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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Waste oil reduction: GKN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the steps required to establish a waste oil management program. Such a program can reduce operational costs, cut wastewater treatment costs and produce a better quality wastewater effluent through such means as: reducing the volume of oils used; segregating oils at the source of generation for recovery and reuse; and reducing the quality of oily wastewater generated. It discusses the metal-working fluid recovery options available for such a program, namely settling, filtration, hydrocyclone, and centrifugation. Included are source lists for vendors of oil skimmer equipment and coolant recovery systems.

Hunt, G.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Low-level-waste-disposal methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the followng: (1) history of low level waste disposal; (2) current practice at the five major DOE burial sites and six commercial sites with dominant features of these sites and radionuclide content of major waste types summarized in tables; (3) site performance with performance record on burial sites tabulated; and (4) proposed solutions. Shallow burial of low level waste is a continuously evolving practice, and each site has developed its own solutions to the handling and disposal of unusual waste forms. There are no existing national standards for such disposal. However, improvements in the methodology for low level waste disposal are occurring on several fronts. Standardized criteria are being developed by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by DOE. Improved techniques for shallow burial are evolving at both commercial and DOE facilities, as well as through research sponsored by NRC, DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Alternatives to shallow burial, such as deeper burial or the use of mined cavities is also being investigated by DOE.

Wheeler, M.L.; Dragonette, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Biodiesel production using waste frying oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Waste sunflower frying oil is successfully converted to biodiesel using lipase as catalyst. {yields} Various process parameters that affects the conversion of transesterification reaction such as temperature, enzyme concentration, methanol: oil ratio and solvent are optimized. {yields} Inhibitory effect of methanol on lipase is reduced by adding methanol in three stages. {yields} Polar solvents like n-hexane and n-heptane increases the conversion of tranesterification reaction. - Abstract: Waste sunflower frying oil is used in biodiesel production by transesterification using an enzyme as a catalyst in a batch reactor. Various microbial lipases have been used in transesterification reaction to select an optimum lipase. The effects of various parameters such as temperature, methanol:oil ratio, enzyme concentration and solvent on the conversion of methyl ester have been studied. The Pseudomonas fluorescens enzyme yielded the highest conversion. Using the P. fluorescens enzyme, the optimum conditions included a temperature of 45 deg. C, an enzyme concentration of 5% and a methanol:oil molar ratio 3:1. To avoid an inhibitory effect, the addition of methanol was performed in three stages. The conversion obtained after 24 h of reaction increased from 55.8% to 63.84% because of the stage-wise addition of methanol. The addition of a non-polar solvent result in a higher conversion compared to polar solvents. Transesterification of waste sunflower frying oil under the optimum conditions and single-stage methanol addition was compared to the refined sunflower oil.

Charpe, Trupti W. [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Rathod, Virendra K., E-mail: vk.rathod@ictmumbai.edu.in [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Used Oil and Filter Disposal Used Oil: Create a segregated storage area or container. Label the container "Waste Oil Only".  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Used Oil and Filter Disposal Used Oil: Create a segregated storage area or container. Label the container "Waste Oil Only". Maintain a written log to document all amounts and types of oil added to the container. No solvents, oil contaminated with solvents, PCBs, non-petroleum based oils, or any other

Maroncelli, Mark

6

Methodology for assessing performance of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the methodology provided in this report is to select the optimal way to manage particular sets of waste streams from generation to disposal in a safe and cost-effective manner. The methodology described is designed to review the entire waste management system, assess its performance, ensure that the performance objectives are met, compare different LLW management alternatives, and select the optimal alternative. The methodology is based on decision analysis approach, in which costs and risk are considered for various LLW management alternatives, a comparison of costs, risks, and benefits is made, and an optimal system is selected which minimizes costs and risks and maximizes benefits. A ''zoom-lens'' approach is suggested, i.e., one begins by looking at gross features and gradually proceeds to more and more detail. Performance assessment requires certain information about the characteristics of the waste streams and about the various components of the waste management system. Waste acceptance criteria must be known for each component of the waste management system. Performance assessment for each component requires data about properties of the waste streams and operational and design characteristics of the processing or disposal components. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Meshkov, N.K.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Camasta, S.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Production of Biofuels from High-Acid-Value Waste Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Biofuels from High-Acid-Value Waste Oils ... (1) Biofuel is derived from a renewable, domestic resource, thereby relieving reliance on petroleum fuel imports. ...

Junming Xu; Guomin Xiao; Yonghong Zhou; Jianchun Jiang

2011-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Environmental Assessment of Paper Waste Management Options by Means of LCA Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental Assessment of Paper Waste Management Options by Means of LCA Methodology ... Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a systematic tool, developed from the principles of material and energy balances, to describe the full resource usages and environmental impacts associated with supply chains delivering products or services. ... The essence of LCA is that it considers all material and energy flows from the “cradle” of primary resources (such as oil or ore deposits) to “grave” of final disposal (such as stable inert material in a landfill). ...

U. Arena; M. L. Mastellone; F. Perugini; R. Clift

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Controlled waste-oil biodegradation at existing drying beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Facility to determine if sludge drying beds at a sewage treatment plant could be used as controlled waste oil biodegradation plots has been completed. A greenhouse-like enclosure would be constructed over three 9.1 meter by 21.3 meter beds to allow for year-round use, and any waste oil runoff would be collected by existing leachate piping. It has been determined that this proposed facility could dispose of existing radioactive waste oil generation (7200 liters/year) from the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP); however, it would be inadequate to handle radioactive waste oils from the new Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) as well. The study reviewed nuclear criticality constraints, biodegradation technology, and the capital cost for an enclosed biodegradation facility.

Hary, L.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Soil stabilization using oil-shale solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil-shale solid wastes are evaluated for use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in durability and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern oil shale appears to be feasible for soil stabilization only if limestone is added during combustion. Testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented and the mechanisms of spent-shale cementation are discussed.

Turner, J.P. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Archeological Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Techno-economic study of re-refining waste lubricating oils in the Arabian Gulf countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste oil reclaimation by re-refining is a promising process for recycling valuable polutant waste. In Arabian Gulf countries, a limited volume of waste oil is recycled. A technical and economical evaluation of some reclaimation methods to produce lubricating oil has been conducted.

M.I. Al-Ahmad; I.S. Al-Mutaz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Waste lubricating oil: an annotated review. 1982 revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of renewed interest in waste oil, both in terms of energy conservation and as a threat to the environment, there appears to be a need for a systemic compilation of information on the subject. This is a revision of the 1979 manuscript (BETC/IC-79/4) reflecting publications of the last three years as well as incorporation of papers that were overlooked. The number of citations has jumped from 486 to 1203, with all previous citations also listed here. The bibliography is divided into broad subject areas. The Introduction gives the history and development of the used oil reclamation industry. The General section includes the comprehensive papers that address several subjects and thus, give a capsulated overview of the used oil situation. Sources of Information and Statistical Treatments of Data tell how to obtain additional and future information and data relating to waste oil and could aid those persons interested in keeping their knowledge current. The Other Lubricating Oils section covers many of the lubricants that have the potential for recycling. The Other Oils section is divided into four sub-sections to aid the reader to find the subject of interest. The section on Related Subjects includes those sideline areas that could apply to used oil reclamation.

Cotton, F.O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Forecasting future oil production in Norway and the UK: a general improved methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new Monte-Carlo methodology to forecast the crude oil production of Norway and the U.K. based on a two-step process, (i) the nonlinear extrapolation of the current/past performances of individual oil fields and (ii) a stochastic model of the frequency of future oil field discoveries. Compared with the standard methodology that tends to underestimate remaining oil reserves, our method gives a better description of future oil production, as validated by our back-tests starting in 2008. Specifically, we predict remaining reserves extractable until 2030 to be 188 +/- 10 million barrels for Norway and 98 +/- 10 million barrels for the UK, which are respectively 45% and 66% above the predictions using the standard methodology.

Fievet, Lucas; Cauwels, Peter; Sornette, Didier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Waste Biomass-Extracted Surfactants for Heavy Oil Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential synergism between biobased surfactants, produced from the alkaline extraction of waste biomass, and a synthetic surfactant was assessed. ... Since the principles of soil washing (critical Ca) were first developed for reservoir engineering, one expects that the ultralow (surfactant-enhanced oil recovery operations. ...

Matthew D. Baxter; Edgar Acosta; Enzo Montoneri; Silvia Tabasso

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points ethanol and ethylene glycol were used for oil shale catalytic esterification of the WVO. Results show that the esterification of wastes of oil utilizing wastes of oil shale combustion can be used to produce biodiesel. Additionally it was found that in order to make the oil shale ash an effective catalyst for transesterification high reaction temperature is required. Therefore the results have indicated that high biodiesel yield is obtained when using ethylene glycol at high temperature while the yield is low when solid catalytic reaction is performed using ethanol at low temperature. The maximum obtained yield was 75?wt. % utilizing ethylene glycol at 150?°C whereas this yield decreased to 69.9?wt. % as the operating temperature was reduced to 100?°C. On the other hand when using ethanol the yield of biodiesel was relatively low (11?wt. % at 60?°C and 9?wt. % at 80?°C).

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mercury and tritium removal from DOE waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work covers the investigation of vacuum extraction as a means to remove tritiated contamination as well as the removal via sorption of dissolved mercury from contaminated oils. The radiation damage in oils from tritium causes production of hydrogen, methane, and low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. When tritium gas is present in the oil, the tritium atom is incorporated into the formed hydrocarbons. The transformer industry measures gas content/composition of transformer oils as a diagnostic tool for the transformers` condition. The analytical approach (ASTM D3612-90) used for these measurements is vacuum extraction of all gases (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, etc.) followed by analysis of the evolved gas mixture. This extraction method will be adapted to remove dissolved gases (including tritium) from the SRS vacuum pump oil. It may be necessary to heat (60{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C) the oil during vacuum extraction to remove tritiated water. A method described in the procedures is a stripper column extraction, in which a carrier gas (argon) is used to remove dissolved gases from oil that is dispersed on high surface area beads. This method appears promising for scale-up as a treatment process, and a modified process is also being used as a dewatering technique by SD Myers, Inc. (a transformer consulting company) for transformers in the field by a mobile unit. Although some mercury may be removed during the vacuum extraction, the most common technique for removing mercury from oil is by using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). SIAC is currently being used by the petroleum industry to remove mercury from hydrocarbon mixtures, but the sorbent has not been previously tested on DOE vacuum oil waste. It is anticipated that a final process will be similar to technologies used by the petroleum industry and is comparable to ion exchange operations in large column-type reactors.

Klasson, E.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Oil field waste disposal in salt caverns: An information website  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has completed the construction of a Website for the US Department of Energy (DOE) that provides detailed information on salt caverns and their use for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Specific topics in the Website include the following: descriptions of salt deposits and salt caverns within the US, salt cavern construction methods, potential types of wastes, waste emplacement, regulatory issues, costs, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic human health risks associated with postulated cavern release scenarios, new information on cavern disposal (e.g., upcoming meetings, regulatory issues, etc.), other studies supported by the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) (e.g., considerations of site location, cavern stability, development issues, and bedded salt characterization in the Midland Basin), and links to other associated Web sites. In addition, the Website allows downloadable access to reports prepared on the topic that were funded by DOE. Because of the large quantities of NOW and NORM wastes generated annually by the oil industry, information presented on this Website is particularly interesting and valuable to project managers, regulators, and concerned citizens.

Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

Contamination of Soil by Crude Oil and Drilling Muds. Use of Wastes by Production of Road Construction Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermal method of separating wastes into organic and mineral parts is proposed for processing crude oil sludges and oil-contaminated soils accumulated in operation of oil fields and oil pipelines. After expo...

Z. A. Mansurov; E. K. Ongarbaev…

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Removal of Crude Oil in Waste Drilling Muds by a Constructed Microbial Consortium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste drilling muds (WDMs) contain serious pollutants produced by crude oil and gas well drilling. Bioremediation has been known as a useful ... enrichment of indigenous microorganisms, which can remove oil conta...

Yunkang Chang; Xingbiao Wang; Yifan Han…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Biodegradation of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons in Soil Contaminated by Oily Wastes Produced During Onshore Drilling Operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The petroleum industry generates high amount of oily wastes during drilling, storage and refining operations. Onshore drilling operations produce oil based wastes, typically 100–150m-3 well. The drilling cuttings...

Qaude-Henri Chaîneau; Jean-Louis Morel; Jean Oudot

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessment of opportunities to increase the recovery and recycling rates of waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste oil represents an important energy resource that, if properly managed and reused, would reduce US dependence on imported fuels. Literature and current practice regarding waste oil generation, regulations, collection, and reuse were reviewed to identify research needs and approaches to increase the recovery and recycling of this resource. The review revealed the need for research to address the following three waste oil challenges: (1) recover and recycle waste oil that is currently disposed of or misused; (2) identify and implement lubricating oil source and loss reduction opportunities; and (3) develop and foster an effective waste oil recycling infrastructure that is based on energy savings, reduced environment at impacts, and competitive economics. The United States could save an estimated 140 {times} 1012 Btu/yr in energy by meeting these challenges.

Graziano, D.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Systematic Waste Minimization in Chemical Processes. 1. Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 In MFM, the functional structure of a system is described using a set of interrelated structures for mass, energy, and information flows. ... (1)?Dantus, M. M.; High, K. A. Economic Evaluation for the Retrofit of Chemical Processes through Waste Minimization and Process Integration. ... Price-Targeting Through Iterative Flowsheet Syntheses in Developing Novel Processing Equipment:? Pervaporation ...

Iskandar Halim; Rajagopalan Srinivasan

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Co-cracking Experiment and Application Route of Waste Plastics and Heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The co-cracking experiment of waste plastics and heavy oil was done in the condition of 400 °C and pressure not higher than 2.0 MPa. The experimental results showed that the yield of heavy oil and coke decreased but the light oil and gas yield increased with the increasing amount of waste plastics. The products of heavy oil's solidifying point, flash point, viscosity and density decreased and had a good pour point depression effect. Heavy oil containing heat conduction oil and solvent contributed to heat transfer, melting and transport and had the effect of dissolution and co-cracking. It would have a good prospect when the co-cracking of waste plastics and heavy oil was applied to the combination processes of visbreaking and delayed coking and catalytic cracking and delayed coking.

Shikui Wu; Kaixiong Xu; Lusen Jiang; Li Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Waste oil reclamation, January 1980-August 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 80-Aug 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains 144 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas-model methodology and data description. [PROLOG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. A linear program is used to select drilling activities for conventional oil and gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using an exogenously specified price path, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas, and for exploration and development in each of six onshore regions. Forecasts of drilling for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) are exogenously determined, and this drilling is included when considering the constraints on drilling rigs. The report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 is a general overview of the model, describing the major characteristics of the methodology and the logical interaction of the various modules. Chapter 3 specifies the structure of the linear program including the equations for the objective function and the constraints. The details of the methodology used to model exploratory, developmental, and deep gas drilling are presented in Chapters 4-6, respectively. Chapter 7 presents a discussion of the economic evaluation which takes place in each discounted cash flow calculation performed by the model. Cost equations are presented, and various user-specified options as to how to incorporate these costs are discussed. Methodological details and equations used to model finding rates and revisions are given in Chapter 8. Possible areas of future enhancements to the PROLOG model are presented in Chapter 9.

Carlson, M.; Kurator, W.; Mariner-Volpe, B.; O'Neill, R.; Trapmann, W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Model methodology and data description of the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. Natural gas is modeled by gas category, generally conforming to categories defined by the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) of 1978, as well as a category representing gas priced by way of a spot market (referred to as ''spot'' gas). A linear program is used to select developmental drilling activities for conventional oil and gas and exploratory drilling activities for deep gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using exogenously specified price paths for oil and gas, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas development and deep gas exploration in each of six onshore regions. Through maximizing total net present value, the linear program provides forecasts of drilling activities, reserve additions, and production. Oil and shallow gas exploratory drilling activities are forecast on the basis of econometrically derived equations, which are dependent on specified price paths for the two fuels. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

POLYVINYLCHLORIDE WASTE WITH OIL SHALE ASH TO CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alkaline oil shale ash. Solid heat carrier (Galoter process)-type oil shale retorting units, where the

V. Oja; A. Elenurm; I. Rohtla; E. Tearo; E. Tali

35

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Deployment of Performance Management Methodology as part of Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River Site - 12178  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) assumed the management lead of the Liquid Waste (LW) Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The four SRR partners and AREVA, as an integrated subcontractor are performing the ongoing effort to safely and reliably: - Close High Level Waste (HLW) storage tanks; - Maximize waste throughput at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); - Process salt waste into stable final waste form; - Manage the HLW liquid waste material stored at SRS. As part of these initiatives, SRR and AREVA deployed a performance management methodology based on Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the DWPF in order to support the required production increase. This project took advantage of lessons learned by AREVA through the deployment of Total Productive Maintenance and Visual Management methodologies at the La Hague reprocessing facility in France. The project also took advantage of measurement data collected from different steps of the DWPF process by the SRR team (Melter Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Laboratory Operations, Plant Operations). Today the SRR team has a standard method for measuring processing time throughout the facility, a reliable source of objective data for use in decision-making at all levels, and a better balance between engineering department goals and operational goals. Preliminary results show that the deployment of this performance management methodology to the LW program at SRS has already significantly contributed to the DWPF throughput increases and is being deployed in the Saltstone facility. As part of the liquid waste program on Savannah River Site, SRR committed to enhance production throughput of DWPF. Beyond technical modifications implemented at different location of the facility, SRR deployed performance management methodology based on OEE metrics. The implementation benefited from the experience gained by AREVA in its own facilities in France. OEE proved to be a valuable tool in order to support the enhancement program in DWPF by providing unified metrics to measure plant performances, identify bottleneck location, and rank the most time consuming causes from objective data shared between the different groups belonging to the organization. Beyond OEE, the Visual Management tool adapted from the one used at La Hague were also provided in order to further enhance communication within the operating teams. As a result of all the initiatives implemented on DWPF, achieved production has been increased to record rates from FY10 to FY11. It is expected that thanks to the performance management tools now available within DWPF, these results will be sustained and even improved in the future to meet system plan targets. (authors)

Prod'homme, A.; Drouvot, O.; Gregory, J. [AREVA, Paris (France); Barnes, B.; Hodges, B.; Hart, M. [SRR, Aiken, SC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Turner, J.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Techno-economic evaluation of waste lube oil re-refining in Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 80 million gallons of automotive lubricating oils are sold in Saudi Arabia. Much of this oil, after use, is actually contributing to the increased pollution of land because of indiscriminate dumping. Any scheme of secondary use of the waste lube oils would be of interest both for conservation of energy resources and for protection of environment. This paper discusses the secondary use for the used automotive lubricating oils. Process technology of Meinken, Mohawk and KTI were selected for the techno-economic feasibility study for refining used oil. Profitability analysis of each process is worked out and the results are compared.

