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1

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits...

2

Methodology for uncertainty estimation in NUREG-1150 (Draft): Conclusions of a review panel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review has been undertaken by a panel of experts, of the methodology for estimation of uncertainty in severe accident risk resulting from accidents to nuclear power plants as presented in the Draft NUREG-1150 report. This report provides detailed dicussions and conclusions resulting from this review process.

Kouts, H.; Cornell, A.; Farmer, R.; Hanauer, S.; Rasmussen, N.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 {times} 10{sup 6} microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period.

von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa) Louisianna State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA) Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Detailed cost estimate of reference residential photovoltaic designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated installation costs for four reference residential photovoltaic designs. Installation cost estimates ranged from $1.28 to $2.12/W/sub p/ for arrays installed by union labor (4.1 to 6.07 kW/sub p/-systems), and from $1.22 to $1.83 W/sub p/ for non-union installations. Standoff mounting was found to increase costs from $1.63/W/sub p/ to $2.12/W/sub p/ for a representative case, whereas 25 kWh of battery storage capacity increased installation costs from $1.44/W/sub p/ to $2.08/W/sub p/. Overall system costs (union-based were $6000 to $7000 for a 4.1 kW array in the northeast, to approx. $9000 for a 6.07 kW/sub p/ array in the southwest. This range of installation costs, approx. $1 to $2/W/sub p/ (in 1980 dollars), is representative of current installation costs for residential PV systems. Any future cost reductions are likely to be small and can be accomplished only by optimization of mounting techniques, module efficiencies, and module reliability in toto.

Palmer, R.S.; Penasa, D.A.; Thomas, M.G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Methodology for reconstruction of historical food consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was written to provide the food consumption methodology to be used in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HDER) Project beyond Phase I (which ended in July 1990). In Phase I (Callaway 1992), baseline food consumption estimates (grams per day) for 10 primary food types in the original 10-county study region were derived from the 1977--1978 National Food Consumption Survey (USDA 1983). The baseline estimates were multiplied by the 1945:1977 ratios to produce consumption estimates for 1945. This ratio backcasting method used in Phase I to project consumption estimates from 1977 back to 1945 will be refined using additional USDA data to improve and document the acceptability of the ratios for deriving backcast consumption estimates. The number of food types and population groups will be expanded to provide more disaggregated estimates of food consumption. Food consumption estimates will be developed for 1945, 1951, and 1957. A database of individual diets will be created from which daily diets will be randomly selected for use in the dose model to calculate doses for reference individuals.

Anderson, D.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells InDioxide CaptureMethodology

7

Quantitative Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation Methodology for a Small Scada Control System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a new methodology for obtaining a quick quantitative measurement of the risk reduction achieved when a control system is modified with the intent to improve cyber security defense against external attackers. The proposed methodology employs a directed graph called a compromise graph, where the nodes represent stages of a potential attack and the edges represent the expected time-to-compromise for differing attacker skill levels. Time-to-compromise is modeled as a function of known vulnerabilities and attacker skill level. The methodology was used to calculate risk reduction estimates for a specific SCADA system and for a specific set of control system security remedial actions. Despite an 86% reduction in the total number of vulnerabilities, the estimated time-to-compromise was increased only by about 3 to 30% depending on target and attacker skill level.

Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost saving purposes by showing further testing wold not enhance the quality of the validation of predictive tools. The proposed methodology is at a conceptual level. When matured and if considered favorably by the stakeholders, it could serve as a new framework for the next generation of the best estimate plus uncertainty licensing methodology that USNRC developed previously. In order to come to that level of maturity it is necessary to communicate the methodology to scientific, design and regulatory stakeholders for discussion and debates. This paper is the first step to establish this communication.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Optimizing Motion Estimation with Linear Programming and Detail-Preserving Variational Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-preserving variational method to upgrade the result into a dense motion field. The proposed scheme is much faster thanD scene reconstruction. Optical flow based meth- ods have been intensively studied for the small scale mo- tion estimation problem, e.g. the motion analysis of succes- sive frames in a high frame

Drew, Mark S.

11

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for a JobBernard Matthew Poelker,8 Best Estimate

13

Methodological Approaches for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions against which a project would be compared. The report also suggests metrics suitable for describing principal characteristics of a modern Smart Grid to which a project can contribute. This first section of the report presents background information on the motivation for the report and its purpose. Section 2 introduces the methodological framework, focusing on the definition of benefits and a sequential, logical process for estimating them. Beginning with the Smart Grid technologies and functions of a project, it maps these functions to the benefits they produce. Section 3 provides a hypothetical example to illustrate the approach. Section 4 describes each of the 10 steps in the approach. Section 5 covers issues related to estimating benefits of the Smart Grid. Section 6 summarizes the next steps. The methods developed in this study will help improve future estimates - both retrospective and prospective - of the benefits of Smart Grid investments. These benefits, including those to consumers, society in general, and utilities, can then be weighed against the investments. Such methods would be useful in total resource cost tests and in societal versions of such tests. As such, the report will be of interest not only to electric utilities, but also to a broad constituency of stakeholders. Significant aspects of the methodology were used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop its methods for estimating the benefits and costs of its renewable and distributed systems integration demonstration projects as well as its Smart Grid Investment Grant projects and demonstration projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of this report, which was cofunded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, is to present a comprehensive set of methods for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects. By publishing this report, EPRI seeks to contribute to the development of methods that will establish the benefits associated with investments in Smart Grid technologies. EPRI does not endorse the contents of this report or make any representations as to the accuracy and appropriateness of its contents. The purpose of this report is to present a methodological framework that will provide a standardized approach for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid demonstration projects. The framework also has broader application to larger projects, such as those funded under the ARRA. Moreover, with additional development, it will provide the means for extrapolating the results of pilots and trials to at-scale investments in Smart Grid technologies. The framework was developed by a panel whose members provided a broad range of expertise.

Lee, Russell [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

New methodology for estimating biofuel consumption for cooking: Atmospheric emissions of black carbon and sulfur dioxide from India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New methodology for estimating biofuel consumption for cooking: Atmospheric emissions of black; accepted 8 June 2004; published 30 July 2004. [1] The dominance of biofuel combustion emissions in the Indian region, and the inherently large uncertainty in biofuel use estimates based on cooking energy

Dickerson, Russell R.

16

This paper introduces a methodology for estimation of energy consumption in peripherals such as audio and video devices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT This paper introduces a methodology for estimation of energy consumption in peripherals such as audio and video devices. Peripherals can be responsible for significant amount of the energy consumption in current embedded systems. We introduce a cycle- accurate energy simulator and profiler capable

Simunic, Tajana

17

Pulse superimposition calculational methodology for estimating the subcritcality level of nuclear fuel assemblies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the subcriticality level of a nuclear fuel assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology simulating the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the experimental and analytical reaction rates and the obtained subcriticality levels. In this methodology, the reaction rate is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the delayed fission neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction rate is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is then superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The analytical results of this new calculation methodology have shown an excellent agreement with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. This methodology can be used to calculate Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Rabiti, C.; Aliberti, G.; Kondev, F.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (INL); (Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A methodology for estimating the residual contamination contribution to the source term in a spent-fuel transport cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ranges of the residual contamination that may build up in spent-fuel transport casks. These contamination ranges are calculated based on data taken from published reports and from previously unpublished data supplied by cask transporters. The data involve dose rate measurements, interior smear surveys, and analyses of water flushed out of cask cavities during decontamination operations. A methodology has been developed to estimate the effect of residual contamination on spent-fuel cask containment requirements. Factors in estimating the maximum permissible leak rates include the form of the residual contamination; possible release modes; internal gas-borne depletion; and the temperature, pressure, and vibration characteristics of the cask during transport under normal and accident conditions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Jordan, H. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Pasupathi, V. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Mings, W.J. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Reardon, P.C. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007b, USGS 1999 SimaPro, MBTA 2007, FAA 2007 BART 2006,SFC 2007b, Caltrain 2004, MBTA 2007, PaLATE, EPA Fels 1977,Green Line station. The MBTA estimates total surface station

