (via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy).

Miller, D. C.; Gedvilas, L. M.; To, B.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Association Behavior of Poly(methacrylic acid)-block-Poly(methyl methacrylate) in Aqueous Medium: Potentiometric and Laser Light Scattering Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP) technique was used to synthesize poly(methacrylic acid-block-methyl methacrylate) (P(MAA???-b-MMA??)) copolymer in order to study the aggregation behavior in aqueous solution ...

Palaniswamy, R.

124

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application-Ch 6Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent Adduct Chemical Ionization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application-Ch 6 Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent Adduct Chemical Ionization Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Book

125

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 6 Structural Characterization of CLA Methyl Esters with Acetonitrile Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 6 Structural Characterization of CLA Methyl Esters with Acetonitrile Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition

126

Laboratory and tentative interstellar detection of trans-methyl formate using the publicly available Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotational spectrum of the higher-energy trans conformational isomer of methyl formate has been assigned for the first time using several pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometers in the 6-60 GHz frequency range. This species has also been sought toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud using the publicly available PRIMOS survey from the Green Bank Telescope. We detect seven absorption features in the survey that coincide with laboratory transitions of trans-methyl formate, from which we derive a column density of 3.1 (+2.6, -1.2) \\times 10^13 cm-2 and a rotational temperature of 7.6 \\pm 1.5 K. This excitation temperature is significantly lower than that of the more stable cis conformer in the same source but is consistent with that of other complex molecular species recently detected in Sgr B2(N). The difference in the rotational temperatures of the two conformers suggests that they have different spatial distributions in this source. As the abundance of trans-methyl formate is far higher ...

Neill, Justin L; Zaleski, Daniel P; Steber, Amanda L; Pate, Brooks H; Lattanzi, Valerio; Spezzano, Silvia; McCarthy, Michael C; Remijan, Anthony J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Photochemistry of Methyl Bromide on the ?-Cr2O3(0001) Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photochemical properties of the Cr-terminated ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface were explored using methyl bromide (CH3Br) as a probe molecule. CH3Br adsorbed and desorbed molecularly from the Cr-terminated ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface without detectable thermal decomposition. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) revealed a CH3Br desorption state at 240 K for coverages up to 0.5 ML, followed by more weakly bound molecules desorbing at 175 K for coverages up to 1 ML. Multilayer exposures led to desorption at ~130 K. The CH3Br sticking coefficient was unity at 105 K for coverages up to monolayer saturation, but decreased as the multilayer formed. In contrast, pre-oxidation of the surface (using an oxygen plasma source) led to capping of surface Cr3+ sites and near complete removal of CH3Br TPD states above 150 K. The photochemistry of chemisorbed CH3Br was explored on the Cr-terminated surface using post-irradiation TPD and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). Irradiation of adsorbed CH3Br with broad band light from a Hg arc lamp resulted in both photodesorption and photodecomposition of the parent molecule at a combined cross section of ~10-22 cm2. Parent PSD was indicative of molecular photodesorption, but CH3 was also detected in PSD and Br atoms were left on the surface, both reflective of photo-induced CH3-Br bond dissociation. Use of a 385 nm cut-off filter effectively shut down the photodissociation pathway but not the parent molecule photodesorption process. From these observations it is inferred that d-to-d transitions in ?-Cr2O3, occurring at photon energies <3 eV, are not responsible for photodecomposition of 2 adsorbed CH3Br. It is unclear to what extent band-to-band versus direct CH3Br photolysis play in CH3-Br bond dissociation initiated by more energetic photons.

Henderson, Michael A.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Microhydration Effects on the Intermediates of the SN2 Reacation of Iodide Anion with Methyl Iodine  

SciTech Connect

Reactions of halide anions with methyl halides (X- + CH3Y ? XCH3 + Y-) are bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions that have been well investigated in the last few decades.[1] Figure 1 shows typical potential energy surfaces (PESs) proposed for symmetric (X- + CH3X ? XCH3 + X-) SN2 reactions along the reaction coordinate. In the gas phase, the PES has two minima corresponding to the stable X-(CH3X) complexes.[2] The PES is substantially distorted by the solvation. Since the negative charge is delocalized over the [X•••CH3•••X]- moiety at the transition state the stabilization energy gained by the solvation is smaller for the transition state than that for the (X- + CH3X) reactants or the X- (CH3X) complexes. In solution, a large potential barrier exists between the reactants and products. The rate constants of these reactions in protic solvents were reported to be a few orders of magnitude smaller than those in aprotic solvents; this trend was explained by the formation of solvation shells of protic molecules around the halide anions.[1,3] Morokuma has previously reported a theoretical study on the PES of the (Cl- + CH3Cl ? ClCH3 + Cl-) SN2 reaction with a few H2O molecules. The attachment of H2O molecules to the Cl-(CH3Cl) reactive system produces metastable isomers, which affect the reaction mechanism.[4] Johnson and coworkers extensively investigated the structure and reactions of halide anion complexes in the gas phase using photodissociation spectroscopy.

Doi, Keisuke; Togano, Eijiro; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Nakanishi, Ryuzo; Nagata, Takashi; Ebata, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yoshiya

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Photodissociation of methyl iodide adsorbed on low-temperature amorphous ice surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Photodissociation dynamics of methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) adsorbed on both amorphous solid water (ASW) and porous amorphous solid water (PASW) has been investigated. The ejected ground-state I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and excited-state I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) photofragments produced by 260- and 290-nm photons were detected using laser resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. In contrast to gas-phase photodissociation, (i) the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) photofragment is favored compared to I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) at both wavelengths, (ii) I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) have velocity distributions that depend upon ice morphology, and (iii) I{sub 2} is produced on ASW. The total iodine [I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})+I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})+I{sub 2}] yield varies with substrate morphology, with greater yield from ASW than PASW using both 260- and 290-nm photons. Temperature-programmed desorption studies demonstrate that ice porosity enhances the trapping of adsorbed CH{sub 3}I, while pore-free ice likely allows monomer adsorption and the formation of two-dimensional CH{sub 3}I clusters. Reactions or collisions involving these clusters, I atomic fragments, or I-containing molecular fragments at the vacuum-surface interface can result in I{sub 2} formation.

DeSimone, Alice J.; Olanrewaju, Babajide O.; Grieves, Gregory A. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States); Orlando, Thomas M. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm. Oxidative damage has been involved in the genotoxic and reproductive effects of OP. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Me-Pa on spermatozoa function and ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. DNA damage was evaluated by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (percentDFI); lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production; sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR); mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 flurochrome; and, fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Results showed alterations in DNA integrity (percentDFI and NT-positive cells) at 7 and 28 dpt, in addition to decreased sperm quality and a decrease in induced-AR; reduced MMP and LPO was observed only at 7 dpt. We found negative correlations between LPO and all sperm alterations. Altered sperm functional parameters were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times, evaluated either in vitro or in vivo. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism ofthe detrimental effects of Me-Pa in male germ cells.

Pina-Guzman, Belem; Sanchez-Gutierrez, M.; Marchetti, Francesco; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Solis-Heredia, M.J .; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

List of Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins Acrylonitr ile Aniline Arsenic and its compounds Benzene Benzo(a)pyrene Beryllium Boric acid (Boron) Cadmium and its compounds Carbon monoxide Chlordecone (Kepone) Chloroform Chloroprene Dibromochloropropane (DBCP) Dichlorobenzene 1,1-Dichloroethane Dichloromethane Dioxane Epichlorohydrin Ethylene Dibromide Ethylene Dichloride Ethylene Oxide Fluorocarbons Formaldehyde Formamides Lead (Organic) Manganese and its compounds Mercury and its compounds (Inorganic) Methyl n-butyl ketone Methyl chloroform Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) Nitrogen Dioxide Ozone Platinum and its compounds Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) Polychlorinated bipenyls (PCB) Selenium and its compounds Styrene Tellurium and its compounds Tetr achloroethylene

133

Weak maser emission of methyl formate toward Sagittarius B2(N) in the Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-LTE radiative transfer treatment of cis-methyl formate (HCOOCH3) rotational lines is presented for the first time using a set of theoretical collisional rate coefficients. These coefficients have been computed in the temperature range 5-30 K by combining coupled-channel scattering calculations with a high accuracy potential energy surface for HCOOCH3-He. The results are compared to observations toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud using the publicly available PRIMOS survey from the Green Bank Telescope. A total of 49 low-lying transitions of methyl formate, with upper levels below 25 K, are identified. These lines are found to probe a presumably cold (~30 K), moderately dense (~1e4 cm-3) and extended region surrounding Sgr B2(N). The derived column density of ~4e14 cm-2 is only a factor of ~10 larger than the column density of the trans conformer in the same source. Provided that the two conformers have the same spatial distribution, this result suggests that strongly non-equilibrium processes m...

Faure, Alexandre; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Wiesenfeld, Laurent

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Experimental investigation of size effect on thermal conductivity for ultra-thin amorphous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to determine whether a “size effect” phenomenon for one particular thermophysical property, thermal conductivity, actually exists for amorphous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films with thicknesses ranging from 40 nm to 2 ?m. This was done by using a non-contact, non-invasive, in-situ Transient Thermo-Reflectance (TTR) laser based technique. The results demonstrated that the intrinsic thermal conductivity of a 40 nm PMMA film deposited on native oxide of silicon increases by a factor of three over bulk PMMA values, and a distinct increase in the thermal conductivity of PMMA film was observed in ultra-thin (sub 100 nm) films. This confirmed the importance of film thickness for the through-plane thermal conductivity value of PMMA film on native oxide of silicon.

Kim, Ick Chan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Copper(II) bis [2-((E)-2-(pyrid-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenolate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new complex CuL{sub 2} [HL = 2-((E)-(2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol] was synthesized, and its structure (C{sub 28}H{sub 22}Br{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}CuN{sub 4}O{sub 2}, Mr = 740.76) was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystal belongs to the triclinic system, space group P1{sup -}, with a = 5.157(6), b = 12.090(1), c =12.310(1) A, {alpha} = 113.962(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 96.7910(10) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 90.0300(10) Degree-Sign , V = 695.4(8) A{sup 3}, Z = 1, R = 0.0481. The complex molecules are linked via the weak C-H...N hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of one dimension (1D) chains along the a axis.

Zhang, X. L., E-mail: zhangxinli6008@163.com [Baoji University of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

(E)-2-[(2-Bromophenylimino)methyl]-5-methoxyphenol: X-ray and DFT-calculated structures  

SciTech Connect

The crystal structure of (E)-2-[(2-Bromophenylimino)methyl]-5-methoxyphenol is determined by using X-ray diffraction and then the molecular structure is investigated with density functional theory (DFT). X-Ray study shows that the title compound has a strong intramolecular O-H-N hydrogen bond and three dimensional crystal structure is primarily determined by C-H-{pi} and weak van der Waals interactions. The strong O-H-N bond is an evidence of the preference for the phenol-imine tautomeric form in the solid state. Optimized molecular geometry is calculated with DFT at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The IR spectra of compound were recorded experimentally and calculated to compare with each other. The results from both experiment and theoretical calculations are compared in this study.

Kosar, B., E-mail: bkosar@omu.edu.tr; Albayrak, C. [Sinop University, Faculty of Education (Turkey); Odabasoglu, M. [Pamukkale University, Chemistry Program (Turkey); Bueyuekguengoer, O. [Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

In situ synthesis of poly (methyl methacrylate)/SiO2 hybrid nanocomposites via "Grafting Onto" strategy based on UV irradiation in the presence of iron aqueous solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poly(methyl methacrylate)/SiO2 (PMMA/SiO2) hybrid composites were prepared via "grafting onto" strategy based on UV irradiation in the presence of iron aqueous solution. Two steps were used to graft polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) ...

Hong Zhang; Chao Li; Jinshan Guo; Limin Zang; Jiahe Luo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Statistical thermodynamics of 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal Prasenjit Seal, Ewa Papajak, Tao Yu, and Donald G. Truhlar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical thermodynamics of 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal Prasenjit Seal, Ewa-body decomposition of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene J. Chem. Phys. 136, and butanal Prasenjit Seal, Ewa Papajak, Tao Yu, and Donald G. Truhlara) Department of Chemistry

Truhlar, Donald G

140

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Structural and chemical properties of the nitrogen-rich energetic material triaminoguanidinium 1-methyl-5-nitriminotetrazolate under pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structural and chemical properties of the bi-molecular, hydrogen-bonded, nitrogen-rich energetic material triaminoguanidinium 1-methyl-5-nitriminotetrazolate C{sub 3}H{sub 12}N{sub 12}O{sub 2} (TAG-MNT) have been investigated at room pressure and under high pressure isothermal compression using powder x-ray diffraction and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. A stiffening of the equation of state and concomitant structural relaxation between 6 and 14 GPa are found to correlate with Raman mode disappearances, frequency discontinuities, and changes in the pressure dependence of modes. These observations manifest the occurrence of a reversible martensitic structural transformation to a new crystalline phase. The onset and vanishing of Fermi resonance in the nitrimine group correlate with the stiffening of the equation of state and phase transition, suggesting a possible connection between these phenomena. Beyond 15 GPa, pressure induces irreversible chemical reactions, culminating in the formation of a polymeric phase by 60 GPa.

McWilliams, R. Stewart; Kadry, Yasmin; Mahmood, Mohammad F.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer (Howard); (CIW); (USARL)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dose-response analysis of infants prenatally exposed to methyl mercury: An application of a single compartment model to single-strand hair analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of estimating fetal exposure is used in a dose-response analysis of data from the 1971 outbreak of methyl mercury poisoning in rural Iraq. An X-ray fluorescence instrument for the measurement of single strands of human hair was employed to obtain longitudinal profiles recapitulating fetal exposure. Logit and hockey-stick models as well as nonparametric smoothing are used to describe data on delayed development and central nervous system abnormality.

Cox, C.; Clarkson, T.W.; Marsh, D.O.; Amin-Zaki, L.; Tikriti, S.; Myers, G.G. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, New York, NY (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Formation of methyl ester of 2-methylglyceric acid from thymine glycol residues: a convenient new method for determining radiation damage to DNA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thymine glycol residues in DNA or thymidine were converted to methyl 2-methylglycerate by reaction with alkaline borohydride followed by methanolic HCl. The product was labeled either from (/sup 3/H)DNA or from (/sup 3/H)borohydride and was followed by cochromatography with authentic /sup 14/C-labeled material. Following acid hydrolysis, the identity of 2-methylglyceric acid was confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry, NMR, IR, and elemental analysis. Treatment of DNA or thymidine with X-irradiation, with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and Fe/sup 2 +/, with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Cu/sup 2 +/, and ascorbate, and with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and ultraviolet light, permanganate, or sonication all produced methyl 2-methylglycerate in varying amounts after alkaline borohydride and methanolic HCl, whereas untreated DNA did not. The data indicate that certain oxidants including hydroxyl radicals generated by chemical means or from radiolysis of water convert thymine residues to thymine glycols in DNA, which can be determined as methyl 2-methylglycerate.

Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J.

1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

Accurate and Reliable Quantification of Total Microalgal Fuel Potential as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters by in situ Transesterfication  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the context of algal biofuels, lipids, or better aliphatic chains of the fatty acids, are perhaps the most important constituents of algal biomass. Accurate quantification of lipids and their respective fuel yield is crucial for comparison of algal strains and growth conditions and for process monitoring. As an alternative to traditional solvent-based lipid extraction procedures, we have developed a robust whole-biomass in situ transesterification procedure for quantification of algal lipids (as fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) that (a) can be carried out on a small scale (using 4-7 mg of biomass), (b) is applicable to a range of different species, (c) consists of a single-step reaction, (d) is robust over a range of different temperature and time combinations, and (e) tolerant to at least 50% water in the biomass. Unlike gravimetric lipid quantification, which can over- or underestimate the lipid content, whole biomass transesterification reflects the true potential fuel yield of algal biomass. We report here on the comparison of the yield of FAMEs by using different catalysts and catalyst combinations, with the acid catalyst HCl providing a consistently high level of conversion of fatty acids with a precision of 1.9% relative standard deviation. We investigate the influence of reaction time, temperature, and biomass water content on the measured FAME content and profile for 4 different samples of algae (replete and deplete Chlorella vulgaris, replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and replete Nannochloropsis sp.). We conclude by demonstrating a full mass balance closure of all fatty acids around a traditional lipid extraction process.

Laurens, L. M. L.; Quinn, M.; Van Wychen, S.; Templeton, D. W.; Wolfrum, E. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Acid-base properties, deactivation, and in situ regeneration of condensation catalysts for synthesis of methyl methacrylate  

SciTech Connect

Condensation reaction of a propionate with formaldehyde is a novel route for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The reaction mechanism involves a proton abstraction from the propionate on the basic sites and activation of the aliphatic aldehyde on the acidic sites of the catalyst. The acid-base properties of ternary V-Si-P oxide catalysts and their relation to the NWA yield in the vapor phase condensation of formaldehyde with propionic anhydride has been studied for the first time. Five different V-Si-P catalysts with different atomic ratios of vanadium, silicon, and phosphorous were synthesized, characterized, and tested in a fixed-bed microreactor system. A V-Si-P 1:10:2.8 catalyst gave the maximum condensation yield of 56% based on HCHO fed at 300{degrees}C and 2 atm and at a space velocity of 290 cc/g cat{center_dot}h. A parameter called the ``q-ratio`` has been defined to correlate the condensation yields to the acid-base properties. The correlation of q-ratio with the condensation yield shows that higher q-ratios are more desirable. The long-term deactivation studies on the V-Si-P 1: 10:2.8 catalyst at 300{degrees}C and 2 atm and at a space velocity of 290 cc/g cat{center_dot}h show that the catalyst activity drops by a factor of nearly 20 over a 180 h period. The activity can be restored to about 78% of the initial activity by a mild oxidative regeneration at 300{degrees}C and 2 atm. The performance of V-Si-P catalyst has been compared to a Ta/SiO{sub 2} catalyst. The Ta- catalyst is more stable and has a higher on-stream catalyst life.

Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J. [Reseach Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Zoeller, J.R. [Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

INSIGHTS INTO SURFACE HYDROGENATION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: OBSERVATIONS OF METHANIMINE AND METHYL AMINE IN Sgr B2(N)  

SciTech Connect

Multiple observations of methanimine (CH{sub 2}NH) and methyl amine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) have been performed toward Sgr B2(N) at 1, 2, and 3 mm using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. In the frequency range 68-280 GHz, 23 transitions of CH{sub 2}NH and 170 lines of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2} have been observed as individual, distinguishable features, although some are partially blended with other lines. For CH{sub 2}NH, the line profiles indicate V{sub LSR} = 64.2 {+-} 1.4 km s{sup -1} and {Delta}V{sub 1/2} = 13.8 {+-} 2.8 km s{sup -1}, while V{sub LSR} = 63.7 {+-} 1.6 km s{sup -1} and {Delta}V{sub 1/2} = 15.1 {+-} 3.0 km s{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}, parameters that are very similar to those of other organic species in Sgr B2(N). From these data, rotational diagrams were constructed for both species. In the case of CH{sub 2}NH, a rotational temperature of T{sub rot} = 44 {+-} 13 K and a column density of N{sub tot} = (9.1 {+-} 4.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} were determined from the analysis. For CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}, T{sub rot} = 159 {+-} 30 K and N{sub tot} = (5.0 {+-} 0.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, indicating that this species is present in much warmer gas than CH{sub 2}NH. The fractional abundances for CH{sub 2}NH and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2} were established to be f (H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} and f (H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, respectively. It has been proposed that CH{sub 2}NH is formed on grains via hydrogenation of HCN; further hydrogenation of CH{sub 2}NH on surfaces leads to CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}. However, given the dissimilarity between the rotational temperatures and distributions of CH{sub 2}NH and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2} in Sgr B2, it is improbable that these species are closely related synthetically, at least in this source. Both CH{sub 2}NH and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2} are more likely created by neutral-neutral processes in the gas phase.

Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M. [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, Arizona Radio Observatory and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, Arizona Radio Observatory and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ilyushin, V. V., E-mail: halfendt@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: lziurys@as.arizona.edu [Institute of Radio Astronomy of the National Academy of Sciences Ukraine, Chervonopraporna 4, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Discovery of 5-[[4-[(2,3-Dimethyl-2H-indazol-6-yl)methylamino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]-2-methyl-benzenesulfonamide (Pazopanib), a Novel and Potent Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway has emerged as one of the most promising new approaches for cancer therapy. We describe herein the key steps starting from an initial screening hit leading to the discovery of pazopanib, N{sup 4}-(2,3-dimethyl-2H-indazol-6-yl)-N{sup 4}-methyl-N{sup 2}-(4-methyl-3-sulfonamidophenyl)-2,4-pyrimidinediamine, a potent pan-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor under clinical development for renal-cell cancer and other solid tumors.

Harris, Philip A.; Boloor, Amogh; Cheung, Mui; Kumar, Rakesh; Crosby, Renae M.; Davis-Ward, Ronda G.; Epperly, Andrea H.; Hinkle, Kevin W.; Hunter, III, Robert N.; Johnson, Jennifer H.; Knick, Victoria B.; Laudeman, Christopher P.; Luttrell, Deirdre K.; Mook, Robert A.; Nolte, Robert T.; Rudolph, Sharon K.; Szewczyk, Jerzy R.; Truesdale, Anne T.; Veal, James M.; Wang, Liping; Stafford, Jeffrey A. (GSKNC)

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

149

CASTING SLIPS FOR FABRICATION OF REFRACTORY METAL WARE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is given for slip casting tungsten metal. The composition consists essentially of tungsten metal with an average particle size of 0.9 micron, an organic vehicle such as methyl chloroform, o-xylene, n-butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, and 1, 1, 2, 2-tetrachlorethane, and a suspending agent such as ethyl cellulose, with the approximate ratio of said vehicle to the tungsten metal being 12 cc of a solution containing from 5 to about 20 grams of said ethyl cellulose in 400 cc of said organic vehicle per 100 grams of metal. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity  

SciTech Connect

Seven water-soluble, tetradentate bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO) ligands were synthesized that vary only in linker geometry and rigidity. Solution phase thermodynamic measurements were conducted between pH 1.6 and pH 9.0 to determine the effects of these variations on proton and uranyl cation affinity. Proton affinity decreases by introduction of the solubilizing triethylene glycol group as compared to un-substituted reference ligands. Uranyl affinity was found to follow no discernable trends with incremental geometric modification. The butyl-linked 4Li-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand exhibited the highest uranyl affinity, consistent with prior in vivo decorporation results. Of the rigidly-linked ligands, the o-phenylene linker imparted the best uranyl affinity to the bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand platform.

Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Mathematical simulation and X-ray diffraction investigation of the crystal structure of 1-phenyl-1-tert-butyl-3-methyl-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran  

SciTech Connect

An algorithm for using a priori generation of crystal structures by the discrete modeling method for the interpretation of data obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments is considered. The crystal structure of 1-phenyl-1-tert-butyl-3-methyl-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran is mathematically simulated using the discrete modeling of molecular packings and studied by X-ray diffraction. The simulation is performed for two isomers of the initial chemical compound that are possible from the viewpoint of the mechanism of the chemical reaction used in the synthesis of this compound. Appropriate models that can serve as starting models for solving and refining the crystal structure with the use of X-ray diffraction data are chosen from a complete set of calculated structural models in accordance with specific criteria. The structure is solved using a starting model calculated using the discrete modeling method and refined by the full-matrix least-squares procedure.

Maleev, A. V., E-mail: andr_mal@mail.ru; Zhitkov, I. K.; Potekhin, K. A. [Vladimir State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death  

SciTech Connect

Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid implicated in multiple diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Information on the toxicity of homocysteine in motor neurons is limited and few studies have examined how this toxicity can be modulated. In NSC-34D cells (a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma), homocysteine induces apoptotic cell death in the millimolar range with a TC{sub 50} (toxic concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is achieved) of 2.2 mM, confirmed by activation of caspase 3/7. Induction of apoptosis was independent of short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Methyl Vitamin B12 (MeCbl) and methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), used clinically to treat elevated homocysteine levels, were tested for their ability to reverse homocysteine-mediated motor neuron cell death. MeCbl in the micromolar range was able to provide neuroprotection (2 h pretreatment prior to homocysteine) and neurorescue (simultaneous exposure with homocysteine) against millimolar homocysteine with an IC{sub 50} (concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is inhibited) of 0.6 {mu}M and 0.4 {mu}M, respectively. In contrast, MTHF (up to 10 {mu}M) had no effect on homocysteine-mediated cell death. MeCbl inhibited caspase 3/7 activation by homocysteine in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas MTHF had no effect. We conclude that MeCbl is effective against homocysteine-induced cell death in motor neurons in a ROS-independent manner, via a reduction in caspase activation and apoptosis. MeCbl decreases Hcy induced motor neuron death in vitro in a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma and may play a role in the treatment of late stage ALS where HCy levels are increased in animal models of ALS.

Hemendinger, Richelle A., E-mail: richelle.hemendinger@carolinashealthcare.org; Armstrong, Edward J.; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Comparative aromatic hydroxylation and N-demethylation of MPTP neurotoxin and its analogs, N-methylated {beta}-carboline and isoquinoline alkaloids, by human cytochrome P450 2D6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin is a chemical inducer of Parkinson's disease (PD) whereas N-methylated {beta}-carbolines and isoquinolines are naturally occurring analogues of MPTP involved in PD. This research has studied the oxidation of MPTP by human CYP2D6 (CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 allelic variants) as well as by a mixture of cytochrome P450s-resembling HLM, and the products generated compared with those afforded by human monoamine oxidase (MAO-B). MPTP was efficiently oxidized by CYP2D6 to two main products: MPTP-OH (p-hydroxylation) and PTP (N-demethylation), with turnover numbers of 10.09 min{sup -1} and K {sub m} of 79.36 {+-} 3 {mu}M (formation of MPTP-OH) and 18.95 min{sup -1} and K {sub m} 69.6 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (PTP). Small amounts of dehydrogenated toxins MPDP{sup +} and MPP{sup +} were also detected. CYP2D6 competed with MAO-B for the oxidation of MPTP. MPTP oxidation by MAO-B to MPDP{sup +} and MPP{sup +} toxins (bioactivation) was up to 3-fold higher than CYP2D6 detoxification to PTP and MPTP-OH. Several N-methylated {beta}-carbolines and isoquinolines were screened for N-demethylation (detoxification) that was not significantly catalyzed by CYP2D6 or the P450s mixture. In contrast, various {beta}-carbolines were efficiently hydroxylated to hydroxy-{beta}-carbolines by CYP2D6. Thus, N(2)-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-{beta}-carboline (a close MPTP analog) was highly hydroxylated to 6-hydroxy-N(2)-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-{beta}-carboline and a corresponding 7-hydroxy-derivative. Thus, CYP2D6 could participate in the bioactivation and/or detoxification of these neuroactive compounds by an active hydroxylation pathway. The CYP2D6*1 enzymatic variant exhibited much higher metabolism of both MPTP and N(2)-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-{beta}-carboline than the CYP2D6*10 variant, highlighting the importance of CYP2D6 polymorphism in the oxidation of these toxins. Altogether, these results suggest that CYP2D6 can play an important role in the metabolic outcome of both MPTP and {beta}-carbolines.

Herraiz, Tomas [Spanish Council for Scientific Research. CSIC. Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: therraiz@ifi.csic.es; Guillen, Hugo [Spanish Council for Scientific Research. CSIC. Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Aran, Vicente J. [Spanish Council for Scientific Research. CSIC. Instituto de Quimica Medica. Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006. Madrid (Spain); Idle, Jeffrey R. [Institute of Pharmacology, 1st Faculty of Medicine Charles University. Albertov 4, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Gonzalez, Frank J. [Laboratory of Metabolism, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Investigation into the Nazarov Cyclization of Aryl Dienyl Ketones and Synthetic Studies Toward Tetrapetalone A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pH were obtained by Color pHast® Indi- cator Strips pH = 0 –pH were obtained by Color pHast ® Indicator Strips pH = 0 –pH were obtained by Color pHast® Indicator Strips pH = 0 –

Marcus, Andrew Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Lithium Enolates of Simple Ketones: Structure Determination Using the Method of Continuous Variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chem. 1985, 30, 586. (h) Ball, S. C.; Cragg-Hine, I.; Davidson, M. G.; Davies, R. P.; Lopez-Solera, M

Collum, David B.

156

Pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the dopamine receptor agonist 5-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-di-n-propylaminotetralin (DK-118) in the cat  

SciTech Connect

The dopamine receptor agonist 5-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-di-n-propylaminotetralin (DK-118) lowers blood pressure, heart rat and inhibits tachycardia induced in cats by electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerves innervating the heart. DK-118, unlike most of its chemically related dopaminergic analogs, exhibits a slow onset of activity suggesting that one or more metabolites of the drug may be responsible for its pharmacologic effects. The purpose of the work described in this thesis was to gain information regarding the possible bioactivation of DK-118 in cats. In one series of experiments, cats were pretreated with inhibitors of drug metabolism, metyrapone or SKF 525-A, and alterations of the pharmacologic effects of DK-118 determined. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay-using electrochemical detection was developed to quantify urine and plasma concentrations of DK-118 in control, metyrapone pretreated and SKF 525-A pretreated cats. Urinary metabolites of (/sup 14/C)DK-118 were identified employing HPLC, GC/MS and FAB/MS. Pharmacologic activity and receptor binding of selected metabolites were determined. Data presented in this thesis are consistent with the hypothesis that metabolites contribute to some of the pharmacologic effects of DK-118.

Koons, J.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Synthesis and Coordination Properties of Trifluoromethyl Decorated Derivatives of 2,6-Bis[(diphenylphosphinoyl)methyl]pyridine N-Oxide Ligands with Lanthanide Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphinoyl Grignard-based substitutions on 2,6-bis(chloromethyl)pyridine followed by N-oxidation of the intermediate 2,6-bis(phosphinoyl)methyl pyridine compounds with mCPBA give the target trifunctional ligands 2,6-bis[bis-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine 1-oxide (2a) and 2,6-bis[bis-(3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine 1-oxide (2b) in high yields. The ligands have been spectroscopically characterized, the molecular structures confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods and the coordination chemistry surveyed with lanthanide nitrates. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses are described for the coordination complexes Nd(2a)(NO3)3, Nd(2a)(NO3)3 (CH3CN)0.5, Eu(2a)(NO3)3 and Nd(2b)(NO3)3 (H2O)1.25; in each case the ligand binds in a tridentate mode to the Ln(III) cation. These structures are compared with the structures found for lanthanide coordination complexes of the parent NOPOPO ligand, [Ph2P(O)CH2]2C5H3NO.

Pailloux, Sylvie [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Shirima, Cornel Edicome [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Ray, Alicia D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Duesler, Eileen N. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Paine, Robert T. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Klaehn, John D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); McIlwain, Michael E [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) ligands was synthesized, and their respective uranyl complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. These structures were inspected for high-energy conformations and evaluated using a series of metrics to measure co-planarity of chelating moieties with each other and the uranyl coordination plane, as well as to measure coordinative crowding about the uranyl dication. Both very short (ethyl, 3,4-thiophene and o-phenylene) and very long ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}-m-xylene and 1,8-fluorene) linkers provide optimal ligand geometries about the uranyl cation, resulting in planar, unstrained molecular arrangements. The planarity of the rigid linkers also suggests there is a degree of pre-organization for a planar coordination mode that is ideal for uranyl-selective ligand design. Comparison of intramolecular N{sub amide}-O{sub phenolate} distances and {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts of amide protons supports earlier results that short linkers provide the optimal geometry for intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Miller, R.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi [Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Miller, R.L. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi (Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Dependence of Donor:Acceptor Ratio on the Photovoltaic Performances of Blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells using blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl)(P3OT) and (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) have been fabricated. P3OT and PC{sub 71}BM were used as the electron donor (D) and acceptor (A), respectively. Both materials were mixed and dissolved in dichlorobenzene with three different D:A ratios i.e. 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 (weight) while maintained at the concentration of 2 wt%(26 mg/ml). The blended thin films were sandwiched between the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and the aluminum film. This paper reports the influence of donor:acceptor ratio on the performance of solar cell devices measured by current-voltage measurement both in the dark and under 1.5 AM solar illumination. It was found that all devices showed the photovoltaic effect with poor diode behavior and the donor:acceptor ratio significantly influenced on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

Fauzia, Vivi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Muhammad [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2010-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury P  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our long-term goal is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic heavy metal pollutants as an environmentally friendly alternative to physical remediation methods. We have focused this phytoremediation research on soil and water-borne ionic and methylmercury. Mercury pollution is a serious world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wild-life populations. Methylmercury, produced by native bacteria at mercury-contaminated wetland sites, is a particularly serious problem due to its extreme toxicity and efficient biomagnification in the food chain. We engineered several plant species (e.g., Arabidopsis, tobacco, canola, yellow poplar, rice) to express the bacterial genes, merB and/or merA, under the control of plant regulatory sequences. These transgenic plants acquired remarkable properties for mercury remediation. (1) Transgenic plants expressing merB (organomercury lyase) extract methylmercury from their growth substrate and degrade it to less toxic ionic mercury. They grow on concentrations of methylmercury that kill normal plants and accumulate low levels of ionic mercury. (2) Transgenic plants expressing merA (mercuric ion reductase) extract and electrochemically reduce toxic, reactive ionic mercury to much less toxic and volatile metallic mercury. This metal transformation is driven by the powerful photosynthetic reducing capacity of higher plants that generates excess NADPH using solar energy. MerA plants grow vigorously on levels of ionic mercury that kill control plants. Plants expressing both merB and merA degrade high levels of methylmercury and volatilize metallic mercury. These properties were shown to be genetically stable for several generations in the two plant species examined. Our work demonstrates that native trees, shrubs, and grasses can be engineered to remediate the most abundant toxic mercury pollutants. Building on these data our working hypothesis for the next grant period is that transgenic plants expressing the bacterial merB and merA genes will (a) remove mercury from polluted soil and water and (b) prevent methylmercury from entering the food chain. Our specific aims center on understanding the mechanisms by which plants process the various forms of mercury and volatilize or transpire mercury vapor. This information will allow us to improve the design of our current phytoremediation strategies. As an alternative to volatilizing mercury, we are using several new genes to construct plants that will hyperaccumulate mercury in above-ground tissues for later harvest. The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory have sites with significant levels of mercury contamination that could be cleaned by applying the scientific discoveries and new phytoremediation technologies described in this proposal. The knowledge and expertise gained by engineering plants to hyperaccumulate mercury can be applied to the remediation of other heavy metals pollutants (e.g., arsenic, cesium, cadmium, chromium, lead, strontium, technetium, uranium) found at several DOE facilities.

Meagher, Richard B.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Identifiable mercury methylation genes and enzymes ...  

be limited or unavailable. Patent applications directed towards this invention may not have been filed with any patent ... Disclosure Number 201202869 ...

164

Inter- and intracellular dynamics of DNA methylation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Spadola, E. Yuan, J. Kosek, L. Jiang, E. Hod, K. Li, V.A. Spadola, E. Yuan, J. Kosek, L. Jiang, E. Hod, K. Li, V.

Shoemaker, Robert Field

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

DNA methylation in early mammalian development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All the cells in the body contain the same genome yet showcase drastically different phenotypes. This is the result of different transcriptional programs, which are partly controlled by epigenetic modifications, including ...

Chan, Michelle M. (Michelle Mei Wah)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Phytogenic biosynthesis and emission of methyl acetate  

passing room air through a series of three high-purity hydro-carbon traps (Restek Inc., Bellefonte, PA, USA). ... Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy

167

Determination of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and tert-Butyl Alcohol in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction/Head Space Analysis in Comparison to EPA Method 5030/8260B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is now one of the most common groundwater contaminants in the United States. Groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also likely to be contaminated with tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), because TBA is a component of commercial grade MTBE, TBA can also be used as a fuel oxygenate, and TBA is a biodegradation product of MTBE. In California, MTBE is subject to reporting at concentrations greater than 3 {micro}g/L. TBA is classified as a ''contaminant of current interest'' and has a drinking water action level of 12 {micro}g/L. In this paper, we describe the development and optimization of a simple, automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) method for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water and demonstrate the applicability of this method for monitoring MTBE and TBA contamination in groundwater, drinking water, and surface water. In this method, the headspace (HS) of a water sample is extracted with a carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane SPME fiber, the MTBE and TBA are desorbed into a gas chromatograph (GC), and detected using mass spectrometry (MS). The method is optimized for the routine analysis of MTBE and TBA with a level of quantitation of 0.3 {micro}g/L and 4 {micro}g/L, respectively, in water. MTBE quantitation was linear for over two orders of concentration (0.3 {micro}g/L -80 {micro}g/L). TBA was found to be linear within the range of 4 {micro}g/L-7,900 {micro}g/L. The lower level of detection for MTBE is 0.03 {micro}g/L using this method. This SPME method using headspace extraction was found to be advantageous over SPME methods requiring immersion of the fiber into the water samples, because it prolonged the life of the fiber by up to 400 sample analyses. This is the first time headspace extraction SPME has been shown to be applicable to the measurement of both MTBE and TBA at concentrations below regulatory action levels. This method was compared with the certified EPA Method 5030/8260B (purge-and-trap/GC/MS) using split samples from laboratory bioreactors treating MTBE contaminated water and applied to environmental samples collected throughout the East Bay area of California. Results from the SPME-HS/GC/MS method were directly comparable to the EPA Method 5030/8260B. This method provides an simple, inexpensive, accurate, and sensitive alternative to EPA Method 5030/8260B for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water samples.

Oh, Keun-Chan; Stringfellow, William T.

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adipose) tissue from [72]. Data set 61 consists of humanheart tissue from [27]. Data set 62 consists of kidney (tissue from TCGA (KIRC). Data set 63 consists of liver (

Horvath, Steve

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

comprises a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Using bisulphite modification and quantitative real-time PCR, the method can be used to analyse a very large pool...

171

Study of methyl group rotations and primary relaxation in poly ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... experiment, we will start with a fixed window scan (FWS), covering the entire ... 4 K. The measurements performed here will cover a temperature ...

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Small RNAs, DNA methylation and transposable elements in wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reinhardtii by a DEAH-Box RNA helicase. Science 2000, 290:homolog of Werner syndrome helicase and RNaseD. Cell 1999,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A-61: Poly Methyl Methacrylate-Halloysite Composite Nanofibers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as Shielding Materials for Electromagnetic Interference and Radiation Shielding ... for Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators during Cold-Working Process.

174

Ultrastructural changes in rat hepatocytes following acute methyl mercury intoxication  

SciTech Connect

Male rats were given daily subcutaneous injections of methylmercuric chloride (CH/sub 3/HgCl) at a dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight for 4 days. The earliest ultrastructural changes consisted of dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, wavy transformation of the mitochondrial membranes and occasional accumulation of liposomes. Focal areas of cytoplasmic degradation were observed 1 day after the initial administration of mercury. An increased number of lysosomes as well as swelling and floccular degeneration of the mitochondria were frequently observed at 2 days. Sequestration of cytoplasmic organelles within the hepatocytes, extrusion of degenerated hepatic organelles and cytoplasmic debris into the sinusoid could be observed 24 hours after the initial mercury administration and became a frequent finding after 4 days of intoxication. (auth)

Desnoyers, P.A.; Chang, L.W.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

176

RESEARCH Open Access Kinetics of DNA methylation inheritance by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/G1 phase was superior to that seen in S phase, but not the observation that the number of the Dnmt1/ PPARg dots seen in S phase was superior to that seen in G2/M phase. Without explaining all variations-treated cells was due to an accumulation of p53. Acknowledgements We thank to Philippe Hulin for its technical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

The Esterification of Naphthenic Acids for Methyl Ester Production .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The remediation of tailings water, a by-product of bitumen extraction, is of utmost importance to the Athabasca oil sands industry due to its toxicity to… (more)

Dastjerdi, Zahra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene werepropane, propylene, n-butane, n-hexane, toluene, n-octaneas ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene and 30 m

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

Segal, Mark R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

An experimental design algorithm applied to study of methyl ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels proceeds by means of the ... to simulate these experiments, in this case the Jet Surrogate Fuel model. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

FLAME-SAMPLING PHOTOIONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY - FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Research focused on detailed studies of the complex combustion chemistry of oxygenated, bio-derived fuels. In particular, studies were done of the flame chemistry of simple methyl and ethyl esters chosen as surrogates for the long-chain esters that are primary constituents of biodiesel fuels. The principal goals of these studies were: (1) show how fuel-specific structural differences including degree of unsaturation, linear vs. branched chain structures, and methoxy vs. ethoxy functions affect fueldestruction pathways, (2) understand the chemistry leading to potential increases in the emissions of hazardous air pollutants including aldehydes and ketones inherent in the use of biodiesel fuels, and (3) define the key chemical reaction mechanisms responsible for observed reductions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and particulate matter when oxygenated fuels are used as replacements for conventional fuels.

Hansen, Nils

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

CATALYSTS FOR HIGH CETANE ETHERS AS DIESEL FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tungstena-zirconia (WZ) catalyst has been investigated for coupling methanol and isobutanol to unsymmetrical ethers, i.e. methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and compared with earlier studied sulfated-zirconia (SZ) and Nafion-H catalysts. In all cases, the ether synthesis mechanism is a dual site S{sub N}2 process involving competitive adsorption of reactants on proximal acid sites. At low reaction temperatures, methylisobutylether (MIBE) is the predominant product. However, at temperatures >135 C the WZ catalyst is very good for dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The surface acid sites of the WZ catalyst and a Nafion-H catalyst were diagnosed by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of N 1s shifts after adsorption of amines. Using pyridine, ethylenediamine, and triethylamine, it is shown that WZ has heterogeneous strong Broensted acid sites. Theoretical study located the transition state of the alcohol coupling reaction on proximal Broensted acid sites and accounted well for XPS core-level shifts upon surface acid-base interactions. While computations have not been carried out with WZ, it is shown that the SZ catalyst is a slightly stronger acid than CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}H (a model for Nafion-H) by 1.3-1.4 kcal/mol. A novel sulfated zirconia catalyst having proximal strong Broensted acid sites was synthesized and shown to have significantly enhanced activity and high selectivity in producing MIBE or isobutene from methanol/isobutanol mixtures. The catalyst was prepared by anchoring 1,2-ethanediol bis(hydrogen sulfate) salt precursor onto zirconium hydroxide, followed by calcination to remove the -(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2})- bridging residues.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Heock-Hoi Kwon; James G. C. Shen; Qisheng Ma; Robert A. Hunsicker; Andrew P. Butler; Scott J. Bollinger

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A novel meta-cleavage product hydrolase from Flavobacterium sp. ATCC27551  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organophosphate degrading (opd) gene cluster of plasmid pPDL2 of Flavobacterium sp. ATCC27551 contains a novel open-reading frame, orf243. This was predicted to encode an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase distantly related to the meta-fission product (MFP) hydrolases such as XylF, PhnD, and CumD. By homology modeling Orf243 has most of the structural features of MFP hydrolases including the characteristic active site catalytic triad. The purified protein (designated MfhA) is a homotetramer and shows similar affinity for 2-hydroxy-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoate (HOHD), 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (HMSA), and 2-hydroxy-5-methylmuconic semialdehyde (HMMSA), the meta-fission products of 3-methyl catechol, catechol, and 4-methyl catechol. The unique catalytic properties of MfhA and the presence near its structural gene of cis-elements required for transposition suggest that mfhA has evolved towards encoding a common hydrolase that can act on meta-fission products containing either aldehyde or ketone groups.

Khajamohiddin, Syed [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Babu, Pakala Suresh [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Chakka, Deviprasanna [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Merrick, Mike [Department of Molecular Microbiology, John Innes Centre, NR4 7UH Norwich (United Kingdom); Bhaduri, Anirban [National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, UAS-GKVK Campus, Bangalore 560065 (India); Sowdhamini, Ramanathan [National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, UAS-GKVK Campus, Bangalore 560065 (India); Siddavattam, Dayananda [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)]. E-mail: sdsl@uohyd.ernet.in

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

184

Oxygen scavenger/metal passivator reduces corrosion, toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haverhill Paper board, a Haverhill, MA manufacturer of recycled paperboard, generates about 120,000 lb/hr of 650 psi, 650/sup 0/F (superheated) steam. Boiler deposition and condensate return corrosion problems were always high on the list of things to avoid. A water treatment firm provided the solution with a recently developed oxygen scavenger. The new scavenger, a Chemical Processing Vaaler Award winner (Mid-November, 1986, p. 130), is a patented formulation containing methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO). The formulation is designed to provide protection comparable to hydrazine but without the toxicity concerns. Used in conjunction with the mechanical deaerator, MEKO scavenges the remaining 5-7 ppb of oxygen from the feed water, producing methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), N/sub 2/O, and water. High volatility gives it the ability to leave the boiler with the steam, protecting the entire generating system. MEKO also acts as a metal surface passivator, protecting iron surfaces from corrosion by forming passivated oxide films. In use since December, 1985, the MEKO-based oxygen scavenger has coupled with the other chemical and mechanical water treatment methods to maintain the boiler in operating condition. The MEKO is performing as well or better than the hydrazine at about the same cost - while avoiding the toxicity problem.