Ali, M.F.; Hamdan, A.J.; Rahman, F. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Diesel vehicle performance on unaltered waste soybean oil blended with petroleum fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interest in using unaltered vegetable oil as a fuel in diesel engines has experienced an increase due to uncertainty in the crude oil market supply and the detrimental effects petroleum fuels have on the environment. Unaltered vegetable oil blended with petroleum fuels is less expensive, uses less energy to produce and is more environmentally friendly compared to petroleum diesel or biodiesel. Here we investigate the engine performance of unaltered waste soybean oil blended with petroleum diesel and kerosene for three vehicles. Five biofuel blends ranging from 15% to 50% oil by volume were tested on a 2006 Jeep Liberty CRD, a 1999 Mercedes E300 and a 1984 Mercedes 300TD. A DynoJet 224x chassis dynamometer was used to test vehicle engine performance for horsepower and torque through a range of RPMs. Results for the Jeep showed a modest decrease in horsepower and torque compared to petroleum diesel ranging from 0.9% for the 15% oil blend to 5.0% lower for the 50% oil blend. However, a 30% oil blend showed statistically better performance (P < 0.05) compared to petroleum diesel. For the 1999 Mercedes, horsepower performance was 1.1% lower for the 15% oil blend to 6.4% lower for the 50% oil blend. Engine performance for a 30% blend was statistically the same (P < 0.05) compare to diesel. Finally, horsepower performance was 1.1% lower for the 15% oil blend to 4.7% lower for the 50% oil blend for the 1984 Mercedes. Overall, the performance on these oil blended fuels was excellent and, on average 1.1% lower than petroleum diesel for blends containing 40% or lower waste soybean oil content. The more significant decrease in power between the 40% and 50% oil blends indicates that oil content in these blended fuels should be no more than 40%.

Eugene P. Wagner; Patrick D. Lambert; Todd M. Moyle; Maura A. Koehle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Oil Waste History of Smackover Field, Arkansas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emulsions resulted in low recovery amounts of pipeline oil, about 30 of the total amount of...Becker, J.-R. (1997). Crude oil waxes, emulsions, and asphaltenes. Tulsa...on stream - a history of Interstate Oil Pipeline Company 1909-1959. Baton Rouge, LA...

Mary L. Barrett

42

Re-refining of waste mineral insulating oil by extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via the three-stage mixer–settler operation was studied as possible process for re-refining of waste mineral insulating oil. The following extraction process parameters were investigated systematically in order to determine their optimum values: amount of water as co-solvent in NMP, extraction temperature and solvent/oil ratio. The process parameters and resulting oil chemical compositions were found to influence the electrical properties and the oxidation stability of the re-refined oil. The levels of aromatic, paraffinic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were determined using IR spectroscopy and HPLC, while other relevant chemical and electrical properties of waste and re-refined oil were determined according to IEC, ISO and ASTM standards. Extraction using NMP was found to be an adequate method for waste mineral insulating oil re-refining, according to the application properties of the re-refined oil. Moderate extraction temperature, 1% water in NMP and a low solvent/oil ratio (0.5) were determined to be the optimum process parameters.

Jelena Luki?; Aleksandar Orlovi?; Michael Spiteller; Jovan Jovanovi?; Dejan Skala

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydrogenated soy ethyl ester (HySEE) from ethanol and waste vegetable oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is gaining recognition in the United States as a renewable fuel which may be used as an alternative to diesel fuel without any modifications to the engine. Currently the cost of this fuel is the factor that limits its use. One way to reduce the cost of biodiesel is to use a less expensive form of vegetable oil such as waste oil from a processing plant. These operations use mainly hydrogenated soybean oil, some tallow and some Canola as their frying oils. It is estimated that there are several million pounds of waste vegetable oil from these operations. Additional waste frying oil is available from smaller processors, off-grade oil seeds and restaurants. This paper reports on developing a process to produce the first 945 liters (250 gallons) of HySEE using recipes developed at the University of Idaho; fuel characterization tests on the HySEE according to the ASAE proposed Engineering Practice for Testing of Fuels from Biological Materials, X552; short term injector coking tests and performance tests in a turbocharged, DI, CI engine; and a 300 hour screening test in a single cylinder, IDI, CI engine.

Peterson, C.; Reece, D.; Thompson, J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Techno-economic evaluation of waste lube oil re-refining in Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 80 million gallons of automotive lubricating oils are sold in Saudi Arabia. Much of this oil, after use, is actually contributing to the increased pollution of land because of indiscriminate dumping. Any scheme of secondary use of the waste lube oils would be of interest both for conservation of energy resources and for protection of environment. This paper discusses the secondary use for the used automotive lubricating oils. Process technology of Meinken, Mohawk and KTI were selected for the techno-economic feasibility study for re-refining used oil. Profitability analysis for each process is worked out and the results are compared. In many countries, the re-refining of used oils has become an important industry. The objective of recovering high quality raffinates is attained through the use of widely differing techniques. The processes concerned can be classified according to the chemical or physical method of used-oil pretreatment selected. Meinken process is based on chemical pretreatment, whereas both Mohawk and KTI processes employ physical methods involving distillation and eliminate the use of sulfuric acid, thus providing a facility for safer operation than Meinken. The plant capacity of two existing units in Jeddah are 10,000 TPA and 80,000 TPA re-refining of waste oil. We selected a plant of 50,000 TPA waste oil re-refining for economic study of these three processes. The authors wish to acknowledge the support from King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals and King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology for this work.

Ali, F.M.; Hamdan, A.J.; Rahman, F. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum & Minerals, Dharan (Saudi Arabia)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Performance assessment methodology and preliminary results for low-level radioactive waste disposal in Taiwan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Taiwan's Institute for Nuclear Energy Research (INER) have teamed together to evaluate several candidate sites for Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Taiwan currently has three nuclear power plants, with another under construction. Taiwan also has a research reactor, as well as medical and industrial wastes to contend with. Eventually the reactors will be decomissioned. Operational and decommissioning wastes will need to be disposed in a licensed disposal facility starting in 2014. Taiwan has adopted regulations similar to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) low-level radioactive waste rules (10 CFR 61) to govern the disposal of LLW. Taiwan has proposed several potential sites for the final disposal of LLW that is now in temporary storage on Lanyu Island and on-site at operating nuclear power plants, and for waste generated in the future through 2045. The planned final disposal facility will have a capacity of approximately 966,000 55-gallon drums. Taiwan is in the process of evaluating the best candidate site to pursue for licensing. Among these proposed sites there are basically two disposal concepts: shallow land burial and cavern disposal. A representative potential site for shallow land burial is located on a small island in the Taiwan Strait with basalt bedrock and interbedded sedimentary rocks. An engineered cover system would be constructed to limit infiltration for shallow land burial. A representative potential site for cavern disposal is located along the southeastern coast of Taiwan in a tunnel system that would be about 500 to 800 m below the surface. Bedrock at this site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. Performance assessment analyses will be performed to evaluate future performance of the facility and the potential dose/risk to exposed populations. Preliminary performance assessment analyses will be used in the site-selection process and to aid in design of the disposal system. Final performance assessment analyses will be used in the regulatory process of licensing a site. The SNL/INER team has developed a performance assessment methodology that is used to simulate processes associated with the potential release of radionuclides to evaluate these sites. The following software codes are utilized in the performance assessment methodology: GoldSim (to implement a probabilistic analysis that will explicitly address uncertainties); the NRC's Breach, Leach, and Transport - Multiple Species (BLT-MS) code (to simulate waste-container degradation, waste-form leaching, and transport through the host rock); the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) (to simulate groundwater flow and estimate flow velocities); the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill performance Model (HELP) code (to evaluate infiltration through the disposal cover); the AMBER code (to evaluate human health exposures); and the NRC's Disposal Unit Source Term -- Multiple Species (DUST-MS) code (to screen applicable radionuclides). Preliminary results of the evaluations of the two disposal concept sites are presented.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Chang, Fu-lin (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Mattie, Patrick D.; Knowlton, Robert G.; Chuang, W-S (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Chi, L-M (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Jow, Hong-Nian; Tien, Norman C. (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Use of Microemulsion Systems in the Solubilization of Petroleum Heavy Fractions for the Prevention of Oil Sludge Waste Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of Microemulsion Systems in the Solubilization of Petroleum Heavy Fractions for the Prevention of Oil Sludge Waste Formation† ... In the present paper we studied eight model particles coated with asphaltenes from different oils in order to mimic the wettability changes and behavior in water after contact with oil. ...

Tereza Neuma de Castro Dantas; Afonso Avelino Dantas Neto; Ca?tia Guaraciara F. T. Rossi; Diego A?ngelo de Arau?jo Gomes; Alexandre Gurgel

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Computational implementation of a systems prioritization methodology for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A preliminary example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systems prioritization methodology (SPM) is under development to provide guidance to the US DOE on experimental programs and design modifications to be supported in the development of a successful licensing application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. The purpose of the SPM is to determine the probabilities that the implementation of different combinations of experimental programs and design modifications, referred to as activity sets, will lead to compliance. Appropriate tradeoffs between compliance probability, implementation cost and implementation time can then be made in the selection of the activity set to be supported in the development of a licensing application. Descriptions are given for the conceptual structure of the SPM and the manner in which this structure determines the computational implementation of an example SPM application. Due to the sophisticated structure of the SPM and the computational demands of many of its components, the overall computational structure must be organized carefully to provide the compliance probabilities for the large number of activity sets under consideration at an acceptable computational cost. Conceptually, the determination of each compliance probability is equivalent to a large numerical integration problem. 96 refs., 31 figs., 36 tabs.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Anderson, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). WIPP Performance Assessments Departments; Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project have was to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to apply these improved models and guidelines in the field.

Terralog Technologies

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

NONE

1996-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350 and 375 C to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan. 2 figs.

Moens, L.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350.degree. and 375.degree. C. to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Testing Waste Olive Oil Methyl Ester as a Fuel in a Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this sense, to gain knowledge about the implications of its use, waste olive oil methyl ester was evaluated as a fuel for diesel engines during a 50-h short-term performance test in a diesel direct-injection Perkins engine. ... At the beginning of the last century, Rudolph Diesel fueled a diesel engine with the oil of an African groundnut (peanut), thus demonstrating the idea of using vegetable oil as a substitute for No. 2 diesel fuel. ... In this way, we obtained a volume value for each trio of working values, making a brake-specific fuel consumption comparison between different tests or fuels possible, as shown in Table 2, where Vi is the volume value for each test and V50 corresponds to that of No. 2 diesel fuel after 50 h (the test that showed the minimum value). ...

M. P. Dorado; E. Ballesteros; J. M. Arnal; J. Gómez; F. J. López Giménez

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

60

METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard.

FOWLER KD

2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 8 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

WEBER RA

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a research methodology to study lumber waste due to design causes in residential construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Construction faces problems regarding inefficiencies of material usage. Builders pay twice for the lumber that is wasted. Once when it is purchased and once when it is disposed. Part of the lumber waste is generated due to the design...

Vyas, Ashok Madhusudan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Determining the biomass fraction of mixed waste fuels: A comparison of existing industry and 14C-based methodologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 14C analysis of flue gas by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) were used to determine the biomass fraction of mixed waste at an operational energy-from-waste (EfW) plant. Results were converted to bioenergy (% total) using mathematical algorithms and assessed against existing industry methodologies which involve manual sorting and selective dissolution (SD) of feedstock. Simultaneous determinations using flue gas showed excellent agreement: 44.8 ± 2.7% for AMS and 44.6 ± 12.3% for LSC. Comparable bioenergy results were obtained using a feedstock manual sort procedure (41.4%), whilst a procedure based on selective dissolution of representative waste material is reported as 75.5% (no errors quoted). 14C techniques present significant advantages in data acquisition, precision and reliability for both electricity generator and industry regulator.

G.K.P. Muir; S. Hayward; B.G. Tripney; G.T. Cook; P. Naysmith; B.M.J. Herbert; M.H Garnett; M. Wilkinson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Methodology for Designing and Evaluating Chemical Systems for Improved Oil Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil recovery ranging between 86%-91% at reservoir temperature with both soft brine (NaCl only) and synthetic formation brine. Synthetic formation brine for Trembley contained a high concentration of divalent cations in addition to monovalent yet it had...

Ahmed, Muhammad Shahab

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Practical guide: Tools and methodologies for an oil and gas industry emission inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the preparation of Title V Permit applications, the quantification and speciation of emission sources from oil and gas facilities were reevaluated to determine the {open_quotes}potential-to-emit.{close_quotes} The existing emissions were primarily based on EPA emission factors such as AP-42, for tanks, combustion sources, and fugitive emissions from component leaks. Emissions from insignificant activities and routine operations that are associated with maintenance, startups and shutdowns, and releases to control devices also required quantification. To reconcile EPA emission factors with test data, process knowledge, and manufacturer`s data, a careful review of other estimation options was performed. This paper represents the results of this analysis of emission sources at oil and gas facilities, including exploration and production, compressor stations and gas plants.

Thompson, C.C. [C-K Associates, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Killian, T.L. [Conoco, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

A combination of streamtube and geostatical simulation methodologies for the study of large oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of streamtube models for reservoir simulation has an extensive history in the oil industry. Although these models are strictly applicable only to fields under voidage balance, they have proved to be useful in a large number of fields provided that there is no solution gas evolution and production. These models combine the benefit of very fast computational time with the practical ability to model a large reservoir over the course of its history. These models do not, however, directly incorporate the detailed geological information that recent experience has taught is important. This paper presents a technique for mapping the saturation information contained in a history matched streamtube model onto a detailed geostatistically derived finite difference grid. With this technique, the saturation information in a streamtube model, data that is actually statistical in nature, can be identified with actual physical locations in a field and a picture of the remaining oil saturation can be determined. Alternatively, the streamtube model can be used to simulate the early development history of a field and the saturation data then used to initialize detailed late time finite difference models. The proposed method is presented through an example application to the Ninian reservoir. This reservoir, located in the North Sea (UK), is a heterogeneous sandstone characterized by a line drive waterflood, with about 160 wells, and a 16 year history. The reservoir was satisfactorily history matched and mapped for remaining oil saturation. A comparison to 3-D seismic survey and recently drilled wells have provided preliminary verification.

Chakravarty, A.; Emanuel, A.S.; Bernath, J.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, LaHabra, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Design methodology to develop a conceptual underground facility for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the design methodology employed to develop conceptual underground layouts for a prospective high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study is in conjunction with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI), project studying the disposal of high level waste in densely welded tuff. The fundamental design effort concentraes on the effects of the heat released from the decaying waste forms and the impact of this heat on ventilation, waste emplacement configurations, and rock stability. This effort will perfect the design of the waste emplacement layout including emplacement hole spacing, emplacement drift spacing, and the areal power density (APD) for the installed waste. This paper contains only viewgraphs. 11 figs.

Zerga, D.P.; Badie, A.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that cocombustion of municipal solid waste and oil shale can reduce emissions of gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2} and HCl) to acceptable levels. Tests in 6- and 15-inch units showed that the oil shale absorbs acid gas pollutants and produces an ash which could be, at the least, disposed of in a normal landfill. Further analysis of the results are underway to estimate scale-up to commercial size. Additional work will be done to evaluate the cementitious properties of oil shale ash.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Synthesis, droplet combustion, and sooting characteristics of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light of the potential of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, i.e. biodiesel) as a renewable energy source, an innovative acid catalyzed process was developed for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oils. The synthesized biodiesels were analytically characterized for their major components, molar fraction and molecular weight of each component, the average molecular weight, and the heat of combustion. Their droplet combustion characteristics in terms of the burning rate, flame size, and sooting tendency were subsequently determined in a high-temperature, freely-falling droplet apparatus. Results show that the biodiesel droplet has higher burning rate, and that biodiesel in general has a lower propensity to soot because its molecular oxygen content promotes the oxidation of the soot precursors.

Li, T. X.; Zhu, D. L.; Akafuah, N.; Saito, K.; Law, C. K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Data Assimilation and Dismantling Waste: A Methodology Customised for Radioactive Inventory Assessment Purposes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data assimilation is a versatile methodology which is widely used nowadays for estimating complex system variables. The estimation of a given quantity by data assimilation involves taking into account both the observational data and the underlying physical principles governing the system under observation. Let us consider two assumptions, (1) the observational information consists of radioactivity measurements of numerous samples of graphite (or other material) from known points and (2) the physical principles are those of activation under neutron flux during nuclear power plant operation. With these two assumptions, a data-assimilation-like methodology is ready to be applied to radioactive inventory computation for dismantling graphite (or other material). The paper is written for a planned graphite disposal project in France, for the purposes of its inventory forecasting. It introduces specific concepts for activation laws, presents the beginning of the application to Bugey 1 plant pile and proposes an original method for overall error quantification. (authors)

Poncet, B.R. [Electricite de France - CIDEN, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Estimate of the risks of disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Assuming a single, generic salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, the best-estimate excess cancer risks ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and hazard indices (referring to noncancer health effects) ranged from 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. Under worse-case conditions in which the probability of cavern failure is 1.0, excess cancer risks ranged from 4.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and hazard indices ranged from 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 0.07. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks are within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can, therefore, provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ultrapyrolytic upgrading of plastic wastes and plastics/heavy oil mixtures to valuable light gas products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Viable operating conditions were identified experimentally for maximizing the production of high-value products such as ethylene, propylene, styrene, and benzene, from the ultrapyrolysis of waste plastics. Using both a batch microreactor and a pilot-plant-sized reactor, the key operating variables considered were pyrolysis temperature, product reaction time, and quench time. In the microreactor experiments, polystyrene (PS), a significant component of waste plastics, was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 800 to 965 C, with total reaction times ranging from 500 to 1,000 ms. At a temperature of 965 C and 500 ms, the yields of styrene plus benzene were greater than 95 wt %. In the pilot-plant experiments, the recently patented internally circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) reactor (Milne et al., US Patent Number 5,370,789, 1994b) was used to ultrapyrolyze low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in addition to LDPE (5% by weight)/heavy oil mixtures at a residence time of 600 ms. Both experiments produced light olefin yields greater than 55 wt % at temperatures above 830 C.

Lovett, S.; Berruti, F.; Behie, L.A. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering] [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending 31 December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The test plan is designed to demonstrate that oil shale co-combusted with municipal solid waste (MSW) can reduce gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO) to acceptable levels (90%+ reduction) and produce a cementitious ash which will, at a minimum, be acceptable in normal land fills. The small-scale combustion testing will be accomplished in a 6-in. circulating fluid bed combustor (CFBC) at Hazen Research Laboratories. This work will be patterned after the study the authors conducted in 1988 when coal and oil shale were co-combusted in a program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. The specific purpose of the test program will be to: determine the required ratio of oil shale to MSW by determining the ratio of absorbent to pollutant (A/P); determine the effect of temperature and resident time in the reactor; and determine if kinetic model developed for coal/oil shale mixture is applicable.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Using oil shale ash waste as a modifier for asphalt binders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale rocks represent one of the most available ... Jordan land contains about 50 billion tons of oil shale, which makes Jordan the third in the ... world of the reserve of this material. Oil shale ash is a b...

Khalid Ghuzlan; Ghazi Al-Khateeb…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Production of hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas from co-gasification of bio-oil and waste engine oil as feedstock for lower alcohols synthesis in two-stage bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High efficient production of lower alcohols (C1–C5 mixed alcohols) from hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas was achieved in this work. A non-catalytic partial oxidation (NPOX) gasification technology was successfully applied in the production and conditioning of bio-oil derived syngas using bio-oil (BO) and emulsifying waste engine oil (EWEO) as feedstock. The effects of water addition and feedstock composition on the gasification performances were investigated. When the BO20 and EWEO30 was mixed with mass ratio of 1: 0.33, the maximum hydrogen yield of 93.7% with carbon conversion of 96.7% was obtained, and the hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas was effectively produced. Furthermore, a two-stage bed reactor was applied in the downstream process of lower alcohols synthesis from hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas (H2/CO/CO2/CH4/N2 = 52.2/19.5/3.0/9.4/15.9, v/v). The highest carbon conversion of 42.5% and the maximum alcohol yield of 0.18 kg/kgcat h with selectivity of 53.8 wt% were obtained over the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3(2.5)//Cu25Fe22Co3K3/SiO2(2.5) catalyst combination system. The mechanism and evaluation for lower alcohols synthesis from model bio-oil derived syngas and model mixture gas were also discussed. The integrative process of hydrogen rich bio-oil derived syngas production and downstream lower alcohols synthesis, potentially providing a promising route for the conversion of organic wastes into high performance fuels and high value-added chemicals.