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrologic evaluation methodology for estimating water movement through the unsaturated zone at commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies key technical issues related to hydrologic assessment of water flow in the unsaturated zone at low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. In addition, a methodology for incorporating these issues in the performance assessment of proposed LLW disposal facilities is identified and evaluated. The issues discussed fall into four areas: estimating the water balance at a site (i.e., infiltration, runoff, water storage, evapotranspiration, and recharge); analyzing the hydrologic performance of engineered components of a facility; evaluating the application of models to the prediction of facility performance; and estimating the uncertainty in predicted facility performance. To illustrate the application of the methodology, two examples are presented. The first example is of a below ground vault located in a humid environment. The second example looks at a shallow land burial facility located in an arid environment. The examples utilize actual site-specific data and realistic facility designs. The two examples illustrate the issues unique to humid and arid sites as well as the issues common to all LLW sites. Strategies for addressing the analytical difficulties arising in any complex hydrologic evaluation of the unsaturated zone are demonstrated.

Meyer, P.D.; Rockhold, M.L.; Nichols, W.E.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Abstract--A robust methodology for estimating the value of service reliability improvements is presented. Although  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assumptions is presented. When a smart grid investment is proposed, reliability improvement is one of the most for investments in smart grid technology. Although reliability undoubtedly improves under most smart grid outage cost estimates to a smart grid investment opportunity. This work was supported in part by the U

23

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

An extension to GUM methodology: degrees-of-freedom calculations for correlated multidimensional estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement advocates the use of an 'effective number of degrees of freedom' for the calculation of an interval of measurement uncertainty. However, it does not describe how this number is to be calculated when (i) the measurand is a vector quantity or (ii) when the errors in the estimates of the quantities defining the measurand (the 'input quantities') are not incurred independently. An appropriate analysis for a vector-valued measurand has been described (Metrologia 39 (2002) 361-9), and a method for a one-dimensional measurand with dependent errors has also been given (Metrologia 44 (2007) 340-9). This paper builds on those analyses to present a method for the situation where the problem is multidimensional and involves correlated errors. The result is an explicit general procedure that reduces to simpler procedures where appropriate. The example studied is from the field of radio-frequency metrology, where measured quantities are often complex-valued and can ...

Willink, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improvements and Applications of the Methodology for Potential Energy Savings Estimation from Retro-commissioning/Retrofit Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PESE) Toolkit is developed to implement the improved methodology and used for testing. The implemented methodology is tested in two retro-commissioned on-campus buildings with hourly measured consumption data. In the Sanders Corps of Cadets Center...

Liu, Jingjing

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessing Monetary Valuation Methodologies for Estimating the Impacts of Climate Change in the Laguna de Rocha (Uruguay).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The motivation for this study arose from the dual observation that there are very few estimates of the local costs of climate change in developing… (more)

Fanning, Andrew L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparison of the Bioavailability of Waste Laden Soils Using ''In Vivo'' ''In Vitro'' Analytical Methodology and Bioaccessibility of Radionuclides for Refinement of Exposure/Dose Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bioavailability of soil contaminants can be measured using in vitro or in vivo techniques. Since there was no standard method for intercomparison among laboratories, we compared two techniques for bioavailability estimation: in vitro dissolution and in vivo rat feeding model for a NIST-traceable soil material. Bioaccessibility was measured using a sequential soil extraction in synthetic analogues of human saliva, gastric and intestinal fluids. Bioavailability was measured in Sprague Dawley rats by determining metal levels in the major organs and urine, feces, and blood. Bioaccessibility was found to be a good indicator of relative metal bioavailability. Results are presented from bioaccessible experiments with Cesium in contaminated DOE soils, and total alpha and beta bioaccessibility. The results indicate that the modified methodology for bioaccessibility can be used for specific radionuclide analysis.

P. J. Lioy; M. Gallo; P. Georgopoulos; R. Tate; B. Buckley

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

The South Wilmington Area remedial cost estimating methodology (RCEM) -- A planning tool and reality check for brownfield development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Wilmington Area (SWA), which is comprised of 200 acres of multi-use urban lowlands adjacent to the Christina River, is a brownfields area that has been targeted for redevelopment/restoration as part of a major waterfront revitalization project for the City of Wilmington, Delaware. The vision for this riverfront development, which is being promoted by a state-funded development corporation, includes plans for a new harbor, convention and entertainment facilities, upscale residences, an urban wildlife refuge, and the restoration of the Christina River. However, the environmental quality of the SWA has been seriously impacted by an assortment of historic and current heavy industrial land-uses since the late 1800`s, and extensive environmental cleanup of this area will be required as part of any redevelopment plan. Given that the environmental cleanup cost will be a major factor in determining the overall economic feasibility of brownfield development in the SWA, a reliable means of estimating potential preliminary remedial costs, without the expense of costly investigative and engineering studies, was needed to assist with this redevelopment initiative. The primary chemicals-of-concern (COCs) area-wide are lead and petroleum compounds, however, there are hot-spot occurrences of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, and other heavy metals such as arsenic and mercury.

Yancheski, T.B. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Christiana, DE (United States); Swanson, J.E. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Spent fuel management fee methodology and computer code user's manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology and computer model described here were developed to analyze the cash flows for the federal government taking title to and managing spent nuclear fuel. The methodology has been used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the spent fuel disposal fee that will provide full cost recovery. Although the methodology was designed to analyze interim storage followed by spent fuel disposal, it could be used to calculate a fee for reprocessing spent fuel and disposing of the waste. The methodology consists of two phases. The first phase estimates government expenditures for spent fuel management. The second phase determines the fees that will result in revenues such that the government attains full cost recovery assuming various revenue collection philosophies. These two phases are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Each of the two phases constitute a computer module, called SPADE (SPent fuel Analysis and Disposal Economics) and FEAN (FEe ANalysis), respectively.

Engel, R.L.; White, M.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember1. Foreign sales ofLiquidsWater0, 19977,

32

Assessment of ISLOCA risk-methodology and application to a combustion engineering plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISOLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed of description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Combustion Engineering plant.

Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods.

Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel, E-mail: atarifeno@cchen.cl, E-mail: atarisal@gmail.com; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile) [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Mayer, Roberto E. [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche R8402AGP (Argentina)] [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche R8402AGP (Argentina)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Using Critical Chain Project Management Methodologies to Build a Production Schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is the proper management of the essential project details across functions: materials, labor activities the proper management of materials and labor activities. Costs and activity durations were estimated usingUsing Critical Chain Project Management Methodologies to Build a Production Schedule By Clayton D

de Weck, Olivier L.

35

Detailed search Miscellaneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Search Go Detailed search Miscellaneous Press sources (PhysicsWeb.org) Based on information from press sources (PhysicsWeb.org) Scientific Research; Nuclear Fusion; Renewable Sources of Energy

36

Attention to Detail | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis Aerosol STATEMENTAttention to Detail

37

A general methodology for inverse estimation of the elastic and anelastic properties of anisotropic open-cell porous materials—with application to a melamine foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes an inverse estimation method for the characterisation of the elastic and anelastic properties of the frame of anisotropic open-cell foams used for sound absorption. A model of viscoelasticity based on a fractional differential constitutive equation is used, leading to an augmented Hooke's law in the frequency domain, where the elastic and anelastic phenomena appear as distinctive terms in the stiffness matrix. The parameters of the model are nine orthotropic elastic moduli, three angles of orientation of the material principal directions and three parameters governing the anelastic frequency dependence. The inverse estimation consists in numerically fitting the model on a set of transfer functions extracted from a sample of material. The setup uses a seismic-mass measurement repeated in the three directions of space and is placed in a vacuum chamber in order to remove the air from the pores of the sample. The method allows to reconstruct the full frequency-dependent complex stiffness matrix of the frame of an anisotropic open-cell foam and in particular it provides the frequency of maximum energy dissipation by viscoelastic effects. The characterisation of a melamine foam sample is performed and the relation between the fractional-derivative model and other types of parameterisations of the augmented Hooke's law is discussed.