Barry, J.; Toy, D.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops  

SciTech Connect

An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

Sweeney, Lynn C.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January 1944--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

In work related to the design and construction of the Process Development Unit (PDU) this quarter involved further detail design and a real start to the construction activities. Status updates are given below for each discipline in the Task 2.0 and 3.0 headings. This work is progressing well. with the caveat of several small slips in the scheduling. On the catalyst development front this quarter was extremely productive. Many catalyst screening experiments were completed and they showed that control of the reaction exotherm is going to be quite challenging under PDU conditions. The presence of much more efficient reactor design and the ability to maintain closer to isothermal conditions is expected to give a significant advantage in actual PDU operation. A major concern at the moment is the cost of La in the catalyst being used. An action plan to remedy this is being put together.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

glutamate-activated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels have recently been de-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nA 2 -30 nA E DEPOL PULSE IOlnV I +2.0 nA ' 1 0.5 s Figure 7. Intracellular current injection during

Alford, Simon

188

he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/L. For the city's Char- nock well field, an initial review of known and sus- pected petroleum spill sites identified about 10 potential sources that lay within 1 km of the well field, lay above the hydrologic unit (LUFTs) and leaking pipelines, other sources of MTBE in groundwater include tank overfilling and faulty

189

3-Methyl-1-butanol production in Escherichia coli: random mutagenesis and two-phase fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioethanol production is an attractive option because of the high productivity and yield during fermentation.

Connor, Michael R.; Cann, Anthony F.; Liao, James C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

207_06 Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 ©2006 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be repro-

191

A comparative analysis of DNA methylation across human embryonic stem cell lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA (to SEJ and MP), and by the Department of Energy

Chen, Pao-Yang; Feng, Suhua; Joo, Jong; Jacobsen, Steve E; Pellegrini, Matteo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Outbreak of Minamata Disease (methyl mercury poisoning) in cats on northwestern Ontario Reserves  

SciTech Connect

Pathological, histochemical, and analytical studies have confirmed the presence of Minamata Disease in at least one of two cats that lived on or near Indian Reserves in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. These symptoms parallel the Japanese experience in the 1950s and raise ominous health considerations for the Indians who share their diet of fish. After being fed a diet that primarily consisted of fish from the English River, one cat developed such acute neurological symptoms as an ataxic gait, other abnormal movements, uncontrolled howling, and seizures. The total mercury analyses showed high levels in all tissues with 16.4 mg/kg in the brain comparable with symptomatic cats in Japan. A second cat that appeared normal had 6.9 mg/kg in its brain tissues, and pathological studies confirmed the presence of latent Minamata Disease.

Takeuchi, T. (Kumamoto Univ., Japan); D' Itri, F.M.; Fischer, P.V.; Annett, C.S.; Okabe, M.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Outbreak of minamata disease (methyl mercury poisoning) in cats on Northwestern Ontario reserves  

SciTech Connect

Pathological, histochemical, and analytical studies have confirmed the presence of Minamata Disease in at least one of two cats that lived on or near Indian Reserves in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. These symptoms parallel the Japanese experience in the 1950s and raise ominous health considerations for the Indians who share their diet of fish. After being fed a diet that primarily consisted of fish from the English River, one cat developed such acute neurological symptoms as an ataxic gait, other abnormal movements, uncontrolled howling, and seizures. The total mercury analyses showed high levels in all tissues with 16.4 mg/kg in the brain comparable with symptomatic cats in Japan. A second cat that appeared normal had 6.9 mg/kg in its brain tissues, and pathological studies confirmed the presence of latent Minamata Disease.

Takeuchi, T. (Kumamoto Univ., Japan); D' Itri, F.M.; Fischer, P.V.; Annett, C.S.; Okabe, M.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Vapors in Biotrickling Filters. 2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will controlled by diffusion in the biofilm near the outlet of the reactor. A fundamental parameter and control in bioreactors equipped with some degree of instrumentation, fundamental knowledge for the proper handbook of physical-chemical properties and environmental fate for organic chemicals, Volume III. Volatile

195

Thermal Decomposition of Methyl Butanoate: Ab Initio Study of a Biodiesel Fuel Surrogate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (1989a,b) from a molecular dynamics simulation of the measured structure factor results of Susman et al., and BOLLER,A.,1994, Thermochim. Acta, 238, 227. ZHANG,M., and BOOLCHAND,P.,1994, Science, 266, 1355. 1772

Violi, Angel

196

Aging effects on DNA methylation modules in human brain and blood tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes in chromosomes cause aging? Cell 1996, 86:9-12. 2.M: Cross-Talk between Aging and Cancer. Annals of the NewMF, Esteller M: Epigenetics and aging: the targets and the

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Type II restriction-modification system methylation subunit of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius  

SciTech Connect

Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering recombination inside or outside of a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and/or nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

Lee, Brady D; Newby, Deborah T; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Roberto, Francisco F; Reed, David W

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions from combustion of algae based methyl ester biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The advantages to using biodiesel in place of petroleum diesel are also accompanied by disadvantages. Biodiesel is usually made from crops that are also used… (more)

Fisher, Bethany Cheryl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Vapors in Biotrickling Filters. 1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, weed-eater, shovel, and a rake. A chipper, compost bin, or a large rented trash dumpster may be useful

200

Forest nurseries face critical choices with the loss of methyl bromide fumigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seedlings over mature composts in USDA Forest Serviceseedlings planted into compost-amended soil that had eitherbio- solid and bark-based composts had the highest average

Weiland, Jerry E; Littke, Will R; Haase, Diane L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Polyol-mediated synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods and nanocomposites with poly(methyl methacrylate)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnO nanorods (length 30-150 nm) were synthesized in di(ethylene glycol) using Zn(CH3COO)2 as a precursor and para-toluene sulphonic acid, p-TSA, as an end-capping agent. Increasing the concentration of p-TSA above 0.1M causes the ...

Alojz Anžlovar; Zorica Crnjak Orel; Ksenija Kogej; Majda Žigon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Inhibition of IFN-[gamma] promoter function by site-specific methylation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When they become activated, naive helper T cells are able to polarize into either THI cells or TH2 cells. Development of naive CD4+ T cells into TH1 cells is characterized by the expression of IFN-y and the silencing of ...

Jones, Brendan T. (Brendan Taber)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Characterization and research investigation of methanol and methyl fuels. Final progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on several aspects of using pure methanol as an alternate fuel are reported. A stock (OEM) Pinto engine mounted on a dynamometer was used to compare methanol with Indolene in terms of power, efficiency, and emissions for a variety of speeds and loads. Although the engine was designed for use with gasoline, it was found that methanol was generally superior in power, thermal efficiency and reduced emissions with the exception of aldehydes. Three different fuel metering systems were tested for a variety of speeds and loads using the dynamometer mounted engine. They were all found to provide superior steady state performance on methanol when compared with the OEM carburetor system with enlarged fuel jets for methanol. Mileage and emissions from a Pinto vehicle equipped with the various fuel metering systems were computer predicted for the Federal emissions test procedure using laboratory engine measurements. A computer was used to simulate the test engine's thermokinetic combustion events. The computer model predicts power, fuel economy and emissions with air-fuel ratio, compression ratio, spark advance and speed as parameters. A small (60 hp) gas turbine was converted to run on methanol. The conversion was easily accomplished, but atomization of the fuel was found to be important in obtaining a reduction in CO and NO/sub x/ for methanol in comparison with jet engine fuel. Environmental factors of marine and aquatic methanol spills and photochemical smog are under study. Preliminary experimentation relative to marine spills indicates that methanol is naturally present in that environment. It appears at this early stage of investigation that damage to the ecosystem from a major coastal spill may be localized and of short duration.

Pefley, R.K.; Browning, L.H.; Hornberger, M.L.; Likos, W.E.; McCormack, M.C.; Pullman, B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

3-Methyl-1-butanol production in Escherichia coli: random mutagenesis and two-phase fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interest in producing biofuels from renewable sources hasafter 60 h. Keywords Biofuels . Metabolic engineering .2008; Stephanopoulos 2007). Biofuels produced from renewable

Connor, Michael R.; Cann, Anthony F.; Liao, James C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Methyl-Substituted Phenols: Correlations of Kinetic Parameters with Molecular Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-of-the-art of using alternative, renewable, and/or novel feedstocks (such coal; biomass; oil shale; tar sands reserves, and heavy oil from tar sands or oil shale. These feedstock sources have been evaluated compounds into smaller molecules. Oil shale in Colorado has the potential to be a large scale domestic

Simons, Jack

206

ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome  

SciTech Connect

ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang (Harvard-Med); (Ottawa Hosp.); (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston); (Tsinghua); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome  

SciTech Connect

ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of neural networks-based controllers in batch polymerisation of methyl methacrylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of batch reactors in today's process industries cannot be overstated. Thus said, it is important to optimise their operation in order to consistently achieve products of high quality while minimising the production of undesirables. In ... Keywords: Batch polymerisation, Batch reactor control, Batch reactor optimisation

E. E. Ekpo; I. M. Mujtaba

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Carbon-catalyzed gasification of organic feedstocks in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spruce wood charcoal, macadamia shell charcoal, coal activated carbon, and coconut shell activated carbon catalyze the gasification of organic compounds in supercritical water. Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). The effects of temperature, pressure, reactant concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and the type of catalyst on the gasification of glucose are reported. Complete conversion of glucose (22% by weight in water) to a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas was realized at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 22.2 h{sup {minus}1} in supercritical water at 600 C, 34.5 MPa. Complete conversions of the whole biomass feeds were also achieved at the same temperature and pressure. The destruction efficiencies for the representative DoD wastes were also high. Deactivation of the carbon catalyst was observed after 4 h of operation without swirl in the entrance region of the reactor, but the carbon gasification efficiency remained near 100% for more than 6 h when a swirl generator was employed in the entrance of the reactor.

Xu, X.; Matsumura, Y.; Stenberg, J.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ENVIRONMENTAL CHAMBER STUDIES OF OZONE IMPACTS OF COATINGS VOCs Final Report to the California Air Resources Board Contract No. 07-339 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An environmental chamber and modeling study was conducted to reduce uncertainties in atmospheric ozone impacts for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from coatings. Some coatings VOCs (Texanol ® and low-aromatic petroleum distillates) have near-zero or negative incremental ozone reactivities in chamber experiments, but calculations show positive ozone impacts in the atmosphere. Modeling indicated that experiments with increased light intensity and added H2O2 should give reactivities that better correlate with those in the atmosphere. After upgrading our chamber’s light source, experiments to test the new method performed as expected, and gave good correlations between experimental and atmospheric MIR values for the VOCs tested. These experiments also appear to be more sensitive to effects of VOCs on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation than previous experiments. Such experiments should be included in future environmental chamber reactivity studies, though other types of experiments are also needed for adequate mechanism evaluation. Experiments were also conducted to assess ozone impacts of ethyl methyl ketone oxime (EMKO), and soy ester solvents. The EMKO results indicated it has both radical sinks and NOx sources in its mechanism, and has no measurable impact on SOA formation. The EMKO mechanism that simulated the data gave a negative MIR of-1.27 gm O3 /gm VOC, but positive MOIR and EBIR values of

William P. L. Carter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(poly (ether ether ketone)) Products ranging from membrane separation filters to heat transfer devices Not-for-profit research company, providing energy and natural gas...

214

Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Products  

controlled rate of catalysis, utilizing ozone for oxidation of alcohols to ketones or aldehydes, is made possible with this environmentally friendly and versatile technology.

215

Atmospheric variability of methyl chloride during the last 300 years from an Antarctic ice core and firn air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a low-pass filter, smoothing variations in the atmospheric composition of a gas over decadal time scales core measurements from Siple Dome provide evidence for a cyclic natural variability on the order of 10 increase measured in firn air may largely be a result of natural processes, which may continue to affect

Saltzman, Eric

216

Structure of trans-methyl 2-phenylhexahydro-2H-isoxazolo (2,3-a)-pyridine-3-carboxylate  

SciTech Connect

The title compound, a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition product, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2[sub 1]/c, with a = 8.199(3), b = 16.908(1), c = 10.248(2) [angstrom],[beta] = 93.58(2)[degrees] and Z = 4. The structure was solved by direct methods and refined by full matrix least squares methods to R = 0.038 for 1687 observed reflections. The stereochemistry of this compound was found to have the [open quotes]ee[close quotes] conformation in the solid state as well as in solution. The piperidine ring in the molecule is in the chair form and the isoxazolidine ring adopts an envelope conformation.

Ul-Haque, M.; Horne, W.; Ali, S.A. (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The role of mismatch repair in mediating cellular sensitivity to cisplatin : the Escherichia coli methyl-directed repair paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anticancer drug cisplatin is in widespread use but its mechanism of action is only poorly understood. Moreover, human cancers acquire resistance to the drug, which limits its clinical utility. A paradox in the field ...

Robbins, Jennifer L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Transcriptional response of O?-methylguanine methyltransferase deficient yeast to methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) of transcription factors and subsequently, induction of RNA processing (35% of genes incrementally induced) and kinases involved in protein phosphorylation. In the WT, the response was restricted to a transient ...

Rao, Anoop, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of benzene to phenol, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzeneof benzene to phenol (and catechol), and toluene toa multi-component PH, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and the meta-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Selective, On-Resin N-Methylation of Cyclic Peptides and Implications for the Discovery of Membrane Permeable Scaffolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

permission from Nat. Chem. Bio. 2011, 7, 810- 817. Copyrightpermission from Nat. Chem. Bio. 2011, 7, 810- 817. Copyright

White, Tina Renea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Diamond and Related Materials 7 (1998) 14911502 Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Sorensen, Model DCS bottom of the burner. No thermocouple was placed in 33-33). The substrate and heater-red optical pyrometer (Williamson, Model 8200), water and a microprocessor thermometer (Model HH23 in a flat copper, and water cooled via a 0.25-inch copper tubing soft-soldered to the burner body

Dandy, David

222

IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Research (NIPER), 2) the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA), and 3) the U interested in fuel comparisons Thousands each year Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA) National gasoline survey Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association 23 cities throughout the U.S. Summer of 1988

223

Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation at all human imprinted regions reveals preservation of epigenetic stability in adult somatic tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRAS3 (1) 60 80 100 at io n DIRAS3 (2) 60 80 100 at io n Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te Bl 0 20 40 % M et hy la Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te Bl 0 20 40 % M et hy la Tissue Tissue DIRAS3 (3) 100 ZDBF2 80 100 20 40 60 80 % M et hy la tio n 20 40 60 % M et hy... at io n SLC22A1 60 80 100 yl at io n Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te 0 20 40 Ti % M et hy Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te 0 20 40 Ti % M et hy ssue ssue SLC22A3 80 100 MEST (s) 80 100 20 40 60 % M et hy la tio n 20 40 60 % M et hy la tio n Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te 0...

Woodfine, Kathryn; Huddleston, Joanna E; Murrell, Adele

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by pure cultures of butane-degrading bacteria. Appl.of K s values for MTBE by butane- degrading bacteria (52).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Complexation of NpO2+ with N-methyl-iminodiacetic Acid: in Comparison with Iminodiacetic and Dipicolinic Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

element in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing because it couldthe development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles, there is an

Rao, Linfeng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluation of pyrethrin aerosol insecticide as an alternative to methyl bromide for pest control in flour mills.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of direct and indirect exposure scenarios, different degrees of residual flour, open and obstructed positions, and seasonal temperature… (more)

Kharel, Kabita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Friction and Wear Behaviors of (quinazolin-4-ones)-3-methyl-butyl Borate as Additive in Liquid Paraffin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been growing concern for the use of mineral oils because of the worldwide interest in environmental issues. This has promoted the use of ash less additives as environmental friendly lubricants. A potential ash less additive containing N, B, ... Keywords: Synthesis, Quinazolin-4-ones, Borate, Additive, Friction and wear behaviors

Ouyang Ping; Zhang Xianming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The dynamics of conformational isomerization in flexible biomolecules. I. Hole-filling spectroscopy of N-acetyl tryptophan methyl amide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

macrophytes. Assemblages with intermediate sized barbel and nase (100­200 mm TL), the larger size classes Cyprinidae of intermediate size classes (100­200 mm TL) as well as common carp and mosquitofish charac and intermediate sizes ( 200 mm TL) of the two benthic

Zwier, Timothy S.

230

Integrating Chemical Hazard Assessment into the Design of Inherently Safer Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive hazard associated with chemicals is a major safety issue in process industries. This kind of hazard has caused the occurrence of many accidents, leading to fatalities, injuries, property damage and environment pollution. Reactive hazards can be eliminated or minimized by applying Inherently Safer Design (ISD) principles such as "substitute" or "moderate" strategies. However, ISD would not be a feasible option for industry without an efficient methodology for chemical hazard assessment, which provides the technical basis for applying ISD during process design. In this research, a systematic chemical hazard assessment methodology was developed for assisting the implementation of ISD in the design of inherently safer process. This methodology incorporates the selection of safer chemicals and determination of safer process conditions, which correspond to "substitute" and "moderate" strategies in ISD. The application of this methodology in conjunction with ISD technique can effectively save the time and investment spent on the process design. As part of selecting safer chemicals, prediction models were developed for predicting hazardous properties of reactive chemicals. Also, a hazard index was adopted to rate chemicals according to reactive hazards. By combining the prediction models with the hazard index, this research can provide important information on how to select safer chemicals for the processes, which makes the process chemistry inherently safer. As part of determining safer process conditions, the incompatibility of Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide (MEKPO) with iron oxide was investigated. It was found that iron oxide at low levels has no impact on the reactive hazards of MEKPO as well as the operational safety. However, when iron oxide is beyond 0.3 wt%, it starts to change the kinetics of MEKPO runaway reaction and even the reaction mechanism. As a result, with the presence of a certain level of iron oxide (> 0.3 wt%), iron oxide can intensify the reactive hazards of MEKPO and impose higher risk to process operations. The investigation results can help to determine appropriate materials for fabricating process equipment and safer process conditions.

Lu, Yuan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mechanism of formation of oil by the hot aqueous alkaline digestion of cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall mechanism of cellulose converson in hot aqueous alkali appears to be one of degradation through glucose to low molecular weight saccharinic acids, dihydroxybutyric acid, glycolic acid, and carbonyl products such as acetone, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and similar compounds. Although the products identified in the present report were fairly complex furans, carbocyclic ketones, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds, nevertheless, in most cases, they could have been formed from simple carbonyl compounds through a series of condensations involving carbanion intermediates. It is conceivable that residual alkali in the oil during acetone extraction could have given rise to diacetone alcohol as an artifact. This is refuted by examination of an aqueous residue which was extracted with diethyl ether and which was never exposed to any acetone: Compounds derived from diacetone alcohol (such as mesityl oxide or 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) were also identified in the diethyl ether extract of the aqueous phase. Other compounds were identified in the oil acetone extract which could not have been derived from acetone or diacetone alcohol, but which could have been formed from other carbonyl compounds by the same mechanism. Hence, diacetone alcohol is a genuine product of cellulose conversion although apparently not an intermediate in further synthesis of other products. The further reaction of the postulated cyclic intermediates, and the route to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons of high molecular weight is intended to be the next subject of investigation in the current work. The fundamental difference in the mechanism of cellulose conversion to oil by pyrolysis and by aqueous alkaline digestion predicted by theory is therefore confirmed. Pyrolysis products may be explained generally by carbonium ion and free radical reactions (in fact, cellulose decomposition is acid-catalyzed), while in aqueous alkali, nucleophilic carbanion reactions are favored.

Molten, P.M.; Miller, R.K.; Donovan, J.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Potential prebiotic roles of (amino-)acylation in the synthesis and function of RNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hexamethyldisilazane h? electromagnetic irradiation (UV) 9 HPLC high performance liquid chromatography Hz Hertz i iso IBCF isobutyl chloroformate i.e. id est IR infrared J NMR coupling constant measured in Hertz LCAA long chain... between the n of O5" and ?* of C2=N3. Reprinted from reference [99] with permission from the copyright holder American Chemical Society. The presence of the major nucleoside/nucleotide by-products that accompany 17 would likely interfere...

Chan, Christopher K.W.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Amphetamine effects on startle gating in normal women and female rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nucleus accumbens (NAC) catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT)low activity to the enzyme catechol-O-methyl transferase (

Talledo, Jo A.; Sutherland Owens, Ashley N.; Schortinghuis, Tijmen; Swerdlow, Neal R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Synthesis and determination of the absolute configuration of Armatol A through a polyepoxide cyclization cascade : revision of the proposed structures of Armatols A-F  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclization Cascades Leading to the Tricyclic Fragment of Armatol A The synthesis of the fused 6,7,7-tricycle of armatol A was investigated. Fragments containing both a ketone and an aldehyde for subsequent fragment coupling ...

Underwood, Brian Saxton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design and synthesis of probes for detection of protein-protein interaction and RNA localization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of the ketone biotin - benzophenone-biotin hydrazide system for detecting the formation of cyan fluorescent protein and NF-kappaB p50 dimers was assessed. A series of benzophenone-based probes were synthesized and ...

Ryan, Jeremy Adam

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Synthesis of indoles via a tandem benzannulation-cyclization strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vinylketenes (generated in situ from cyclobutenones or a-diazo ketones) react with ynamides via a pericyclic cascade process to produce highly-substituted aniline derivatives. Cyclization of the benzannulation products can ...

Lam, Tin Yiu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Studies directed towards the total synthesis of (+)-sieboldine A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress towards the total synthesis of sieboldine A is described. This synthetic approach uses a nickel-catalyzed alkyne-ketone reductive cyclization to form the hydrindane core of the natural product in good yield and ...

Gehling, Victor S. (Victor Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

RUTHENIUM DECONTAMINATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction method of separating uranium from fission products is given. A small amount of a low molecular weight ketone is added to an acidic aqueous solution containing neutron-irradiated uranium and its associated fission products. The resulting solution is digested and then contacted with an organic liquid that extracts uranium values. The purpose of the step of digesting the aqueous solution in the presence of the ketone is to suppress the extractability of ruthenium.

Gresky, A.T.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

239

The versatile E. coli adaptive response protein AlkB mitigates toxicity and mutagenicity of etheno-, ethano-, and methyl-modified bases in vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Escherichia coli AlkB protein is an exceptionally versatile DNA repair enzyme. Its expression is induced upon exposure to alkylating agents as part of the Ada-mediated adaptive response. This member of the ac-ketoglu ...

Frick, Lauren Elizabeth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

(Butan-2-ol-jO)[2-({(ethylsulfanyl)- [2-(2-oxidobenzylidene-jO)hydrazinylidene-jN 2]methyl}iminomethyl)phenolato-jO]dioxidouranium(VI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disorder in main residue; R factor = 0.038; wR factor = 0.078; data-to-parameter ratio = 17.4. The U atom in the title complex, [U(C17H15N3O2S)O2-(C4H10O)], exists within a distorted pentagonal–bipyramidal geometry where the oxide O atoms occupy axial positions [O—U—O = 179.61 (18) ] and the pentagonal plane is defined by the N2O2 atoms of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand and the O atom of the butan-2-ol molecule. In the crystal, centrosymmetric aggregates are formed via pairs of hydroxy–phenoxide O—H O hydrogen bonds. The azomethine C N atoms, the ethylthiolyl group and the butyl group of the butan-2-ol molecule are disordered over two positions in a 0.668 (3):0.332 (3) ratio. Related literature For background to uranyl Schiff base complexes, see: S ¸ ahin et al. (2010); Özdemir et al. (2011). For a related structure, see: Takjoo et al. (2012).