Haijun Guo; Fen Peng; Hairong Zhang; Lian Xiong; Shanggui Li; Can Wang; Bo Wang; Xinde Chen; Yong Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Risk analyses for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed of in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing the contaminants` toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks have been found to be within the US EPA target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

86

Application of inorganic aluminum salts to intensification of the clarification of cinder and oil-containing waste water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of inorganic coagulants together with polyacrylamide (PAA) were tested in waste water containing oil and finely dispersed cinder. It has been established that concentrated solutions of aluminum salts have the maximal clarification efficiency (82%). It has been shown that the residual alkali content of water is higher when concentrated (20%) solutions of aluminum salts are used than in the case of the use of dilute (1%) solutions. The expediency of the use of aluminum salts for the treatment of waste water with a low initial alkalinity (below 1.0 meq/liter) has been established. It has been established that aluminum sulfate is maximally effective when the alkali content of the water being purified is less than 1.8 or greater than 4.5 meq/liter.

Shub, V.B.; Khukhryanskaya, I.A.

1987-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Towards effective regulation of offshore oil and gas waste management in Nigeria.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The development of the offshore oil and gas industry has been going on for many decades with little thought of the consequences of its activities… (more)

Ofuani, Anwuli Irene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Production of methane gas from organic fraction municipal solid waste (OFMSW) via anaerobic process: application methodology for the Malaysian condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid waste management in Malaysia is confronted with many problems, including low collection coverage, irregular collection services, inadequate equipment used for waste collection, crude open dumping and burning without air and water pollution control systems, inadequate legal provisions and resource constraints. These problems have various effects on the development of the solid waste management system in Malaysia. Anaerobic digestion has been suggested as an alternative method for removing high concentrations of organic waste. In this study, two types of anaerobic digesters which are Simulated Landfill Bioreactor (SLBR) and Anaerobic Solid-Liquid (ASL) reactor were proposed. The reactors were operated at a temperature 60°C, analysed for biogas production and volatile fatty acid.

Irnis Azura Zakarya; Ismail Abustan; Norli Ismail; Mohd Suffian Yusoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Eastern oil shale research involving the generation of retorted and combusted oil shale solid waste, shale oil collection, and process stream sampling and characterization: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 518 tons of New Albany oil shale were obtained from the McRae quarry in Clark County, Indiana and shipped to Golden, CO. A portion of the material was processed through a TOSCO II pilot plant retort. About 273 tons of crushed raw shale, 136 tons of retorted shale, 1500 gallons of shale oil, and 10 drums of retort water were shipped to US Department of Energy, Laramie, WY. Process conditions were documented, process streams were sampled and subjected to chemical analysis, and material balance calculations were made. 6 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kuwait, Middle East, oil and gas fields, oil refinery, oil waste, oil well,Equipment Kuwait Oil Co. 1991. Mideast well fire, oil spillKuwait, Persian Gulf, Saudia Arabia, Oil spill, cleanup, oil spills, crude, oil spill incidents, oil spills-pipeline, warfare, oil skimmers, oil wells,

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessing the Effect of Timing of Availability for Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Largest Oil and Gas Pools in the Alberta Basin: Description of Data and Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from large stationary sources and storage in geological media is a technologically-feasible mitigation measure for the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere in response to climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sequestered underground in oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, in uneconomic coal beds and in salt caverns. The Alberta Basin provides a very large capacity for CO2 storage in oil and gas reservoirs, along with significant capacity in deep saline formations and possible unmineable coal beds. Regional assessments of potential geological CO2 storage capacity have largely focused so far on estimating the total capacity that might be available within each type of reservoir. While deep saline formations are effectively able to accept CO2 immediately, the storage potential of other classes of candidate storage reservoirs, primarily oil and gas fields, is not fully available at present time. Capacity estimates to date have largely overlooked rates of depletion in these types of storage reservoirs and typically report the total estimated storage capacity that will be available upon depletion. However, CO2 storage will not (and cannot economically) begin until the recoverable oil and gas have been produced via traditional means. This report describes a reevaluation of the CO2 storage capacity and an assessment of the timing of availability of the oil and gas pools in the Alberta Basin with very large storage capacity (>5 MtCO2 each) that are being looked at as likely targets for early implementation of CO2 storage in the region. Over 36,000 non-commingled (i.e., single) oil and gas pools were examined with effective CO2 storage capacities being individually estimated. For each pool, the life expectancy was estimated based on a combination of production decline analysis constrained by the remaining recoverable reserves and an assessment of economic viability, yielding an estimated depletion date, or year that it will be available for CO2 storage. The modeling framework and assumptions used to assess the impact of the timing of CO2 storage resource availability on the region’s deployment of CCS technologies is also described. The purpose of this report is to describe the data and methodology for examining the carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity resource of a major hydrocarbon province incorporating estimated depletion dates for its oil and gas fields with the largest CO2 storage capacity. This allows the development of a projected timeline for CO2 storage availability across the basin and enables a more realistic examination of potential oil and gas field CO2 storage utilization by the region’s large CO2 point sources. The Alberta Basin of western Canada was selected for this initial examination as a representative mature basin, and the development of capacity and depletion date estimates for the 227 largest oil and gas pools (with a total storage capacity of 4.7 GtCO2) is described, along with the impact on source-reservoir pairing and resulting CO2 transport and storage economics. The analysis indicates that timing of storage resource availability has a significant impact on the mix of storage reservoirs selected for utilization at a given time, and further confirms the value that all available reservoir types offer, providing important insights regarding CO2 storage implementation to this and other major oil and gas basins throughout North America and the rest of the world. For CCS technologies to deploy successfully and offer a meaningful contribution to climate change mitigation, CO2 storage reservoirs must be available not only where needed (preferably co-located with or near large concentrations of CO2 sources or emissions centers) but also when needed. The timing of CO2 storage resource availability is therefore an important factor to consider when assessing the real opportunities for CCS deployment in a given region.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Bachu, Stefan

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

Biodiesel production from vegetable oil and waste animal fats in a pilot plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, corn oil as vegetable oil, chicken fat and fleshing oil as animal fats were used to produce methyl ester in a biodiesel pilot plant. The FFA level of the corn oil was below 1% while those of animal fats were too high to produce biodiesel via base catalyst. Therefore, it was needed to perform pretreatment reaction for the animal fats. For this aim, sulfuric acid was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol in the pretreatment reactions. After reducing the FFA level of the animal fats to less than 1%, the transesterification reaction was completed with alkaline catalyst. Due to low FFA content of corn oil, it was directly subjected to transesterification. Potassium hydroxide was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol for transesterification reactions. The fuel properties of methyl esters produced in the biodiesel pilot plant were characterized and compared to EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 biodiesel standards. According to the results, ester yield values of animal fat methyl esters were slightly lower than that of the corn oil methyl ester (COME). The production cost of COME was higher than those of animal fat methyl esters due to being high cost biodiesel feedstock. The fuel properties of produced methyl esters were close to each other. Especially, the sulfur content and cold flow properties of the COME were lower than those of animal fat methyl esters. The measured fuel properties of all produced methyl esters met ASTM D6751 (S500) biodiesel fuel standards.

Ertan Alptekin; Mustafa Canakci; Huseyin Sanli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The incentives for establishing and the expertise for implementing successful waste minimization programs can be found in every company. The “in-house” expertise that discovers, designs, builds and manages manufacturing processes understand...

Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

94

Methodology and computational framework used for the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement accident analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology, computational framework, and integrated PC-based database have been developed to assess the risks of facility accidents in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. The methodology includes the following interrelated elements: (1) screening of storage and treatment processes and related waste inventories to determine risk-dominant facilities across the DOE complex, (2) development and frequency estimation of the risk-dominant sequences of accidents, and (3) determination of the evolution of and final compositions of radiological or chemically hazardous source terms predicted to be released as a function of the storage inventory or treatment process throughput. The computational framework automates these elements to provide source term input for the second part of the analysis which includes (1) development or integration of existing site-specific demographics and meteorological data and calculation of attendant unit-risk factors and (2) assessment of the radiological or toxicological consequences of accident releases to the general public and to the occupational work force.

Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Huttenga, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R.; TenBrook, W.; Russell, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Project report: Tritiated oil repackaging highlighting the ISMS process. Historical radioactive and mixed waste disposal request validation and waste disposal project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) was established to define a framework for the essential functions of managing work safely. There are five Safety Management Functions in the model of the ISMS process: (1) work planning, (2) hazards analysis, (3) hazards control, (4) work performance, and (5) feedback and improve. Recent activities at the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility underscored the importance and effectiveness of integrating the ISMS process to safely manage high-hazard work with a minimum of personnel in a timely and efficient manner. This report describes how project personnel followed the framework of the ISMS process to successfully repackage tritium-contaminated oils. The main objective was to open the boxes without allowing the gaseous tritium oxide, which had built up inside the boxes, to release into the sorting room. The boxes would be vented out the building stack until tritium concentration levels were acceptable. The carboys would be repackaged into 30-gallon drums and caulked shut. Sealing the drums would decrease the tritium off-gassing into the RMWMF.

Schriner, J.A. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, Inc., NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Petroleum Technology Office National Petroleum Technology Office under Contract W -31-109- under Contract W -31-109- Eng Eng -38 -38 Prepared by: Prepared by: John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David Tomasko Tomasko , , Deborah Deborah Elcock Elcock , Deborah L. Blunt, and , Deborah L. Blunt, and Gustavious Gustavious P. W illiams P. W illiams Argonne National Laboratory August 1998 August 1998 Disposal of NORM - Disposal of NORM - Contam inated O il Contam inated O il Field Wastes in Salt Field Wastes in Salt Caverns Caverns Disposal of NORM in Salt Caverns Page i Table of Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

97

Assessment of solid-waste characteristics and control technology for oil-shale retorting. Final report for September 1983-February 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents information on oil-shale deposits in the eastern and western parts of the United States, their geological subdivisions, locations, tonnage, and physical and chemical characteristics. Characteristics of solid and liquid wastes produced from various oil-shale-processing technologies and control methods are presented. Also included are results from an experimental study to construct liners and covers for disposal of spent shale. A compilation of available data on the auto-ignition potential of raw and spent shales indicates a similarity between raw-shale fines and bituminous coals.

Agarwal, A.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Biodiesel production from Stauntonia chinensis seed oil (waste from food processing): Heterogeneous catalysis by modified calcite, biodiesel purification, and fuel properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present research, the potential of Stauntonia chinensis (SC) seed oil obtained from processing waste was investigated for the first time as biodiesel feedstock, including physicochemical properties of the oil, the heterogeneous catalysis process, purification, and fuel properties. A 29.37 ± 0.64 wt.% of oil content and 2.41 mg KOH/g of acid value was found. Under the optimised reaction conditions in the presence of modified calcite, an 88.02% of yield and a 98.90 wt.% of FAME content were achieved. According to EN 14124 (2012), SC biodiesel exhibited superior fuel properties compared to the most of other feedstock oils since it had an ideal fatty acid composition (low Cn:0 (8.06 wt.%), high Cn:1 (80.16 wt.%), and low Cn:2,3 (8.45 wt.%)). It was absolutely vital that the use of SC seed oil as a biodiesel feedstock would not compete with its use in food. In summary, SC seed oil should be recommended as a promising feedstock for biodiesel.

Rui Wang; Lili Sun; Xiaolin Xie; Lizhi Ma; Zhigang Liu; Xiaoyan Liu; Ning Ji; Guofang Xie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bio-refinery of Orange peels waste. a New Concept based on Integrated Green and Solvent Free Extraction Processes Using Ultrasound and Microwave Techniques to Obtain Essential Oil, Polyphenols and Pectin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, extraction of essential oil, polyphenols and pectin from orange peel has been optimized using microwave and ultrasound technology without adding any solvent but only “in situ” water which was recycled and used as solvent. The essential oil extraction performed by Microwave Hydrodiffusion and Gravity (MHG) was optimized and compared to steam distillation extraction (SD). No significant changes in yield were noticed: 4.22±0.03% and 4.16±0.05% for MHG and SD respectively. After extraction of essential oil, residual water of plant obtained after MHG extraction was used as solvent for polyphenols and pectin extraction from MHG residues. Polyphenols extraction was performed by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE). Response surface methodology (RSM) using central composite designs (CCD) approach was launched to investigate the influence of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). The statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions of ultrasound power and temperature were 0.956 W/cm2 and 59.83 °C giving a polyphenol yield of 50.02 mg GA/ 100 g dm. Compared with the conventional extraction (CE), the UAE gave an increase of 30% in TPC yield. Pectin was extracted by conventional and Microwave assisted extraction. This technique gives a maximal yield of 24.2% for microwave power of 500 W in only 3 min whereas conventional extraction gives 18.32% in 120 min. Combination of microwave, ultrasound and the recycled “in situ” water of citrus peels allow us to obtain high added values compounds in shorter time and managed to make a closed loop using only natural resources provided by the plant which makes the whole process intensified in term of time and energy saving, cleanliness and reduced waste water.

Meryem Boukroufa; Chahrazed Boutekedjiret; Loïc Petigny; Njara Rakotomanomana; Farid Chemat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Response surface methodology based prediction of engine performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fuelled with canola oil methyl ester  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fuel injection timing and engine speed on engine performance and exhaust emission parameters using a diesel engine running on canola oil methyl ester (COME). COME was produced by means of the transesterification method and tested at full load with various engine speeds by changing fuel injection timing (12 15 and 18?°CA) in a turbocharged direct injection (TDI) diesel engine. The experiments were designed using response surface methodology (RSM) which is one of the well-known design of experiment technique for predicting the responses engine performance and exhaust emission parameters from a second order polynomial equation obtained by modeling the relation between fuel injection timing (t) and engine speed (n) parameters. By using the second order full quadratic RSM models obtained from experimental results responses brake power brake torque brake mean effective pressure brake specific fuel consumption brake thermal efficiency exhaust gas temperature oxygen (O2) oxides of nitrogen (NOx) carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon monoxide (CO) and light absorption coefficient (K) affected from factors t and n were able to be predicted by 95% confidence interval.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fluidised bed co-gasification of coal and olive oil industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of bagasse wastes mixed with coal is technically feasible, without major installation changes. The effect of experimental conditions on co-gasification process was analysed, to enhance gas production and improve its composition and energetic content. The rise of bagasse content increased tars and gaseous hydrocarbons contents, which can be reduced by increasing gasification temperature and/or air flow rate. The rise of temperature till 890 °C favoured hydrocarbons further reactions and allowed an increase of 45% in hydrogen release and a decrease in gaseous hydrocarbons of 55%. A reduction of around 30% in gaseous hydrocarbons was also achieved by rising O2/fuel ratio till 0.6 g/g daf, which decreased gas heating value, due to nitrogen diluting effect. Though no significant changes in gaseous hydrocarbons composition were obtained, the presence of dolomite in the fluidised bed had the benefit of decreasing tars content and rising gas yield, being the gas richer in hydrogen content.

Rui Neto André; Filomena Pinto; Carlos Franco; M. Dias; I. Gulyurtlu; M.A.A. Matos; I. Cabrita

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Recovery Act: Develop a Modular Curriculum for Training University Students in Industry Standard CO{sub 2} Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery, Sequestration, & Monitoring Measuring & Verification are topics that are not typically covered in Geoscience, Land Management, and Petroleum Engineering curriculum. Students are not typically exposed to the level of training that would prepare them for CO{sub 2} reservoir and aquifer sequestration related projects when they begin assignments in industry. As a result, industry training, schools & conferences are essential training venues for new & experienced personnel working on CO{sub 2} projects for the first time. This project collected and/or generated industry level CO{sub 2} training to create modules which faculties can utilize as presentations, projects, field trips and site visits for undergrad and grad students and prepare them to "hit the ground running" & be contributing participants in CO{sub 2} projects with minimal additional training. In order to create the modules, UTPB/CEED utilized a variety of sources. Data & presentations from industry CO{sub 2} Flooding Schools & Conferences, Carbon Management Workshops, UTPB Classes, and other venues was tailored to provide introductory reservoir & aquifer training, state-of-the-art methodologies, field seminars and road logs, site visits, and case studies for students. After discussions with faculty at UTPB, Sul Ross, Midland College, other universities, and petroleum industry professionals, it was decided to base the module sets on a series of road logs from Midland to, and through, a number of Permian Basin CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, CO{sub 2} Carbon Capture and Storage (CCUS) projects and outcrop equivalents of the formations where CO{sub 2} is being utilized or will be utilized, in EOR projects in the Permian Basin. Although road logs to and through these projects exist, none of them included CO{sub 2} specific information. Over 1400 miles of road logs were created, or revised specifically to highlight CO{sub 2} EOR projects. After testing a number of different entry points into the data set with students and faculty form a number of different universities, it was clear that a standard website presentation with a list of available power point presentations, excel spreadsheets, word documents and pdf's would not entice faculty, staff, and students at universities to delve deeper into the website http://www.utpb.edu/ceed/student modules.

Trentham, R. C.; Stoudt, E. L.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Investigation of oil adsorption capacity of granular organoclay media and the kinetics of oil removal from oil-in-water emulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, includes almost 98% of all waste generated by oil and gas exploration and their production activities. This oil contaminated waste water has a great impact on our environment and is considered...

Islam, Sonia

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Intensification of biodiesel production from waste goat tallow using infrared radiation: Process evaluation through response surface methodology and artificial neural network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the first time, an efficient simultaneous trans/esterification process for biodiesel synthesis from waste goat tallow with considerable free fatty acids (FFAs) content has been explored employing an infrared radiation assisted reactor (IRAR). The impacts of methanol to tallow molar ratio, IRAR temperature and H2SO4 concentration on goat tallow conversion were evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal conditions, 96.7% FFA conversion was achieved within 2.5 h at 59.93 wt.% H2SO4, 69.97 °C IRAR temperature and 31.88:1 methanol to tallow molar ratio. The experimental results were also modeled using artificial neural network (ANN) and marginal improvement in modeling efficiency was observed in comparison with RSM. The infrared radiation strategy could significantly accelerate the conversion process as demonstrated through a substantial reduction in reaction time compared to conventionally heated reactor while providing appreciably high biodiesel yield. Moreover, the in situ water removal using silica-gel adsorbent could also facilitate achieving higher FFA conversion to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Owing to the occurrence of simultaneous transesterification of triglycerides present in goat tallow, overall 98.5 wt.% FAME content was determined at optimal conditions in the product biodiesel which conformed to ASTM and EN biodiesel specifications.

R. Chakraborty; H. Sahu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling and wastes should be assessed on the basis of the concentration of oil present in the waste. Typically

Siddharthan, Advaith

110

Conservation of Oil and Gas (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation prohibits the production, storage, or transportation of oil or gas in a manner, in an amount, or under conditions that constitute waste. Actions which may lead to the waste of oil...