Cuenca, Jacques, E-mail: jcuenca@kth.se; Van der Kelen, Christophe; Göransson, Peter [Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory for Sound and Vibration Research, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 8, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

1992 CBECS Detailed Tables  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)WyomingSquare Feet 50,001.6.A.0.EastDetailed

39

assessment committee methodology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shinozuka, Masanobu 49 The Future of Natural Gas Supplementary Paper SP2.1 Natural Gas Resource Assessment Methodologies CiteSeer Summary: Techniques for estimation of...

40

Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders.

Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

Computed tomography:the details.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

RAMS (Risk Analysis - Modular System) methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Risk Analysis - Modular System (RAMS) was developed to serve as a broad scope risk analysis tool for the Risk Assessment of the Hanford Mission (RAHM) studies. The RAHM element provides risk analysis support for Hanford Strategic Analysis and Mission Planning activities. The RAHM also provides risk analysis support for the Hanford 10-Year Plan development activities. The RAMS tool draws from a collection of specifically designed databases and modular risk analysis methodologies and models. RAMS is a flexible modular system that can be focused on targeted risk analysis needs. It is specifically designed to address risks associated with overall strategy, technical alternative, and `what if` questions regarding the Hanford cleanup mission. RAMS is set up to address both near-term and long-term risk issues. Consistency is very important for any comparative risk analysis, and RAMS is designed to efficiently and consistently compare risks and produce risk reduction estimates. There is a wide range of output information that can be generated by RAMS. These outputs can be detailed by individual contaminants, waste forms, transport pathways, exposure scenarios, individuals, populations, etc. However, they can also be in rolled-up form to support high-level strategy decisions.

Stenner, R.D.; Strenge, D.L.; Buck, J.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NCR's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150. After the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, the NRC initiated a sever accident research program to develop an improved understanding of severe accidents and to provide a second technical basis to support regulatory decisions in this area. A key product of this program is NUREG-1150, which provides estimates of risk for several nuclear reactors of different design. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. A major aspect of the work was the development of a methodology that improved upon previous full-scale probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) in several areas which are described.

Benjamin, A.S.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cooperative Education Detailed Operational Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

credits of Cooperative education for one of the required elective courses in the ME programME 3990 Cooperative Education Detailed Operational Procedures Overview Cooperative education and Aeronautical Engineering faculty. Cooperative education is not a required component of the ME program

de Doncker, Elise

46

Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant. This document also includes appendices A through I which provide: System descriptions; ISLOCA event trees; human reliability analysis; thermal hydraulic analysis; core uncovery timing calculations; calculation of system rupture probability; ISLOCA consequences analysis; uncertainty analysis; and component failure analysis.

Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

48

A methodology to assess cost implications of automotive customization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on determining the cost of customization for different components or groups of components of a car. It offers a methodology to estimate the manufacturing cost of a complex system such as a car. This ...

Fournier, Laëtitia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

IDC RP2 & 3 US Industry Standard Cost Estimate Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, using a commercial software cost estimation tool calibrated to US industry performance parameters. This is not a cost estimate for Sandia to perform the project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

Harris, James M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Review and evaluation of paleohydrologic methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to identify methodologies that could be used to interpret paleohydrologic environments. Paleohydrology is the study of past hydrologic systems or of the past behavior of an existing hydrologic system. The purpose of the review was to evaluate how well these methodologies could be applied to the siting of low-level radioactive waste facilities. The computer literature search queried five bibliographical data bases containing over five million citations of technical journals, books, conference papers, and reports. Two data-base searches (United States Geological Survey - USGS) and a manual search were also conducted. The methodologies were examined for data requirements and sensitivity limits. Paleohydrologic interpretations are uncertain because of the effects of time on hydrologic and geologic systems and because of the complexity of fluvial systems. Paleoflow determinations appear in many cases to be order-of-magnitude estimates. However, the methodologies identified in this report mitigate this uncertainty when used collectively as well as independently. That is, the data from individual methodologies can be compared or combined to corroborate hydrologic predictions. In this manner, paleohydrologic methodologies are viable tools to assist in evaluating the likely future hydrology of low-level radioactive waste sites.

Foley, M.G.; Zimmerman, D.A.; Doesburg, J.M.; Thorne, P.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Estimate of radionuclide release characteristics into containment under severe accident conditions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed review of the available light water reactor source term information is presented as a technical basis for development of updated source terms into the containment under severe accident conditions. Simplified estimates of radionuclide release and transport characteristics are specified for each unique combination of the reactor coolant and containment system combinations. A quantitative uncertainty analysis in the release to the containment using NUREG-1150 methodology is also presented.

Nourbakhsh, H.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Software Function Allocation Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2 The Jackson Methodology 2. 1. 3 Higher Order Software 2. 1. 4 Structured Analysis and Design Technique 2. 1. 5 Software Requirements Engineering Methodology 2. 1. 6 Software Development System 2. 2 Relation to Current Research 3. SFAM... BACKGROUND 3. 1 SPAN Preconditions 3. 2 SFAM Concepts 3. 3 SFAM Environment 12 13 3. 3. 1 SPAM Decision Types 3. 3. 2 SFAM Goal 3. 3. 3 SFAM Environment Summary 13 16 16 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Page 3. 4 SFAM Outline 17 3. 4. 1 SFAM Step...

O'Neal, Michael Ralph

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

54

Los Alamos PC estimating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Detailed methodology of geospatial fire behavior analyses for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three data sources were utilized to compare and contrast fire behavior modeling outputs (Table 1) from FlamMap for the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina.

Hollingsworth, LaWen; Kurth, Laurie

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

56

Epidemiological Study of Learning Disabled Adolescents in Secondary Schools: Details of the Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods used, teacher time spent on different tasks, and equipment available to the program. Testing Instruments LD and low-achieving students were administered three tests: the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery (Woodcock & Johnson, 1977.... The CSDC students received none of these tests due to distance from the research staff . Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery. Seven subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Battery were administered: the Letter-Word Identification, Passage Comprehension...

Schumaker, Jean B.; Warner, Michael M.; Deshler, Donald D.; Alley, Gordon R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Critical infrastructure systems of systems assessment methodology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing the risk of malevolent attacks against large-scale critical infrastructures requires modifications to existing methodologies that separately consider physical security and cyber security. This research has developed a risk assessment methodology that explicitly accounts for both physical and cyber security, while preserving the traditional security paradigm of detect, delay, and respond. This methodology also accounts for the condition that a facility may be able to recover from or mitigate the impact of a successful attack before serious consequences occur. The methodology uses evidence-based techniques (which are a generalization of probability theory) to evaluate the security posture of the cyber protection systems. Cyber threats are compared against cyber security posture using a category-based approach nested within a path-based analysis to determine the most vulnerable cyber attack path. The methodology summarizes the impact of a blended cyber/physical adversary attack in a conditional risk estimate where the consequence term is scaled by a ''willingness to pay'' avoidance approach.

Sholander, Peter E.; Darby, John L.; Phelan, James M.; Smith, Bryan; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Walter, Andrew; Varnado, G. Bruce; Depoy, Jennifer Mae

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

BASF's Energy Survey Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cost breakdowns by utility types are identified to further analyze trends. Consideration is given to the review of the various energy supply contracts for alternative options that may exist. The consumption history is used to create a distribution...BASF?s Energy Survey Methodology Thomas R. Theising BASF Corporation operates several dozen manufacturing Sites within NAFTA and periodically conducts Energy Surveys at each Site. Although these manufacturing sites represent a variety...