Reza Takjoo; A Atefeh Najafi; A Seik Weng Ng B; Edward R. T. Tiekink B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Photoluminescence spectral study of single CdSe/ZnS Colloidal Nanocrystals in Poly(methyl methacrylate) and Quantum Dots molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals . . . . . . . .D. CdSe/ZnS NCs in negative photon resist SU-line shapes of single CdSe VI Optical characterization of

Shen, Yaoming

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Separation of technetium from nuclear waste stream simulants. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors evaluated several calorimetric assays for ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and discovered that all were flawed. They evaluated atomic absorption spectroscopy as a technique to determine sub-millimolar concentrations of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and discovered that it is not sensitive enough for their use. However, they discovered that ICP-AES can be used to determine concentrations of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} down to 0.25 ppm. They next determined that ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} can be quickly extracted (10 minutes or less) from aqueous HNO{sub 3} using the commercial extractant Aliquat-336 nitrate diluted with 1,3-diisopropylbenzene. Higher concentrations of extractant led to higher values of K{sub d} (the distribution ratio). K{sub d} was lower as the nitrate concentration of the medium increased, and was also lowered by increasing the acidity at constant nitrate ion concentration. The authors performed parallel studies with TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, determining that K{sub d}(ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) and K{sub d}(TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) track similarly as the conditions are changed. An effort was made to prepare substituted pyridium nitrate salts that are soluble in organic solvents to be used as alternate extractants. However, in all cases but one, the salts were also soluble to some extent in the aqueous phase, significantly limiting their usefulness as extractants for these purposes. Many of the new extractant salts would partition between the organic solvent and water so that 10% of the extractant salt was in the aqueous phase. Only 1-methyl-3,5-didodecylpyridium nitrate did not show any measurable solubility in water. However, this compound was not as good an extractant as Aliquat-336. A considerable effort was also made to find suitable alternative solvents to 1,3-diisopropylbenzene. Several ketone solvents with flash points above 60 C were tested, and two of these, 2-nonanone and 3-nonanone, were superior to 1,3-diisopropylbenzene as a diluent.

Strauss, S.H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tetrazine 2-Methyl-2-Nitro Propane Cyanide)>': (Pryazole) (l~nitro~2-methyl~1~propane, both and the the Diechmannexhaust. l~nitro~2-methyl~2-propane, experiment, they found

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assessing gene effects on the brain and risk for disease using machine learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harrison PJ, Weinberger DR. Catechol-o-methyltransferase,R, Delespaul P, van Os J. The catechol-O-methyl transferasein press), neuregulin, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT),

Kohannim, Omid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical feedstock for production of a range of important industrial chemicals, primarily acetic acid, formaldehyde, methyl methacrylate and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE)....

247

Investigations of the Biological Roles of Substituted Cyclohexadienes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years there have been two cycloterpenals, molecules consisting of a cyclohexadienal core, isolated from nature. Cyclocitral, the condensation product of citral, has been isolated from the North Sea bryozoans Flustra foliacea. In the human eyes, cycloretinal has been isolated and is a toxic by product of the vision cycle. This retinal dimer is believed to contribute to age related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. In 1992, it was discovered that if [beta]-ionylideneacetaldehyde was incubated with beta-lactoglobulin ([beta]-LG), the principal whey protein in dairy milk, that it would mediate the formation of cyclo-[beta]-ional. No follow up studies were performed on this protein mediated reaction or what biological activities these cycloterpenals may possess. This dissertation investigates the biological roles of substituted cyclohexadienes including cycloterpenals and cyclohexadiene enaminonitriles. To mimic the protein mediated reaction, we developed a synthetic procedure to produce a wide array of cycloterpenal by utilizing L-proline. Over 100 cycloterpenals were synthesized and screened for their biological activities against an array of cell based screens. The phenotypic effects of these cycloterpenals were screened against a PC12 assay where dramatic effects were observed on neurite outgrowth. During the synthesis of starting materials for the production of our cycloterpenal library, it was discovered that if excess base was added to the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction between a methyl-ketone and diethyl-(cyanomethyl)-phosphonate, conversion of the [alpha]-[beta]-unsaturated nitrile into an enaminonitrile was observed. This new synthetic procedure was optimized to generate a library of enaminonitriles as well as their quinazoline derivatives. The work within also includes the investigation of the [beta]-LG mediated reaction formation of cycloterpenals with natural and unnatural [beta]-methyl aldehydes. We were able to demonstrate that [beta]-LG could mediate the conversion of [alpha],[beta]-unsaturated aldehydes into their corresponding cycloterpenal. In vitro analysis was also performed with store bought milks and the [beta]-LG present was able to mediate the formation of cyclocitral. An in vivo experiment was also performed by utilizing New Zealand White rabbits to demonstrate the formation of cycloretinal within the blood stream by feeding a source of [beta]-LG with retinal. Interestingly, in human blood, [beta]-LG is present at concentrations of 0.7-1.2 g/dL. The protein has been identified within drusen pigments and lipofuscin granules that accumulate in the retina of macular degeneration patients. As humans do not produce beta-lactoglobulin, the source of this protein is from milk and milk products. With these experiments, we clearly demonstrate that under the appropriate conditions, cycloretinal can be produced with [beta]-LG. We have clearly established a direct link between [beta]-LG chemistry and age-related macular degeneration.

Bench, Bennie John

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Molecular water oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

Gratzel, Michael (St. Sulpice, CH); Munavalli, Shekhar (Bel Air, MD); Pern, Fu-Jann (Lakewood, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Epigenetic Mechanisms and Gene Networks in the Nervous System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Miltenberger et al., 1997), and extensive variation in phenotype is produced by differential methylation

Champagne, Frances A.

250

Beryllium-Copper Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Room-temperature corrosion properties of beryllium-copper...not recommended Atmosphere Industrial Marine Rural Water Fresh Softened Brine Sewage Gas (dry) Chlorine Oxygen/ozone Carbon dioxide Sulfur dioxide Ammonia Fuel gases Acetylene Organic compounds Most organic acids Alcohols Ketones Chlorinated solvents Fuels Lubricating/hydraulic oils Pyridine...

251

Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

Casey, Charles P. (Madison, WI); Guan, Hairong (Cincinnati, OH)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

New mass spectrometry techniques for studying physical chemistry of atmospheric heterogeneous processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ion mode DESI and nano-DESI result in the formation of protonated molecules [M + H]+ and molecules cationised on metals, such as sodium [M + Na]+ adducts, while deprotonated [M Ă? H]Ă? molecules are observed+ ) reacts selectively with molecules (M) containing carbonyl groups, such as aldehydes and ketones [79

Nizkorodov, Sergey

253
254

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been employed to determine the structures and energies of the isomers of the OH-toluene adduct, the methyl hydroxycyclohexadienyl radical, and their corresponding transitio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons (DOE Award No. DE-FG02-02ER63098) Prepared by Luisa T. Molina, Renyi Zhang and Mario J. Molina Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories. (1) Measurements of Gas-Phase Kinetics and Mechanism Work has been accomplished to develop laboratory instrumentation to conduct kinetic and mechanistic measurements of the aromatic hydrocarbon reactions initiated by OH, using

255
256

Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence and Fluorescence Lifetime Spatial Heterogeneity of Poly (2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene) in Presence of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric Acid Methyl Ester  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we studied the luminescence property and fluorescence lifetime mapping of MEH-PPV/PCBM system by using electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) and time-correlated single photo counting (TC-SPC) technologies. The ECL results showed that the oxidation peak of MEH-PPV near 0.7 V (vs. SCE) and ECL response of films shifted positively towards 1.2 V when in the presence of PCBM. At the same time, the oxidation peak current density of MEH-PPV increases while the ECL response decreased with the loading of PCBM in the composite films. The fluorescence lifetime images clearly show that the lifetime fluctuation is effected by different substrates and MEH-PPV/PCBM ratios. Meanwhile, the lifetime of MEH-PPV decreases with the increasing of film thickness. The lifetimes of MEH-PPV films on TiO2 substrate are lower than them of films on cover slips.

Geng, Hongwei; Pan, Shanlin; Hu, Dehong

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Variable dimensionality in the uranium fluoride/2-methyl-piperazine system: Synthesis and structures of UFO-5, -6, and -7; Zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials with unprecedented topologies  

SciTech Connect

Recently, low temperature (T < 300 C) hydrothermal reactions of inorganic precursors in the presence of organic cations have proven highly productive for the synthesis of novel solid-state materials. Interest in these materials is driven by the astonishingly diverse range of structures produced, as well as by their many potential materials chemistry applications. This report describes the high yield, phase pure hydrothermal syntheses of three new uranium fluoride phases with unprecedented structure types. Through the systematic control of the synthesis conditions the authors have successfully controlled the architecture and dimensionality of the phase formed and selectively synthesized novel zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials.

Francis, R.J.; Halasyamani, P.S.; Bee, J.S.; O'Hare, D.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Modelling and optimisation of batch distillation involving esterification and hydrolysis reaction systems. Modelling and optimisation of conventional and unconventional batch distillation process: Application to esterification of methanol and ethanol using acetic acid and hydrolysis of methyl lactate system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Batch distillation with chemical reaction when takes place in the same unit is referred to as batch reactive distillation process. The combination reduces the capital… (more)

Edreder, Elmahboub A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Annotated bibliography of research carried out from 1993 to 1999 under DoE Award No. DE-IA02-94ER14411: Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out during a six year period under a DoE interagency grant. Because all results have been published as full papers in appropriate refereed journals that are openly available in most scientific libraries, the report takes the form of an annotated bibliography. In the interests of scientific continuity and bibliographic usefulness, however, work carried out on this same project from 1990-1992 under an earlier DoE award, as well as related work currently (2000-2002) in progress, will also be discussed. It should be stressed, however, that only work directly connected to the grantee is cited explicitly in this final grant report. The many important papers by other workers in the field during the last decade must be obtained from reference citations in the 21 publications mentioned.

Hougen, Jon T.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hydrophobic Polycationic Coatings Disinfect Poliovirus and Rotavirus Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coating surfaces with N-alkylated polyethylenimines (PEIs), namely branched N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI via covalent attachment to glass or linear N,N-dodecyl,methyl-PEI by physical deposition (“painting”) onto polyethylene, ...

Larson, Alyssa Maxine

263

Fast and sensitive mapping of bisulfite-treated sequencing data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Cytosine DNA methylation is one of the major epigenetic modifications and influences gene expression, developmental processes, X-chromosome inactivation, and genomic imprinting. Aberrant methylation is furthermore known to be associated ...

Christian Otto; Peter F. Stadler; Steve Hoffmann

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NIST: Freq. Interstellar Molec. Micro. Trans. - Table 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... C 2 H 4 O 2, Methyl ester formic acid (methyl formate), CH 3 OCHO, [107-31-3], Bro75. C 2 H 4 O 2, Acetic acid, CH 3 COOH, [64-19-7], Meh97. ...

265

The role of the de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a in the nervous system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNA methylation is an important mechanism of gene regulation. Evidence is mounting that epigenetic mechanisms including that of DNA methylation operate in the nervous system. Genetic disruption of the de novo DNA ...

Nguyen, Suzanne Pham

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sorbent Assisted Catalyst for the One-Pot Sequestration and Conversion of Renewable Feedstocks into Fuels  

algae oils, by not utilizing current methods of fatty acid conversion to methyl ester, makes this technology economically attractive.

267

AMukhopadhyay_SIM2008_final.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of mercury - Methyl mercury formation. * Biocorrosion * Biofouling of crude oil 2 Stored legacy waste Radioactive and heavy metal waste management...

268

Pramipexole effects on startle gating in rats and normal men  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

brain regional activity of catechol-O-methyl transferase (reflex depends on the catechol O-methyltransferase Val158Met

Swerdlow, Neal R.; Lelham, Sophia A.; Sutherland Owens, Ashley N.; Chang, Wei-Li; Sassen, Sebastiaan D.; Talledo, Jo A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters): Experiments and modeling – Advances and future refinements

Lucie Coniglio; Hayet Bennadji; Pierre Alex; Re Glaude; Olivier Herbinet; Francis Billaud

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

MOUSE ORGAN HARVEST PROTOCOL 10/01 TO FREEZE TISSUES FOR FROZEN SECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bits of dry ice and 2 methyl butane. This will be the freezing mixture which will freeze the organs OCT turns white 9. Remove plastic molds with frozen organs from dry ice/ 2 methyl butane and let them No 15160-215 3. Frozen sample write-on bags: VWR Cat. No: 01-002-37 4. 2 methyl butane: Fisher Cat. No

Abagyan, Ruben

272

Method for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Method for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

276

Purifying contaminated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, C.G.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis Charles P. Casey, Principal Investigator Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 Phone 608-262-0584 FAX: 608-262-7144 Email: casey@chem.wisc.edu http://www.chem.wisc.edu/main/people/faculty/casey.html Executive Summary. Our goal was to learn the intimate mechanistic details of reactions involved in homogeneous catalysis and to use the insight we gain to develop new and improved catalysts. Our work centered on the hydrogenation of polar functional groups such as aldehydes and ketones and on hydroformylation. Specifically, we concentrated on catalysts capable of simultaneously transferring hydride from a metal center and a proton from an acidic oxygen or nitrogen center to an aldehyde or ketone. An economical iron based catalyst was developed and patented. Better understanding of fundamental organometallic reactions and catalytic processes enabled design of energy and material efficient chemical processes. Our work contributed to the development of catalysts for the selective and mild hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes; this will provide a modern green alternative to reductions by LiAlH4 and NaBH4, which require extensive work-up procedures and produce waste streams. (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H Hydrogenation Catalysts. Youval Shvo described a remarkable catalytic system in which the key intermediate (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H (1) has an electronically coupled acidic OH unit and a hydridic RuH unit. Our efforts centered on understanding and improving upon this important catalyst for reduction of aldehydes and ketones. Our mechanistic studies established that the reduction of aldehydes by 1 to produce alcohols and a diruthenium bridging hydride species occurs much more rapidly than regeneration of the ruthenium hydride from the diruthenium bridging hydride species. Our mechanistic studies require simultaneous transfer of hydride from ruthenium to the aldehyde carbon and of a proton from the CpOH unit to the aldehyde oxygen and support reduction of the aldehyde without its prior coordination to ruthenium. Another important step in the catalysis is the regeneration of 1 from reaction of H2 with the stable diruthenium bridging hydride complex 2. Studies of the microscopic reverse of this process (hydrogen evolution from 1 which occurs at 80 �������°C) in the presence of alcohol (the product of aldehyde hydrogenation) have shown that a dihydrogen complex is formed reversibly at a rate much faster than hydrogen evolution. Kinetic and theoretical studies in collaboration with Professor Qiang Cui of Wisconsin indicated an important role for alcohol in mediating transfer of hydrogen to ruthenium. One key to developing more active catalysts was to destabilize the bridging hydride intermediate 2 to prevent its formation or to speed its conversion to a reactive monohydride 1 by reaction with H2. We found several successful ways to destabilize the bridging hydride and to obtain more active catalysts. Most recently, we discovered related iron catalysts for hydrogenation that do not form dimers; the cost advantage of iron catalysts is spectacular. Iron Catalysts. In an exciting development, we found that a related iron complex is also a very active ketone hydrogenation catalyst. This hydrogenation catalyst shows high chemoselectivity for aldehydes, ketones, and imines and isolated C=C, C���¯�������ºC, C-X, -NO2, epoxides, and ester functions are unaffected by the hydrogenation conditions. Mechanistic studies have established a reversible hydrogen transfer step followed by rapid dihydrogen activation. The same iron complex also catalyzes transfer hydrogenation of ketones.

Charles P. Casey

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

The synthesis and lanthanide coordination chemistry of 2,6-bis[(dicyclohexyl)phosphino-methyl]pyridine N,P,P'-trioxide. The crystal structure of 2,6-bis[(dicyclohexyl)phosphinomethyl] pyridine N,P,P'-trioxide erbium(III) nitrate  

SciTech Connect

The title ligand is obtained in two steps with high overall yield, and is soluble in aromatic solvents, making its liquid-liquid extraction performance of potential interest. The ligand forms a stable 1:1 coordination complex with Er(NO3)3 and the molecular structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction methods. The Er(III) ion is chelated by one tridentate ligand and three bidentate nitrate groups. The structural results are discussed in the context of complexes formed by related ligands.

Gan, Xinmin; Rapko, Brian M.; Duesler, E N.; Binyamin, Iris; Paine, Robert T.; Hay, Benjamin P.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

A proposed sensor deployment to investigate biogeochemical controls on mercury cycling in Mugu Lagoon, California (CON 5)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogeochemical controls on mercury cycling in Mugu Lagoon,of UCLA, is impaired for mercury, a potent neurotoxin, whichhealth and wildlife t o •Mercury methylation is the process

Sarah Rothenberg; Jenny Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PNNL: Available Technologies: Agriculture & Mining Industry  

Bio-based. Bio-based. Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran; Building Efficiency. DSOM (Decision Support for Operations and ...

282

Novel Functionalized Nanomaterials for Organic Decontamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... oxide (TiO2)-graphene-rhamnolipid for decontamination of organics (methyl orange, phenol and diesel) from water. The results show the advantage of organic ...

283

Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethene and its methyl- and chlorine-substituted derivativesand the stratospheric chlorine loadings of its parentowing to the presence of chlorine atoms adjacent to the

Coleman, Beverly Kaye

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

DIRECT ANALYSIS OF UNDILUTED PHOTORESIST WITH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in-valve with syringe-driven diluent and internal standard streams before ... six potential contaminant elements in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidon were auto- ...

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mercury uptake and dynamics in sea ice algae, phytoplankton and grazing copepods from a Beaufort Sea Arctic marine food web.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mercury (Hg) is one of the primary contaminants of concern in the Arctic marine ecosystem. Methyl Hg (MeHg) is known to biomagnify in food webs.… (more)

Burt, Alexis Emelia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Chemical, biochemical and molecular genetic interrogation of biosynthetically robust marine cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmethylation catalyzed by catechol O-methyltransferase."transfer catalyzed by catechol-O-methyl-transferase." J Amtransmethylation catalyzed by catechol O-methyltransferase."

Grindberg, Rashel Vina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Strategies and Technologies for Improving Air Quality Around Ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methyl ester soybean oil/diesel fuel blends. Bioresour.T. , Hydrotreated vegetable oil as fuel for heavy dutywith residual fuel oils. Journal of Aerosol Science, 2002.

Khan, Mohammad Yusuf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NIST Tech Beat - March 1, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Computer modeling rendition of the proposed carbon-fluorine bond-breaking macrocycle after reaction with a molecule of methyl fluoride (CH3F). ...

289

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Computer modeling rendition of the proposed carbon-fluorine bond-breaking macrocycle after reaction with a molecule of methyl fluoride (CH3F). ...

290

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Degraded by External Thermal Radiation. ... 24-25, 1992, Arlington, VA, 155-177 ... Structural Analysis of the Response of the ...

291

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methyl esters (DME) and Fischer-Tropsch liquids, as well astransport fuels using Fischer-Tropsch or other conversionconcluded that biodiesel, Fischer-Tropsch synthetic kerosene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

EA-1157: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1157: Final Environmental Assessment Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas This EA evaluates the...

293

Instrument Schedule for dcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mon Mar 12 2007, 1, 7902, Rotational dynamics of methane in the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF8 and methane-methyl coupling (preliminary ...

294

Supercontiunuum FTIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Near-IR FT spectra of methane, shown in Figure 1, and methyl salicylate were acquired with both sources to demonstrate the reasonable spectral ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

Instrument Schedule for dcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thu May 10 2007, 4, 7902, Rotational dynamics of methane in the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF8 and methane-methyl coupling, Zhou*, Wu ...

296

Gas Metrology Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the neurotoxic risk associated with trophic transfer of methyl mercury to humans, the reduction of mercury emissions from coal-fired electric … ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the panel of breast cancer cell lines. Subnetwork enrichment of these genes has identifed 35 common regulators with 6 or more predicted markers. In addition to identifying epigenetically regulated genes, we show evidence of differentially expressed methylation patterns between the basal and luminal subtypes. Our results indicate that the proposed computational protocol is a viable platform for identifying epigenetically regulated genes. Our protocol has generated a list of predictors including COL1A2, TOP2A, TFF1, and VAV3, genes whose key roles in epigenetic regulation is documented in the literature. Subnetwork enrichment of these predicted markers further suggests that epigenetic regulation of individual genes occurs in a coordinated fashion and through common regulators.

Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

Site Navigation - Brookhaven National Laboratory — a passion for ...  

BSA 10-13: Direct determination of methylation of CpG dinucleotides. BNL Reference Number: BSA 10-13. Patent Status: Application Number 20120219942 was published on ...

299

Biogeochemistry of Isoprenoid Production and Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodgeradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is an exploration of microbial isoprenoid production and destruction by anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation. Isoprenoids are methyl-branched hydrocarbons, and include biomarkers from all three… (more)

Dawson, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ThermoML Data for FPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Liquid liquid equilibria at 298.15 K for ternary mixtures of methyl tert-butyl ether + methanol (or ethanol) + imidazolium-based ionic liquids at ...

302

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships | BSA 08-02 ...  

Changes in methyl CpG islands have been associated with particular cancer diagnoses and ... Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the ...

303

Agency datasets monthly list | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particularly chemicals, can have many valid synonyms. For example, toluene, methyl benzene, and phenyl methane, are commonly used names for the same chemical. EPA programs...

304

GAMMA-RAY DETECTION WITH PbO GLASS CONVERTERS IN MWPC: ELECTRON CONVERSION EFFICIENCY AND TIME RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10X CF and 30% iso- butane, respectively. The effects of gas+ 67% Ar 3% methylal+30% Iso­ butane + 67% Ar Comparing the

Lum, G.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

BS-Seeker2: a versatile aligning pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RL: MethylCoder: software pipeline for bisulfite-treateda versatile aligning pipeline for bisulfite sequencing dataof BS Seeker, as a full pipeline for mapping bisulfite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NIST MS Data Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Spectra that produce top matches with NIST 98 Acetic acid, 1-methylethyl ester Acetic acid, butyl ester Butanoic acid, 3-oxo-, methyl ester 1-Butanol ...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

ThermoML Data for JCED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Liquid Liquid Equilibria of Water + Acetic Acid + Cyclopentyl Methyl Ether ... Title: Effects of Different Organic Acids on Solubility and Metastable ...