111

Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

Lin, Lan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Characterisation and Evaluation of Wastes for Treatment in the Batch Pyrolysis Plant in Studsvik, Sweden - 13586  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik is built primarily for treatment of uranium containing dry active waste, 'DAW'. Several other waste types have been identified that are considered or assumed suitable for treatment in the pyrolysis plant because of the possibility to carefully control the atmosphere and temperature of the thermal treatment. These waste types must be characterised and an evaluation must be made with a BAT perspective. Studsvik have performed or plan to perform lab scale pyrolysis tests on a number of different waste types. These include: - Pyrophoric materials (uranium shavings), - Uranium chemicals that must be oxidised prior to being deposited in repository, - Sludges and oil soaks (this category includes NORM-materials), - Ion exchange resins (both 'free' and solidified/stabilised), - Bitumen solidified waste. Methodology and assessment criteria for various waste types, together with results obtained for the lab scale tests that have been performed, are described. (authors)

Lindberg, Maria; Oesterberg, Carl; Vernersson, Thomas [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development, Application, and Evaluation of a Methodology to Estimate Distributed Slip on Fractures due to Future Earthquakes for Nuclear Waste Repository Performance Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...acknowledge the funding and support received...fracture networks at Yucca Mountain, southwest Nevada...Nuclear Waste Disposal Research) Report...acknowledge the funding and support re-ceived...fracture networks at Yucca Mountain, southwest Nevada...

Paul R. La Pointe; Trenton Cladouhos; Sven Follin

116

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Oil shale research in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Combustion and performance of a diesel engine with preheated Jatropha curcas oil using waste heat from exhaust gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The viscosity and density of CJO (crude Jatropha oil) were reduced by heating it using the heat from exhaust gas of a diesel engine with an appropriately designed helical coil heat exchanger. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combustion characteristics of a DI (direct injection) diesel engine using PJO (preheated Jatropha oil). It exhibited a marginally higher cylinder gas pressure, rate of pressure rise and heat release rate as compared to HSD (high speed diesel) during the initial stages of combustion for all engine loadings. Ignition delay was shorter for PJO as compared to HSD. The results also indicated that BSFC (brake specific fuel consumption) and EGT (exhaust gas temperature) increased while BTE (brake thermal efficiency) decreased with PJO as compared to HSD for all engine loadings. The reductions in CO2 (carbon dioxide), HC (hydrocarbon) and \\{NOx\\} (nitrous oxide) emissions were observed for PJO along with increased CO (carbon monoxide) emission as compared to those of HSD.

Priyabrata Pradhan; Hifjur Raheman; Debasish Padhee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pilot-scale testing of a fuel oil-explosives cofiring process for recovering energy from waste explosives: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army generates and stores a significant quantity of explosives and explosive-related materials that do not meet specifications for their primary use. Current explosives disposal processes do not recover any resources from these materials. The heat of combustion of these materials is typically 9 to 15 kJ/g (4000 to 6500 Btu/lb), which is 21 to 33% of the high heating value of No. 2 fuel oil. One secondary use for explosives is to cofire them with other fuels to recover their energy content. Bench-scale testing has shown that cofiring is feasible and safe within certain guidelines. To further evaluate cofiring, a proof-of-principle test was conducted in a 300-kW (10/sup 6/ Btu/h) combustion chamber. The test program was discontinued before completion because of failures largely unrelated to the explosives contained in the fuel. This report presents the results of the proof-of-principle tests, as well as design and operational changes that would eliminate problems encountered during the course of the test program. It is clearly feasible to cofire explosives and fuel oil. However, more data are needed before the process can be tested in a production boiler, furnace, or incinerator. 20 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bradshaw, W.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Impact of thermal barrier coating application on the combustion, performance and emissions of a diesel engine fueled with waste cooking oil biodiesel–diesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel fuel was produced from waste cooking oil by transesterification process. B20 and B50 blends of biodiesel–petroleum diesel were prepared. These blends and D2 fuels were tested in a single cylinder CI engine. Performance, combustion and emission values of the engine running with the mentioned fuels were recorded. Then the piston and both exhaust and intake valves of the test engine were coated with layers of ceramic materials. The mentioned parts were coated with 100 ?m of NiCrAl as lining layer. Later the same parts were coated with 400 ?m material of coating that was the mixture of 88% of ZrO2, 4% of MgO and 8% of Al2O3. After the engine coating process, the same fuels were tested in the coated engine at the same operation condition. Finally, the same engine out parameters were obtained and compared with those of uncoated engine parameters in order to find out how this modification would change the combustion, performance and emission parameters. Results showed that the modification of the engine with coating process resulted in better performance, especially in considerably lower brake specific fuel consumption (Bsfc) values. Besides, emissions of the engine were lowered both through coating process and biodiesel usage excluding the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission. In addition, the results of the coated engine are better than the uncoated one in terms of cylinder gas pressure, heat release rate (HRR) and heat release (HR).

Selman Ayd?n; Cenk Say?n

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of moisture removal and energy usage in pretreatment module of waste cooking oil for biodiesel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) is a plausible low cost biodiesel feedstock but it exhibits few unfavorable parameters for conversion into biodiesel. One of the parameter is the presence of high moisture content which will inhibit or retard catalyst during the acid esterification or base transesterification causing lower purity and yield of biodiesel. This will effect the post processing and escalate production cost making WCO a not favorable biodiesel feedstock. Therefore, it is important to have an effective moisture removal method to reduce the moisture content below 0.05%wt or 500 ppm in WCO for an efficient biodiesel production. In this work, the effectiveness of moisture removal and the energy usage of a newly develop innovative pretreatment module has been evaluated and reported. Results show that the pretreatment module is able to reduce up to 85% to effectively reduce the moisture content to below 500ppm of the initial moisture content of WCO and only consume 157 Wh/l energy compared to conventional heating that consume 386 Wh/l and only remove 67.6% moisture in 2 hours.

K Palanisamy; M K Idlan; N Saifudin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Radioactive Waste DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste 1. Summary Comments on Draft Branch Technical Position on a Performance Assessment Methodology for Low-Level Radioactive...

124

Radiation doses and hazards from processing of crude oil at the Tema oil refinery in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......petroleum products and wastes at the Tema oil refinery...radionuclides in the wastes than the crude oil and...monitoring to establish long-term effect on both public...accumulate at the bottom of storage tanks, tubings and other...uncontrolled release of waste containing TENORM, concentrated......

E. O. Darko; D. O. Kpeglo; E. H. K. Akaho; C. Schandorf; P. A. S. Adu; A. Faanu; E. Abankwah; H. Lawluvi; A. R. Awudu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Used oil re-refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used oils, especially used lubricating oils which are normally considered waste and are discarded or burned, are reclaimed for reuse by a re-refining procedure involving the steps of: heat soaking the used oil; distilling the heat soaked oil; passing the distillate through a guard bed of activated material; hydrotreating the guard bed treated distillate under standard hydrotreating conditions. If the used oil to be re-refined contains a quantity of water and/or fuel fraction which the practioner considers sufficiently large to be detrimental, the used oil may be subjected to a dewatering/defueling step prior to being heat soaked.

Reid, L. E.; Ryan, D. G.; Yao, K. C.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

Comparison of the Bioavailability of Waste Laden Soils Using ''In Vivo'' ''In Vitro'' Analytical Methodology and Bioaccessibility of Radionuclides for Refinement of Exposure/Dose Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bioavailability of soil contaminants can be measured using in vitro or in vivo techniques. Since there was no standard method for intercomparison among laboratories, we compared two techniques for bioavailability estimation: in vitro dissolution and in vivo rat feeding model for a NIST-traceable soil material. Bioaccessibility was measured using a sequential soil extraction in synthetic analogues of human saliva, gastric and intestinal fluids. Bioavailability was measured in Sprague Dawley rats by determining metal levels in the major organs and urine, feces, and blood. Bioaccessibility was found to be a good indicator of relative metal bioavailability. Results are presented from bioaccessible experiments with Cesium in contaminated DOE soils, and total alpha and beta bioaccessibility. The results indicate that the modified methodology for bioaccessibility can be used for specific radionuclide analysis.

P. J. Lioy; M. Gallo; P. Georgopoulos; R. Tate; B. Buckley

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Study of the combustion mechanism of oil shale semicoke in a thermogravimetric analyzer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale semicoke, formed in retort furnaces, is ... solid waste. For the industrial application of oil shale semicoke in combustion, this present work focused...

X. X. Han; X. M. Jiang; Z. G. Cui

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

130

Comparison of the bioavailability of elemental waste laden soils using in vivo and in vitro analytical methodology and refinement of exposure/dose models. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The authors hypotheses are: (1) the more closely the synthetic, in vitro, extractant mimics the extraction properties of the human digestive bio-fluids, the more accurate will be the estimate of an internal dose; (2) performance can be evaluated by in vivo studies with a rat model and quantitative examination of a mass balance, calculation and dose estimates from model simulations for the in vitro and in vivo system; and (3) the concentration of the elements Pb, Cd, Cr and selected Radionuclides present in the bioavailable fraction obtained with a synthetic extraction system will be a better indicator of contaminant ingestion from a contaminated soil because it represents the portion of the mass which can yield exposure, uptake and then the internal dose to an individual. As of April 15, 1998, they have made significant progress in the development of a unified approach to the examination of bioavailability and bioaccessibility of elemental contamination of soils for the ingestion route of exposure. This includes the initial characterization of the soil, in vitro measurements of bioaccessibility, and in vivo measurements of bioavailability. They have identified the basic chemical and microbiological characteristics of waste laden soils. These have been used to prioritize the soils for potential mobility of the trace elements present in the soil. Subsequently they have employed a mass balance technique, which for the first time tracked the movement and distribution of elements through an in vitro or in vivo experimental protocol to define the bioaccessible and the bioavailable fractions of digested soil. The basic mass balance equation for the in vitro system is: MT = MSGJ + MIJ + MR. where MT is the total mass extractable by a specific method, MSGJ, is the mass extracted by the saliva and the gastric juices, MIJ is the mass extracted by the intestinal fluid, and MR is the unextractable portion of the initial mass. The above is based upon the use of a synthetic digestive bio-fluids model that includes the saliva, gastric juices, and intestinal fluids. The system has been devised to sequentially extract elements from soil by starting with an extraction by the saliva and carrying the entire mixture to the subsequent bio-fluids for further extraction. The residence time of the soil in each extractant and the liquid to mass ratio in the gastric juices are based upon typical values known for the human digestive system. Experiments were conducted to examine the sensitivity of the extractions to changes in these major variables. The results indicated the lack of significant extraction after 2 h of residence in gastric fluid. The range of variation of the liquid to mass ratio was element dependent over the interval 100:1 and 5,000:1. The final values used for the extraction protocol were: 2 h residence time , and a ratio of 1,000:1. Details of the chemical composition of the extraction protocol are found in Hamel, 1998.'

Lioy, P.J.; Gallo, M.; Georgopoulos, P. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (US). Exposure Measurement and Assessment Div.; Tate, R.; Buckley, B. [Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy from waste via coal/waste co-firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the feasibility of waste-to-energy plants using the cocombustion of coal with refuse-derived fuels. The paper discusses the types of wastes available: municipal solid wastes, plastics, tires, biomass, and specialized industrial wastes, such as waste oils, post-consumer carpet, auto shredder residues, and petroleum coke. The five most common combustion systems used in co-firing are briefly described. They are the stoker boiler, suspension-fired boilers, cyclone furnaces, fluidized bed boilers, and cement kilns. The paper also discusses the economic incentives for generating electricity from waste.

Winslow, J.; Ekmann, J.; Smouse, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Harding, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE/LX/07-0096 Secondary Document DMSA C-337-45 Solid Waste Management...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosol can, a tube of gasket adhesive, container of roof cement, drum of gloves and boots, batteries, and waste oil. The Toxic Substances Control Act waste formerly stored...

133

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

134

MATURE FINE TAILINGS (MFTs): A STUDY OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ATHABASCA OIL SANDS PETROLEUM MINING WASTE APPLIED IN CONCRETE MIXTURES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This study investigates the compressive properties of concrete incorporating Mature Fine Tailings (MFTs) waste stream from a tar sands mining operation. The objectives of… (more)

Leav, Jean S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Oil shale: The environmental challenges III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers of a symposium whose purpose was to discuss the environmental and socio-economic aspects of oil shale development. Topics considered include oil shale solid waste disposal, modeling spent shale disposal, water management, assessing the effects of oil shale facilities on water quality, wastewater treatment and use at oil shale facilities, potential air emissions from oil shale retorting, the control of air pollutant emissions from oil shale facilities, oil shale air emission control, socioeconomic research, a framework for mitigation agreements, the Garfield County approach to impact mitigation, the relationship of applied industrial hygiene programs and experimental toxicology programs, and industrial hygiene programs.

Petersen, K.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Process Waste Assessment, Mechanics Shop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Mechanics Shop. The Mechanics Shop maintains and repairs motorized vehicles and equipment on the SNL/California site, to include motorized carts, backhoes, street sweepers, trash truck, portable emergency generators, trencher, portable crane, and man lifts. The major hazardous waste streams routinely generated by the Mechanics Shop are used oil, spent off filters, oily rags, and spent batteries. The used off and spent off filters make up a significant portion of the overall hazardous waste stream. Waste oil and spent batteries are sent off-site for recycling. The rags and spent on filters are not recycled. They are disposed of as hazardous waste. Mechanics Shop personnel continuously look for opportunities to minimize hazardous wastes.

Phillips, N.M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

138

A Green Route to Petroleum Feedstocks: Photochemistry of Fats and Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Green Route to Petroleum Feedstocks: Photochemistry of Fats and Oils ... We demonstrate that it is possible to generate long chain olefins from different fat sources, i.e., animal fat, vegetable oils/fats, and waste cooking oil. ...

Maria L. Muro-Small; Douglas C. Neckers

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4, 19'70, p. 89. 24. C-b Shale Oil Venture: Hydrology, MinePiles Solid wastes from the shale-oil recovery process alsofrom a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Extraction?Flocculation Re-refining Lubricating Oil Process Using Ternary Organic Solvents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Extraction?Flocculation Re-refining Lubricating Oil Process Using Ternary Organic Solvents ... Res., 1997, 36 (9), ... Waste lubricating oils may be re-refined with organic solvents that dissolve base oil and segregate the additives and solid particles. ...

J. P. Martins

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Methodology for Formulating Diesel Surrogate Fuels with Accurate Compositional, Ignition-Quality, and Volatility Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? Marathon Petroleum Company, Main Street, Findlay, Ohio, 45840 ... We have applied this method on product streams such as finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oil streams (used automotive and transformer oils). ...

Charles J. Mueller; William J. Cannella; Thomas J. Bruno; Bruce Bunting; Heather D. Dettman; James A. Franz; Marcia L. Huber; Mani Natarajan; William J. Pitz; Matthew A. Ratcliff; Ken Wright

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oil shale: Technology status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

The potential of glycerol in freezing preservation of turbine oil-degrading bacterial consortium and the ability of the revised consortium to degrade petroleum wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The turbine oil (TuO)-degrading bacterial consortium Tank-2 (original Tank-2) was preserved as a glycerol stock at ?80 °C from 2009 to 2012. Storage methods have been unavailable so far for any TuO-degrading bacterial consortia or isolates. To evaluate the usefulness of glycerol stock, the original Tank-2 consortium frozen in glycerol at ?80 °C was thawed and then revived by repeated culture in mineral salts medium (MSM) containing 0.5% (w/w) TuO (revived Tank-2). The revived Tank-2 consortium exhibited a high activity to degrade TuO, which was equivalent to that of original Tank-2. It also degraded car engine oil, used car engine oil, Arabian light and Vityaz crude oils and TuO in wastewater. These results indicated that a glycerol stock at ?80 °C was useful for storing Tank-2. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) that targeted the V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the DGGE band profiles of principal bacteria were significantly different between the original and revived Tank-2 consortia and between the revived Tank-2 culture grown in MSM containing TuO and that grown in MSM containing other types of petroleum products. This suggested that bacterial strains inherently residing in Tank-2 could adjust their compositions based on the storage and culture conditions.

Kumiko Kurachi; Reia Hosokawa; Marina Takahashi; Hidetoshi Okuyama

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Methodology Carnegie Mellon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), choice of drilling sites by oil companies (Keller, Rady, and Cripps, 2005), and choice of modeling

Spirtes, Peter

146

„Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wissenschaftliche Voraussagen deuten auf „Peak Oil“, das Maximum globaler Erdölförderung, in unserer ... der demokratischen Systeme führen. Psychoanalytische Betrachtung darf „Peak Oil“ für die Zivilisation als e...

Dr. Manuel Haus; Dr. med. Christoph Biermann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition is 6-percent coal/petcoke/animal meal mix, 16-sawdust Coal, plastic, and tires Tires Petcoke, plastic, andwaste oil Petcoke, sunflower shells, and waste oil Tire

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for Landscape Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE orders mandate the development of a waste minimization program. The program`s goals are to: reduce volumes of wastes and toxicity; implement a system of tracking and reporting improvements; and devise a method for performing tasks. To satisfy the requirements of this program, Sandia conducts pollution prevention opportunity assessments (PPOAs) to identify waste-generating processes. The information collected from a PPOA then is used to identify waste minimization opportunities. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted using Sandia`s new methodology for prioritizing, evaluating and managing site-wide waste streams. This new methodology and the list of priority waste streams are described in the wastes revision of the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment Plant. This PPOA addresses landscape waste minimization, partially in response to recent legislation and regulations.

Phillips, N.M.; Raubfogel, S.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Minimizing casing corrosion in Kuwait oil fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion in production strings is a well known problem in Kuwait oil fields. Failure to remedy the affected wells results mainly in undesirable dump flooding of the oil reservoirs, or in oil seepage and hydrocarbon contamination in shallow water bearing strata. Any of these situations (unless properly handled) leads to a disastrous waste of oil resources. This study discusses casing leaks in Kuwait oil fields, the nature of the formations opposite the leaks and their contained fluids, and the field measures that can be adopted in order to avoid casing leak problems.

Agiza, M.N.; Awar, S.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effect of wettability on light oil steamflooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes NIPER's research on four interrelated topics for Light Oil Steamflooding. Four interrelated topics are described: The methodology for measuring capillary pressure and wettability at elevated temperature, the use of silylating agents to convert water-wet Berea sandstones or unconsolidated quartz sands to oil-wetted surfaces, the evaluation of the thermal hydrolytic stability of these oil-wet surfaces for possible use in laboratory studies using steam and hot water to recover oil, and the effect of porous media of different wettabilities on oil recovery where the porous media is first waterflooded and then steamflooded.

Olsen, D.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effect of wettability on light oil steamflooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes NIPER`s research on four interrelated topics for Light Oil Steamflooding. Four interrelated topics are described: The methodology for measuring capillary pressure and wettability at elevated temperature, the use of silylating agents to convert water-wet Berea sandstones or unconsolidated quartz sands to oil-wetted surfaces, the evaluation of the thermal hydrolytic stability of these oil-wet surfaces for possible use in laboratory studies using steam and hot water to recover oil, and the effect of porous media of different wettabilities on oil recovery where the porous media is first waterflooded and then steamflooded.

Olsen, D.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Scanned Treatment of Mixed Incin. Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Waste DOE/IG-0588 March 2003 Page 17 Page 18 Use of Treatment Resources Details of Finding ........................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ............................................6 Appendices Prior Reports ...............................................................................8 Objective, Scope, and Methodology ...........................................9 Management Comments ...........................................................11 TREATMENT OF MIXED INCINERABLE WASTE TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Waste Stored Rather Than Treated We found the Department of Energy (Department) was not treating its mixed incinerable solid waste expeditiously or cost-effectively.