Theising, T. R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

D.C. Mecham

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard, Maryland preece@umbc.edu 2002 © Andrews, Nonnecke and Preece #12;Electronic Survey Methodology Page 2 Conducting Research on the Internet: Electronic survey Design, Development and Implementation Guidelines

Nonnecke, Blair

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic...

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Investigating surety methodologies for cognitive systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in cognitive science provide a foundation for new tools that promise to advance human capabilities with significant positive impacts. As with any new technology breakthrough, associated technical and non-technical risks are involved. Sandia has mitigated both technical and non-technical risks by applying advanced surety methodologies in such areas as nuclear weapons, nuclear reactor safety, nuclear materials transport, and energy systems. In order to apply surety to the development of cognitive systems, we must understand the concepts and principles that characterize the certainty of a system's operation as well as the risk areas of cognitive sciences. This SAND report documents a preliminary spectrum of risks involved with cognitive sciences, and identifies some surety methodologies that can be applied to potentially mitigate such risks. Some potential areas for further study are recommended. In particular, a recommendation is made to develop a cognitive systems epistemology framework for more detailed study of these risk areas and applications of surety methods and techniques.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, David Eugene; Mills, Kristy (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Caldera, Eva (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the other 26 zones. Note that the MCNP files for F02 were created using the Monte Carlo burnup linkage code Monteburns, which saves MCNP input files with detailed compositions as a function of burnup. The 'intermediate burnup files' produced for F02 include a cooling time of 27 years. The axial location of 5 spacers was also included in the ROK F02 assembly in which each spacer contained a length of 3.81 cm. Note that due to the nature of Monteburns, which was run in a special fashion for this problem, the step number increments after the 27 year decay, so the second column of Table 2 refers to the step number that should be used in the Monteburns files.

Trellue, Holly R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification/validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issues of verification, calibration, and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been receiving increasing levels of attention in the research literature and in engineering technology. Both CFD researchers and users of CFD codes are asking more critical and detailed questions concerning the accuracy, range of applicability, reliability and robustness of CFD codes and their predictions. This is a welcomed trend because it demonstrates that CFD is maturing from a research tool to the world of impacting engineering hardware and system design. In this environment, the broad issue of code quality assurance becomes paramount. However, the philosophy and methodology of building confidence in CFD code predictions has proven to be more difficult than many expected. A wide variety of physical modeling errors and discretization errors are discussed. Here, discretization errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential equations to algebraic equations, and their solution. Boundary conditions for both the partial differential equations and the discretized equations will be discussed. Contrasts are drawn between the assumptions and actual use of numerical method consistency and stability. Comments are also made concerning the existence and uniqueness of solutions for both the partial differential equations and the discrete equations. Various techniques are suggested for the detection and estimation of errors caused by physical modeling and discretization of the partial differential equations.

Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.; Aeschliman, D.P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

66

PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Reference 3, available on the Sandia web site www.sandia.gov/Renewable_Energy/Wind_Energy/. DELAMINATION1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have

67

Estimating Methods  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Running GL Detail Report (also known as Department Detail Report) Initial PeopleSoft Screen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running GL Detail Report (also known as Department Detail Report) Initial PeopleSoft Screen Select BSU Processes and Reports #12;Select GL Detail Report The page below will open. At this point you will have two options: #12;Option 1: If you have never run a GL Detail Report you will need to choose "Add

Barrash, Warren

69

Methodology for characterizing modeling and discretization uncertainties in computational simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research effort focuses on methodology for quantifying the effects of model uncertainty and discretization error on computational modeling and simulation. The work is directed towards developing methodologies which treat model form assumptions within an overall framework for uncertainty quantification, for the purpose of developing estimates of total prediction uncertainty. The present effort consists of work in three areas: framework development for sources of uncertainty and error in the modeling and simulation process which impact model structure; model uncertainty assessment and propagation through Bayesian inference methods; and discretization error estimation within the context of non-deterministic analysis.

ALVIN,KENNETH F.; OBERKAMPF,WILLIAM L.; RUTHERFORD,BRIAN M.; DIEGERT,KATHLEEN V.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Estimation and Reduction Methodologies for Fugitive Emissions from Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0214 Compressor Seals Gas/Vapor 0.228 Pressure Relief Seals Gas/Vapor 0.104 Flanges All 0.00083 Open-Ended Lines All 0.0017 Sampling Connections All 0.0150 Table 1. Average Emission Factors for Fugitive Emissions (kg/hr/source). The product of the emission...Tssion Factor Emission Factor Val ves Gas a LLb HL c 0.0451 0.0852 0.00023 d 0.00048 0.00171 0.00023 Pump Sea Is LL HL 0.437 0.3885 0.0120 0.0135 Compressor Seal se Pressure ReI ief Valves Flanges Open -Ended Lines Gas Gas All All 1...

Scataglia, A.

71

Quality Guidline for Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Levelization factor NETL National Energy Technology Laboratory NGCC Natural gas combined cycle O&M Operation and maintenance PC Pulverized coal PSFM Power systems financial model...

72

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanosElectric CoMeridian

73

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted)December 2005dNovember 1,

74

A Review of Geothermal Resource Estimation Methodology | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan,Financial Framework

75

EIA - Appendix B: Estimation Methodologies of Household Vehicles Energy  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. uraniumForms

76

Simulating plant motion with levels of detail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Enhancing the Benefit of the Chemical Mixture Methodology: A Report on Methodology Testing and Potential Approaches for Improving Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive testing shows that the current version of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is meeting its intended mission to provide conservative estimates of the health effects from exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. However, the current version of the CMM could benefit from several enhancements that are designed to improve its application of Health Code Numbers (HCNs) and employ weighting factors to reduce over conservatism.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Glantz, Clifford S.; Booth, Alexander E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides a methodology to estimate unmetered industrial water use for evaporative cooling systems, steam generating boiler systems, batch process applications, and wash systems. For each category standard mathematical relationships are summarized and provided in a single resource to assist Federal agencies in developing an initial estimate of their industrial water use. The approach incorporates industry norms, general rules of thumb, and industry survey information to provide methodologies for each section.

Boyd, Brian K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS CASE METHODOLOGY GUIDE & WORKBOOK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance advantages of the new digital technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. This Business Case Methodology approaches building a business case for a particular technology or suite of technologies by detailing how they impact an operator in one or more of the three following areas: Labor Costs, Non-Labor Costs, and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are “harvestable,” meaning they result in an actual reduction in headcount and/or cost. The report consists of a Digital Technology Business Case Methodology Guide and an accompanying spreadsheet workbook that will enable the user to develop a business case.

Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Hart, Adam; Vlahoplus, Chris

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RENDERING FILTERS FOR CONTROLLING DETAIL AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENDERING FILTERS FOR CONTROLLING DETAIL AND CREATING EFFECTS CHRISTOPHER ROBERT DECORO may be unified under the general theme of the rendering filter. Generally stated, such a filter is a passive, stateless operator that acts upon a decomposition of terms in the rendering equation

82

Detailed Financial Procedures Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed Financial Procedures Page 1 of 3 Inventories and Disposals Background In accordance with Standing Financial Regulation, Heads of Departments are responsible for maintaining inventories for all disposals thereof. (Ref 8.03 & 8.06) Inventory Spreadsheet The following information should be recorded

Levi, Ran

83

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

Espinosa, Horacio D.