308

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 517 Requested by Sens. Daschle & Murkowski  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Additional analysis of the impact of the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban provisions of S. 517.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S.1766  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2002-06 Release date: March 2002 This report analyzes the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766.

310

SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

CHEMISTRY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING JUNE 20, 1959  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H-F conductance and susceptance were determined for coil-type vessels over a range of frequencies from 2 to 30 mc. The ultraviolet absorption spectra of organic compounds in the vapor phase were determined, and a maximum was assigned to each compound. The dielectric constant values for five alpha substituted ketones at 25 deg C are reponted. A series of acids in dimethylformamide was titrated with the alkali methoxides by the high-frequency and conductance methods. The titration curves by these two methods were very similar in shape and also very similar to the curves for the corresponding type of acid in aqueous solution (W.L.H.)

None

1959-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method for reclaiming waste lubricating oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying and reclaiming used lubricating oils containing additives such as detergents, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, extreme pressure agents and the like and other solid and liquid contaminants by preferably first vacuum distilling the used oil to remove water and low-boiling contaminants, and treating the dried oil with a solvent mixture of butanol, isopropanol and methylethyl ketone which causes the separation of a layer of sludge containing contaminants, unspent additives and oxidation products. After solvent recovery, the desludged oil is then subjected to conventional lubricating oil refining steps such as distillation followed by decolorization and deodorization.

Whisman, Marvin L. (Bartlesville, OK); Goetzinger, John W. (Bartlesville, OK); Cotton, Faye O. (Bartlesville, OK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

PRODUCTION OF FLUOROCARBONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to a process for recovering fluorocarbons from a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons with partially and completely fluorinated products thereof. It consists of contacting the mxture in the cold with a liquid which is a solvent for the hydrocarbons and which is a nonsolvent for the fluorocarbons, extracting the hydrocarbons, separating the fluorocarbon-containing layer from the solvent-containing layer, and submitting the fluorocarbon layer to fractlonal distillation, to isolate the desired fluorocarbon fraction. Suitable solvents wnich may be used in the process include the lower aliphatic alcohols, and the lower aliphatic ketones.

Sarsfield, N.F.

1949-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a 750 feet high resolution capillary gas chromatographic column. The mixture was found to be 90% of 1:1 ratio 7-methyl, and 8-methyl-heptadecane, and 10% of 6-methylheptadecane. An optical rotation of +2.5 {+-} 0.5 was obtained on a 5 mg of mixture.

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cell Stem Cell, Volume 12 Supplemental Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Jacobsen, Matteo Pellegrini and Amander T. Clark #12;Figure S1. DNA Methylation in PGCs and iPGCs somatic cells from e10.5 embryos (D) and iPGCs (E). The xaxis denotes individual CpG dinucleotides of differentiation, showing gating strategy for SSEA1+/cKitbright iPGCs (green). G: Metaplot of methylation

Jacobsen, Steve

318

Ultrafine PMMA(QDs)/PVDF core-shell fibers for nanophotonic applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrafine fibers of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) with unique core-shell structure were fabricated via facile electrospinning method, and were adopted as waveguide materials. PMMA, into which CdSe/ZnS quantum dots ... Keywords: CdSe/ZnS, Core-shell fiber, Electrospinning, Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), Quantum dots

Shi-Li Quan; Hyun-Sik Lee; El-Hang Lee; Kyoung-Duck Park; Seung Gol Lee; In-Joo Chin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

MPP8 mediates the interactions between DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a and H3K9 methyltransferase GLP/G9a  

SciTech Connect

DNA CpG methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation are two major repressive epigenetic modifications, and these methylations are positively correlated with one another in chromatin. Here we show that G9a or G9a-like protein (GLP) dimethylate the amino-terminal lysine 44 (K44) of mouse Dnmt3a (equivalent to K47 of human DNMT3A) in vitro and in cells overexpressing G9a or GLP. The chromodomain of MPP8 recognizes the dimethylated Dnmt3aK44me2. MPP8 also interacts with self-methylated GLP in a methylation-dependent manner. The MPP8 chromodomain forms a dimer in solution and in crystals, suggesting that a dimeric MPP8 molecule could bridge the methylated Dnmt3a and GLP, resulting in a silencing complex of Dnmt3a-MPP8-GLP/G9a on chromatin templates. Together, these findings provide a molecular explanation, at least in part, for the co-occurrence of DNA methylation and H3K9 methylation in chromatin.

Chang, Yanqi; Sun, Lidong; Kokura, Kenji; Horton, John R.; Fukuda, Mikiko; Espejo, Alexsandra; Izumi, Victoria; Koomen, John M.; Bedford, Mark T.; Zhang, Xing; Shinkai, Yoichi; Fang, Jia; Cheng, Xiaodong (Moffitt); (Emory-MED); (Kyoto); (Texas)

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bacterial Genetics and Molecular Biology -a Genomics Perspective (Ch. 1) Trudy M. Wassenaar, David W. Ussery Chapter 1. What is DNA?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more complex atoms to be stable. Eventually, atoms began to clump and condense due to gravity, causing in E. coli are called Dam (for DNA adenine methylase) and Dcm (DNA cytosine methylase). Not every group is sequence-dependent. Dam methylates the A in the sequence GATC and Dcm methylates the first C

Ussery, David W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a Model for Understanding Bacterial Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial Mercury Methylation Contact: Cynthia Gilmour (gilmourc@si.edu, 443-482-2498) DOE/Office of Science Contact: Cynthia Gilmour (gilmourc@si.edu, 443-482-2498) DOE/Office of Science/Biological & Environmental/Biological & Environmental Research ·The ORNL Mercury Science Focus Area is developing the Hg-methylating bacterium

322

Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

Blom, Alex Jason

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system was investigated that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of alcohols and the hydrogenation of ketones. Such a catalyst, if used in a membrane containing an alcohol solvent, might be of use in selective H/sub 2/ separation from gas mixtures. The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol and 2-octanol were studied using a RhCl/sub 3//SnCl/sub 2//LiCl catalyst system. These alcohols are dehydrogenated at rates that are initially rapid, but which gradually slow to a stop. The decrease in rate of H/sub 2/ evolution is a result of the establishment of an equilibrium between the alcohol and the liberated hydrogen and ketone. At 150/sup 0/C, cyclohexanol has the fastest rate of dehydrogenation. Several dehydrogenation/hydrogenation cycles have been carried out using this alcohol over a period of one week without serious catalyst deactivation or side reactions. Initial tests of the catalyst dissolved in cyclohexanol within two membranes were inconclusive. An anion exchange membrane was not suitably wetted by the catalyst solution and Celgard/sup TM/, which was wetted, could not be kept wet at 150/sup 0/C under flow conditions in the membrane cell. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Nelson, D.A.; Lilga, M.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Expanding the scope of the nucleophile catalyzed aldol lactonization (NCALl) process and transformations of the resulting beta-lactones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expanding the uses of the NCAL and finding the spectrum of substrates best suited for such a transformation has been the main effort of my research. Previous studies had focused on aldedydes as the requisite functionality that would provide the needed electrophilicity in order to complete the aldol; however, recent advancements have introduced ketones as a viable carbonyl. With an established protocol in hand, I set out to explore various substrates that could yield Beta-lactones in good to moderate yields such as amino acid derivatives, diones, and large cyclic formations as well as simple, straight chain acids with varying groups Alpha to the ketone. In general, I was able to establish a basic framework of substrates that are highly and/or moderately susceptible towards the NCAL and current studies continue to further expand the scope. In addition to making Beta-lactones, I investigated alkyl cuprates as soft nucleophiles to afford addition at the Beta carbon yielding a variety of acids. Substrates for cuprate additions have been expanded to bulkier and multi-cyclic Beta-lactones and applied to the synthesis of a Merck IND intermediate. Additions to bi- and tri-chloro Beta-lactones due to the presence of the resulting moity in natural products are currently being studied.

Matla, Andrea Slava

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Interstellar Isomers: The Importance of Bonding Energy Differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present strong detections of methyl cyanide, vinyl cyanide, ethyl cyanide and cyanodiacetylene molecules with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) toward the Sgr B2(N) molecular cloud. Attempts to detect the corresponding isocyanide isomers were only successful in the case of methyl isocyanide for its J(K)=1(0)-0(0) transition, which is the first interstellar report of this line. To determine the spatial distribution of methyl isocyanide, we used archival Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array data for the J(K)=4(K)-3(K) (K=0-3) transitions but no emission was detected. From ab initio calculations, the bonding energy difference between the cyanide and isocyanide molecules is >8500 cm^-1 (>12,000 K). That we detect methyl isocyanide emission with a single antenna (Gaussian beamsize(Omega_B)=1723 arcsec^2) but not with an interferometer (Omega_B=192 arcsec^2), strongly suggests that methyl isocyanide has a widespread spatial distribution toward the Sgr B2(N) region. Thus, large-scale, non-thermal processes in the surrounding medium may account for the conversion of methyl cyanide to methyl isocyanide while the LMH hot core, which is dominated by thermal processes, does not produce a significant amount of methyl isocyanide. Ice analog experiments by other investigators have shown that radiation bombardment of methyl cyanide can produce methyl isocyanide, thus supporting our observations. We conclude that isomers separated by such large bonding energy differences are distributed in different interstellar environments, making the evaluation of column density ratios between such isomers irrelevant unless it can be independently shown that these species are co-spatial.

Anthony J. Remijan; J. M. Hollis; F. J. Lovas; D. F. Plusquellic; P. R. Jewell

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Send Orders of Reprints at reprints@benthamscience.net 226 Current Computer-Aided Drug Design, 2013, 9, 226-232  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Consider the molecular graph of 2-methyl butane, with the vertex labelling as shown in Fig. (1). Fig. (1). The molecular graph of 2-methyl butane (CAS 78-78-4). The adjacency matrix A(G) and the distance matrix D(G) of 2-methyl butane are: A(G) D(G) 1 2 3 4 5 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0

Gini, Giuseppina

327

Metal-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions for the Synthesis of Significant Chiral Building Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Morita Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction a carbon-carbon bond forming reaction between an ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl and aldehydes or activated ketones in the presence of a nucleophilic catalyst. The MBH reaction is an atom-economical method of rapid increase of molecular complexity. The development of this process has received considerable attention in recent years. This dissertation presents the development of a new catalytic system for the symmetric and asymmetric MBH reaction. The new system for the racemic version of this reaction was accomplished employing a 1:1:1 ratio of catalytic amounts (10 mol%) of MgI2, TMEDA and DMAP and proved to be highly effective. For the asymmetric version was developed a highly enantio-selective system based on Fu’s planar chiral DMAP derivative (II) with ee´s up to 98%. Abnormal MBH adducts are obtained employing either ethyl 2,3-butadienoate or ethyl propiolate in good yields, in the presence if MgI2 and either a tertiary amine or phosphine as the nucleophile. The ?,?-unsaturated carbonyls where prepared by a modified direct ?- methylenation using paraformaldehyde, diisopropylammonium trifluoroacetate, and catalytic acid or base with excellent yields for several carbonyls compounds. The Negishi cross-coupling reaction is the Pd or Ni-catalyzed stereoselective cross-coupling or organozincs and aryl-, alkenyl-, or alkynyl halides. Enantioselective Negishi cross-coupling of aryl zincs and ?-bromo ketones was accomplished employing a NCN Pincer complex as the catalyst with ee´s up 99%. The required pincer complexes have been prepared by the oxidative addition of pincer ligands with palladium or nickel. Additionally, It has been developed a direct and highly active, (NCN)-Pd catalytic system for the ?-arylation of ketones with a variety of aryl bromides using the air and moisture stable [t-BuPheBox-Me2]PdBr (XVI) as the catalyst. The adducts are obtained in excellent yields (92% average for 20 examples) in only 1 hour using 1 mol% of catalyst loading. Perhaps more importantly, the work described here shows that XVI is highly reactive, highly selective, even on substrates bearing challenging functional groups such alkenes.

Bugarin Cervantes, Alejandro

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Infrared absorption measurements of the kinetics of Cl atom reactions with C{sub 3}H{sub n} (n=4,6) unsaturated hydrocarbons between 300-850 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reaction of chlorine (Cl) atoms with the unsaturated C{sub 3}H{sub n} where n=4,6, hydrocarbons propylene, allene, and methyl acetylene have been uninvestigated as a function of temperature and pressure.

Farrell, J.T.; Pilgrim, J.S.; Taatjes, C.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Mercury, Cadmium and Lead Biogeochemistry in the Soil–Plant–Insect System in Huludao City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YE, Ketris MP (2005a) Mercury in coal: a review part 1of total and methyl mercury by arthropods. Bull Environ259 DOI 10.1007/s00128-009-9688-6 Mercury, Cadmium and Lead

Zhang, Zhong-Sheng; Lu, Xian-Guo; Wang, Qi-Chao; Zheng, Dong-Mei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

AOCS Official Method Ce 2-66  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preparation of Methyl Esters of Fatty Acids AOCS Official Method Ce 2-66 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method provides a means for prepari

331

AOCS Official Method Ch 1-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preparation of Methyl Esters of Long-Chain Fatty Acids AOCS Official Method Ch 1-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method provides a means

332

Biodiesel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fatty acid methyl esters, or long-chain mono alkyl esters. It is produced from renewable sources such as new and used vegetable oils and animal fats and is a cleaner-burning...

333

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period-Unit: Download Series History ... 51: 64: 59: 70: 70: 62: 2009-2013: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 41: 44: 49: 61: 49: 50: 2004-2013: Other ...

334

U.S. Oxygenate Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History; Fuel Ethanol: 855: 877: 891: 868: 849: 852: 1981-2013: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 48: 55: 54: 51 ...

335

Different Roles for Tet1 and Tet2 Proteins in Reprogramming-Mediated Erasure of Imprints Induced by EGC Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genomic imprinting directs the allele-specific marking and expression of loci according to their parental origin. Differential DNA methylation at imprinted control regions (ICRs) is established in gametes and, although ...

Piccolo, Francesco M.

336

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. FEBRUARY, 1992 Prepared by: Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Methyl mercury is formed by biotic and abiotic methylation of mercury

337

/sup 29/Si NMR study of the surface of pyrogenic silica modified by methylchlorosilanes  

SciTech Connect

Cross-polarization /sup 29/Si NMR spectra have been used for aerosil modified by methyl-chlorosilanes to identify surface organosilicon compounds and their reactions during hydrolysis and methanolysis.

Brie, V.V.; Gorlov, Yu.I.; Chuiko, A.A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Thermodynamics of the Densification Process for Polymer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... According to Price [7], very little change in the enthalpy of poly(methyl methacrylate) is ob- served up to about 800 ... Pv/t = [i - 2-1/6r(rV0"1/3]~1 . . (9) ...

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optimal estimation of the surface fluxes of chloromethanes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four chloromethanes - methyl chloride (CH3Cl), dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), chloroform (CHCl3), and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), are chlorine-containing gases contributing significantly to stratospheric ozone depletion ...

Xiao, Xue, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Presentation and accessibility of surface bound ligands on amphiphilic graft copolymer films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amphiphilic comb-type graft copolymers comprising a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone and short, polyethylene oxide (PEO) side chains, PMMA-g-PEO, are proposed to self-organize at the polymer/water interface, ...

Kuhlman, William A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The applications of comb polymer to the study of liver cell adhesion and signaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comb polymer, which consists of a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone with hydrophilic hydroxy-poly(ethylene oxide) (HPOEM) side chains, is a tool that has many possible applications for the study of liver ...

Yin, David, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Proposed Identification of Environmental Tobacco Smoke as a Toxic Air Contaminant, Part C: Public Comments and ARB/OEHHA Staff Responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1B1, sulfotransferase 1A1, catechol-o-methyltransferase andphenol, the cresols, 2,4-dimethyl phenol, catechol, andthe methyl catechols, all of which have some carcinogenic

California Environmental Protection Agency: Air Resources Board

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Comparison of etch characteristics of KOH, TMAH and EDP for bulk micromachining of silicon (110)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk micromachining in Si (110) wafer is an essential process for fabricating vertical microstructures by wet chemical etching. We compared the anisotropic etching properties of potassium hydroxide (KOH), tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and ethylene ...

Shankar Dutta; Md Imran; P. Kumar; R. Pal; P. Datta; R. Chatterjee

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

AOCS Official Method Ae 4-52  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Fatty Acids AOCS Official Method Ae 4-52 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the free fatty acids in oil removed from the seed by methyl alc

345

Chemical Resistance Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 0. 53. Ethylene Oxide, 21, 4, 17, 5, 1, 5, 1, 5, 189, 2, 48, 4. 54. Hydrogen Fluoride, 210, 2, 1, 5, 142, 1, 1, 5, ND, 0, 6, 3. 55. Methyl Chloride, ...

346

Index of /ftp/ale_gage_Agage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

began in 1978 using Hewlett-Packard (HP) 5840 gas chromatographs (gc) with an electron-capture detector (ECD) to measure five species (CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), methyl...

347

AOCS Official Method Ca 14b-96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantification of Free Glycerin in Selected Glycerides and Fatty Acid Methyl Esters by HPLC with Laser Light-Scattering Detection AOCS Official Method Ca 14b-96 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads ...

348

Radiation Chemistry of MTBE in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Aqueous Solution Stephen P. Mezyk, Jace Jones, William J. Cooper, Thomas Tobien, Michael G. Nickelsen, J. Wesley Adams, Kevin E. O'Shea, David M....

349

Microsoft Word - Transportation pdf.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finnish homes 0.23 to 0.86 Christensen and Mustonen, 1987 Various radioisotopes Danish home 0.1 to 0.5 Roed and Cannell, 1987 Noble gGases, methyl iodide, elemental iodine,...

350

Cationic Ir(III) alkyl and hydride complexes: stoichiometric ...  

80 S.R. Klei et al./Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical 189 (2002) 79–94 platinum(II) catalyst capable of converting methane to methyl bisulfate, which could ...

351

Engineering Project Solar-Boosted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of CTL · Coal & the Department of Defense · Fischer-Tropsch Fuel & EngineTesting · Coal & Biomass Methanol Methyl Acetate Acetic Anhydride Naphtha Waxes Fischer Tropsch Liquids Diesel/Jet/Gas Fuels

352

Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, April 1, 1984-March 31, 1985. [EDTA-radicals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. Our research, which utilizes the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: (1) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; (2) the control of the quantum yield of formation of redox products; and (3) the mechanisms by which reduced species interact with water to yield H/sub 2/ homogeneously and heterogeneously. Research activities are summarized for the following: (1) reaction of methyl viologen with EDTA-radicals; (2) solution medium control of photoredox yields; (3) photochemistry of methyl viologen charge-transfer complexes; (4) thermal reduction of methyl viologen in alkaline solution; (5) formation of dihydrogen from reduced methyl viologen; and (6) photophysics of Cr(III)-polypyridyl complexes.

Hoffman, M.Z.

1985-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Site Navigation - Brookhaven National Laboratory — a passion for ...  

BSA 11-19: Methyl CpG Detection using McrA. BNL Reference Number: BSA 11-19. Patent Status: U.S. Patent Number 8,263,742 was issued on September 11, 2012

354

Energy Basics: Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The biomass-derived ethyl or methyl esters can be blended with conventional diesel fuel or used as a neat fuel (100% biodiesel). Learn more about biodiesel basics. Biofuel...

355

Performance degradation of P3HT:PCBM Polymer/fullerene photovoltaic cells under gamma irradiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gamma radiation damage effect on polymer-based hybrid photovoltaic cells consisting of a blend of poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is investigated.… (more)

Todd, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Biochemical characterization of the E. coli Very Short Patch Repair pathway and its coordination with methyltransferase repair of 0?-methylguanine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The E. coli Very Short Patch Repair (VSPR) system corrects T:G mismatches that arise through Dcm-mediated methylation and subsequent deamination of the underlined cytosine residue in the palindromic sequence 5'-CCWGG-3' ...

Rye, Peter Thomas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Pentanol isomer synthesis in engineered microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential application as biofuels. They are found as natural3-Methyl-1-butanol . Biofuels 32 MJ/L for gasoline) and aabout microbial production of biofuels in general have been

Cann, Anthony F.; Liao, James C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

AOCS Official Method H 17-58  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic Methyl Alcohol AOCS Official Method H 17-58 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION   SCOPE 4FFAAA535C08DEE987D5D4241D901519 MC-H1758 2422

360

Compositions of alkyl 4-[o-(substituted amino)phenyl]-3-thioallophanates and methods of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various alkyl 4-[o-(substituted amino)phenyl]-3-thioallophanates are useful as fungicides and mite ovicides. An exemplary specie is methyl 4-(o-butyramidophenyl)-3-thioallophanate.

Adams, Charles De Witt (Newark, DE)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

AOCS Official Method Ce 1-62  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acid Composition by Packed Column Gas Chromatography AOCS Official Method Ce 1-62 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION Methyl esters of fatty ac

362

An engineered split M.HhaI-zinc finger fusion lacks the intended methyltransferase specificity  

SciTech Connect

The ability to site-specifically methylate DNA in vivo would have wide applicability to the study of basic biomedical problems as well as enable studies on the potential of site-specific DNA methylation as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diseases. Natural DNA methyltransferases lack the specificity required for these applications. Nomura and Barbas [W. Nomura, C.F. Barbas 3rd, In vivo site-specific DNA methylation with a designed sequence-enabled DNA methylase, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129 (2007) 8676-8677] have reported that an engineered DNA methyltransferase comprised of fragments of M.HhaI methyltransferase and zinc finger proteins has very high specificity for the chosen target site. Our analysis of this engineered enzyme shows that the fusion protein methylates target and non-target sites with similar efficiency.

Meister, Glenna E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ostermeier, Marc [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: oster@jhu.edu

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

NIST Recommended Rest Frequencies for Observed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... methyl formate C2H4O2 Acetic acid CH3COOH 64-19-7 Meh97 C2H4O2 Hydroxyacetaldehyde CH2OHCHO 141-46-8 Hol00 ...

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Ozone-initiated chemistry in an occupied simulated aircraft cabin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nonanal, decanal, 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO), formic acid and acetic acid, with 0.25 to 0.30 moles of quantified product volatilized per mole of ozone...

365

Method for the Collection and HPLC Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide and Cl and C2 Hydroperoxides in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) method was developed to quantify hydrogen peroxide, methyl hydroperoxide. Hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, ethyl hydroperoxide, and peroxyaectic acid in the atmosphere. Gas-phase hydroperoxides are ...

Meehye Lee; Birgitta C. Noone; Daniel O'sullivan; Brian G. Heikes

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Serine 80 regulates its chromatin association and neurological function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mutations of MECP2 (Methyl-CpG Binding Protein 2) cause Rett syndrome. As a chromatin-associated multifunctional protein, how MeCP2 integrates external signals and regulates neuronal function remain unclear. Although ...