156

Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co?mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery it is necessary to remove these components. The separation of oil from water and solids using gravitational settling methods is typically incomplete. Oil?in?water and oil?water?solid emulsions can be demulsified and separated into their individual layers by microwave radiation. The data also show that microwave separation is faster than gravity separation and can be faster than conventional heating at many conditions. After separation of emulsion into water and oil layers water can be discharged and oil is collected. High?frequency microwave recycling process can recover oil and gases from oil shale residual oil drill cuttings tar sands oil contaminated dredge/sediments tires and plastics with significantly greater yields and lower costs than are available utilizing existing known technologies. This process is environmentally friendly fuel?generating recycler to reduce waste cut emissions and save energy. This paper presents a critical review of Microwave radiation method for oil recovery.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-D-9 site is the former location of an underground storage tank used for holding fuel for the 184-DA Boiler House. Results of soil-gas samples taken from six soil-gas probes in a rectangle around the site the tank had been removed from concluded that there were no volatile organic compounds at detectable levels in the area. The 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the start of the new millennium, the expression “Peak Oil” was unknown. Nevertheless, a discussion about when the world’s rate of oil production would reach its maximum had already ... . King Hubbert presented...

Kjell Aleklett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2010, world oil prices advanced from approximately $25 per barrel to more than $100 per barrel. The price appreciation of oil over the decade was around ten times the rate of inflation.

Robert Rapier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Waste reduction assistance program (WRAP) on-site consultation audit report: Seafood processing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste audit study was conducted at a seafood processing plant in Alaska. The report discusses process descriptions, waste types and quantities, current waste and materials management practices, and waste reduction alternatives. The company's current practices include use of fish waste, burning of used oil and solvents, and water conservation. Additional opportunities include microfiltration of solvents and oils, recycling of used batteries, inventory control and formation of a waste reduction team. Appendices include a summary of state regulations, a fact sheet on used oil, and a list of vendors and services.

Not Available

1989-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Design and manufacture of a low-cost mechanism for compacting used oil filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Used automotive oil filter disposal is a real and increasing problem in the United States. With over 450 million oil filters sold each year, and 80% of used filters thrown into landfills, this waste represents a significant ...

Kosoglow, Richard D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Life cycle and matrix analyses for re-refined Oil in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unstable market systems and consumer preferences for virgin oil have inhibited the development of waste oil re-refining in Japan. In this papery comparative life cycle inventories were developed for re-refining w...

Chie Nakaniwa; Thomas E. Graedel

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomized oil burner Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oil burner Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomized oil burner Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Wood Waste -A Modern Fuel M. A. SERRELL,...

165

Analysis of oil-pipeline distribution of multiple products subject to delivery time-windows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation defines the operational problems of, and develops solution methodologies for, a distribution of multiple products into oil pipeline subject to delivery time-windows constraints. A multiple-product oil pipeline is a pipeline system...

Jittamai, Phongchai

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

DOE Challenge Home Label Methodology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 2012 1 October 2012 1 Label Methodology DOE Challenge Home Label Methodology October 2012 DOE Challenge Home October 2012 2 Label Methodology Contents Background ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Methodology ............................................................................................................................................. 5 Comfort/Quiet .......................................................................................................................................... 5 Healthy Living ........................................................................................................................................... 7

167

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

168

Software Function Allocation Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES 1. INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Terminology Definitions 1, 2 Problem Definition 2. CURRENT RESEARCH STATUS 2. 1 Current Methodologies 2. 1. 1 Structured Design 2. 1..., 2 The Jackson Methodology 2. 1. 3 Higher Order Software 2. 1. 4 Structured Analysis and Design Technique 2. 1. 5 Software Requirements Engineering Methodology 2. 1. 6 Software Development System 2. 2 Relation to Current Research 3. SFAM...

O'Neal, Michael Ralph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Produced water is a major waste produced from oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source… (more)

Beech, Scott Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various… (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

2008 ASC Methodology Errata  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION'S ERRATA CORRECTIONS BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION'S ERRATA CORRECTIONS TO THE 2008 AVERAGE SYSTEM COST METHODOLOGY September 12, 2008 I....

172

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes September 6, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.

173

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

174

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a “nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

Mustafa Hamid Al-abbas; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Mohd. Marsin Sanagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

177

Pyrolysis of waste tyres: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of waste tyres produces oil, gas and char, and recovered steel. • Batch, screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed are main reactor types. • Product yields are influenced by reactor type, temperature and heating rate. • Pyrolysis oils are complex and can be used as chemical feedstock or fuel. • Research into higher value products from the tyre pyrolysis process is reviewed. - Abstract: Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H{sub 2}, C{sub 1}–C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, CO and H{sub 2}S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale.

Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodolog...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific...

179

FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis Methodologies to Analysis Methodologies to someone by E-mail Share FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies on Facebook Tweet about FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies on Twitter Bookmark FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies on Google Bookmark FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies on Delicious Rank FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies on Digg Find More places to share FCT Systems Analysis: Analysis Methodologies on AddThis.com... Home Analysis Methodologies Resource Analysis Technological Feasibility & Cost Analysis Environmental Analysis Delivery Analysis Infrastructure Development & Financial Analysis Energy Market Analysis DOE H2A Analysis Scenario Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

180

Application of the Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter defines the methodological approach of the Green Energy Audit. The whole activity is divided into ... others. The chapter aims to provide the auditor with an overview, then in the subsequent...

Giuliano Dall’O’

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

BASF's Energy Survey Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BASF?s Energy Survey Methodology Thomas R. Theising BASF Corporation operates several dozen manufacturing Sites within NAFTA and periodically conducts Energy Surveys at each Site. Although these manufacturing sites represent a variety.... Brainstorming activities always follow the walk-through time to capture as many findings as possible. A ranking process is then applied to extract those 20% of the ideas worth the bulk of the savings. A methodology of developing quick economics is applied...

Theising, T. R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Criticality Characteristics of Current Oil Price Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology that recently lead us to predict to an amazing accuracy the date (July 11, 2008) of reverse of the oil price up trend is briefly summarized and some further aspects of the related oil price dynamics elaborated. This methodology is based on the concept of discrete scale invariance whose finance-prediction-oriented variant involves such elements as log-periodic self-similarity, the universal preferred scaling factor lambda=2, and allows a phenomenon of the "super-bubble". From this perspective the present (as of August 22, 2008) violent - but still log-periodically decelerating - decrease of the oil prices is associated with the decay of such a "super- bubble" that has started developing about one year ago on top of the longer-term oil price increasing phase (normal bubble) whose ultimate termination is evaluated to occur in around mid 2010.

Drozdz, Stanislaw; Oswiecimka, Pawel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Re-refined lubrication oils. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning treatments and re-refining of used lubrication oils. Topics include the decontamination processes, reclamation of automobile oils, and handling and storage of waste oils. Environmental analyses of used oil recycling are included. Environmental, resource conservation, and economic aspects of recycled lubricating oils are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Waste Feed Qualification Program Development Approach - 13114  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is a nuclear waste treatment facility being designed and constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (under contract DE-AC27-01RV14136 [1]) to process and vitrify radioactive waste that is currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. A wide range of planning is in progress to prepare for safe start-up, commissioning, and operation. The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the WTP design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring acceptance requirements can be met before the transfer of waste. The WTP Project has partnered with Savannah River National Laboratory to develop the waste feed qualification program. The results of waste feed qualification activities will be implemented using a batch processing methodology, and will establish an acceptable range of operator controllable parameters needed to treat the staged waste. Waste feed qualification program development is being implemented in three separate phases. Phase 1 required identification of analytical methods and gaps. This activity has been completed, and provides the foundation for a technically defensible approach for waste feed qualification. Phase 2 of the program development is in progress. The activities in this phase include the closure of analytical methodology gaps identified during Phase 1, design and fabrication of laboratory-scale test apparatus, and determination of the waste feed qualification sample volume. Phase 3 will demonstrate waste feed qualification testing in support of Cold Commissioning. (authors)

Markillie, Jeffrey R.; Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Halverson, Thomas G. [Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, Connie C.; Peeler, David K. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Sequential investment planning for complex oil development projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we consider sequential real investment decisions for the development of discovered oil prospects. Following a decision analysis approach, we propose a methodology to explore the upside of a dynamic drilling ...

Ayd?n, Cevat Onur

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessment of Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and to assess Eagle Ford shale oil and gas reserves, contingent resources, and prospective resources. I first developed a Bayesian methodology to generate probabilistic decline curves using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) that can quantify the reserves...

Gong, Xinglai

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

190

OIL IMPORTS: For and Against  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OIL IMPORTS: For and Against ... The eight—Ashland Oil, Atlantic Richfield, Cities Service, Marathon Oil, Mobil Oil, Standard Oil (Ind.), ...

1969-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

methodology | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

methodology methodology Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): The main object of the SUNY task for SWERA is to prepare high resolution global irradiance (GHI) and direct irradiance (DNI) data sets for the countries of Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.Much of our initial effort focused on building up the satellite data tx_metadatatool, and in strengthening and validating the models capable of converting that data into ground surface irradiances. Three research articles, acknowledging all or partial funding from UNEP & SWERA have been published on this subject. Source SUNY Albany Date Released July 31st, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated August 29th, 2003 (11 years ago) Keywords Cuba methodology solar SWERA UNEP Data application/pdf icon Download Report (pdf, 2.6 MiB)

192

Bioconversion of Heavy oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??70 % of world?s oil reservoirs consist of heavy oil, and as the supply of conventional oil decreases, researchers are searching for new technologies to… (more)

Steinbakk, Sandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings January 19, 2011 - 1:21pm Addthis Truck 51 of the Chula Vista Fire Department. Truck 51 of the Chula Vista Fire Department. John Young What does this project do? Reuses cooking oil that is normally considered waste, saving taxpayer dollars. Reduces reliance on foreign oil Cuts emissions Anyone who has ever worked in a restaurant probably shudders at the mention of having to dispose of used cooking oil. While not much can be done to eliminate this unpleasant kitchen task, what's changing is how that oil can be recycled to help reduce our dependence on foreign sources of energy. Used cooking oil is a key (and very low cost) ingredient in the production

194

Generating Resourcesg Assessment Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fixed Cost (annual basis) Fuel Price Forecasts Natural gas, coal, oil Transmission, Integration Costs, cooling (wet vs. dry), specifications Price Year The intage of the technolog o ernight capital cost in the PNW; used in the Power Plan as possible new resource options Price Year ­ The vintage

195

Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could Mean More  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could Mean More Oil and Less CO2 Emissions Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could Mean More Oil and Less CO2 Emissions November 15, 2005 - 2:45pm Addthis "Weyburn Project" Breaks New Ground in Enhanced Oil Recovery Efforts WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE)-funded "Weyburn Project" successfully sequestered five million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Weyburn Oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada, while doubling the field's oil recovery rate. If the methodology used in the Weyburn Project was successfully applied on a worldwide scale, one-third to one-half of CO2 emissions could be eliminated in the next 100 years and billions of barrels of oil could be

196

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

197

Economic Cost Analysis of Biodiesel Production: Case in Soybean Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) Combustion of petroleum diesel is a major source for emitting greenhouse gas (GHG). ... An economic analysis model using ASPEN PLUS software suggested that the production costs of soapstock and soybean oil biodiesel would be approximately 0.41 and 0.53 USD L?1, respectively, a 25% reduction relative to the estimated cost of biodiesel produced from soybean oil. ... The use of waste cooking oil to produce biodiesel reduced the raw material cost. ...

Yii-Der You; Je-Lueng Shie; Ching-Yuan Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Huang; Cheng-Yu Pai; Yue-Hwa Yu; Chungfang Ho Chang

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Are there really bubbles in oil prices?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this paper is to identify bubbles in oil prices by using the “exponential fitting” methodology proposed by Watanabe et al. (2007)  [28,29]. We use the daily US dollar closing crude oil prices of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) covering the 1986:01:02–2013:07:09 and the Brent for the 1987:05:20–2013:07:09 periods. The distinguishing feature of this study from the previous studies is that this is the first study in the literature showing the existence of bubbles in crude oil prices. We found that there are four distinct periods of persistent bubbles in the crude oil prices since 1986. Two of these persistent bubbles are before 2000 and two of them are after 2000. We conclude that further research is needed to understand better how futures markets may impact the oil price formation.

Mehmet Balcilar; Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir; Hakan Yetkiner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Efficient Design of a Waste Heat Rejection System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and oil preheaters. The heating requirements for these heat sinks are generally met by burning fossil fuels or even by using electric heaters while available waste heat is rejected to the surrounding environment using devices such as cooling towers...

Mehta, P.

200

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE Systems Engineering Methodology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM) In-Stage Assessment Process Guide Version 3 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Chief Information Officer In-Stage Assessment Process Date: September 2002 Page i Rev Date: Table of Contents Section Page 1.0 Overview .......................................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction........................................................................................................................ 1 Purpose .............................................................................................................................. 1 Who Conducts ...................................................................................................................

202

Effect of the Particle Surface on Oil Recovery from Petroleum Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective disposal of oily sludge generated from the petroleum industry has received increasing concerns, and oil recovery from such waste was considered as one feasible option. ... A no. of crude oils and petroleum products were tested with the surface materials that are used or may potentially be used to recover oil spills. ...

Qunxing Huang; Xu Han; Feiyan Mao; Yong Chi; Jianhua Yan

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Industrial Use of Fish Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commerce are obtained as by-products from fish-meal production or from food fish wastes. vVorld fish-oil production was an estimated 865,000 tons in 1966. Production has increased 2S.Sjr since 1961. All other oils, selectively hydrogenated, and de- odorized for these applications. Fish oils in food products were discontin

204

Oil drilling to use LSU process Show Caption BILL FEIG/THE ADVOCATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS Oil drilling to use LSU process Show Caption BILL FEIG/THE ADVOCATE Advocate staff process to make wood-plastic composites has found a new application in the oil and gas business to turn used plastic motor oil containers and wood waste into a strong composite material that can be used

205

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermal Pretreatment For TRU Waste Sorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a study on thermal treatment of TRU waste to develop a removal technology for materials that are forbidden for disposal. The thermal pretreatment in which hot nitrogen and/or air is introduced to the waste is a process of removing combustibles, liquids, and low melting point metals from PVC wrapped TRU waste. In this study, thermal pretreatment of simulated waste was conducted using a desktop thermal treatment vessel and a laboratory scale thermal pretreatment system. Combustibles and low melting point metals are effectively separated from wastes by choosing appropriate temperature of flowing gases. Combustibles such as papers, PVC, oil, etc. were removed and low melting point metals such as zinc, lead, and aluminum were separated from the simulated waste by the thermal pretreatment. (authors)

Sasaki, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Miyamoto, Y.; Yamaguchi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Rapid assessment of redevelopment potential in marginal oil fields, application to the cut bank field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Infill predictions on a single-phase synthetic case showed greater accuracy than results from statistical techniques. The methodology successfully identified infill well locations iv on a synthetic case derived from Cut Bank field, a water-flooded oil... OF METHODOLOGY ON SYNTHETIC CASES????????... 11 Single Phase Synthetic Gas Reservoir Case????????..??... 11 Cut Bank Field Overview?????????..??????..??. 17 Multiphase Synthetic Oil Reservoir case????????.??.?... 24 TEST OF METHODOLOGY ON ACTUAL CASE...

Chavez Ballesteros, Luis Eladio

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

208

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

209

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to prevent the waste of oil and gas, promote environmental stewardship, and regulate the exploration,

210

Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hydrotreating of oil from eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale provides one of the major fossil energy reserves for the United States. The quantity of reserves in oil shale is less than the quantity in coal, but is much greater (by at least an order of magnitude) than the quantity of crude oil reserves. With so much oil potentially available from oil shale, efforts have been made to develop techniques for its utilization. In these efforts, hydrotreating has proved to be an acceptable technique for upgrading raw shale oil to make usuable products. The present work demonstrated the use of the hydrotreating technique for upgrading an oil from Indiana New Albany oil shale.

Scinta, J.; Garner, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Oil price volatility and oil-related events: An Internet concern study perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oil-related events have increased the uncertainty and complexity of the worldwide oil market. This paper investigates the effects of four types of oil-related events on world oil prices, using an event study methodology and an AR-GARCH model. The Internet information concerning these events, which is derived from search query volumes in Google, is introduced in an analytical framework to identify the magnitude and significance of the market response to oil-related events. The results indicate that world oil prices responding to different oil-related events display obvious differentiation. The cumulative abnormal returns, which reflect the influence of the global financial crisis, tend to drop first and then reverse and rise, while the cumulative abnormal returns induced by other oil-related events present a stronger persistent effect. The impact of the global financial crisis on oil price returns is significantly negative, while the impact of the Libyan war and hurricanes is significantly positive. However, the reactions of oil price returns to different OPEC production announcements are inconsistent.

Qiang Ji; Jian-Feng Guo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Waste Analysis Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for dangerous, mixed, and radioactive waste accepted for confirmation, nondestructive examination (NDE) and nondestructive assay (NDA), repackaging, certification, and/or storage at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Mixed and/or radioactive waste is treated at WRAP. WRAP is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

TRINER, G.C.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Safeguards Envelope Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but this early research was the foundation for the process monitoring systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, the prime example of this Dissertation (See Appendix 1). Early approaches at Argonne National Laboratory in integrated system tracking... was dropped in favor or IGENPRO. IGENPRO, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is a technique and code used in order to resolve events using first principles thermohydraulic codes instead of event-based structure. This methodology is especially...

Metcalf, Richard

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard, Maryland preece@umbc.edu 2002 © Andrews, Nonnecke and Preece #12;Electronic Survey Methodology Page 2 Conducting Research on the Internet: Electronic survey Design, Development and Implementation Guidelines

Nonnecke, Blair

216

Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Name Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Place Denver, Colorado References COGCC Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission is an organization based in Denver, Colorado. The mission of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) is to foster the responsible development of Colorado's oil and gas natural resources. Responsible development results in: The efficient exploration and production of oil and gas resources in a manner consistent with the protection of public health, safety and welfare The prevention of waste The protection of mineral owners' correlative rights The prevention and mitigation of adverse environmental impacts

217

Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, submerged oil refers to near shore oil which has picked up sediments You Should Know About Submerged Oil 1. Submerged oil is relatively uncommon: DWH oil is a light crude

218

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic...

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

220

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory nonradiological waste management information for 1994 and record to date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1994. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

French, D.L.; Lisee, D.J.; Taylor, K.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1992 and record to date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1992. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

Randall, V.C.; Sims, A.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1993 and record to date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1993. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

Sims, A.M.; Taylor, K.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 December 4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) Line management ensures that the requirements for generating, storing, treating, transporting, and disposing of hazardous waste, universal waste, and used oil, established under 40 CFR Subchapter I, applicable permits, and DOE requirements have been effectively implemented for federal and contractor employees, including subcontractors. Written programs and plans are in place and updated when conditions or requirements change. Employees have been properly trained for the wastes they handle. Documentation of waste characterizations, manifests, land disposal restrictions,

224

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sheds for reuse in Plant Engineering. Relocation cost $550, but avoided the purchase of new sheds or composted at the stump dump. Plant Engineering grounds vehicle wash system * Waste minimization 8,000 Oils POTENTIAL COSTS FOR TREATMENT & DISPOSAL COST OF RECYCLE, PREVENTION ESTIMATED COST SAVINGS PROJECT

225

Liquid-phase Processing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil using Pt/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as switchgrass, sorghum and miscanthus, agriculture crops such as corn and sugarcane, municipal solid waste, agriculture wastes and forest residues. Energy crops are more preferred since they produce high yield, low fertilizer application requirements and low...), plastic wastes (Bhattacharya et al., 2009; Karaduman et al., 2001; Rutkowski and 7 Kubacki, 2006; Scott et al., 1990), waste biomass like oil cakes (?zbay et al., 2001), energy crops (He et al., 2009), and forest residues (Ingram et al., 2007...