84

Contact details: School of Architecture, BCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With 90% of the UK population living in urban areas, improving urban sustainability has become a pressing Economic Fabric This work package investigated opportunities and barriers to achieving sustainable is to be sustainable in the widest sense. Contact details: Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, U0B Dr. Austin Barber

Birmingham, University of

85

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Selected UMR Methodology Improvement Projects and Collaborations Last Updated: March 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 emissions and associated fuel consumption into the Urban Mobility Report Sponsor: National Center) to review and update the public transportation methodology used to estimate the delay reduction benefit Emission Simulator (MOVES) model. The research successfully developed and applied the methodology

87

IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) Cost Estimate Summary (Leveraged NDC Case).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, based on leveraging a fully funded, Sandia executed NDC Modernization project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

Harris, James M.; Prescott, Ryan; Dawson, Jericah M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Short-term energy outlook. Volume 2. Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume updates models and forecasting methodologies used and presents information on new developments since November 1981. Chapter discusses the changes in forecasting methodology for motor gasoline demand, electricity sales, coking coal, and other petroleum products. Coefficient estimates, summary statistics, and data sources for many of the short-term energy models are provided. Chapter 3 evaluates previous short-term forecasts for the macroeconomic variables, total energy, petroleum supply and demand, coal consumption, natural gas, and electricity fuel shares. Chapter 4 reviews the relationship of total US energy consumption to economic activity between 1960 and 1981.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Structural concepts and details for seismic design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual discusses building and building component behavior during earthquakes, and provides suggested details for seismic resistance which have shown by experience to provide adequate performance during earthquakes. Special design and construction practices are also described which, although they might be common in some high-seismic regions, may not be common in low and moderate seismic-hazard regions of the United States. Special attention is given to describing the level of detailing appropriate for each seismic region. The UBC seismic criteria for all seismic zones is carefully examined, and many examples of connection details are given. The general scope of discussion is limited to materials and construction types common to Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Although the manual is primarily written for professional engineers engaged in performing seismic-resistant design for DOE facilities, the first two chapters, plus the introductory sections of succeeding chapters, contain descriptions which are also directed toward project engineers who authorize, review, or supervise the design and construction of DOE facilities. 88 refs., 188 figs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY MANUAL August 2013 #12;ii Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince-Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 6472 Biological the safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Northern British Columbia, University of

93

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42YearDelawareDetails of U.S.

94

CBECS 1992 - Building Characteristics, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS98,,,1999,0,0,1e+15,1469,6,01179,"WAT","HY"Tables andA 6 J (MillionCubic35775 84 8711757Detailed

95

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm Uses DOE's FastestDetailed Look at RNA

96

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm Uses DOE's FastestDetailed Look at

97

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm Uses DOE's FastestDetailed Look

98

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm Uses DOE's FastestDetailed

99

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

100

Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ongoing work exploring fuel chemistry, analysis of and improving simulation methodologies for high efficiency clean combustion regimes, and computational performance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in shaping total energy consumption. These changes may bethe reduction of total energy consumption is not due toimprovements on the total energy consumption is estimated by

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estimating radiogenic cancer risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ISE System Development Methodology Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Information Systems Engineering (ISE) System Development Methodology Manual (SDM) is a framework of life cycle management guidelines that provide ISE personnel with direction, organization, consistency, and improved communication when developing and maintaining systems. These guide-lines were designed to allow ISE to build and deliver Total Quality products, and to meet the goals and requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Westinghouse Savannah River Company, and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

Hayhoe, G.F.

1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Implementation impacts of PRL methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department`s previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Methodology Booklet provides a comprehensive review and methodology guiding principles for constructing energy efficiency indicators, with illustrative examples of application to individual countries. It reviews work done by international agencies and national government in constructing meaningful energy efficiency indicators that help policy makers to assess changes in energy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices, and the knowledge of these countries' institutions, relevant sources of information to construct an energy indicator database are identified. A framework based on levels of hierarchy of indicators -- spanning from aggregate, macro level to disaggregated end-use level metrics -- is presented to help shape the understanding of assessing energy efficiency. In each sector of activity: industry, commercial, residential, agriculture and transport, indicators are presented and recommendations to distinguish the different factors affecting energy use are highlighted. The methodology booklet addresses specifically issues that are relevant to developing indicators where activity is a major factor driving energy demand. A companion spreadsheet tool is available upon request.

Sathaye, Jayant; Price, Lynn; McNeil, Michael; de la rue du Can, Stephane

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

National Certification Methodology for the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a common framework and key elements of a national certification methodology called Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU). A spectrum from senior managers to weapons designers has been engaged in this activity at the two laboratories for on the order of a year to codify this methodology in an overarching and integrated paper. Following is the certification paper that has evolved. In the process of writing this paper, an important outcome has been the realization that a joint Livermore/Los Alamos workshop on QMU, focusing on clearly identifying and quantifying differences between approaches between the two labs plus developing an even stronger technical foundation on methodology, will be valuable. Later in FY03, such a joint laboratory workshop will be held. One of the outcomes of this workshop will be a new version of this certification paper. A comprehensive approach to certification must include specification of problem scope, development of system baseline models, formulation of standards of performance assessment, and effective procedures for peer review and documentation. This document concentrates on the assessment and peer review aspects of the problem. In addressing these points, a central role is played by a 'watch list' for weapons derived from credible failure modes and performance gate analyses. The watch list must reflect our best assessment of factors that are critical to weapons performance. High fidelity experiments and calculations as well as full exploitation of archival test data are essential to this process. Peer review, advisory groups and red teams play an important role in confirming the validity of the watch list. The framework for certification developed by the Laboratories has many basic features in common, but some significant differences in the detailed technical implementation of the overall methodology remain. Joint certification workshops held in June and December of 2001 and continued in 2002 have proven useful in developing the methodology, and future workshops should prove useful in further refining this framework. Each laboratory developed an approach to certification with some differences in detailed implementation. The general methodology introduces specific quantitative indicators for assessing confidence in our nuclear weapon stockpile. The quantitative indicators are based upon performance margins for key operating characteristics and components of the system, and these are compared to uncertainties in these factors. These criteria can be summarized in a quantitative metric (for each such characteristic) expressed as: (i.e., confidence in warhead performance depends upon CR significantly exceeding unity for all these characteristics). These Confidence Ratios are proposed as a basis for guiding technical and programmatic decisions on stockpile actions. This methodology already has been deployed in certifying weapons undergoing current life extension programs or component remanufacture. The overall approach is an adaptation of standard engineering practice and lends itself to rigorous, quantitative, and explicit criteria for judging the robustness of weapon system and component performance at a detailed level. There are, of course, a number of approaches for assessing these Confidence Ratios. The general certification methodology was publicly presented for the first time to a meeting of Strategic Command SAG in January 2002 and met with general approval. At that meeting, the Laboratories committed to further refine and develop the methodology through the implementation process. This paper reflects the refinement and additional development to date. There will be even further refinement at a joint laboratory workshop later in FY03. A common certification methodology enables us to engage in peer reviews and evaluate nuclear weapon systems on the basis of explicit and objective metrics. The clarity provided by such metrics enables each laboratory and our common customers to understand the meaning and logic

Goodwin, B T; Juzaitis, R J

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

Lange, C.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Developing cost curves for conserved energy in new refrigerators and freezers: Demonstration of methodology and detailed engineering results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper develops and demonstrates a procedure for determining the cost of conserved energy in residential refrigerators and freezers and for ranking conservation measures according to economic feasibility and practicality. Prepared jointly by the Natural Resources Defense Council and ACEE for the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Goldstein, D.; Miller, P.; Watson, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperatur...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion Engines Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion...

110

Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein solutions with a mean field treatment of hydrodynamic Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated...

111

Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

112

Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base...