Tao, Jifang

367

The Bimodal Energy Landscape When Polymers Adsorb Hildegard M. Schneider, Peter Frantz, and Steve Granick*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of conformational substates in a model system (poly(methyl methacrylate) adsorbed primarily by hydrogen bonding onto and its potential breakdown at the molecular level has been emphasized on theoretical grounds.5

Granick, Steve

368

Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In response to a Congressional request, EIA examined the progress being made to meet the bans on the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) being implemented in New York and Connecticut at the end of 2003.

Joanne Shore

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Graphene Coating-enabled Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... phase-matching constraints with tunable nonreciprocity factor and potentially ... ALICE in Wonderland - A Story of Carbon Nanotube Electron Emission in Space .... Methyl Orange with the Magnesium Hydroxide /Titanium Dioxide Composite ...

370

Comparing the biodiesel and biogasoil production from different natural triglycerides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regarding the sustainable mobility, product quality and environmental aspects fatty acids methyl esters and biogasoils were compared. They were produced by the transesterification and special hydrocracking (including the isomerization, as well) of triglycerides, ... Keywords: biodiesel, biogasoil, feedstock supply, quality comparison

Jenö Hancsók; Zoltán Varga; Sándor Kovács; Tamás Kasza

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Bhopal Gas Leak: A Numerical Investigation of the Prevailing Meteorological Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional mesoscale model was used to understand the meteorological conditions and the influence of the terrain on the local flow pattern during the Bhopal methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas leak. The study reveals that under the prevailing ...

Maithili Sharan; S. G. Gopalakrishnan; R. T. McNider; M. P. Singh

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Horizontal Surface Tension Gradients Induced in Monolayers by Gravity Water Wave Action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface tension gradients have been measured for three different monolayers (oleyl alcohol, palmitic acid methyl ester and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide) spread on a wavy water surface (waves with 1-Hz frequency; 2 cm wave height). The wave-...

Philipp A. Lange; Heinrich Hühnerfuss

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optimization of Fabrication Process for a PDMS-SOG-Silicon Based PCR Micro Chip through System Identification Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) micro-chip with integrated thin film heaters and temperature detectors has been realized on a silicon-SOG-PDMS (polydi( methyl) siloxane) platform. Accurate temperature sensing and control is important for a PCR reaction. ...

Venumadhav Korampally; Shantanu Bhattacharya; Yuanfang Gao; Sheila A. Grant; Steven B. Kleiboeker; Keshab Gangopadhyay; Jinglu Tan; Shubhra Gangopadhyay

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors contribute to learning-induced metaplasticity in the hippocampus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hippocampal learning is thought to induce metaplasticity, which can facilitate subsequent learning. Administered at single low doses, the N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptor antagonist memantine predominantly blocks ?7 nicotinic ...

Benjamin Becker; Eva M. Klein; Nadine Striepens; Yoan Mihov; Thomas E. Schlaepfer; Juergen Reul; Liesbet Goossens; Koen Schruers; Keith M. Kendrick; René Hurlemann

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Design of a micro-Functional Testing System for process characterization of a hot micro-embossing machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth in industrial, commercial, and medical applications for micro-fluidic devices has fueled heightened research and development into micro-fluidic design, materials, and increasingly manufacturing. Polymers (Poly(methyl ...

Thaker, Kunal H. (Kunal Harish)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

David J. Szalda's List of Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David J. Szalda: David J. Szalda: List of Publications Towards the Photoreduction of CO2 with Ni (bpy)n2+ Complexes, Mori, Y.; Szalda, D. J.; Brunschwig, B. S.; Schwarz, H. A.; Fujita, E. In Photochemistry and Radiation Chemistry: Complementary Methods for the Study of Electron Transfer, Advances in Chemistry;, ; Wishart, J. F. and Nocera, D. G., Eds.;, Eds.; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, in press; . Abstract Hydride Transfer Reactions of Transition Metal Hydrides in the Preparation of [Cp(CO)3W(h1-aldehyde)]+ OTf- and [Cp(CO)3W(h1-ketone)]+ OTf-Complexes, Song, J.-S.; Szalda, D. J.; Bullock, R. M. Inorg. Chim. Acta 1997, 259, 161-172. Abstract Electronic and Molecular Structures of Pentaammineruthenium Pyridine and Benzonitrile Complexes as a Function of Oxidation State, Shin, Y.-g.

377

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO 2 Capture DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787 S. James Zhou, Shiguang Li, and Howard Meyer, GTI Yong Ding and Ben Bikson, PoroGen NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 10, 2013 2  Materials technology company commercially manufacturing products from high performance plastic PEEK (poly (ether ether ketone))  Products ranging from membrane separation filters to heat transfer devices  Not-for-profit research company, providing energy and natural gas solutions to the industry since 1941  Facilities  18 acre campus near Chicago  200,000 ft 2 , 28 specialized labs Introduction to GTI and PoroGen PEEK Fiber + Cartridge + Module = Separation system 3 Project overview  Funding: $3,736 K (DOE: $2,986 K, Cost share: $750 K)

378

Evaluation and Characterization of Membranes for H2SO4/Water and I2/HI/H2O Water Separation and Hydrogen Permeation for the S-I Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report are the findings into three membrane separation studies for potential application to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. The first is the removal of water from hydriodic acid/iodine mixtures. In the S-I cycle, iodine is added to the product of the Bunsen reaction to facilitate the separation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from hydriodic acid (HI). The amount of iodine can be as high as 83% of the overall mass load of the Bunsen product stream, which potentially introduces a large burden on the cycle’s efficiency. Removal of water from the HI and iodine mixture would substantially reduce the amount of required additional iodine. In this work, performance data for Nafion® and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes is shown.

Frederick R. Stewart

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

Standard practice for infrared flash thermography of composite panels and repair patches used in aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice describes a procedure for detecting subsurface flaws in composite panels and repair patches using Flash Thermography (FT), in which an infrared (IR) camera is used to detect anomalous cooling behavior of a sample surface after it has been heated with a spatially uniform light pulse from a flash lamp array. 1.2 This practice describes established FT test methods that are currently used by industry, and have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of composite structures during post-manufacturing and in-service examinations. 1.3 This practice has utility for testing of polymer composite panels and repair patches containing, but not limited to, bismaleimide, epoxy, phenolic, poly(amide imide), polybenzimidazole, polyester (thermosetting and thermoplastic), poly(ether ether ketone), poly(ether imide), polyimide (thermosetting and thermoplastic), poly(phenylene sulfide), or polysulfone matrices; and alumina, aramid, boron, carbon, glass, quartz, or silicon carbide fibers. Typical as-fabricate...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

Whisman, Marvin L. (Bartlesville, OK); Reynolds, James W. (Bartlesville, OK); Goetzinger, John W. (Bartlesville, OK); Cotton, Faye O. (Bartlesville, OK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Substantially isotactic, linear, alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and an olefin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compound, [Pd(Me-DUPHOS)(MeCN){sub 2}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, [Me-DUPHOS: 1,2-bis(2,5-dimethylphospholano)benzene] is an effective catalyst for the highly enantioselective, alternating copolymerization of olefins, such as aliphatic {alpha}-olefins, with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic polymers which can serve as excellent starting materials for the synthesis of other classes of chiral polymers. For example, the complete reduction of a propylene-carbon monoxide copolymer resulted in the formation of a novel, optically active poly(1,4-alcohol). Also, the previously described catalyst is a catalyst for the novel alternating isomerization cooligomerization of 2-butene with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic poly(1,5-ketone).

Sen, A.; Jiang, Z.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Substantially isotactic, linear, alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and an olefin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compound, [Pd(Me-DUPHOS)(MeCN).sub.2 ](BF.sub.4).sub.2, [Me-DUPHOS: 1,2-bis(2,5-dimethylphospholano)benzene] is an effective catalyst for the highly enantioselective, alternating copolymerization of olefins, such as aliphatic .alpha.-olefins, with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic polymers which can serve as excellent starting materials for the synthesis of other classes of chiral polymers. For example, the complete reduction of a propylene-carbon monoxide copolymer resulted in the formation of a novel, optically active poly(1,4-alcohol). Also, the previously described catalyst is a catalyst for the novel alternating isomerization cooligomerization of 2-butene with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic poly(1,5-ketone)

Sen, Ayusman (State College, PA); Jiang, Zhaozhong (State College, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

No-carrier-added (/sup 18/F)-N-methylspiroperidol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the synthesis of a radioligand, labeled with a positron emitting radionuclide which is suitable for dynamic studies in humans using positron emission transaxial tomography. No-carrier-added (NCA) (/sup 18/F)-N-methylspiroperiodl is prepared from four different sustrates: p-nitrobenzonitrile, cyclopropyl p-nitrophenyl ketone, p-cyclopropanoyl-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium iodide and p-cyclopropanoyl-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium perchlorate. The process for the production of NCA (/sup 18/F)-N-methylspiroperidol is a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. Furthermore, the compound of this invention is shown to be effective as a new drug of choice for in vivo examination of dopamine binding sites in a human brain. In particular, this drug is primarily useful in the noninvasive technique of positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT).

Shiue, C.Y.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1985-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal insulation as a source of air pollution  

SciTech Connect

Complaints about odors in buildings may be caused by penetration of moisture into mineral wool used as thermal insulation in the cavity wall or under the roof. The complaints may occur particularly during hot weather. In laboratory experiments, moist mineral wool produced the same unpleasant odor at 50{degree}C. In air samples over the moist wool, higher aliphatic aldehydes, ketones and aromatic aldehydes were detected. In air samples collected in rooms of buildings where complaints about odor had been made, higher aliphatic aldehydes (n-hexanal-n-decanal) were detected with concentrations between 1 and 50 {mu}g{center dot}m{sup {minus}3} for each of these aldehydes. Thus, the penetration of moisture into mineral wool used for thermal insulation should be avoided.

van der Wal, J.F.; Moons, A.M.M.; Steenlage, R. (TNO Division of Technology for Society, Delft (Netherlands))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Title Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Salminen, Justin, Nicolas Papaiconomou, Anand R. Kumar, Jong-Min Lee, John B. Kerr, John S. Newman, and John M. Prausnitz Journal Fluid Phase Equilibria Volume 261 Pagination 421-426 Keywords hydrophobic, ionic liquids, piperidinium, properties, pyrrolidinium, safety, toxicity Abstract Some properties are reported for hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) containing 1-methyl-1-propyl pyrrolidinium [MPPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl pyrrolidinium [MBPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-propyl piperidinium [MPPip]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl piperidinium [MBPip]+, 1-methyl-1-octyl pyrrolidinium [MOPyrro]+ and 1-methyl-1-octyl piperidinium [MOPip]+ cations. These liquids provide new alternatives to pyridinium and imidazolium ILs. High thermal stability of an ionic liquid increases safety in applications like rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices. Thermal properties, ionic conductivities, viscosities, and mutual solubilities with water are reported. In addition, toxicities of selected ionic liquids have been measured using a human cancer cell line. The ILs studied here are sparingly soluble in water but hygroscopic. We show some structure-property relationships that may help to design green solvents for specific applications. While ionic liquids are claimed to be environmentally benign solvents, as yet few data have been published to support these claims.

387

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations after Low and High LET Irradiations  

SciTech Connect

Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding the delayed, non-targeted effects of radiation including radiationinduced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET x-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF?B), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. MiRNA shown to be altered in expression level after x-ray irradiation are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Different and higher incidence of epigenetic changes were observed after exposure to low LET x-rays than high LET Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes even though they are chromosomally stable suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the cell without initiating RIGI.

Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Dimerization of a Viral SET Protein Endows its Function  

SciTech Connect

Histone modifications are regarded as the most indispensible phenomena in epigenetics. Of these modifications, lysine methylation is of the greatest complexity and importance as site- and state-specific lysine methylation exerts a plethora of effects on chromatin structure and gene transcription. Notably, paramecium bursaria chlorella viruses encode a conserved SET domain methyltransferase, termed vSET, that functions to suppress host transcription by methylating histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27), a mark for eukaryotic gene silencing. Unlike mammalian lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), vSET functions only as a dimer, but the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that dimeric vSET operates with negative cooperativity between the two active sites and engages in H3K27 methylation one site at a time. New atomic structures of vSET in the free form and a ternary complex with S-adenosyl homocysteine and a histone H3 peptide and biochemical analyses reveal the molecular origin for the negative cooperativity and explain the substrate specificity of H3K27 methyltransferases. Our study suggests a 'walking' mechanism, by which vSET acts all by itself to globally methylate host H3K27, which is accomplished by the mammalian EZH2 KMT only in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex.

H Wei; M Zhou

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can also be transferred to our laboratory. Molecular Target/use Radiotracer Name Structure Chemical Name Hexokinase/glucose metabolism, cancer, brain function 18 FDG 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose Dopamine D2/D3 receptors/addiction, psychiatric disorders [ 11 C]raclopride 3,5-dichloro-N-{[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin- 2-yl]methyl}-2-hydroxy-6- [ 11 C]methoxybenzamide Dopamine transporters / cocaine pharmacokinetics, addiction, neurological disorders [ 11 C]cocaine methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-s(benzoyloxy)- 8-[ 11 C]methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate Blood flow/nicotine pharmacokinetics [ 11 C]nicotine 3-[(2S)-1-[ 11 C]methylpyrrolidin-2-

392

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

240 Federal Register 240 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 98 / Friday, May 20, 2011 / Notices amendment of methyl bromide products that include the non-CUE/QPS use on fresh market tomatoes (CA), fresh market peppers (CA), Vidalia onions (GA), and ginger (HI) is December 31, 2012. The effective date of the amendment of methyl bromide products that includes the non-CUE/QPS use for resurfacing/replanting turf and sod on golf courses and athletic/recreational fields is December 31, 2013. The effective date of the amendment of methyl bromide products that include the non-CUE/QPS use on caneberry or tobacco seedling tray uses is December 31, 2014. The effective date of the amendment listed in Table 1B is May 20, 2011. These amendments do not affect post-harvest fumigant uses of

393

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

240 Federal Register 240 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 98 / Friday, May 20, 2011 / Notices amendment of methyl bromide products that include the non-CUE/QPS use on fresh market tomatoes (CA), fresh market peppers (CA), Vidalia onions (GA), and ginger (HI) is December 31, 2012. The effective date of the amendment of methyl bromide products that includes the non-CUE/QPS use for resurfacing/replanting turf and sod on golf courses and athletic/recreational fields is December 31, 2013. The effective date of the amendment of methyl bromide products that include the non-CUE/QPS use on caneberry or tobacco seedling tray uses is December 31, 2014. The effective date of the amendment listed in Table 1B is May 20, 2011. These amendments do not affect post-harvest fumigant uses of

394

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

395

Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Modeling the Auto-Ignition of Biodiesel Blends with a Multi-Step Model  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in using biodiesel in place of or in blends with petrodiesel in diesel engines; however, biodiesel oxidation chemistry is complicated to directly model and existing surrogate kinetic models are very large, making them computationally expensive. The present study describes a method for predicting the ignition behavior of blends of n-heptane and methyl butanoate, fuels whose blends have been used in the past as a surrogate for biodiesel. The autoignition is predicted using a multistep (8-step) model in order to reduce computational time and make this a viable tool for implementation into engine simulation codes. A detailed reaction mechanism for n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends was used as a basis for validating the multistep model results. The ignition delay trends predicted by the multistep model for the n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends matched well with that of the detailed CHEMKIN model for the majority of conditions tested.

Toulson, Dr. Elisa [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Allen, Casey M [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Miller, Dennis J [Michigan State University, East Lansing; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Schock, Harold [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Lee, Tonghun [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mechanistic enzymology of CO dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final steps in acetyl-CoA biosynthesis by anaerobic bacteria are performed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), a nickel/iron-sulfur protein. An important achievement was to establish conditions under which acetyl-CoA synthesis by purified enzymes equals the in vivo rate of acetate synthesis. Under these optimized conditions we established that the rate limiting step in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from methyl-H[sub 4]folate, CO and CoA is likely to be the methylation of CODH by the methylated corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein. We then focused on stopped flow studies of this rate limiting transmethylation reaction and established its mechanism. We have studied the carbonylation of CODH by infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy and determined that the [Ni-Fe[sup 3-4]S[sub 4

Ragsdale, S.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DOE/EIS-0285; Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (May 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement - Appendices Statement - Appendices DOE/EIS-0285 Arrow-leaf Balsamroot Cooperating Agencies Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0285 APPENDICES May 2000 Table of Contents Appendix A - Public Involvement: Publications Appendix B - Biological Weed Control Agents Appendix C - Bonneville Pesticide Applicator Certification Plan Appendix D - Sample Educational Information Appendix E - Clearance Criteria Appendix F - FS Mitigation Measures and Background Appendix G - BLM Mitigation Measures and Background Appendix H - Herbicide Fact Sheets 2,4-D Azafenidin Bromacil Chlorsulfuron Clopyralid Dicamba Dichlobenil Diuron Fosamine Ammonium Glyphosate Halosulfuron-methyl Hexazinone Imazapyr Isoxaben Mefluidide Metsulfuron-methyl

399

A review of chromatographic characterization techniques for biodiesel and biodiesel blends.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review surveys chromatographic technology that has been applied to the characterization of biodiesel and its blends. Typically, biodiesel consists of fatty acid methyl esters produced by transesterification of plant or animal derived triacylglycerols. Primary attention is given to the determination of trace impurities in biodiesel, such as methanol, glycerol, mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, and sterol glucosides. The determination of the fatty acid methyl esters, trace impurities in biodiesel, and the determination of the biodiesel content of commercial blends of biodiesel in conventional diesel are also addressed.

Pauls, R. E. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Phosphorylation of HOX11/TLX1 on Threonine-247 during mitosis modulates expression of cyclin B1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have side chains with amine groups this change likely does not affect DNA interac- tions [20]. In contrast, Thr has both methyl and hydro- xyl groups in its side chain while Ile contains only a hydrophobic methyl group and this amino acid change... CDP/Cux [39], hSIX1 [40], the POU transcrip- tion factors Oct-1, GHF-1 and Pit-1[41-43], the NK-like homeodomain proteins, Csx/Nkx2.5 [44], and PRH/Hex [45] and the clustered homeobox genes HOXA9 [46], HOXA10 [47-50], HOXB6 [51] and HOXB7 [52]. In some...

Chen, Edwin; Huang, Xiaoyong; Zheng, Yanzhen; Li, You-Jun; Chesney, Alden; Ben-David, Yaacov; Yang, Eric; Hough, Margaret R

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

Chiriac, R., E-mail: rodica.chiriac@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); De Araujos Morais, J. [Universite Federal de Paraiba, Campus I Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Carre, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bayard, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chovelon, J.M. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

C-C and C-Heteroatom Bond Dissociation Energies in CH3R?C(OH)2: Energetics for Photocatalytic Processes of Organic Diolates on TiO2 Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The bond energies of a range of gem-diols, CH3R?C(OH)2 (R? = H, F, Cl, Br, CN, NO2, CF3, CH3CH2, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH2CH2, ((CH3)2)CH, (CH3)3C, ((CH3)2CH)CH2, (CH3CH2)(CH3)CH, C6H5 (CH3CH2)(CH3)CH) which serve as models for binding to a surface have been studied with density functional theory (DFT) and the molecular orbital G3(MP2) methods to provide thermodynamic data for the analysis of the photochemistry of ketones on TiO2. The ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced photodecomposition of adsorbed acetone and 3,3-dimethylbutanone on the rutile TiO2 (110) surface have been investigated with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The C-CH3 and C-C(R?) bond dissociation energies in CH3R?C(OH)2 were predicted, and our calculated bond dissociation energies are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. We used a series of isodemic reactions to provide small corrections to the various bond dissociation energies. The calculated bond dissociation energies are in agreement with the observed photodissociation processes except for R? = CF3, suggesting that these processes are under thermodynamic control. For R? = CF3, reaction dynamics also play a role in determining the photodissociation mechanism. The gas phase Brönsted acidities of the gem-diols were calculated. For three molecules, R? = Cl, Br, and NO2, loss of a proton leads to the formation of a complex of acetic acid with the anion Cl-, Br-, and NO2-. The acidities of these three species are very high with the former two having acidities comparable to CF3SO3H. The ketones (R?RC(=O)) are weak Lewis acids except where addition of OH- leads to the dissociation of the complex to form an anion bonded to acetic acid, R' = NO2, Cl, and Br. The X-C bond dissociation energies for a number of X-CO2- species were calculated and these should be useful in correlating with photochemical reactivity studies.

Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Dixon, David A.; Henderson, Michael A.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Ultraviolet absorbing copolymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photostable and weather stable absorping copolymers have been prepared from acrylic esters such as methyl methacrylate containing 0.1 to 5% of an 2-hydroxy-allyl benzophenone, preferably the 4,4' dimethoxy derivative thereof. The pendant benzophenone chromophores protect the acrylic backbone and when photoexcited do not degrade the ester side chain, nor abstract hydrogen from the backbone.

Gupta, Amitava (Pasadena, CA); Yavrouian, Andre H. (La Crescenta, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

Meagher, Richard Brian (Athens, GA); Summers, Anne O. (Athens, GA); Rugh, Clayton L. (Athens, GA)

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lichtgesteuerte Proteinfragmente knnen Onkogene ein-und ausschalten Publikation in ,,Angewandte Chemie", International Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemis- try) and molecular probes (chemical genetics). Medicinal chemistry and chemical genetics (*), and methylated ruthenium complex Me1-OH (!). Angewandte Chemie 3Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 0000, 00, 0 ­ 0 www. Angewandte Chemie 5Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 0000, 00, 0 ­ 0 www.angewandte.org 2005 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co

Arndt, Katja

406

Selection of best neural network for estimating properties of diesel-biodiesel blends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybean oil was transesterified with methanol in the presence of alkaline catalyst to produce methyl esters commonly known as biodiesel. Biodiesel and diesel blends were prepared and tested in laboratory for flash point, fire point, viscosity and density. ... Keywords: artificial neural network, biodiesel, density, fire point, flash point, transesterification, viscosity

Jatinder Kumar; Ajay Bansal

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emission Impacts of Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Urban Buses and Farming Tractors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................................... 14 Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields........................................................ 34 Appendix B: Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields) LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas LS low-sulfur LSD low-sulfur diesel MTBE methyl

Argonne National Laboratory

408

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 96, pp. 1000610009, August 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has industrial sources (primarily natural gas leaks of thermogenic origin), as well as a number of methyl bromide (CH3Br), an ozone-depleting gas, is highly uncertain, because it has complex sources. This result suggests that industrial CH3Br is isotopically distinct and that the carbon isotopic composition

Goldstein, Allen

409

A fluorescence quenching assay to discriminate between specific and nonspecific inhibitors of dengue virus protease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

positives is a major hurdle in the search for lead compounds that can be developed into drugs. A small electrophoresis; Nle, norleucine; RFU, relative fluorescence units; AMC, 7-amino-4-methyl coumarin; SE, standard­9, Bz-nKRR-H) were chemically synthesized in-house. Fluorogenic peptide substrate Bz-Nle

Caflisch, Amedeo

410

Result Demonstration Report Pigweed Control in Grain Sorghum Using Peak. 1996 to 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

74 78 Peak + Methylated Oil 0.75 oz + 1 pt 78 88 93 1) WAT = Weeks after treatment application. #12Result Demonstration Report Pigweed Control in Grain Sorghum Using Peak. 1996 to 1999 Brent Bean Summary Studies were conducted from 1996 to 1999 to evaluate pigweed control in grain sorghum using Peak

Mukhtar, Saqib

411

Mathematical modeling of chemical oil-soluble transport for water control in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High water-cut is a long-standing problem in the upstream petroleum industry. Typically one-fourth of the produced fluids from oil wells worldwide are hydrocarbons and the remaining is water. Self-selective in-situ gel formation is a new potential technology ... Keywords: Gelation, Numerical modeling, Porous media, Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate or tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Water cut

H. Valiollahi; Z. Ziabakhsh; P. L. J. Zitha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of Supported Polymeric Liquid Membrane Technology for Aqueous MTBE Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) as a gasoline additive has generated a serious, widespread groundwater contamination problem in California. This study evaluated the use of supported polymeric liquid membrane technology in the remediation of MTBE contaminated groundwater.