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Economic and Environmental Aspects of Heat Exchanger Cleaning -- How FP&L Has Used the Newly Patented MCC Process to Clean Turbine Lube Oil Coolers to Maximize Efficiency and Minimize Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of efficient and timely cleaning of heat exchangers. There are great differences in the cleaning processes that are used to clean exchanger bundles in industry today. The cleaning of turbine lube oil coolers is a specialized case in point. A newly patented...

Wood, H. A. T.

227

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

228

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Microsoft Word - Tank Waste Report 9-30-05.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Activities at the Hanford Site DOE/IG-0706 October 2005 REPORT ON THE ACCELERATED TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL ACTIVITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Tank Waste Retrieval Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 Prior Reports 7 Management Comments 8 Tank Waste Retrieval Page 1 Details of Finding Tank Waste The Department will not meet Tri-Party Agreement (Agreement) Retrieval Activities milestones for the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks located at the C-Tank Farm within schedule and cost. Based on the current C-Tank Farm retrieval schedule and the amount of waste retrieved to date, the Department will not accomplish its

230

Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capability to secure oil transport security. Additionally,international oil agreements: 1) ensuring energy security;security, and many argue that as the second-largest consumer of oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,Mexico, Italy, France, Canada, US, and UK. Figure 10. Historical Chinese oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton Junedirectly. Understanding Crude Oil Prices* James D. Hamilton

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

business of having some oil in inventory, which is referredKnowledge of all the oil going into inventory today for salebe empty, because inventories of oil are essential for the

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crudein predicting quarterly real oil price change. variable real

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by this point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supplycurrent pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.in the supply or demand for oil itself could be regarded as

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Adsorption of pyridine by combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large volumes of solid waste material will be produced during the commercial production of shale oil. An alternative to the disposal of the solid waste product is utilization. One potential use of spent oil shale is for the stabilization of hazardous organic compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the adsorption of pyridine, commonly found in oil shale process water, by spent oil shale. The adsorption of pyridine by fresh and weathered samples of combusted New Albany Shale and Green River Formation oil shale was examined. In general, pyridine adsorption can be classified as L-type and the isotherms modeled with the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. For the combusted New Albany Shale, weathering reduced the predicted pyridine adsorption maximum and increased the amount of pyridine adsorption maximum. The pyridine adsorption isotherms were similar to those mathematically described by empirical models, the reduction in solution concentrations of pyridine was generally less than 10 mg L{sup {minus}1} at an initial concentration of 100 mg L{sup {minus}1}. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Essington, M.E.; Hart, B.K.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Used oil disposal and recycling in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used oil represents an important energy resource, which, if properly managed and reused, could lessen US dependence on imported fuels. About 1.4 million gallons of used oil is generated annually in the United States. Of that total, about 70% is recycled: 57% is used as fuel and 12% is refined. In August 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency adopted standards for recycling of used oil, and many states also regulate used oil (six states list used oil as hazardous waste). This report reviews the sources of used oil and methods of disposition, focusing on reprocessing and re-refining. About 83% of the recycled used oil is reprocessed for use as fuel. However, concern about the level of lead in such fuel is increasing. Re-refining used oil is an environmentally friendly process that yields higher energy savings than reprocessing; however, it is more capital-intensive. Reprocessing used oil for use as fuel yields an energy savings (over disposal) of 131,130 Btu/gal, while re-refining the oil for reuse as lube oil saves 180,000 Btu/gal, an advantage of 48,870 Btu/gal. However, further research is needed to enhance re- refining and to demonstrate the quality and competitiveness of its products.

Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

242

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Desulfurization of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strategies for heavy oil desulfurization were evaluated by reviewing desulfurization literature and critically assessing the viability of the various methods for heavy oil. The desulfurization methods includin...

Rashad Javadli; Arno de Klerk

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Tall oil pitch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....Undistilled residue from the distillation of crude tall oil. It is generally recognized that tall oil pitches contain some high-boiling esters and neutral...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysts agree that the Persian Gulf region will continue tos oil imports. 17 The Persian Gulf region is particularlyaccess to oil from the Persian Gulf because of conflict

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

oil1990.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Table 1. Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households that Use Fuel OilKerosene, 1990 Residential Buildings Average Fuel Oil...

248

Oil Sands Feedstocks  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Centre for Upgrading Technology 'a Canada-Alberta alliance for bitumen and heavy oil research' Oil Sands Feedstocks C Fairbridge, Z Ring, Y Briker, D Hager National Centre...

249

Crude Oil Domestic Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Crude Oil Domestic Production Refinery Crude Oil Inputs Refinery Gross Inputs Refinery Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refinery Percent Operable Utilization Net...

250

Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Production (Missouri) Production (Missouri) Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This legislation contains additional information about the permitting, establishment, and operation of oil and gas wells, while additional regulations address oil and gas drilling and production and well spacing and unitization

251

Plan for addressing issues relating to oil shale plant siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Research Institute plan for addressing oil shale plant siting methodology calls for identifying the available resources such as oil shale, water, topography and transportation, and human resources. Restrictions on development are addressed: land ownership, land use, water rights, environment, socioeconomics, culture, health and safety, and other institutional restrictions. Descriptions of the technologies for development of oil shale resources are included. The impacts of oil shale development on the environment, socioeconomic structure, water availability, and other conditions are discussed. Finally, the Western Research Institute plan proposes to integrate these topics to develop a flow chart for oil shale plant siting. Western Research Institute has (1) identified relative topics for shale oil plant siting, (2) surveyed both published and unpublished information, and (3) identified data gaps and research needs. 910 refs., 3 figs., 30 tabs.

Noridin, J. S.; Donovan, R.; Trudell, L.; Dean, J.; Blevins, A.; Harrington, L. W.; James, R.; Berdan, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

256

Systems Integration Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program (APEP) of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into power plant systems that meet performance and emission goals of VISION 21. The myriad of fuels, fuel processing, power generation, and emission control technologies are narrowed down to selected scenarios by a screening analysis to identify those combinations that have the potential to achieve the VISION 21 goals consisting of 60% efficiency (HHV) for coal based systems and 75% efficiency (LHV) for gas-based systems. The selected promising cycle scenarios are then analyzed in detail to develop the performance and costs for each. The methodology used in arriving at these promising cases and the preliminary results of the cycle analyses are presented. The technology levels considered are based on projected technical and manufacturing advances being made in industry and on advances identified in current and future government supported research such as the Clean Coal Program, Combustion 2000 (LEBS and HIPPS), Advanced Turbine Systems program, Low-Cost Advanced Fuel Cell programs, and the Flexible Gas Turbine Systems program. Examples of systems included in these advanced cycles are solid oxide and molten carbonate fuel cells, advanced gas turbines, ion transport membrane separation and hydrogen-oxygen combustion.

Samuelsen, Scott; Rao, Ashok

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Compliance evaluation inspection report: Marathon Oil Company, Garyville, Louisiana. NPDES Permit No. LA0045683. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the findings of a compliance evaluation inspection of the Marathon Oil Company in Garyville, Louisiana, Conducted on June 24, 1992. It is part of a series of inspections of industrial waste dischargers.

NONE

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

259

Data quality enhancement in oil reservoir operations : an application of IPMAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a study of data quality enhancement opportunities in upstream oil and gas industry. Information Product MAP (IPMAP) methodology is used in reservoir pressure and reservoir simulation data, to propose ...

Lin, Paul Hong-Yi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ships After Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ships After Oil ... Special self-propelled tenders planned for offshore drilling operations in Gulf ...

1956-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

262

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

NETL: News Release - NETL's Oil and Natural Gas Program Provides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24, 2007 24, 2007 Oil and Natural Gas Program Uses Stranded Gas to Revive Oil Production Project Generates Energy from Waste Gas to Restore Marginal Fields WASHINGTON, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project is turning "stranded" natural gas at marginal, or low-production, oil fields into fuel for distributed electric power. The breakthrough is bringing previously idle oil fields back into production and could boost domestic oil production by some 28 million barrels per year within the next 10 years, helping to reduce the Nation's dependence on foreign oil sources. Stranded gas is natural gas that is uneconomic to produce for one or more reasons: the energy, or Btu content, may be too low; the gas may be too impure to use; or, the volume may be too small to warrant a pipeline connection to the gas infrastructure. Non-commercial gas is sometimes produced along with oil, becoming an environmental liability. This unwanted byproduct of oil production has become a major problem in California oil fields where producers have been forced to abandon sites early, leaving valuable reserves of domestic oil untapped.

264

Oil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

265

Staged Catalytic Gasification/Steam Reforming of Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While the slag can be used in the current industry infrastructure as a construction material, up-scaling of biomass utilization will lead to land depletion because the mineral and metal balances are not closed. ... Table 4 shows gasification results at similar temperatures for two different types of pyrolysis oil (pine and beech) and of another liquid biomass stream, a “light” and a “heavy” sugar waste stream. ... The sugar waste streams that were gasified are a side product from lactic acid production. ...

Guus van Rossum; Sascha R. A. Kersten; Wim P. M. van Swaaij

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Waste Segregation Based on Derived Clearance Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology and results of a radiological modeling in support of an application to release very low level radiologically contaminated waste from regulatory control and allow its haulage and disposal in a hazardous waste landfill. The Canadian regulatory body responsible for licensing operations involving nuclear materials (the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission), has not yet formally defined clearance levels for free release of low level radiologically contaminated waste. The IAEA clearance levels have been derived for certain situations and receptor characteristics, which might be too conservative for an actual case. A site-specific pathways analysis was therefore completed to define conditional clearance levels using the concept of de minimis dose limit. Derived Conditional Clearance Levels were calculated for each radionuclide based on the maximally exposed hypothetical individuals to determine whether each waste stream can be 'cleared' from regulatory controls. The results showed that haulage of the waste from the station to the haulage/processing facility and transportation of waste or sludge from the haulage/processing facility to the disposal facility, handling of the waste or sludge at the haulage/processing facility, and incineration and/or disposal of waste or sludge at the disposal facility would not expose the workers to doses above 0.1 {mu}Sv/yr., which is less than the de minimis dose limit of 10 {mu}Sv/yr. (authors)

Garisto, N.C.; Parhizgari, Z. [SENES Consultants Limited, Richmond Hill, ON (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Turbine cooling waxy oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for pipelining a waxy oil to essentially eliminate deposition of wax on the pipeline wall is described comprising: providing a pressurized mixture of the waxy oil and a gas; effecting a sudden pressure drop of the mixture of the oil and the gas through an expansion turbine, thereby expanding the gas and quickly cooling the oil to below its cloud point in the substantial absence of wax deposition and forming a slurry of wax particles and oil; and pipelining the slurry.

Geer, J.S.

1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

269

Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transuranic Waste Characterization Sampling and Analysis Methods Manual (Methods Manual) provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma DE-FC26-00NT15125 Project Goal The Hunton formation in Oklahoma has some unique production characteristics, including large water production, initially decreasing gas-oil ratios, and excellent dynamic continuity—but poor geological continuity. The overall goal of the project is to understand the mechanism of gas and oil production from the Hunton Formation in Oklahoma so that similar reservoirs in other areas can be efficiently exploited. An additional goal is to develop methodologies to improve oil recovery using secondary recovery techniques. Performers University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Marjo Operating Company, Tulsa, OK University of Houston, Houston, TX Orca Exploration, Tulsa, OK

271

A field laboratory for improved oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Annex III of the Memorandum of Understanding, undertaken by the Houston Petroleum Research Center at the University of Houston, was to develop a field laboratory for research in improved oil recovery using a Gulf Coast reservoir in Texas. The participants: (1) make a field site selection and conducted a high resolution seismic survey in the demonstration field, (2) obtained characteristics of the reservoir (3) developed an evaluation of local flood efficiency in different parts of the demonstration reservoir, (4) used diverse methodology to evaluate the potential recovery of the remaining oil in the test reservoir, (5) developed cross-well seismic tomography, and (6) will transfer the learned technologies to oil operators through publication and workshops. This abstract is an overview of these tasks.

Hildebrandt, A.F.; McDonald, J.; Claridge, E.; Killough, J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

273

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

274

Microsoft Word - Tran Waste final report 2-8-05.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transuranic Waste Management at Transuranic Waste Management at Los Alamos National Laboratory DOE/IG-0673 February 2005 REPORT ON TRANSURANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Legacy Transuranic Waste Disposal Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 2. Transuranic Waste Storage 8 3. Prior Audit Reports 10 4. Management Comments 11 Legacy Transuranic Waste Disposal Page 1 Details of Finding Background Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has been involved in the development, production, and maintenance of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile for over six decades. Research, development, and fabrication of weapons components produced a

275

Oil and Gas Conservation (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation (Nebraska) Conservation (Nebraska) Oil and Gas Conservation (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission This section establishes the state's interest in encouraging the development, production, and utilization of natural gas and oil resources in a manner which will prevent waste and lead to the greatest ultimate

276

1994 lubricating oil and wax capacities of U. S. and Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper consists of several tables which list the names of US and Canadian refineries, their location, and their capacity for production of lubricating oil and waxes categorized by finishing operations and primary processing. A separate table lists US and Canadian re-refiners and their capacity for refining waste lubricating oils.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Venezuela with Mexico, another major oil pro- ducing countryOil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .2.6: Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico 350 Productivity

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Study of the effects of operating factors on the resulting producer gas of oil palm fronds gasification with a single throat downdraft gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Malaysia has abundant but underutilized oil palm fronds. Although the gasification of biomass using preheated inlet air as a gasifying medium is considered an efficient and environmentally friendly method, previous studies were limited to certain types of biomass wastes and gasifier designs. Hence, the effects of preheating the gasifying air on oil palm fronds gasification in a single throat downdraft gasifier are presented in this paper. In addition, the effects of varying the flow rate of the gasifying air and the moisture content of the feedstock on the outputs of oil palm fronds gasification were studied. A response surface methodology was used for the design of the experiment and the analysis of the results. The results showed that preheating the gasifying air to 500 °C increased the concentrations of CO from 22.49 to 24.98%, that of CH4 from 1.98 to 2.87%, and that of H2 from 9.67 to 13.58% on dry basis in the producer gas at a 10% feedstock moisture content. Conversely, the dry basis concentrations of CO, CH4, and H2 decreased from 22.49, 1.98 and 9.67% to 12.01, 1.44 and 5.45%, respectively, as the moisture content increased from 10 to 20%. The airflow rate was also proven to significantly affect the quality of the resulting producer gas.

Fiseha M. Guangul; Shaharin A. Sulaiman; Anita Ramli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demonstrated Petroleum Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy Murphy Larry Zirker Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program * Performed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Fleet Operations * Goal - Support DOE's efforts to reduce petroleum consumption & ensure the energy security of the United States Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Objectives - Test the concept of using oil bypass filters to minimize engine oil changes & the generation of waste oils - Demonstration the economics of oil bypass filter systems - Estimate potential engine oil saving from bypass filter technologies that can be achieved by INEEL,

282

Economics of Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract ‘Peak oil’ refers to the future decline in world production of crude oil and the accompanying potentially calamitous effects. The peak oil literature typically rejects economic analysis. This article argues that economic analysis is indeed appropriate for analyzing oil scarcity because standard economic models can replicate the observed peaks in oil production. Moreover, the emphasis on peak oil is misplaced as peaking is not a good indicator of scarcity, peak oil techniques are overly simplistic, the catastrophes predicted by the peak oil literature are unlikely, and the literature does not contribute to correcting identified market failures. Efficiency of oil markets could be improved by instead focusing on remedying market failures such as excessive private discount rates, environmental externalities, market power, insufficient innovation incentives, incomplete futures markets, and insecure property rights.

S.P. Holland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

284

Architecture-Driven Modelling Methodologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical software development methodologies take architectural issues as granted or pre-determined. They thus neglect the impact decisions for architecture have within the development process. This omission is applicable as long as we are considering ...

Hannu Jaakkola; Bernhard Thalheim

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology Step 1 (Estimate total amount of weekly U.S. coal production) U.S. coal production for the current week is estimated using a ratio...

286

44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials.

J.M. Scaglione

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the public policy of the state to conserve and control the natural resources of oil and gas, and their products; to prevent waste of oil and gas; to provide for the protection and adjustment of the rights of landowners, producers, and interested parties; and to safeguard the health,

288

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

289

Oil price and financial markets: Multivariate dynamic frequency analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this paper is to study the degree of interdependence between oil price and stock market index into two groups of countries: oil-importers and oil-exporters. To this end, we propose a new empirical methodology allowing a time-varying dynamic correlation measure between the stock market index and the oil price series. We use the frequency approach proposed by Priestley and Tong (1973), that is the evolutionary co-spectral analysis. This method allows us to distinguish between short-run and medium-run dependence. In order to complete our study by analysing long-run dependence, we use the cointegration procedure developed by Engle and Granger (1987). We find that interdependence between the oil price and the stock market is stronger in exporters? markets than in the importers? ones.

Anna Creti; Zied Ftiti; Khaled Guesmi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Methodological Approach For Reservoir Heterogeneity Characterization Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution of rock properties. Characterization of porosity, permeability, oil, gas and water saturation of hydrocarbon bearing rocks is the focus of this technical paper. Calculating formation porosity and waterSPE 28394 A Methodological Approach For Reservoir Heterogeneity Characterization Using Artificial

Mohaghegh, Shahab

292

Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

State Oil and Gas Boards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boards Boards Jump to: navigation, search State Oil and Gas Board and Commission sites are related to oil and gas production, well sites, and any other relevant data and information. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission is a multi-state government agency that promotes the quality of life for all Americans. This list is where information for OpenEI pages is held, and also, in most cases, where oil and gas data can be derived, open to the public. In many cases, EIA may hold the data related to Oil and Gas. Also, some datasets may only contain a state report pdf, in which case the data would need to be pulled out of the pdf and put into an excel or xml. Here are the states: State link Information Contact info Alabama Alabama Oil and Gas Board The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama is a regulatory agency of the State of Alabama with the statutory charge of preventing waste and promoting the conservation of oil and gas while ensuring the protection of both the environment and the correlative rights of owners. The Board is granted broad authority in Alabama oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. 420 Hackberry Lane Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 205.349.2852

294

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

295

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

296

U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well June 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - Based on updated information and scientific assessments, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, and Chair of the National Incident Command's Flow Rate Technical Group (FRTG) Dr. Marcia McNutt (Director of the U.S. Geological Survey) today announced an improved estimate of how much oil is flowing from the leaking BP well. Secretary Chu, Secretary Salazar, and Dr. McNutt convened a group of federal and independent scientists on Monday to discuss new analyses and

297

Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SECURE Methodology to Identify Potential Reductions in Utility and Process Energy Consumption Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology to Identify...

298

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

299

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing...

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Residential heating oil price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 2.91 per gallon. That's down 1.10 from a year ago, based on the...

302

Residential heating oil price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.5 cents from a week ago to 2.84 per gallon. That's down 1.22 from a year ago, based on the...

303

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.6 cents from a week ago to 2.97 per gallon. That's down 1.05 from a year ago, based on the...

304

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.6 cents from a week ago to 3.04 per gallon. That's down 99.4 cents from a year ago, based on the...

305

US Crude oil exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2014 EIA Energy Conference U.S. Crude Oil Exports July 14, 2014 By Lynn D. Westfall U.S. Energy Information Administration U.S. crude oil production has grown by almost 50% since...

306

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Apply process integration to waste minimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a systematic method for identifying process modifications to minimize waste generation. It is based on the hierarchical decision procedure, which provides a framework for identifying process improvement options and evaluating heat and mass integration opportunities. The article deals specifically with an adaptation of the hierarchical decision approach for use in pollution abatement applications. The article also illustrates the use of the technique by applying it to the fluid catalytic cracking unit at Amoco Oil Co.'s Yorktown, VA, refinery.