113

Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-45917 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report..............................................................................................46 #12;#12;1 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S. Kaoru Kawamoto and network equipment, there has been no recent study that estimates in detail how much electricity

114

Validation of error estimators and superconvergence by a computer-based approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATORS FOR PATCHWISE UNIFORM MESHES 5. 1 The methodology for checking the estimators. 5. 2 Numerical study of the estimators. . . . . 5. 3 Major results. 58 . . 58 65 160 CHAPTER VI STUDY OF THE ERROR ESTIMATORS FOR GENERAL MESHES . . 6. 1... Definition of the robustness index 6. 2 The computational methodology for general grids . . 6. 3 Numerical studies of robustness of various error estimators . . 6. 4 Major results. vn Page 164 164 166 167 , 198 CHAPTER VII STUDY OF SUPERCONVERGENCE...

Upadhyay, Chandra Shekhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Estimating Energy Savings in Compressed Air Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are frequently overestimated because the methods used to estimate savings neglect to consider important factors such as compressor control and type, storage, and multiple compressor operation. In this paper, a methodology is presented for modeling air... compressor performance and calculating projected energy savings from easily obtainable performance data such as full-load power, no-load power, rated capacity, average fraction full-load power or average fraction rated capacity. The methodology...

Schmidt, C.; Kissock, J. K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Soclety of Petroteum Engineers CT Scan and Neural Network Technology for Construction of Detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Detailed Distribution of Residual Oil Saturation During Waterflooding A. Garg', A.R. Kovscek2, M. Nikravesh reservoirs. Fractured petroleum reservoirs provide over 20 ?ZO of the world oil reserves [1]. Examples of prolific fmctured reservoirs are: the Monterey Shales in California (estimated tens of billions of barrels

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

117

Ancillary-service details: Dynamic scheduling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic scheduling (DS) is the electronic transfer from one control area to another of the time-varying electricity consumption associated with a load or the time-varying electricity production associated with a generator. Although electric utilities have been using this technique for at least two decades, its use is growing in popularity and importance. This growth is a consequence of the major changes under way in US bulk-power markets, in particular efforts to unbundle generation from transmission and to increase competition among generation providers. DS can promote competition and increase choices. It allows consumers to purchase certain services from entities outside their physical-host area and it allows generators to sell certain services to entities other than their physical host. These services include regulation (following minute-to-minute variations in load) and operating reserves, among others. Such an increase in the number of possible suppliers and customers should encourage innovation and reduce the costs and prices of providing electricity services. The purpose of the project reported here was to collect and analyze data on utility experiences with DS. Chapter 2 provides additional details and examples of the definitions of DS. Chapter 3 explains why DS might be an attractive service that customers and generators, as well as transmission providers, might wan to use. Chapter 4 presents some of the many current DS examples the authors uncovered in their interviews. Chapter 5 discusses the costs and cost-effectiveness of DS. Chapter 6 explains what they believe can and cannot be electronically moved from one control area to another, primarily in terms of the six ancillary services that FERC defined in Order 888. Chapter 7 discusses the need for additional research on DS.

Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

Klasson, KT

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Estimation and Simulation Framework for Energy Efficient Design using Platform FPGAs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Estimation and Simulation Framework for Energy Efficient Design using Platform FPGAs Sumit modeling technique, domain specific modeling, and a methodology for energy-efficient design of application

Prasanna, Viktor K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

continuing work on exploring fuel chemistry, analysis of advanced combustion regimes, and improvements in simulation methodologies deer12flowers.pdf More Documents & Publications...

122

Estimating Dataset Size Requirements for Classifying DNA Microarray Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Dataset Size Requirements for Classifying DNA Microarray Data S. Mukherjee*+#1 , P methodology for estimating dataset size requirements for classifying microarray data using learning curves is introduced. The goal is to use existing classification results to estimate dataset size requirements

Poggio, Tomaso

123

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Methodology for predicting torsional fatigue life of turbine generator shafts using crack initiation plus propagation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overall methodology now exists that addresses both crack initiation and propagation in predicting the fatigue life of large turbine generator shafts. It can estimate previous torsional transient damage and predict residual life. In short, this improved methodology allows utilities to determine the availability of turbogenerators with greater confidence.

Anderson, A.F.; Williams, R.A.; Wilkening, W.W.; LeFort, P.N.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimating externalities of biomass fuel cycles, Report 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of the biomass fuel cycle, in which biomass is combusted to produce electricity. The major objectives of this study were: (1) to implement the methodological concepts which were developed in the Background Document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles, and by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the biomass fuel cycle; (2) to develop, given the time and resources, a range of estimates of marginal (i.e., the additional or incremental) damages and benefits associated with selected impact-pathways from a new wood-fired power plant, using a representative benchmark technology, at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information available to support energy decision making and the estimation of externalities, and by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The demonstration of methods, modeling procedures, and use of scientific information was the most important objective of this study. It provides an illustrative example for those who will, in the future, undertake studies of actual energy options and sites. As in most studies, a more comprehensive analysis could have been completed had budget constraints not been as severe. Particularly affected were the air and water transport modeling, estimation of ecological impacts, and economic valuation. However, the most important objective of the study was to demonstrate methods, as a detailed example for future studies. Thus, having severe budget constraints was appropriate from the standpoint that these studies could also face similar constraints. Consequently, an important result of this study is an indication of what can be done in such studies, rather than the specific numerical estimates themselves.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed.

Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Wegner estimate for multi-particle random Hamiltonians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove a Wegner estimate for a large class of multiparticle Anderson Hamiltonians on the lattice. These estimates will allow us to prove Anderson localization for such systems. A detailed proof of localization will be given in a subsequent paper.

Werner Kirsch

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

New Results in Stability, Control, and Estimation of Fractional Order Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control and estimation, even for systems where fractional order models do not arise “naturally”. This dissertation is aimed at further building of the base methodology with a focus on robust feedback control and state estimation. By setting...

Koh, Bong Su

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electric Utility Demand-Side Evaluation Methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in the case of electric utilities society and the ratepayer. Commissio~ Substanti ve Rul es Sec. 23.22 stops short of specifying an evaluation methodology or requiring a benefit-cost analysis for each conservation program, but it does require that util... of view using a standard benefit-cost methodology. The methodology now in use by several. electric utilities and the Public Utility Commlsslon of Texas includes measures of efficiency and equity. The nonparticipant test as a measure of equity...

Treadway, N.

132

Methodology for assessing performance of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the methodology provided in this report is to select the optimal way to manage particular sets of waste streams from generation to disposal in a safe and cost-effective manner. The methodology described is designed to review the entire waste management system, assess its performance, ensure that the performance objectives are met, compare different LLW management alternatives, and select the optimal alternative. The methodology is based on decision analysis approach, in which costs and risk are considered for various LLW management alternatives, a comparison of costs, risks, and benefits is made, and an optimal system is selected which minimizes costs and risks and maximizes benefits. A ''zoom-lens'' approach is suggested, i.e., one begins by looking at gross features and gradually proceeds to more and more detail. Performance assessment requires certain information about the characteristics of the waste streams and about the various components of the waste management system. Waste acceptance criteria must be known for each component of the waste management system. Performance assessment for each component requires data about properties of the waste streams and operational and design characteristics of the processing or disposal components. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Meshkov, N.K.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Camasta, S.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology: handbook. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is Volume 1 of a two-part document which describes a project conducted to develop a methodology to evaluate the acceptability of nuclear power plant (NPP) simulation facilities for use in the simulator-based portion of NRC's operator licensing examination. The proposed methodology is to be utilized during two phases of the simulation facility life-cycle, initial simulator acceptance and recurrent analysis. The first phase is aimed at ensuring that the simulator provides an accurate representation of the reference NPP. There are two components of initial simulator evaluation: fidelity assessment and a direct determination of the simulation facility's adequacy for operator testing. The second phase is aimed at ensuring that the simulation facility continues to accurately represent the reference plant throughout the life of the simulator. Recurrent evaluation is comprised of three components: monitoring reference plant changes, monitoring the simulator's hardware, and examining the data from actual plant transients as they occur. Volume 1 is a set of guidelines which details the steps involved in the two life-cycle phases, presents an overview of the methodology and data collection requirements, and addresses the formation of the evaluation team and the preparation of the evaluation plan. 29 figs.