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

Chemical Engineering Science 57 (2002) 45954604 www.elsevier.com/locate/ces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synthesis gas intermediates via steam reforming and partial oxidation, direct CH4 conver- sion reactions and optimization of catalysts and membrane reactors for the non-oxidative conversion of methane Lin Lia;b, Richard that activate methane to form methyl radicals or ethene and the conversion of ethene to aromatics increased

Iglesia, Enrique

414

Energetics of Adsorbed CH3 and CH on Pt(111) by Calorimetry: Dissociative Adsorption of CH3I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxidation of methane, steam reforming, combustion and selective oxidations of methane and various other of formation, the enthalpy for the dissociation of adsorbed methane to adsorbed methyl coadsorbed + 2 Had was found to be uphill by between +4 and +23 kJ/mol. Measured methane yields (which require

Campbell, Charles T.

415

I. Pt-Catalyzed Tandem Epoxide Fragmentation/Pentannulation of Propargylic Esters II. Progress Toward the Kopsia Family of Indole Alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N H NO 2 BnO N H xylenes, catechol BnO N H 2 , Pd/C NH 2 BnOBnO N H NO 2 BnO N H xylenes, catechol 3-(2-Nitroethyl)-5-1.1 equiv. ), and 3-methyl-catechol (250 mg, 2.3 mmol, 0.1

Pujanauski, Brian Gerard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

IU ChemIstry Vol. 52 College of Arts & sciences Alumni Association Fall 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

skill. The COMT gene codes for the Catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme, which metabolizes released effects of the catechol-O-methyl- transferase gene Val158/108Met polymorphism. Biological Psychiatry, 64, S., Kolachana, B.S., Egan, M.F., Goldberg, T.E., & Weinberger, D.R. (2005). Effect of catechol- O

Indiana University

417

The impact of genetic variation in comt and bdnf on resting-state functional connectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic imaging techniques allow investigation of the mechanisms by which genetic variants influence brain structure and function. The default mode network (DMN) is characterized by a default state of neuronal activity in the brain that is linked to ... Keywords: brain-derived neurotrophic factor, catechol-O-methyl transferase, default mode network, functional neuroimaging, genetic polymorphism, resting-state connectivity

Joon Hwan Jang; Je-Yeon Yun; Wi Hoon Jung; Geumsook Shim; Min Soo Byun; Jae Yeon Hwang; Sung Nyun Kim; Chi-Hoon Choi; Jun Soo Kwon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic O-demethylation (AOD) of phenylmethylethers is a process of both basic and applied significance. The aryl-O-methyl ethers are abundant in natural products, particularly as components of lignin. They are present as methoxylated lignin monomers in anaerobic environments and can be completely degraded there by mixed microbial populations. AOD is an essential early step in this process, and it is also a key reaction in the utilization of the O-methyl substituent as a C-one substrate by acetogens. An understanding of the AOD reaction mechanism might suggest new ways in which chemicals could be derived from lignocellulosic materials. The biochemical mechanism for the anaerobic cleavage of the aryl-O-methyl ether bond is an intriguing, but relatively unexplored process. In contrast to aerobic O-demethylating enzymes, AOD appears to involve methyl group transfer. Thus, novel biochemical information on an important biotransformation reaction will be gained from the research proposed. Recently, we have shown that AOD activity is inducible and have developed an assay for detecting AOD activity in cell-free extracts of Acetobacterium woodii. AOD activity is stimulated in vitro by the addition of ATP (1mM) and pyruvate (30 mM), the K{sub M} for vanillate being 0.4 mM. In collaboration with protein purification experts, we proposed to purify the AOD enzyme and characterize the protein(s) and the enzymatic reaction involved. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Frazer, A.C.; Young, L.Y.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Catalytic applications of mono- and dinuclear complexes containing metal-carbon sigma bonds. Final report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses results from several studies involved in the project. Investigations include: vibrational models for surface olefins and alkylidenes; mechanism of the formation and fragmentation of diosmacyclobutanes; reaction of dienes and allenes with diosmacyclobutanes; determination by nematic phase NMR of the structure of mononuclear and dinuclear ethylene complexes of osmium; and generation of ``coordinatively unsaturated`` complexes by protonation of methyl osmium complexes.

Norton, J.R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, supplement au n09, Tome 48, septembre 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-jet polished in 3:l methyl alcoho1:nitric acid at -18% and 25 VDC. The micrographs and convergent beam elect corrosion cracking resistance. This phase's reactivity with seawater appears to promote dissolution range from unacceptable to acceptable for high performance aero- space structures. INTRODUCTION Aluminum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

news and views 570 nature structural biology volume 8 number 7 july 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sequences and the requirement that they multimerize for tight binding. Almost all SAND domains are located of methylation interference experiments performed on the GMEB13 and DEAF-13 SAND domain containing proteins like the SAND domain been seen before? One can specu- late that this fold may not be ideally suited

Lim, Wendell

423

Retention indices, relative response factors, and mass spectra of trifluoroethyl and heptafluorobutyl esters of carboxylic acids determined by capillary GC/MS  

SciTech Connect

The GC/MS characteristics of carboxylic acid esters prepared from fluorine-containing alcohols were compared to those of methyl esters. The GC retention of 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl (TFE) esters was less than, and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butyl (HFB) esters approximately equivalent to that of methyl esters. The peak shape of both TFE and HFB esters was slightly superior to that of methyl esters. Mass spectra of TFE and HFB aliphatic esters show significantly more intense molecular and key fragment ions than those of methyl esters. Also, owing to their significantly higher molecular weights, TFE or HFB ester molecular ions and most fragment ions of interest occur at significantly higher m/z values than most potential interfering ions. The GC retention indices, relative GC/MS total ion current response factors, and 70 eV electron impact mass spectra of about 70 TFE and 70 HFB carboxylic acid esters are reported. Results from analysis of a TFE/HFB esterified petroleum carboxylic acid concentrate are discussed in detail. 26 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Yu, S.K.-T.; Vrana, R.P.; Green, J.B.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

publication 442-880 There are broad and increasing interests across the nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). When cooking oil or rendered animal fat is used, two additional steps (before transesterification a reaction called trans- esterification in which fresh vegetable oil, used cooking oil, or rendered animal fat reacts with alcohol (usually in the methyl form) in the presence of a catalyst (Ma and Hanna, 1999

Liskiewicz, Maciej

425

Biodiesel fuel from animal fat. Ancillary studies on transesterification of beef tallow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transesterification of beef tallow was investigated. The solubility of ethanol in beef tallow was much higher than that of methanol. At 100 C the solubility of methanol was 19% (w/w). The solubility of ethanol in beef tallow reached 100% (w/w) at about 68 C. For the distribution of methanol between beef tallow methyl esters (BTME) and glycerol, the percentage of total methanol in the glycerol phase was higher than that in the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) phase in a simulated system at room temperature. At 65--80 C, however, the percentage of total methanol in FAME (60% (w/w)) was higher than that in glycerol (40% (w/w)) in a 90:10 (w/w) blend of FAME and glycerol. This coincided with the methanol distribution in the transesterified product. The process for making beef tallow methyl esters should recover methanol using vacuum distillation, separate the ester and glycerol phases, and then wash the beef tallow methyl esters with warm water. At neutral pH, the separation of ester and glycerol and water washing was easier because it reduced emulsion formation.

Ma, F.; Clements, L.D.; Hanna, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydridomethyl iridium complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

428

Ris Energy Report 5 Renewable-based fuels for transport 4 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by avoiding distribution, but at the risk of a range of quality if pro- duced on a small scale [3]. Biodiesel Converting vegetable oils to biodiesel is a common ap- proach to overcome the problems with direct use of veg esters with properties similar to mineral diesel and some glyc- erine by-product. Usually as a methyl

429

As Global energy consumption rises, more research is being conducted towards alternative renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the combustion properties of each fatty acid in biodiesel. Simulating methyl oleate as 100% biodiesel would allow renewable fuels. · Combustion modeling is being used to simulate biodiesel combustion in diesel engines. · Simulating biodiesel combustion to obtain combustion data relevant to real world applications, can be very

Hutcheon, James M.

430

Synthesis of DiamidoPyrrolyl Molybdenum Complexes Relevant to Reduction of Dinitrogen to Ammonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A potentially useful trianionic ligand for the reduction of dinitrogen catalytically by molybdenum complexes is one in which one of the arms in a [(RNCH2CH2)3N]3? ligand is replaced by a 2-mesitylpyrrolyl-?-methyl arm, ...

Chin, J. M.

431

Cell-Trappable Quinoline-Derivatized Fluoresceins for Selective and Reversible Biological Zn(II) Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of two new, cell-trappable fluorescent probes for Zn(II) are presented. These probes, 2-(4,5-bis(((6-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethoxy)quinolin-8-yl)amino)methyl)-6-hydroxy-3-oxo-3H-8 ...

McQuade, Lindsey E.

432

Impact of Solvent on Photocatalytic Mechanisms: Reactions of Photodesorption Products with Ice Overlayers on the TiO2(110) Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of water and methanol ice overlayers on the photodecomposition of acetone on rutile TiO2(110) were evaluated in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the absence of ice overlayers, acetone photodecomposed on TiO2(110) at 95 K by ejection of a methyl radical into the gas phase and formation of acetate on the surface. With ice overlayers, the methyl radicals are trapped at the interface between TiO2(110) and the ice. When water ice was present, these trapped methyl radicals reacted either with each other to form ethane or with other molecules in the ice (e.g., water or displaced acetone) to form methane (CH4), ethane (CH3CH3) and other products (e.g., methanol), with all of these products trapped in the ice. The new products were free to revisit the surface or depart during desorption of the ice. When methanol ice was present, methane formation came about only from reaction of trapped methyl radicals with the methanol ice. Methane and ethane slowly leaked through methanol ice overlayers into vacuum at 95 K, but not through water ice overlayers. Different degrees of site competition between water and acetone, and between methanol and acetone led to different hydrogen abstraction pathways in the two ices. These results provide new insights into product formation routes and solution-phase radical formation mechanisms that are important in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

INSIDE: COMPUTER SCIENTISTS Fighting Brain Tumors 18 FILMMAKER Tom DiCillo 32 KEITH FENIMORE'S Social Networking 38  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cucumber mosaic susceptible CMV - cucumber mosaic virus COC crop oil concentrate CPB - Colorado potato - miles per hour MoA - mode of action MR - mosaic resistant MSO methylated seed oil MT - mosaic tested N OF - oil formulation OLF - other labeled formulations OMRI Organic Materials Review Institute opt - optimum

434

Respond, Recover, Restructure: Technologies Helping the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cucumber mosaic susceptible CMV - cucumber mosaic virus COC crop oil concentrate CPB - Colorado potato - miles per hour MoA - mode of action MR - mosaic resistant MSO methylated seed oil MT - mosaic tested N OF - oil formulation OLF - other labeled formulations opt - optimum OS - ozone sensitive OT - ozone

Québec, Université du

435

Molecular Recognition in Cyclodextrin Complexes of Amino Acid Derivatives: The Effects of Kinetic Energy on the Molecular Recognition of a Pseudopeptide in a Nonconstraining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Recognition in Cyclodextrin Complexes of Amino Acid Derivatives: The Effects of Kinetic Energy on the Molecular Recognition of a Pseudopeptide in a Nonconstraining Host Environment as Revealed-acetyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester has been determined at several temperatures between 298 and 20 K to further study molecular

Vold, Robert

436

d W D t W K D ' D d : ^ ^ ^  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon fossil fuels to biofuels (particularly bioethanol and biodiesel [1] and [2]). Since the principal of the conversion of methyl decanoate and of the mole fraction profiles of the reaction products and O2 negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior, as can be observed in Fig. 4. The conversion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

437

AOCS Official Method Ce 2c-11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Methylation of Lipids in Foods by Acid-Alkali Hydrolysis AOCS Official Method Ce 2c-11 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads 50A083EC5D1CBF7F7A43600CCBB0596A Definition This method describes an acid-alkaline procedure

438

AOCS Official Method Ce 2b-11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Methylation of Lipids in Foods by Alkali Hydrolysis AOCS Official Method Ce 2b-11 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads EAFDDE2C2B1F81398CE9DF42FBCA214D Definition This method describes a simultaneous alkali hydrolysi

439

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year.

Information Center

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Key role of the NO-pathway and MMP-9 in high blood flow-induced remodeling of rat resistance arteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.henrion@univ-angers.fr Abbreviations: Angiotensin converting enzyme: ACE; Doxycycline: DOX; L-NAME (N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl perindopril or the MMPs inhibitor doxycycline. After 14 days, outward hypertrophic remodeling occurred in HF-remodeling was prevented by L-NAME, eNOS gene knockout and doxycycline. L-NAME prevented eNOS overexpression and MMPs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Polygeneration Integration of Gasoline Synthesis and IGCC Power Production Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas produced by gasification in a gas turbine. This synthesis gas is also an excellent raw material for a gas turbine in a combined cycle power generation scheme. Coal Residue Gasification Gas Cleaning for chemicals production such as methanol, DiMethyl Ether (DME), gasoline, Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG), hydrogen

442

Nanoimprinted photonic crystals for the modification of the (CdSe)ZnS nanocrystals light emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report experimental results of photoluminescence (PL) enhancement in 2D photonic crystals nanoimprinted in functionalized poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) based polymer in which (CdSe)ZnS core-shell luminescent nanocrystals (NCs) have been incorporated. ... Keywords: (CdSe)ZnS nanocrystals, Light extraction, Nanoimprint lithography, Photoluminescence, Photonic crystal

V. Reboud; N. Kehagias; M. Zelsmann; M. Striccoli; M. Tamborra; M. L. Curri; A. Agostiano; D. Mecerreyes; J. A. Alduncín; C. M. Sotomayor Torres

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Carbon-13 magnetic resonance of hydrocarbons. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Several tetralins, tetrahydrophenanthrenes, and dihydroanthracenes were synthesized, /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation measurements were carried out on aromatic and hydroaromatic compounds. /sup 13/C chemical shift studies were also conducted on methylated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalenes, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrenes, and 9,10-dihydroanthracenes. (DLC)

Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Molecular Biology and Genetics of the Acetate-Utilizing Methanogenic Bacteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methane biosynthesis by the Methanosarcina species, in contrast to other methanogens, occurs from the full range of methanogenic substrates that include acetate, methanol, tri-methyl, di-methyl, and methyl-amine, methyl-sulfides, and in limited instances, H2/CO2. The Methanosarcina are also versatile in their ability to adapt and grow in habitats of varying osmolarity ranging from fresh water environments, marine environments, and to hyper saline environments (ca to 1.2 M NaCl). To facilitate studies that address the biochemistry, molecular biology and physiology of these organisms, we have constructed a whole-genome microarray to identify classes of differentially expressed genes in M. mazei strain Goe1. We propose to further identify and examine how genes and their proteins involved in the synthesis and transport of osmolytes in the cell are regulated. These compounds include N-epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, alpha-glutamate, betaine, and potassium whose levels within the cell are modulated in order to provide appropriate osmotic balance. We will identify differentially expressed genes involved in hydrogen and carbon dioxide sequestration since M. mazei strain Goe1 is currently the only practical model for such study. Finally, we will explore the essential roles of two metals, molybdate and tungstate, in methanogen regulation and metabolism of these environmentally essential organsims. The above studies will advance our general understanding of how methanogens respond to their environmental signals, and adapt by adjusting their physiology to thrive in changing anaerobic habitats whether natural or man-made.

Robert P. Gunsalus

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

445

PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

Rajakumara, Eerappa; Wang, Zhentian; Ma, Honghui; Hu, Lulu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wu, Feizhen; Li, Haitao; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Shi, Yang (MSKCC); (Constellation); (Fudan); (Tsinghua)

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

E Rajakumara; Z Wang; H Ma; L Hu; H Chen; Y Lin; R Guo; F Wu; H Li; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Method of absorbing UF.sub.6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures employing as an absorbent a liquid composition at least one of the components of which is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2.

Lafferty, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smiley, Seymour H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Radimer, Kenneth J. (Little Falls, NJ)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

The synthesis and evaluation of new alpha-hydrogen nitroxides for 'Living' free radical polymerization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.0 mmol), 2-methyl-2-nitro-propane-1,3-diol (0.2702 g, 2.0phenyl- ethoxy)-amino]-propane-1,3-diol (21). To a solutionphenyl-ethoxy)- amino]-2-phenyl-propane-1,3-diol (27). To a

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Reduced biodegradability in a polymer flood process  

SciTech Connect

In a polymer flood, where bacterial contamination frequently causes a loss in viscosity of the polymer, the viscosity of the polymer solution is maintained by the use of a xanthan polymer modified by methylation of a portion of the subunit sugar residues of the xanthan base.

Williams, D.; Munnecke, D. M.

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Revised Version DESY04128 arXiv:physics/0408137  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of flexible molecules in this intermediate size regime.6 The method has been applied first to the methyl using the methods of IR-UV hole-filling spectroscopy HFS and IR-induced population transfer spectroscopy. These changes in population were detected using laser-induced fluorescence downstream in the expansion. In HFS

451

Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well as N. crassa Dim-5 in complex with a H3K9 peptide and a viral protein complexed to H3K27. These structures collectively highlighted a remarkable plasticity of the peptide-binding site and a lack of clear structural motifs that correlate with sequence selectivity. Methylation of H3K9 in humans relies mostly on members of the Suv39 family, namely EHMT1/GLP, EHMT2/G9a, SUV39H1, SUV39H2, SETDB1 and SETDB2, as well as then non-Suv39 enzymes PRDM2 and ASH1L. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structures of the methyltransferase domains of GLP, G9a, SUV39H2 and PRDM2, and propose a structural mechanism for substrate recognition. Our data also provide important insight to guide the development of potent and selective inhibitors of HKMTs, which are likely to have applications in a variety of diseases including regenerative medicine, oncology and inflammation.

Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Predicting flammability of gas mixtures containing volatile organic compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One requirement regarding the transportation of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste containers currently limits the total concentration of potentially flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and flammable gases in the headspace of the waste container. Typical VOCs observed in the drums include aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, alcohols, cyclohexane, as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes). Flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, may be generated in the containers by radiation-induced decomposition (radiolysis) of water and hydrocarbon waste forms. An experimental program was initiated to identify an accurate means for predicting flammability for gas mixtures containing one or more of the following species: hydrogen, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, toluene, or 2-butanone. The lower flammability limits (LFL) of gas mixtures containing equimolar quantity for each species were determined in a 19-liter laboratory flammability chamber using a strong spark ignition source. The group factor contribution method was determined to be more accurate than the LeChatelier method for estimating the LFL for these gas mixtures.

Liekhus, K. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Zlochower, I. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Lab.; Djordjevic, S.; Loehr, C. [Benchmark Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

SciTech Connect

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

Arsenite promotes centrosome abnormalities under a p53 compromised status induced by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus an interaction between arsenite and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of a tobacco-specific carcinogen 4- (methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone, NNK) and arsenite on lung cell transformation. BEAS-2B, an immortalized human lung epithelial cell line, was selected to test the centrosomal abnormalities and colony formation by NNK and arsenite. We found that NNK, alone, could enhance BEAS-2B cell growth at 1-5 muM. Under NNK exposure, arsenite was able to increase centrosomal abnormality as compared with NNK or arsenite treatment alone. NNK treatment could also reduce arsenite-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, these cellular effects were found to be correlated with p53 dysfunction. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells cotreated with NNK and arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that NNK could provide a p53 compromised status. Arsenite would act specifically on this p53 compromised status to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenite under tobacco-specific carcinogen co-exposure.

Liao, W.-T. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan (China); Center of Excellence for Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yu, H.-S. [Center of Excellence for Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dermatology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin Pinpin, E-mail: pplin@nhri.org.t [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Louis W., E-mail: lwchang44@yahoo.co [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

CORROSIVITY AND COMPOSITION OF RAW AND TREATED PYROLYSIS OILS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis offers a relatively low cost method of processing biomass to produce a liquid product that has the potential for conversion to several types of liquid fuels. The liquid product of fast pyrolysis, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, contains a high oxygen content primarily in the form of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. These oils are typically very acidic with a Total Acid Number that is often in the range of 50 to 100, and previous studies have shown this material to be quite corrosive to common structural materials. Removal of at least some of the oxygen and conversion of this oil to a more useful product that is considerably less corrosive can be accomplished through a hydrogenation process. The product of such a treatment is considered to have the potential for blending with crude oil for processing in petroleum refineries. Corrosion studies and chemical analyses have been conducted using as produced bio-oil samples as well as samples that have been subjected to different levels of oxygen removal. Chemical analyses show treatment affected the concentrations of carboxylic acids contained in the oil, and corrosion studies showed a positive benefit of the oxygen removal. Results of these studies will be presented in this paper.

Keiser, Jim; Howell, Michael; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Sam; Elliott, Douglas C.

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions  

SciTech Connect

Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters using liquid-liquid extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated liquid-liquid extraction as a treatment method for biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW). Distribution coefficients for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were determined for the following solvents: methylisobutyl ketone (MIBK), n-butyl acetate, n-butanol, MIBK/n-butyl acetate (50:50 vol), MIBK/n-butanol (50:50 vol), tri-butyl phosphate, tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO)/MIBK (10:90 wt), TOPO/kerosene (10:90 wt), kerosene, and toluene. The best distribution coefficient of 1.3 was given by n-butanol. Chemical analysis of the wastewater by gas chromatography (GC) showed acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations of about 4000 mg/1. Methanol, ethanol, and acetone were identified in trace amounts. These five compounds accounted for 45% of the measured COD of 29,000 mg/1. Because of the presence of carboxylic acids, pH was expected to affect extraction of the wastewater. At low pH the acids should be in the acidic form, which increased extraction by MIBK. Extraction by n-butanol was increased at high pH, where the acids should be in the ionic form.