Rossiter, A.P.; Spriggs, H.D. (Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, VA (United States)); Klee, H. Jr. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

311

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

Levi, Ran

313

Rheological Modification of Lubricating Greases with Recycled Polymers from Different Plastics Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rheological Modification of Lubricating Greases with Recycled Polymers from Different Plastics Waste ... Tall, S.; Albertsson, A. C.; Karlsson, S. Recycling of Mixed Plastic Fractions: Mechanical Properties of Multicomponent Extruded Polyolefin Blends Using Response Surface Methodology J. Appl. ...

J. E. Martín-Alfonso; C. Valencia; M. C. Sánchez; J. M. Franco; C. Gallegos

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

Dillon, J.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Prior to developing the API Compendium of GHG Emissions Methodologies for the Oil and Gas Industry (PDF 14.6 MB), API reviewed a wide range of government estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from the oil and gas industry as well as existing and widely used methodologies for estimating emissions from our industry's operations. This review made it quite clear that while existing data and methods may be adequate for national-level estimates of greenhouse gas emissions, they were inadequate for developing reliable facility- and company-specific estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations. Download Acrobat Reader The Compendium is used by industry to assess its greenhouse gas emissions. Working with a number of other international associations as well as

316

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waste?to?Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

319

Co-processing of agriculture and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass and bio-processed waste are potential candidates for co-liquefaction with coal. Specific materials used here include sawdust and poultry manure. Liquefaction experiments were run on each of these materials, separately and with coal, using tetralin as solvent at 350{degrees}C and 1000 psi(cold) hydrogen pressure for 1h. Total conversion was monitored, as well as conversion to asphaltenes, oils and gases. All the biomass samples are converted to oils and gases under the reaction conditions. Poultry manure seems to convert coal more completely, and to produce more oils and gases, than conventional liquefaction.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, J.P. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Treatment of Mercury Contaminated Oil from the Mound Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over one thousand gallons of tritiated oil, at various contamination levels, are stored in the Main Hill Tritium Facility at the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (MEMP), commonly referred to as Mound Site. This tritiated oil is to be characterized for hazardous materials and radioactive contamination. Most of the hazardous materials are expected to be in the form of heavy metals, i.e., mercury, silver, lead, chromium, etc, but transuranic materials and PCBs could also be in some oils. Waste oils, found to contain heavy metals as well as being radioactively contaminated, are considered as mixed wastes and are controlled by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The SAMMS (Self-Assembled Mercaptan on Mesoporous Silica) technology was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for removal and stabilization of RCRA metals (i.e., lead, mercury, cadmium, silver, etc.) and for removal of mercury from organic solvents. The SAMMS material is based on self-assembly of functionalized monolayers on mesoporous oxide surfaces. The unique mesoporous oxide supports provide a high surface area, thereby enhancing the metal-loading capacity. SAMMS material has high flexibility in that it binds with different forms of mercury, including metallic, inorganic, organic, charged, and neutral compounds. The material removes mercury from both organic wastes, such as pump oils, and from aqueous wastes. Mercury-loaded SAMMS not only passes TCLP tests, but also has good long-term durability as a waste form because: (1) the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance in ion-exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis over a wide pH range and (2) the uniform and small pore size of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria from solubilizing the bound mercury.

Klasson, KT

2000-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Solid waste drum array fire performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated waste are a major concern in DOE waste storage facilities. This report is the second of two reports on fire testing designed to provide data relative to the propagation of a fire among storage drum arrays. The first report covers testing of individual drums subjected to an initiating fire and the development of the analytical methodology to predict fire propagation among storage drum arrays. This report is the second report, which documents the results of drum array fire tests. The purpose of the array tests was to confirm the analytical methodology developed by Phase I fire testing. These tests provide conclusive evidence that fire will not propagate from drum to drum unless an continuous fuel source other than drum contents is provided.

Louie, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Haecker, C.F. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States); Beitel, J.J.; Gottuck, D.T.; Rhodes, B.T.; Bayier, C.L. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Manufacture of refrigeration oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricating oils suitable for use in refrigeration equipment in admixture with fluorinated hydrocarbon refrigerants are produced by solvent extraction of naphthenic lubricating oil base stocks, cooling the resulting extract mixture, optionally with the addition of a solvent modifier, to form a secondary raffinate and a secondary extract, and recovering a dewaxed oil fraction of lowered pour point from the secondary raffinate as a refrigeration oil product. The process of the invention obviates the need for a separate dewaxing operation, such as dewaxing with urea, as conventionally employed for the production of refrigeration oils.

Chesluk, R.P.; Platte, H.J.; Sequeira, A.J.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

327

NETL: News Release - Successful Sequestration Project Could Mean More Oil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 15, 2005 November 15, 2005 Successful Sequestration Project Could Mean More Oil and Less Carbon Dioxide Emissions Weyburn Project Breaks New Ground in Enhanced Oil Recovery Efforts WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE)-funded "Weyburn Project" successfully sequestered five million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Weyburn Oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada, while doubling the field's oil recovery rate. If the methodology used in the Weyburn Project was successfully applied on a worldwide scale, one-third to one-half of CO2 emissions could be eliminated in the next 100 years and billions of barrels of oil could be recovered. "The success of the Weyburn Project could have incredible implications for reducing CO2 emissions and increasing America's oil production. Just by applying this technique to the oil fields of Western Canada we would see billions of additional barrels of oil and a reduction in CO2 emissions equivalent to pulling more than 200 million cars off the road for a year," Secretary of Energy Bodman said. "The Weyburn Project will provide policymakers, the energy industry, and the general public with reliable information about industrial carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery."

328

M&S methodological challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

M&S provides a formal way to generate or test existing knowledge. Like mathematics, M&S provides an apparatus for deduction while generating data that can be used for statistical inference. However, unlike mathematics, M&S's formal approach varies from ... Keywords: epistemology, methodology, philosophy

Jose J. Padilla; Andreas Tolk; Saikou Y. Diallo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid--liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average individual particle sizes of approximately 40 nanometers.

Chaiko, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid-liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average. individual particle sizes of approximately 40 manometers.

Chaiko, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Carcinogenicity Studies of Estonian Oil Shale Soots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determine the carcinogenicity of Estonian oil shale soot as well as the soot from oil shale fuel oil. All

A. Vosamae

333

Waste Receiving and Processing, Module 2A, feed specification: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed descriptions of the various mixed low-level waste feed streams that will be processed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 2A (WRAP 2A) are provided. Feed stream descriptions are based on available reports, the solid waste information tracking system database, and the 1993 solid waste forecast data. Available chemical and physical attributes, radionuclide data, waste codes, and packaging information are shown for 15 feed streams. The information sources and methodology for obtaining projections for WRAP 2A expected feed stream volumes also are described.

Kruger, O.L.; Sheriff, M.L.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

The effect of vibration on alpha radiolysis of transuranic (TRU) waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on previously unpublished scoping work related to the potential for vibration to redistribute radionuclides on transuranic (TRU) waste. If this were to happen, the amount of gases generated, including hydrogen, could be increased above the undisturbed levels. This could be an important consideration for transport of TRU wastes either at DOE sites or from them to a future repository, e.g., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These preliminary data on drums of real waste seem to suggest that radionuclide redistribution does not occur. However improvements in the experimental methodology are suggested to enhance safety of future experiments on real wastes as well as to provide more rigorous data.

Zerwekh, A.; Kosiewicz, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Warren, J. (NFT, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The effect of vibration on alpha radiolysis of transuranic (TRU) waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on previously unpublished scoping work related to the potential for vibration to redistribute radionuclides on transuranic (TRU) waste. If this were to happen, the amount of gases generated, including hydrogen, could be increased above the undisturbed levels. This could be an important consideration for transport of TRU wastes either at DOE sites or from them to a future repository, e.g., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These preliminary data on drums of real waste seem to suggest that radionuclide redistribution does not occur. However improvements in the experimental methodology are suggested to enhance safety of future experiments on real wastes as well as to provide more rigorous data.

Zerwekh, A.; Kosiewicz, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Warren, J. [NFT, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

337

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

338

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Discharge to Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discharge to Ocean Discharge to Ocean Fact Sheet - Discharge to Ocean Past Practices In early offshore oil and gas development, drilling wastes were generally discharged from the platforms directly to the ocean. Until several decades ago, the oceans were perceived to be limitless dumping grounds. During the 1970s and 1980s, however, evidence mounted that some types of drilling waste discharges could have undesirable effects on local ecology, particularly in shallow water. When water-based muds (WBMs) were used, only limited environmental harm was likely to occur, but when operators employed oil-based muds (OBMs) on deeper sections of wells, the resulting cuttings piles created impaired zones beneath and adjacent to the platforms. At some North Sea locations, large piles of oil-based cuttings remain on the sea floor near the platforms. Piles of oil-based cuttings can affect the local ecosystem in three ways: by smothering organisms, by direct toxic effect of the drilling waste, and by anoxic conditions caused by microbial degradation of the organic components in the waste. Current regulatory controls minimize the impacts of permitted discharges of cuttings.

340

Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1 Ovidiu Ghita2 Pedro. In this paper we present a novel methodology to automate the recycling process of non-ferrous metal Waste from that the proposed solution can be used to replace the manual procedure that is currently used in WEEE recycling

Whelan, Paul F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Standard guide for characterization of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes for thermal treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide identifies methods to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes before a waste is processed at high temperatures, for example, vitrification into a homogeneous glass ,glass-ceramic, or ceramic waste form. This includes waste forms produced by ex-situ vitrification (ESV), in-situ vitrification (ISV), slagging, plasma-arc, hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) and/or cold-pressing and sintering technologies. Note that this guide does not specifically address high temperature waste treatment by incineration but several of the analyses described in this guide may be useful diagnostic methods to determine incinerator off-gas composition and concentrations. The characterization of the waste(s) recommended in this guide can be used to (1) choose and develop the appropriate thermal treatment methodology, (2) determine if waste pretreatment is needed prior to thermal treatment, (3) aid in development of thermal treatment process control, (4) develop surrogate wa...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs DE-FC26-04NT15508 Project Goal The project goal is to provide a methodology that will allow operators of oil reservoirs in carbonate reefs to better image the interior structure of those reservoirs and to identify those areas that contain the most oil remaining after initial production. Performers Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Z-Seis Inc., Houston, TX Results This study provides a significant step forward in reservoir characterization by demonstrating that crosswell seismic imaging can be used over considerable distances to better define features within a reservoir and by showing that pre-stack characteristics of reflection events can be used to reduce ambiguity in determination of lithology and fluid content. Crosswell seismic imaging of the two reefs has provided data that is well beyond any that a reservoir engineer or development geologist has previously had for improved characterization and production.

346

Vegetable oil fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the future role of renewable agricultural resources in providing fuel is discussed. it was only during this century that U.S. farmers began to use petroleum as a fuel for tractors as opposed to forage crop as fuel for work animals. Now farmers may again turn to crops as fuel for agricultural production - the possible use of sunflower oil, soybean oil and rapeseed oil as substitutes for diesel fuel is discussed.

Bartholomew, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NCR's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150. After the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, the NRC initiated a sever accident research program to develop an improved understanding of severe accidents and to provide a second technical basis to support regulatory decisions in this area. A key product of this program is NUREG-1150, which provides estimates of risk for several nuclear reactors of different design. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. A major aspect of the work was the development of a methodology that improved upon previous full-scale probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) in several areas which are described.

Benjamin, A.S.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

US oil consumption, oil prices, and the macroeconomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the oil price shock of 1973–74, researchers have waged ... national income. Studies examining the relationship between oil prices, oil consumption, and real output have produced remarkably ... to dramatical...

Ali F. Darrat; Otis W. Gilley; Don J. Meyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane bills Lower oil prices are not only driving down gasoline costs, but U.S. consumers will also see a bigger savings in...

350

Effects of Oil and Oil Dispersants on the Marine Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 April 1971 research-article Effects of Oil and Oil Dispersants on the Marine Environment R. G. J. Shelton In the context of marine pollution, the term 'oil' can cover a very wide range of substances and usually...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Enhanced Oil Recovery to Fuel Future Oil Demands | GE Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Fuel Future Oil Demands Enhanced Oil Recovery to Fuel Future Oil Demands Trevor Kirsten 2013.10.02 I'm Trevor Kirsten and I lead a team of GE researchers that investigate a...

352

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

354

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

What substitutes for oil?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... bagasse, ethyl alcohol, vegetable oils, methane and hydrogen; as well as hydro and nuclear power generation, conservation methods, and solar, wind and tidal energy.

David Spurgeon

1978-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

357

Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

358

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

359

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

360

Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: Oil & Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources...

362

Transuranic waste baseline inventory report. Revision No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties from across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system into a series of {open_quotes}waste profiles{close_quotes} that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The purpose of Revisions 0 and 1 of this report was to provide data to be included in the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) performance assessment (PA) processes for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revision 2 of the document expanded the original purpose and was also intended to support the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) requirement for providing the total DOE TRU waste inventory. The document included a chapter and an appendix that discussed the total DOE TRU waste inventory, including nondefense, commercial, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-contaminated, and buried (predominately pre-1970) TRU wastes that are not planned to be disposed of at WIPP.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified...

364

Lead Corrosion and Oil Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... tests the horn was AISI 304, the balls were variously high purity Al, Cu, SAE 52100 steel, and Pb. The oil was a refined paraffinic mineral oil into which ... oil Bearing

J. K. APPELDOORN; P. PACOR; V. RIDDEI

1972-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

367

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

368

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

369

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Wastes: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I. To characterize the biodegradation of cellulosic materials using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. II. To develop an electrochemical/spectroscopic methodology to characterize TRU waste microbial transformation III. To develop molecular models of TRU complexes in order to understand microbial transformation In all cases, objectives are designed to compliment the efforts from other team members, and will be periodically coordinated through the lead P.I. at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), A.J. Francis.

Halada, Gary P.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

CONGRESS BLASTS OIL INDUSTRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IN PACKED HEARINGS last week before angry members of Congress, the heads of BP, ExxonMobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell Oil defended their industry in light of the April 20 BP oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, which has led to the worst ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Oil Quantity : The histori  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model for Prudhoe Bay. Figure 11: Historical Prudhoe Bay oil production data, modeled economically Production (million bbl per Month) Historical Production Best Fit (Hist. Tax w/ELF, Ref. P) High Price 120 140 160 19 Oil Quantity Con Wel N E A N N ng Results e Bay : The histori Bay over tim : Prudhoe Ba

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

373

The Geopolitics of Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduce their production by a similar...barrels ofoil a day. Although the...barrels of oil per day. It is likely...Virtually all the OPEC producers, particularly...their oil. In 1973, 90 percent...increase indigenous production, and ac-celerate...

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the US nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCBs, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay, and fission products of DOE operations. To allow disposal, the asbestos must be converted chemically, followed by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives. An attempt was made to apply techniques that have already proved successful in the mining, oil, and metals processing industries to the development of a multi-stage process to remove and separate hazardous chemical radioactive materials from asbestos. This process uses three methods: ABCOV chemicals which converts the asbestos to a sanitary waste; dielectric heating to volatilize the organic materials; and electrochemical processing for the removal of heavy metals, RCRA wastes and radionuclides. This process will result in the destruction of over 99% of the asbestos; limit radioactive metal contamination to 0.2 Bq alpha per gram and 1 Bq beta and gamma per gram; reduce hazardous organics to levels compatible with current EPA policy for RCRA delisting; and achieve TCLP limits for all solidified waste.

Kasevich, R.S.; Nocito, T.; Vaux, W.G.; Snyder, T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . OilEllner, ”Organized Labor in Venezuela 1958-1991: Behavior

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Chinaâs Oil Diplomacy with Russia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In Chinaâs view, it is necessary to get crude oil and oil pipeline. Under Russia and China strategic partnership, China tries to obtain âlong term… (more)

Chao, Jiun-chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

oil | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil oil Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chapter 5 - Crude Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oil has been the number one source of energy in the world since the middle of the twentieth century. The world is very dependent on petroleum for transportation fuels, petrochemicals and asphalt. But ever increasing demand has caused the price of oil to spike in recent years, and only the world economic crisis has been able to temper demand and bring the price down to more reasonable levels. However, the demand and price are likely to shoot up again when the economy recovers. At the same time, the peak oil theory of M. King Hubbert predicts that world oil production is likely to peak soon. This prediction raises questions about what source of energy will come to the fore when oil is not able to keep up.

Brian F. Towler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

383

An Alternative to Performing Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Container Headspace Gas Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is operating under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) for contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste. The HWFP contains limitations on allowable emissions from waste disposed in the underground. This environmental performance standard imposed on the WIPP consists of limiting volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from emplaced waste to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The standard is currently met by tracking individual waste container headspace gas concentrations, which are determined by headspace gas sampling and analysis of CH TRU waste containers. The WIPP is seeking a HWFP modification to allow the disposal of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Because RH TRU waste is limited to approximately 5% of the waste volume and is emplaced in the disposal room walls, it is possible to bound the potential RH TRU waste contribution to VOC emissions using conservative upper bounds. These conservative upper bounds were developed as an alternative to RH TRU waste canister headspace gas sampling and analysis. The methodology used to perform the calculations used to evaluate VOC emissions from emplaced RH TRU waste canisters applied the same equations as those used to evaluate VOC emissions in the original HWFP application.

Spangler, L. R.; Djordjevic, S. M.; Kehrman, R. F.; Most, W. A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

385

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

386

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

387

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24–192 mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively.

B. Ruiz; X. Flotats

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Activity concentrations of 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K radionuclides in refinery products and the additional radiation dose originated from oil residues in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radioactive materials (TENORM). Oil and gas production, coal mining and combustion, drinking or waste water treatments...Sources from the point of view of radiation protection, taking economic and social factors into account, the common goal is to keep......

A. Parmaksiz; Y. Agus; F. Bulgurlu; E. Bulur; Ç. Yildiz; T. Öncü

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Device Assembly Facility (DAF) Glovebox Radioactive Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provides programmatic support to the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility in the form of target assembly. The target assembly activities are performed in a glovebox at DAF and include Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Currently, only activities with transuranic SNM are anticipated. Preliminary discussions with facility personnel indicate that primarily two distributions of SNM will be used: Weapons Grade Plutonium (WG-Pu), and Pu-238 enhanced WG-Pu. Nominal radionuclide distributions for the two material types are included in attachment 1. Wastes generated inside glove boxes is expected to be Transuranic (TRU) Waste which will eventually be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Wastes generated in the Radioactive Material Area (RMA), outside of the glove box is presumed to be low level waste (LLW) which is destined for disposal at the NTS. The process knowledge quantification methods identified herein may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around the DAF and possibly JASPER as long as the fundamental waste stream boundaries are adhered to as outlined below. The method is suitable for quantification of waste which can be directly surveyed with the Blue Alpha meter or swiped. An additional quantification methodology which requires the use of a high resolution gamma spectroscopy unit is also included and relies on the predetermined radionuclide distribution and utilizes scaling to measured nuclides for quantification.

Dominick, J L

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

OpenEI - oil  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

/0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas /0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/805 This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. 

License
Type of License: 

393

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

394

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear weapon reliability evaluation methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of those activities that are normally performed by Sandia National Laboratories to provide nuclear weapon reliability evaluations for the Department of Energy. These reliability evaluations are first provided as a prediction of the attainable stockpile reliability of a proposed weapon design. Stockpile reliability assessments are provided for each weapon type as the weapon is fielded and are continuously updated throughout the weapon stockpile life. The reliability predictions and assessments depend heavily on data from both laboratory simulation and actual flight tests. An important part of the methodology are the opportunities for review that occur throughout the entire process that assure a consistent approach and appropriate use of the data for reliability evaluation purposes.

Wright, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

HS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Fossil Energy Study Guide: Oil Pet roleum-or cr ude oil-is a fossil fuel that is found in large quantities beneath the Earth's sur face and is often used as a fuel or raw material in the chemical indust r y. It is a smelly, yellow-to-black liquid and is usually found in underg round areas called reser voirs. If you could look down an oil well and see oil where Nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-an "oil reservoir"-looks very much like any other rock formation. Oil exists in this underground formation as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th

399

MS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL Ever wonder what oil looks like underground, down deep, hundreds or thousands of feet below the surface, buried under millions of tons of rock and dirt? If you could look down an oil well and see oil where nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-called an "oil reservoir" -looks very much like any other rock formation. It looks a lot like...well, rock. Oil exists underground as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th e "pores" and the oil droplets can be seen only through a microscope. Th e droplets cling to the rock, like drops of water cling

400

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hazardous waste assessment and reduction options in an auto service station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hazardous waste assessment was performed and options for reduction of waste antifreeze and car wash wastewater were studied for Thompson`s Freeway Amoco, a gasoline station with a small repair shop and car wash, located in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1992, 1,310 gallons of waste aqueous antifreeze solution (50 vol% ethylene glycol, 50 vol% water), 6,580 gallons of waste oil, 138 gallons of waste parts washer solvent, and 2,702 lbs of waste oil filters, all classified as hazardous waste, were generated by this and three other sister stations of similar size under the same ownership. In addition, 779,810 gallons of car wash wastewater, not classified as hazardous waste, were also produced and discharged into the sewer. Various options were studied for reductions in waste antifreeze and car was wastewater by recycling and reuse. The economic evaluations are presented with the conclusions that on-site recycling of antifreeze is viable but not car wash wastewater recycling.

Baria, D.N.; Dorland, D.; Miller, K.C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analysis of options for coal combustion waste management in the Pacific Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many Pacific Basin countries rely on oil for electricity production. Alternative fuel sources such as coal, which is available in the Pacific Basin, can help mitigate adverse impacts of sudden price increases or supply disruptions. Coal combustion produces solid and potentially hazardous wastes of concern to environmental regulators and utility managers. This paper identifies issues associated with managing coal combustion wastes in the Pacific Basin, using the state of Hawaii as a case study. Hawaii is typical of many Pacific Basin locations in that it depends on oil, has limited sites, for waste management operations, and is subject to domestic and international waste management regulations. The paper discusses coal-fired utility wastes, environmental impacts of coal combustion waste disposal, and regulatory requirements that impact coal waste management. From this baseline, potential on- and off-island options for coal waste management are identified. Waste management costs are estimated and non-quantifiable issues are addressed for each option. Many options are applicable across the Pacific Rim and may serve as a basis for future fuel-use decisions.

Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

7 - Assessing and modelling the performance of nuclear waste and associated packages for long-term management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Examples of analytical approaches and methodologies for modelling the behaviour of waste forms and waste package metals in long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are presented. Two cases, long-term geological disposal and interim extended dry storage, are considered. The integrity of the waste package (or canister) that serves as a barrier is dependent upon the performance of construction metals. Corrosion degradation modes of the construction metals are evaluated. The waste behaviour during SNF degradation is also evaluated. In each mode of corrosion or degradation, the associated risk insights are discussed in the system performance of disposal or storage.

T.M. Ahn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report October–December 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation quarterly report (October–December 2004) details the ongoing fleet evaluation of oil bypass filter technologies being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL; formerly Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight INL four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INL employees on various routes and six INL Chevrolet Tahoes with gasoline engines are equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. This quarter, three additional buses were equipped with bypass filters from Refined Global Solutions. Oil bypass filters are reported to have an engine oil filtering capability of less than 1 micron. Both the puraDYN and Refined Global Solutions bypass filters have a heating chamber to remove liquid contaminate from the oil. During the quarter, the eleven diesel engine buses traveled 62,188 miles, and as of January 3, 2005 the buses had accumulated 643,036 total test miles. Two buses had their engine oil changed this quarter. In one bus, the oil was changed due to its degraded quality as determined by a low total base number (<3.0 mg KOH/g). The other bus had high oxidation and nitration numbers (>30.0 Abs/cm). Although a total of six buses have had their oil changed during the last 26 months, by using the oil bypass filters the buses in the evaluation avoided 48 oil changes, which equates to 1,680 quarts (420 gallons) of new oil not consumed and 1,680 quarts of waste oil not generated. Therefore, over 80% of the oil normally required for oil-changes was not used, and, consequently, the evaluation achieved over 80% reduction in the amount of waste oil normally generated. The six Tahoe test vehicles traveled 39,514 miles, and as of January 3, 2005 the Tahoes had accumulated 189,970 total test miles. The Tahoe filter test is in transition. To increase the rate of bypass filter oil flow on the Tahoes, puraDYN provided a larger orifice assembly, and these are being changed out as the Tahoes come in for regular service.

Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordan Fielding

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Oil Price Volatility  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Speculation and Oil Price Volatility Robert J. Weiner Robert J. Weiner Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Professor of International Business, Public Policy & Public Administration, and International Affairs Public Administration, and International Affairs George Washington University; George Washington University; Membre Associ Membre Associ é é , GREEN, Universit , GREEN, Universit é é Laval Laval EIA Annual Conference Washington Washington 7 April 2009 7 April 2009 1 FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY FACTORS DRIVNG OIL PRICE VOLATILITY ► ► Market fundamentals Market fundamentals . . Fluctuations in supply, Fluctuations in supply, demand, and market power demand, and market power Some fundamentals related to expectations of Some fundamentals related to expectations of

408

Winter Crude Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: While the relatively low stock forecast (although not as low as last winter) adds some extra pressure to prices, the price of crude oil could be the major factor affecting heating oil prices this winter. The current EIA forecast shows residential prices averaging $1.29 this winter, assuming no volatility. The average retail price is about 7 cents less than last winter, but last winter included the price spike in November 2000, December 2000, and January 2001. Underlying crude oil prices are currently expected to be at or below those seen last winter. WTI averaged over $30 per barrel last winter, and is currently forecast to average about $27.50 per barrel this winter. As those of you who watch the markets know, there is tremendous uncertainty in the amount of crude oil supply that will be available this winter. Less

409

Oil Market Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Logo Oil Market Assessment - September Logo Oil Market Assessment - September 12, 2001 EIA Home Page Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Rumors of scattered closures of U.S. refineries, pipelines, and terminals were reported, and Louisiana Offshore Oil Port operations were partially suspended. While the NYMEX and New York Harbor were temporarily closed, operations are expected to resume soon. Most, if not all petroleum industry infrastructure is expected to resume normal operations today or in the very near term. Prices at all levels (where markets were open) posted increases yesterday, but many prices fell today, as initial reactions

410

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

411

India: Becoming well oiled  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... been stirred into vigorous action and its redoubled efforts to find more oil onshore and offshore are beginning to yield results. From onshore fields in Assam and Gujarat, production this ... figure will go up to 11 million tonnes.

Correspondent

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Steadying of oil prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil prices have fallen below the 30 dollar mark ... in the lower half of OPEC’s target price band. Will OPEC manage to maintain high prices and revenues by restricting production?

Klaus Matthies

414

Imbibition assisted oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyzed in detail to investigate oil recovery during spontaneous imbibition with different types of boundary conditions. The results of these studies have been upscaled to the field dimensions. The validity of the new definition of characteristic length...

Pashayev, Orkhan H.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sound Oil Company  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sound Oil Company Sound Oil Company file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/blackard/Desktop/EIA/LEE0152.HTM[11/29/2012 2:30:44 PM] DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application for Exception Name of Petitioner: Sound Oil Company Date of Filing: August 16, 1994 Case Number: LEE-0152 On August 16, 1994, Sound Oil Company (Sound) of Seattle Washington, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals of the Department of Energy. In its Application, Sound requests that it be relieved of the requirement that it file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have determined that the Application for Exception should be denied.

416

Oil Reserves and Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Oil Reserves and Production Eric Drake The growth of world energy requirements over the last...remaining proved recoverable reserves will probably decline continuously...to grow. The declining reserves will be insufficient to...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20.86 20.67 20.47 20.24 20.32 19.57 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

418

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19.11 18.73 18.63 17.97 18.75 18.10 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

419

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biocatalysis in Oil Refining focuses on petroleum refining bioprocesses, establishing a connection between science and technology. The micro organisms and biomolecules examined for biocatalytic purposes for oil refining processes are thoroughly detailed. Terminology used by biologists, chemists and engineers is brought into a common language, aiding the understanding of complex biological-chemical-engineering issues. Problems to be addressed by the future R&D activities and by new technologies are described and summarized in the last chapter.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Ramirez-Corredores, M. M. [BP Global Fuels Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement and support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Lynette Schlandt for her help during my stay at this University. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . . nl DEDICATION... tool for control. The State of Texas passed and implemented OSPRA (Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act) of 1991. The most significant requirement for both these laws was the need for a Facility Response Plan for the companies. This would help a...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology....................................................................................................................................

422

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology....................................................................................................................................

423

Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

425

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

426

Composition and diagenesis of oil shale industrial solid wastes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tänane Eesti elektrienergia tootmine tugineb enam kui 90% osas põlevkivienergeetikal. Põlevkivi põletamisel ja/või keemilisel töötlemisel tekib suures koguses jääkprodukte – tuhka ja poolkoksi. Jäätmete taaskasutamine… (more)

Mõtlep, Riho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods- can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, M.B.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A field laboratory for improved oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Annex III of the Memorandum of Understanding, undertaken by the Houston Petroleum Research Center at the University of Houston, was to develop a field laboratory for research in improved oil recovery using a Gulf Coast reservoir in Texas. The participants: (1) make a field site selection and conducted a high resolution seismic survey in the demonstration field, (2) obtained characteristics of the reservoir (3) developed an evaluation of local flood efficiency in different parts of the demonstration reservoir, (4) used diverse methodology to evaluate the potential recovery of the remaining oil in the test reservoir, (5) developed cross-well seismic tomography, and (6) will transfer the learned technologies to oil operators through publication and workshops. This abstract is an overview of these tasks.

Hildebrandt, A.F.; McDonald, J.; Claridge, E.; Killough, J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Herd mentality and oil prices: implications for sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the current volatility (early 2007), oil prices have experienced a persistently upward trend since 2004. By examining the cascading and stochastic models of herding, the paper looks at the role of herding and diminishing resources behind the volatility and rapid rise in oil prices. A main argument here is that the existence of institutional herding is not incompatible with the entry of noise traders; it rather leads and complements them. The paper also shows that persistent rise may in fact encourage sustainable alternative sources of energy to save the pernicious impact of herding, which can always rattle the prices dissuading the investors from investing in alternative energy. The methodology is based on literature review and the relevant data on oil prices.

Hosein Piranfar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

LCA of a spent lube oil Re-refining process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although re-refining of spent lubricating oils (used oils) has been practiced with varying technical and commercial success for over the past 50 years, a sustainable processing technology has yet to become widely accepted. Poor on-stream efficiency, inconsistent product quality, and careless management of feedstock contaminants and byproducts have often resulted in widespread environmental problems and poor economics. Environmentally-conscious design of processes and products is increasingly viewed as an integral strategy in the sustainable development of new refining and chemical processes. Life cycle assessment is becoming the preferred methodology for comparing the environmental impacts of competing processes. A life cycle analyses of a promising new re-refining technology, the HyLubeTM process, has been undertaken to quantify the intrinsic benefits of HyLube re-refining over the current practice of recovering used oils for fuel value

Tom N. Kalnes; David R. Shonnard; Andreas Schuppel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

High-Yield Harvest of Nanofibers/Mesoporous Carbon Composite by Pyrolysis of Waste Biomass and Its Application for High Durability Electrochemical Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Themochemically converting the waste biomass to functional carbon nanomaterials and bio-oil is an environmentally friendly apporach by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by open burning. ...

Wu-Jun Liu; Ke Tian; Yan-Rong He; Hong Jiang; Han-Qing Yu

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

436

Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electric Utility Demand-Side Evaluation Methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"::. ELECTRIC UTILITY DEMAND-SIDE EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES* Nat Treadway Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The electric. util ity industry's demand-side management programs can be analyzed ?from various points... of view using a standard benefit-cost methodology. The methodology now in use by several. electric utilities and the Public Utility Commlsslon of Texas includes measures of efficiency and equity. The nonparticipant test as a measure of equity...

Treadway, N.

438

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

439

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

442

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

443

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

444

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Solidification and Stabilization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solidification & Stabilization Solidification & Stabilization Fact Sheet - Solidification and Stabilization The cuttings separated from the mud at the shale shakers may be coated with so much mud that they are unsuitable for the next reuse or disposal step or are difficult to handle or transport. Constituents of the cuttings or the mud coating them (e.g., oil, metals) may leach from the waste, making them unsuitable for land application or burial approaches. Various materials can be added to cuttings to solidify and stabilize them. The processes of solidification and stabilization can be defined as follows: Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate the waste in a monolithic solid of high structural integrity. The encapsulation may be of fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or of a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Solidification does not necessarily involve a chemical interaction between the wastes and the solidifying reagents but may mechanically bind the waste into the monolith. Contaminant migration is restricted by vastly decreasing the surface area exposed to leaching and/or by isolating the wastes within an impervious capsule.

445

Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Justin Coleman, P.E. Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014

446

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

449

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

450

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Optimising the Use of Spent Oil Shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Worldwide deposits of oil shales are thought to represent ~3 trillion barrels of oil. Jordanian oil shale deposits are extensive and high quality, and could… (more)

FOSTER, HELEN,JANE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during oil shale retorting: retort water and gas condensate.commercial oil shale plant, retort water and gas condensateunique to an oil shale retort water, gas condensate, and

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between...

455

Oil Prices and Long-Run Risk.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide anexcellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low… (more)

READY, ROBERT

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

heavy_oil | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heavy Oil Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Heavy oil is a vast U.S. oil resource that is...

457

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

458

Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

Gerald Huffman

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Integrated solid waste management of Springfield, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1993 cost of the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for Municipal Solid Waste management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of managing MSW in Springfield; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodology waste oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Economic effects of peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that global oil production peaked, this paper uses scenario analysis to show the economic effects of a possible supply shortage and corresponding rise in oil prices in the next decade on different sectors in Germany and other major economies such as the US, Japan, China, the OPEC or Russia. Due to the price-inelasticity of oil demand the supply shortage leads to a sharp increase in oil prices in the second scenario, with high effects on GDP comparable to the magnitude of the global financial crises in 2008/09. Oil exporting countries benefit from high oil prices, whereas oil importing countries are negatively affected. Generally, the effects in the third scenario are significantly smaller than in the second, showing that energy efficiency measures and the switch to renewable energy sources decreases the countries' dependence on oil imports and hence reduces their vulnerability to oil price shocks on the world market.

Christian Lutz; Ulrike Lehr; Kirsten S. Wiebe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

463

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

464

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Theoretical, Methodological, and Empirical Approaches to Cost Savings: A Compendium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication summarizes and contains the original documentation for understanding why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) privatization approach provides cost savings and the different approaches that could be used in calculating cost savings for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Phase I contract. The initial section summarizes the approaches in the different papers. The appendices are the individual source papers which have been reviewed by individuals outside of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the TWRS Program. Appendix A provides a theoretical basis for and estimate of the level of savings that can be" obtained from a fixed-priced contract with performance risk maintained by the contractor. Appendix B provides the methodology for determining cost savings when comparing a fixed-priced contractor with a Management and Operations (M&O) contractor (cost-plus contractor). Appendix C summarizes the economic model used to calculate cost savings and provides hypothetical output from preliminary calculations. Appendix D provides the summary of the approach for the DOE-Richland Operations Office (RL) estimate of the M&O contractor to perform the same work as BNFL Inc. Appendix E contains information on cost growth and per metric ton of glass costs for high-level waste at two other DOE sites, West Valley and Savannah River. Appendix F addresses a risk allocation analysis of the BNFL proposal that indicates,that the current approach is still better than the alternative.

M Weimar

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations Continued(Arkansas) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations Continued(Arkansas) Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations Continued(Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources The General Rules have been adopted by the Oil and Gas Commission in accordance with applicable state law requirements and are General Rules of state-wide application, applying to the conservation and prevention of waste of crude oil and natural gas in the State of Arkansas and protection

468

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

469

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

470

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program: Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Seventh Quarterly Report April - June 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation quarterly report (April–June 2004) details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight INEEL four-cycle diesel engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes and six INEEL Chevrolet Tahoes with gasoline engines are equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. The bypass filters are reported to have engine oil filtering capability of <1 micron and a built-in additive package to facilitate extended oil-drain intervals. This quarter, the eight diesel engine buses traveled 85,632 miles. As of the end of June 2004, the eight buses have accumulated 498,814 miles since the beginning of the test and 473,192 miles without an oil change. This represents an avoidance of 39 oil changes, which equates to 1,374 quarts (343 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, furthermore, 1,374 quarts of waste oil not generated. One bus had its oil changed due to the degraded quality of the engine oil. Also this quarter, the six Tahoe test vehicles traveled 48,193 miles; to date, the six Tahoes have accumulated 109,708 total test miles. The oil for all six of the Tahoes was changed this quarter due to low Total Base Numbers (TBN). The oil used initially in the Tahoe testing was recycled oil; the recycled oil has been replaced with Castrol virgin oil, and the testing was restarted. However, the six Tahoe’s did travel a total of 98,266 miles on the initial engine oil. This represents an avoidance of 26 oil changes, which equates to 130 quarts (32.5 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, consequently, 130 quarts of waste oil not generated. Based on the number of oil changes avoided by the test buses and Tahoes to date, the potential engine oil savings if an oil bypass filter system were used was estimated for the INEEL, DOE complex and all Federal fleets of on-road vehicles. The estimated potential annual engine oil savings for the three fleets are: INEEL – 3,400 gallons, all DOE fleets – 32,000 gallons, and all Federal fleet – 1.7 million gallons.

Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordan Fielding

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Asymmetries in the response of economic activity to oil price increases and decreases?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It has been common to assume that the relationship between economic activity and oil prices is asymmetric. Theoretical underpinnings for this asymmetry include costly sectoral reallocation, partial equilibrium models of irreversible investment, and some version of precautionary savings. Yet, recent studies that use new methodologies to test for asymmetries in U.S. data have cast some doubts on that premise. In this paper, we use state-of-the-art techniques to evaluate the presence of asymmetries for a set of OECD countries containing both oil exporters and oil importers. We find very little support for the hypothesis that the response of industrial production to oil price increases and decreases is asymmetric. Our results have important implications for theoretical models of the transmission of oil price shocks: they point towards the importance of direct-supply and direct-demand transmission channels, as well as indirect transmission channels that imply a symmetric response.

Ana María Herrera; Latika Gupta Lagalo; Tatsuma Wada

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the US oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the US oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits.

Suermann, J.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

An analysis of repository waste-handling operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to document the operational analysis of waste-handling facilities at a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The site currently under investigation for the geologic repository is located at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The repository waste-handling operations have been identified and analyzed for the year 2011, a steady-state year during which the repository receives spent nuclear fuel containing the equivalent of 3000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and defense high-level waste containing the equivalent of 400 MTU. As a result of this analysis, it has been determined that the waste-handling facilities are adequate to receive, prepare, store, and emplace the projected quantity of waste on an annual basis. In addition, several areas have been identified where additional work is required. The recommendations for future work have been divided into three categories: items that affect the total waste management system, operations within the repository boundary, and the methodology used to perform operational analyses for repository designs. 7 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

Dennis, A.W.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E. (comps.)

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z