Bell, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second phase of the project involved developing a low-cost and scalable approach for the synthesis of microporous carbon materials with well-controlled pore sizes that would be suitable for hydrogen storage. The team studied several approaches, including the use of different zeolites as a template, the use of organic micelle structures as a template, and the slow oxidation of polymer precursors. Among them, the slow activation of Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under either CO2 environment or H2O vapor produced microporous carbon with an average pore size of less than 2 nm. Initial testing at 77K at both NREL and the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) showed that these materials can store ~5.1 wt% hydrogen (excess) at 40 bar and 77K. The main feature to note with this material is that while the excess gravimetric capacities (>5 wt% at 77K) and specific surface areas (>3100 m2/g) are similar to AX-21 and other “super activated” commercial carbon sorbents at the same temperatures and pressures, due to the smaller pore sizes, bulk densities greater than 0.7 g/ml can be achieved, enabling excess volumetric capacities greater than 35 g/L; more than double that of AX-21.

Jie Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methyl isobutyl ketone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Minimizing the formation of coke and methane on Co nanoparticles in steam reforming of biomass-derived oxygenates  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental understanding and control of chemical transformations are essential to the development of technically feasible and economically viable catalytic processes for efficient conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach, we report high hydrogen selectivity and catalyst durability of acetone steam reforming (ASR) on inert carbon supported Co nanoparticles. The observed catalytic performance is further elucidated on the basis of comprehensive first-principles calculations. Instead of being considered as an undesired intermediate prone for catalyst deactivation during bioethanol steam reforming (ESR), acetone is suggested as a key and desired intermediate in proposed two-stage ESR process that leads to high hydrogen selectivity and low methane formation on Co-based catalysts. The significance of the present work also sheds a light on controlling the chemical transformations of key intermediates in biomass conversion such as ketones. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) project of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computing time was granted by the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL, and sponsored by the U.S. DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

Sun, Junming; Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities  

SciTech Connect

Described is a method to make liquid chemicals, such as functional intermediates, solvents, and liquid fuels from biomass-derived cellulose. The method is cascading; the product stream from an upstream reaction can be used as the feedstock in the next downstream reaction. The method includes the steps of deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be converted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid so formed can be further reacted to yield a host of valuable products. For example, the pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes. Alternatively, the nonene may be isomerized to yield a mixture of branched olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of branched alkanes. The mixture of n-butenes formed from .gamma.-valerolactone can also be subjected to isomerization and oligomerization to yield olefins in the gasoline, jet and Diesel fuel ranges.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano (Madison, WI); West, Ryan M. (Madison, WI)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

464

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following major areas of investigation: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment, enhanced recovery); liquid processing (characterization of petroleum and synthetic crude, thermodynamics; process technology); utilization; project integration and technology transfer. Highlights for this period in research studies are listed as those in extraction research and processing and thermodynamics research. Searches for microorganisms that will be useful in enhanced oil recovery have produced two promising leads. At Oklahoma State University, bacteria of the genus Clostridia have been found which can live in a brine solution as found in most petroleum reservoirs. These bacteria produce carbon dioxide, acetic acid, alcohols, and ketones as metabolic products. At the University of Georgia, a culture of bacteria has been found which will reduce the viscosity of a 10/sup 0/ API gravity oil by 95 percent. The analysis of heavy oils requires differentiation of sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen-containing compounds from hydrocarbons. The most effective way to do this is with a high-resolution mass spectrometer that can distinguish between compounds having molecular weights only a fractional unit apart. These molecular weights are calculated from the computer acquired time-moments of the various ions in a mass spectrum. Thus, the accuracy of results reflects, in part, the numerical methods used in data processing. Consequently, the effect of the mathematical functions on the accuracy of mass measurement is being determined.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Large scale total synthesis of apoptolidinone and progress towards the total synthesis of ammocidin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apoptolidin 1.1 was isolated in 1997 by Hayakawa and co-workers from a soil bacterium Nocardiopsis sp. during screening for specific apoptosis inducers. The primary biological test revealed that this polyketide macrolide induced apoptosis in cells transformed with the adenovirus type E1A oncognene, but not normal cells. This dissertation describes the latest studies in understanding of apoptolidin’s biological activity mechanism and previous contributions towards its total synthesis. Synthesizing apoptolidinone 1.26 by an intra-molecular Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons approach featuring a Suzuki coupling, cross metathesis and two diastereoselective aldol reactions is discussed. 15 mg apoptolidinone is prepared via our previously developed intramolecular Suzuking coupling approach. Ammocidin 3.1, which was found to induce apoptosis in Ba/F3-v12 cells in an IL- 3 free medium, is a specific apoptosis inducer discovered by Hayakawa and co-workers in 2001 from Saccharothrix sp. AJ9571. A strategy featuring Suzuki coupling, cross metathesis, Yamaguchi macrolactonization and three asymmetric aldol reactions was applied to the total synthesis of ammocidinone 3.6, the aglycone of ammocidin. The preparation of the key building blocks was discussed in the following chapter: aldehyde 3.8 (C14-C19) was synthesized via Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation; ethyl ketone 3.9’ (C20-C28) was prepared via Kobayashi and Crimmins’s asymmetric aldol methodologies; aldehyde 3.14 (C7-C13) was generated by Brown crotylation and cross metathesis.

Liu, Qingsong

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cadmium selenide nanoparticles and nanoclusters were prepared and added to polymer solar cells to improve their photon capture ability. These nanoparticles did exhibit some beneficial effects on the photon conversion efficiencies of selected polymer solar cells. Ternary bulk heterojunction systems based on composites of methyl viologen-doped, CdSe nanoparticles blended with poly (3-hexothiopene) (P3HT) and 6, 6-phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were also tested. It was found that the devices with methyl viologen-doped CdSe nanoparticles do produce more photocurrent in a region surrounding the absorption peak of the particles (560 to 660nm) when compared to pristine P3HT:PCBM devices. Gold nanorods were also prepared and tested in some solar cells. These nanorods did produce a very small enhancement in photon absorbance, but the observed increase the photon conversion efficiency was not sufficient to make the effort worthwhile. Our goals were (1) to prepare cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide clusters and nanoparticles to be tested as photon absorbers to enhance the photon conversion efficiency of polymer solar polymer solar cells and (2) to prepare gold and silver nanorods to be added to polymer solar cells to enhance their photon capture capability. The cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide nanoparticles and some new nanoclusters were prepared. The cadmium selenide nanoparticles were also tested in solar cells and did exhibit some positive effects when they were combined with certain co-absorbing polymers. Due to solubility problems that were not solved in the available time, the new nanoclusters were not tested in solar cells. Ternary bulk heterojunction systems based on composites of methyl viologen doped, CdSe nanoparticles blended with poly (3-hexothiopene) (P3HT) and 6, 6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) have been examined in detail. The methyl viologen was added to promote charge separation of the initially formed excitons. It was found that the devices with CdSe produce more photocurrent in a region surrounding the absorption peak of the particles (560 to 660nm) when compared to a pristine P3HT:PCBM device. Gold nanorods were prepared and tested in some solar cells. These did show a very small enhancement in photon absorbance. However, the increase in short circuit current was negligible, which suggests that this antenna effect produces no significant increase in photocurrent generation. Efforts to synthesize niobium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles for use in polymer solar polymer solar cells were also made. The nanoparticles were prepared, but they were not tested in the cells before the termination of the funding of the project.

ADAMS, RICHARD D., PhD.

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

468

Health Benefits and Quality of Texas Red Wines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing techniques for red wines and their potential health benefits have intensively been investigated, however, information relevant to the grape and wine industry in Texas is less frequently available. The overall objective of this work was to investigate the reduction of 3-alkyl-2-methoxypyrazines that can affect the quality of Texas wines and to study the health benefits of Texas wines. The methods used include SPME-GC-MS and molecular bioassays. The first objective was to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory potential effect of red wine polyphenols from Black Spanish wine (Vitis aestivalis hybrid) in colonic human fibroblast cells. Results show that an extract prepared from Black Spanish wine decreased gene expression and activation of NF-kB transcription factor and target proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules. Induction of microRNA-126 (miR- 126) by wine extract was found to be one of the underlying molecular mechanism by which wine extract decreased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and inflammation in colon cells. These mechanisms may be relevant to the prevention of iv inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that may increase the risk for colon cancer. The second objective was to investigate the role of the green june beetle (GJB ) as exogenous source of MPs other than the multicolored Asian Lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis). Over the last decade, the green june beetle has been suspected to be a source of MPs based on intermittent reports from Texas growers of an atypical aroma and flavor reminiscent of crushed green June beetles (GJB). Specifically the North region of Texas seems affected. Results demonstrated GJB as source of 3-isopropyl-2- methoxypyrazine, where one GJB could elevate MPs above sensory perceptible levels in 4.3 gallons of wine. The incorporation of GJB to the winemaking process may contribute negatively to the sensory properties of Texas wines and therefore should be strictly controlled. The third objective was to explore the potential effect of micro-oxygenation treatment and accelerated aging techniques relevant for the state of Texas in the reduction of 3-Isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), and 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) levels as determined by SPME-GC-MS. Results show that MPs were not affected by MOX or oak interaction. Although the data suggest that MOX and oak exposure do not directly affect MPs concentration. The fourth research objective was to explore the potential effect of three commercial available yeast strains, BM45, K1, and D80, on MPs levels in Black Spanish wines. Black Spanish wines were fermented with MB45 strain resulted in the highest amount of MPs. Conversely K1 and D80 yeast strains reduced IBMP levels in comparison with the control. An increase in IBMP was not expected. However it has been demonstrated that amino acids valine and leucine are MPs precursors. If Vitis v aestivalis hybrid grapes contained a similar methyltransferase enzyme found in Vitis vinifera grapes and S. cerevisiae contained similar IPMP biosynthesis pathway found in Pseudomonas perolens BM45 may have led to the increased IBMP observed in the fermentation. In addition we evaluated MPs levels of wines fermented over 20 days with a chemical defined grape juice medium containing a concentration of yeast available nitrogen of 200 mg N/L. Data suggest that wines fermented with BM45 and D80 yeast strains reduced IBMP but K1 yeast did not show any effect in comparison with the control. In addition MPs were evaluated in the yeast mannoproteins fraction. Results show the presence of IBMP in low concentration below the method detection limit. This data demonstrate for the first time that yeast mannoproteins binds IBMP. to evidence for interactions between mannoproteins secreted by the D80 yeast strain and IBMP. This work will provide valuab

Angel Morales, Gabriela Del Carmen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES FEBRUARY, 1992 Prepared by: Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation

470

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

691 - 8700 of 31,917 results. 691 - 8700 of 31,917 results. Page EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas, Carrollton, Kentucky This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to advance Oxyhydrochlorination technology to an integrated engineering-scale process. http://energy.gov/nepa/ea-1157-methyl-chloride-oxyhydrochlorination-methane-building-black-chemicals-and-fuels-natural Page Annual Performance Reports The Annual Performance Report provides key performance information that demonstrates DOE's accountability to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and... http://energy.gov/cfo/reports/annual-performance-reports Page EIS-0289: JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project

471

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 results: 7 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Elton J. Cairns [Clear All Filters] 2008 Shin, Joon Ho, Pratyay Basak, John B. Kerr, and Elton J. Cairns. "Rechargeable Li/LiFePO4 Cells Using N-Methyl-N-butyl pyrrolidinium Bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide-LiTFSI Electrolyte Incorporating Polymer Additives." Electrochimica Acta 54, no. 2 (2008): 410-414. Shin, Joon Ho, and Elton J. Cairns. "N-Methyl-(n-butyl)pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-LiTFSI-poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether mixture as a Li/S cell electrolyte." Journal of Power Sources 177 (2008): 537-545. 2007 Nakahara, Kentaro, Jiro Iriyama, Shigeyuki Iwasa, Masahiro Suguro, Masaharu Satoh, and Elton J. Cairns. "Al-laminated film packaged organic radical

472

Crossed beam studies of full and half collisions. [F + H/sub 2/(D/sub 2/)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of two experiments performed on a new very high resolution crossed molecular beams apparatus are discussed. The first experiment, photofragmentation of methyl iodide, is deconvoluted to yield vibrational state distributions for the recoiling methyl fragment. These distributions are then analyzed in terms of half-collision models and Franck-Condon factors. The second experiment, a full-collision example, is the reaction of F atoms with H/sub 2/ and D/sub 2/. Laboratory angular and velocity distributions for both systems are obtained at several energies. Center-of-mass product distributions are calculated and discussed in terms of recently predicted state dependent resonance phenomena for the reaction. The design of the new apparatus is also discussed.

Sparks, R.K.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Integrate Experiments and Models to Estimate Exposure - (1) Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrate Experiments and Models to Estimate Exposure - (1) Building Integrate Experiments and Models to Estimate Exposure - (1) Building Fumigation and (2) Elemental Mercury Spill Speaker(s): Wanyu Chan Date: February 22, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn Models that predict exposure concentrations in the indoor and outdoor air can be improved by experiments designed to validate or calibrate the models. This presentation will showcase two examples where experiments and models are integrated to estimate exposure concentrations. One example is the use of methyl bromide as fumigant at food processing facilities. Field studies were conducted at three mill sites that are representative of typical industry practices in terms of size, operation, and fumigation protocol. Concentrations of methyl bromide inside the mills and outdoors

474

Inhibitory study of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 using a fluorescent approach  

SciTech Connect

Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play important roles in both normal physiology and human diseases. Deregulation of PRMT activity has been linked to several pathological states such as cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Herein, we report our work of designing and using new fluorescent reporters to perform single-step analysis of substrate binding and methylation by PRMT1. Both fluorescence intensity and anisotropy of the two reporters, R4-FL and H4-FL, were shown to effectively manifest enzyme-substrate interactions, highlighting their application in investigating PRMT inhibitors. In particular, the methylation process of R4-FL can be directly studied using fluorescence intensity readout. By combining the fluorescent measurement with radioactive analysis, we determined that AMI-1 inhibits PRMT1 activity through the mechanism of blocking peptide substrate binding.

Feng You; Xie Nan; Wu Jiang; Yang Chao [Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4098, Atlanta, Georgia 30302 (United States); Zheng, Yujun George [Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4098, Atlanta, Georgia 30302 (United States)], E-mail: yzheng@gsu.edu

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

475

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on equilibrium adsorption of various alcohols on 60--200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed during the July--September period. The alcohols include ethanol, methanol, isobutanol, t-butanol, 1-heptanol, 1-octanol, 1-hexadecanol, 4-methyl-2-pentanol, and 2-methyl-l-pentanol. Amounts of equilibrium adsorption of alcohols (ALCO) on 60--200 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal are 1 - 230 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mg-ALCO/g-coal, whereas equilibrium concentrations of alcohols are 3--40 ppM. Relations between equilibrium loadings of alcohols on the coal and equilibrium concentrations of alcohols in aqueous solutions are shown to be linear.

Kwon, K.C.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Development of chemiresponsive sensors for detection of common homemade explosives.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field-structured chemiresistors (FSCRs) are polymer based sensors that exhibit a resistance change when exposed to an analyte of interest. The amount of resistance change depends on the polymer-analyte affinity. The affinity can be manipulated by modifying the polymer within the FSCRs. In this paper, we investigate the ability of chemically modified FSCRs to sense hydrogen peroxide vapor. Five chemical species were chosen based on their hydrophobicity or reactivity with hydrogen peroxide. Of the five investigated, FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide exhibited a significant response to hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additionally, these same FSCRs were evaluated against a common interferrant in hydrogen peroxide detection, water vapor. For the conditions investigated, the FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide were able to successfully distinguish between water vapor and hydrogen peroxide vapor. A portion of the results presented here will be submitted to the Sensors and Actuators journal.

Brotherton, Christopher M.; Wheeler, David Roger

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Oscillatory thermal instability - the Bhopal disaster and liquid bombs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal runaway reactions were involved in the Bhopal disaster of 1984, in which methyl isocyanate was vented from a storage tank of the liquid, and occur in liquid peroxide explosions, yet to date there have been few investigations into the mechanism of thermal runaway in such liquid thermoreactive systems. Consequently protocols for storing thermally unstable liquids and deactivating liquid bombs may be suboptimal. In this work the hydrolysis of methyl isocyanate and the thermal decomposition of triacetone triperoxide were simulated using a gradientless, continuous-flow reactor paradigm. This approximation enabled stability analyses on the steady state solutions of the dynamical mass and enthalpy equations. The results indicate that thermal runaway in both systems is due to the onset of a large amplitude, hard thermal oscillation initiated at a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. This type of thermal misbehaviour cannot be predicted using classical ignition theory, and may be typical of liquid thermoreactive syst...

Ball, Rowena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Molecular tools for investigating ANME community structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Methane production and consumption in anaerobic marine sediments 1 is catalyzed by a series of reversible tetramethanopterin (H4MPT)-linked C1 transfer reactions. Although many of these reactions are conserved between one-carbon compound utilizing microorganisms, two remain diagnostic for archaeal methane metabolism. These include reactions catalyzed by N5-methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase and methyl coenzyme M reductase. The latter enzyme is central to C-H bond formation and cleavage underlying methanogenic and reverse methanogenic phenotypes. Here we describe a set of novel tools for the detection and functional analysis of H4MPT-linked C1 transfer reactions mediated by uncultivated anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME). These tools include polymerase chain reaction primers targeting ANME methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A subgroups and protein extraction methods from marine sediments compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling population structure and functional dynamics. [910, 1,043

Hallam, Steven J.; Page, Antoine P.; Constan, Lea; Song, Young C.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

479

Mechanism and Significance of Post-Translational Modifications in the Large (LS) and Small (SS) Subunits of Ribulose-1,5 Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project focused on a molecular and biochemical characterization of the protein methyltransferases responsible for methylation of the LS and SS in Rubisco, and the associated functional consequences accompanying these modifications. Our results provided some of the most informative structural and mechanistic understandings of SET domain protein methyltransferases. These results also positioned us to provide the first unambiguous assignment of the kinetic reaction mechanism for SET-domain protein methyltransferases, and to design and engineer an alternative substrate for Rubisco LSMT, enabling substrate specificity and functional significance studies. We demonstrated that the minimal substrate recognized by Rubisco LSMT is free lysine as well as monomethyllysine, an observation corroborated both by structural analyses as well as enzymatic activity and subsequent product distribution analyses. Ternary complexes between Rubisco LSMT and free lysine compared to complexes with monomethyllysine demonstrated that the structural basis for multiple methyl group additions is a consequence of hydrogen-bond driven spatial shifts in the amino group of Lys-14, which maintains the direct in-line geometry necessary for SN2 nucleophilic attack. The structural observations are also consistent with the previous proposal that the multiplicity of methyl group additions takes place through a processive mechanism, with successive methyl group additions to an enzyme protein complex which does not disassociate prior to the formation of trimethyllysine. This mechanism has important implications, since the regulation of gene expression by SET domain histone methyltransferases is not only dependent on site-specific lysine methylation, but also the degree of methylation. We examined the kinetic reaction mechanism for three different types of SET domain protein methyltransferases, each under conditions supporting mono-, di-, or trimethyllysine formation corroborated by product analyses. Additionally, the tight initial binding of Rubisco LSMT to Rubisco also allowed us to design a novel immobilized complex between Rubisco and Rubisco LSMT, which allowed for an unambiguous demonstration of the requirement for trimethyllysine formation prior to disassociation of the Rubisco LSMT:Rubisco complex, and therefore proof of the processive mechanism for methyl group transfer. These kinetic studies also demonstrated that an important factor has been overlooked in all kinetic analyses of SET domain protein methyltransferases reported to date. This factor is the influence of the low turnover number for SET domain protein methyltransferases and how, relative to the time-frame of kinetic enzyme assays, this can generate changes in kinetic profiles shifting reciprocal plot patterns from random/ordered bi-bi to the real kinetic reaction mechanism plots of ping-pong. Although the ternary complexes of Rubisco LSMT with S-Adenosylhomocysteine and lysine and monomethyllysine were informative in regard to reaction mechanism, they were not helpful in identifying the mechanism used by Rubisco LSMT for determining substrate specificity. We were unsuccessful at obtaining ternary complexes of Rubisco LSMT with bound synthetic polypeptide substrates, as has been reported for several histone methyltransferases. However, we were able to model a polypeptide sequence corresponding to the N-terminal region of the LS of Rubisco into the apparent substrate binding cleft in Rubisco LSMT. Knowledge of the determinants of polypeptide substrate specificity are important for identifying possible alternate substrates, as well as the possibility of generating more desirable substrates amenable to site-directed mutagenesis experiments unlike Rubisco. We determined that Rubisco LSMT is capable of methylating synthetic polypeptide mimics of the N-terminal region of the LS, both free as well as conjugated to keyhole limpet hemacyanin, but with considerable less efficiency than intact holoenzyme.

Houtz, Robert, L.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes. Annual report, September 15, 1978--December 15, 1978  

SciTech Connect

Effort was concentrated during the past quarter to define the extent of biological control necessary to achieve high production rates of methane. Although sustained production rates in excess of 100 cc/hr were consistently obtained in the previous quarter, the fermentation activity decreased with respect to productivity. All efforts during the past quarter proved ineffective in arresting the decline in productivity. Methane production now averaging 20 cc/hr is no better than productivity previously obtained on ozonated SSL with no supplemental methyl alcohol addition being added. Although it is still evident that supplemental methyl alcohol enhances methane production, the rate is now below the satisfactory or expected level. The fundamental conclusion one must draw from this quarter's results is that methane fermentation of simple oxygenated molecules is more efficient and produces a richer off-gas in terms of energy content than the same fermentation conducted on low molecular weight fragments obtained by the ozonation of SSL.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1978-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

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481

IMPRINTED GENES & TRANSPOSITIONS: EPIGENOMIC TARGETS FOR LOW DOSE RADIATION EFFECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined.

Randy Jirtle

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

Original article Microinjection of NMDA Receptor Agents into the Central Nucleus of the Amygdale Alters Water Intake in Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective(s) The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a forebrain structure which is important in regulation of ingestive behavior and there is direct and circumstantial evidence to indicate that some circuits involved with feeding behavior include glutamatergic elements. The present study examined whether administration of NMA (N-Methyl-DL-aspartic acid) or MK801 into the CeA altered water intake under deprivation. Materials and Methods Animals were deprived for 24 hr before tested for water intake. NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamatergic receptor agonist, NMA and its antagonist, MK801 were infused bilaterally, and water intake measured for 1 hr thereafter. Results The intra-CeA injection of NMDA glutamatergic agonist, NMA (0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 µg/rat) increased water intake (Pwater intake significantly (Pwater intake in this nucleus.

Jalal Solati; Ramin Hajikhani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z