Laughery, K.R. Jr.; Carter, R.J.; Haas, P.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Wednesday, 27 February 2013 00:00 Our way of life is deeply...

135

Alternate States of Proteins Revealed by Detailed Energy Landscape Mapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternate States of Proteins Revealed by Detailed Energy Landscape Mapping Michael D. Tyka1 Keywords: Rosetta; alternative conformations; protein mobility; structure prediction; validation What through analysis of detailed protein energy landscapes generated by large-scale, native- enhanced sampling

Baker, David

136

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

Estimating HAPs and radionuclide emissions from a laboratory complex at a nuclear processing site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique methodology was developed for conducting an air emission inventory (AEI) at a DOE nuclear processing facility. This methodology involved the use of computer-assisted design (CAD) drawings to document emission points, computerized process drawings to document industrial processes leading to emissions, and a computerized data base of AEI forms to document emission estimates and related process data. A detailed air emissions inventory for operating years 1985--1991 was recently implemented for the entire site using this methodology. One industrial area at the DOE Site is comprised of laboratory facilities that provide direct support to the nuclear reactor and recovery operations, developmental studies to support reactor and separation operations, and developmental studies to support waste handling and storage. The majority of the functions are conducted in a single large building complex wherein bench scale and pilot scale experiments are carried out involving radionuclides, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and other chemicals reportable under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act (SARA) Title 111. The results of the inventory showed that HAP and radionuclide emissions from the laboratory complex were relatively minor.

Paul, R.A. [IT Corp., Durham, NC (United States); Faugl, T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

How to use the Weblinks GL Transaction Detail Rollup Template  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to use the Weblinks GL Transaction Detail Rollup Template Issue Details The following instructions will show you how to utilize Excel to summarize the Weblinks GL Transaction Detail report so Instructions: 1. Create a Weblinks report 2. Export to Excel 3. Open the Excel 4. Copy and paste to Weblinks GL

Yamamoto, Keith

139

UoS Motor Accident Report Form COMPANY DETAILS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIV01FL02 UoS Motor Accident Report Form COMPANY DETAILS INSURED: University of Sussex ADDRESS: LOCATION: DESCRIPTION OF HOW ACCIDENT HAPPENED: PLEASE DRAW A SKETCH OF THE ACCIDENT: #12;DRIVER DETAILS: PREVIOUS ACCIDENTS: ADDRESS: VEHICLE DETAILS DATE VEHICLE PURCHASED: MAKE/MODEL: REGISTRATION: MILEAGE

Sussex, University of

140

A Methodology for Calculating Emissions Reductions from Renewable Energy Programs and Its Application to the Wind Farms in the Texas ERCOT Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the TCEQ. This paper provides a detailed description of the methodology developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by a wind farm...

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Enabling Detailed Energy Analyses via the Technology Performance Exchange: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key tenets to increasing adoption of energy efficiency solutions in the built environment is improving confidence in energy performance. Current industry practices make extensive use of predictive modeling, often via the use of sophisticated hourly or sub-hourly energy simulation programs, to account for site-specific parameters (e.g., climate zone, hours of operation, and space type) and arrive at a performance estimate. While such methods are highly precise, they invariably provide less than ideal accuracy due to a lack of high-quality, foundational energy performance input data. The Technology Performance Exchange was constructed to allow the transparent sharing of foundational, product-specific energy performance data, and leverages significant, external engineering efforts and a modular architecture to efficiently identify and codify the minimum information necessary to accurately predict product energy performance. This strongly-typed database resource represents a novel solution to a difficult and established problem. One of the most exciting benefits is the way in which the Technology Performance Exchange's application programming interface has been leveraged to integrate contributed foundational data into the Building Component Library. Via a series of scripts, data is automatically translated and parsed into the Building Component Library in a format that is immediately usable to the energy modeling community. This paper (1) presents a high-level overview of the project drivers and the structure of the Technology Performance Exchange; (2) offers a detailed examination of how technologies are incorporated and translated into powerful energy modeling code snippets; and (3) examines several benefits of this robust workflow.

Studer, D.; Fleming, K.; Lee, E.; Livingood, W.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell...

144

azobenzene detailed mechanism: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Post Graduate Activities Detail & History Materials Science Websites Summary: Raytheon Systems Engineer Tucson AZ MENG Rockwell Collins Mechanical Engineer Sterling VA MENG...

145

A Stochastic Reactor Based Virtual Engine Model Employing Detailed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Stochastic Reactor Based Virtual Engine Model Employing Detailed Chemistry for Kinetic Studies of In-Cylinder Combustion and Exhaust Aftertreatment A Stochastic Reactor Based...

146

Remote estimation of carbon dioxide uptake by a Mediterranean forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assessing the global carbon budget in a context of climate change (Ciais et al., 2005; Boisvenue & RunningRemote estimation of carbon dioxide uptake by a Mediterranean forest M A R T I´ N F. G A R B U L of the ecology of global change. Current remote sensing methodologies for estimating gross primary productivity

Garbulsky, Martín

147

NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology Energy Technology (RET) projects. These climatological profiles are used for designing systems that have for implementing RETs, there are inherent problems in using them for resource assessment. Ground measurement

Firestone, Jeremy

148

Geologic selection methodology for transportation corridor routing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lack of planning techniques and processes on long, linear, cut and cover-tunneling route transportation systems has resulted because of the advancement of transportation systems into underground corridors. The proposed methodology is tested...

Shultz, Karin Wilson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Senior Systems Analyst-PeopleSoft Campus Solutions Posting Details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and emerging technologies. This position may lead and coordinate the design, development, and implementation assurance and testing activities required to maintain business solutions. This position reportsSenior Systems Analyst-PeopleSoft Campus Solutions Posting Details Posting Details Position Title

Liblit, Ben

150

Adult Football Helmet Detailed Ratings Riddell Revolution Speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adult Football Helmet Detailed Ratings May 2011 Riddell Revolution Speed Helmet ID SPEED1 SPEED2: A total of 10 adult football helmet models were evaluated using the STAR evaluation system for May 2011.397 0.350 0.322 Overall STAR 0.356 Very Good: Adult Football Helmet Detailed Ratings May 2011 #12

Lu, Chang

151

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel Olivier Herbineta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate Olivier Herbineta , William of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

Analysis Methodology for Industrial Load Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR INDUSTRIAL LOAD PROFILES Thomas W. Reddoch Executive Vice President Eleclrolek Concepts, Inc. Knoxvillc, Tennessee ABSTRACT A methodology is provided for evaluating the impact of various demand-side management... (OSM) options on industrial customers. The basic approach uses customer metered load profile data as a basis for the customer load shape. OSM technologies are represented as load shapes and are used as a basis for altering the customers existing...

Reddoch, T. W.

153

Aggregate Building Simulator (ABS) Methodology Development, Application, and User Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the relationship between the national building stock and various global energy issues becomes a greater concern, it has been deemed necessary to develop a system of predicting the energy consumption of large groups of buildings. Ideally this system is to take advantage of the most advanced energy simulation software available, be able to execute runs quickly, and provide concise and useful results at a level of detail that meets the users needs without inundating them with data. The resulting methodology that was developed allows the user to quickly develop and execute energy simulations of many buildings simultaneously, taking advantage of parallel processing to greatly reduce total simulation times. The result of these simulations can then be rapidly condensed and presented in a useful and intuitive manner.

Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

RSMASS-D models: An improved method for estimating reactor and shield mass for space reactor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three relatively simple mathematical models have been developed to estimate minimum reactor and radiation shield masses for liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs), in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE) reactors, and out-of-core thermionic reactors (OTRs). The approach was based on much of the methodology developed for the Reactor/Shield Mass (RSMASS) model. Like the original RSMASS models, the new RSMASS-derivative (RSMASS-D) models use a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations, along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. All three models vary basic design parameters within a range specified by the user to achieve a parameter choice that yields a minimum mass for the power level and operational time of interest. The impact of critical mass, fuel damage, and thermal limitations are accounted for to determine the required fuel mass. The effect of thermionic limitations are also taken into account for the thermionic reactor models. All major reactor component masses are estimated, as well as instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, and safety system masses. A new shield model was developed and incorporated into all three reactor concept models. The new shield model is more accurate and simpler to use than the approach used in the original RSMASS model. The estimated reactor and shield masses agree with the mass predictions from separate detailed calculations within 15 percent for all three models.

Marshall, A.C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the core and borehole scales. Vp, density, porosity, and permeability logs are integrated with crosswell reflection data to produce impedance, permeability, and porosity images. These images capture three flow units that are characterized at the pore and borehole scales. The upper flow units are thin, continuous beds, and the deeper flow unit is thicker and heterogeneous. NMR well log calibration data and thin section analysis demonstrate that interwell region permeability is controlled mainly by micropores and macropores, which represent the flow unit matrices of the confined aquifer. Reflection image-derived impedance provides lateral detail and the depth of the deeper confining unit. The permeable regions identified in both parts of this phase of the study are consistent with the hydrological results of high water production being monitored between two wells in the South Florida aquifer. Finally, we describe the two major methodologies developed to support the aquifer characterization efforts--(1) a method to estimate frequency-dependent scattering attenuation based on the volume fraction and typical size of vugs or karsts, and (2) a method to more accurately interpret NMR well logs by taking into account the diffusion of magnetization between large and small pores. For the first method, we take the exact vug structure from x-ray CT scans of two carbonate cores and use 3-D finite difference modeling to determine the P-wave scattering attenuation in these cores at ultrasonic frequencies. In spite of the sharp contrast in medium properties between cavity and rock and the violation of the small perturbation assumption, the computed scattering attenuation is roughly comparable to that predicted by various random medium scattering theories. For the second method, we investigate how the diffusion of magnetization between macropores and micropores influences NMR log interpretation through 2D simulation of magnetization diffusion in realistic macropore geometries derived from digital images of thin sections. In most cases, our simulations show that the resulting simulate

Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several of the new generation nuclear power plant designs have structural configurations which are proposed to be deeply embedded. Since current seismic analysis methodologies have been applied to shallow embedded structures (e.g., ASCE 4 suggest that simple formulations may be used to model embedment effect when the depth of embedment is less than 30% of its foundation radius), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory with the objective of investigating the extent to which procedures acceptable for shallow embedment depths are adequate for larger embedment depths. This paper presents the results of a study comparing the response spectra obtained from two of the more popular analysis methods for structural configurations varying from shallow embedment to complete embedment. A typical safety related structure embedded in a soil profile representative of a typical nuclear power plant site was utilized in the study and the depths of burial (DOB) considered range from 25-100% the height of the structure. Included in the paper are: (1) the description of a simplified analysis and a detailed approach for the SSI analyses of a structure with various DOB, (2) the comparison of the analysis results for the different DOBs between the two methods, and (3) the performance assessment of the analysis methodologies for SSI analyses of deeply embedded structures. The resulting assessment from this study has indicated that simplified methods may be capable of capturing the seismic response for much deeper embedded structures than would be normally allowed by the standard practice.

XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C. (BNL); GRAVES, H. (US NRC).

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity of Photovoltaic Electricity #12;IEA-PVPS-TASK 12 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SYSTEMS PROGRAMME Methodology

160

Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model, Parameter, and Scenario Uncertainty with Application to Uranium Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes the development and application of a methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess predictive uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport modeling that considers the combined impact of hydrogeologic uncertainties associated with the conceptual-mathematical basis of a model, model parameters, and the scenario to which the model is applied. The methodology is based on a n extension of a Maximum Likelihood implementation of Bayesian Model Averaging. Model uncertainty is represented by postulating a discrete set of alternative conceptual models for a site with associated prior model probabilities that reflect a belief about the relative plausibility of each model based on its apparent consistency with available knowledge and data. Posterior model probabilities are computed and parameter uncertainty is estimated by calibrating each model to observed system behavior; prior parameter estimates are optionally included. Scenario uncertainty is represented as a discrete set of alternative future conditions affecting boundary conditions, source/sink terms, or other aspects of the models, with associated prior scenario probabilities. A joint assessment of uncertainty results from combining model predictions computed under each scenario using as weight the posterior model and prior scenario probabilities. The uncertainty methodology was applied to modeling of groundwater flow and uranium transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area. Eight alternative models representing uncertainty in the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties as well as the temporal variability were considered. Two scenarios represent alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. The scenario alternatives were implemented in the models through the boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling and illustrate the benefits of the methodology I providing better estimates of predictive uncertiay8, quantitative results for use in assessing risk, and an improved understanding of the system behavior and the limitations of the models.

Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Rockhold, Mark L.; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MODELLING GEOGRAPHIC PHENOMENA AT MULTIPLE LEVELS OF DETAIL: A MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:1250/1:2500/1:10,000). Such a transformation involves creation of higher order or composite objects, such as settlement, forest, hills and to Ross Purves for his comments and suggestions on our hills and range boundary detection methodology. I

162

Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value of Co-Firing Biomass in Pulverized Coal Plants Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value of...

163

aij projects methodology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Page Topic Index 1 A New Project Execution Methodology; Integrating Project Management Principles with Quality Project Execution Methodologies University of Kansas - KU...

164

STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification Filtering of MSMS Database Search Results. STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification...

165

Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress This Report to Congress, published in August 2006,...

166

Modeling of Diesel Exhaust Systems: A methodology to better simulate...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Diesel Exhaust Systems: A methodology to better simulate soot reactivity Modeling of Diesel Exhaust Systems: A methodology to better simulate soot reactivity Discussed...

167

New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Presentation given at...

168

Barr Engineering Statement of Methodology Rosemount Wind Turbine...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Barr Engineering Statement of Methodology Rosemount Wind Turbine Simulations by Truescape Visual Reality, DOEEA-1791 (May 2010) Barr Engineering Statement of Methodology Rosemount...

169

Detailed Description of Key NIF Milestones for NNSA Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Detailed Description of Key NIF Milestones for NNSA Short Description NIC EP Rev 4.0 Approved = Milestone Reporting Tool, which NNSA uses to support quarterly status reporting of NIC Level 1-2 milestones

170

CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF of the quarter, and 10% on in­class work, Karplus & Larrabee Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Spring 1998

Karplus, Kevin

171

CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 1999 4 Special guest lecturers I may arrange to have some guest lectures

Karplus, Kevin

172

CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Porter 144, MWF). Everything must be turned in by the last day of class, Friday March 12. Karplus Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE

Karplus, Kevin

173

CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF 2, and need to do the grading mostly on Dec 2. Karplus Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 2000 4 Special

Karplus, Kevin

174

Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

Kosnik, D. E.; Corr, D. J. [Infrastructure Technology Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Hopwood, T. [Kentucky Transportation Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

Estimating electricity storage power rating and discharge duration for utility transmission and distribution deferral :a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a methodology for estimating the power and energy capacities for electricity energy storage systems that can be used to defer costly upgrades to fully overloaded, or nearly overloaded, transmission and distribution (T&D) nodes. This ''sizing'' methodology may be used to estimate the amount of storage needed so that T&D upgrades may be deferred for one year. The same methodology can also be used to estimate the characteristics of storage needed for subsequent years of deferral.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Butler, Paul Charles; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (,.Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Details of Forestry Commission and DARDNI Plant Health Contacts for UK Points of Entry UK Principle Ports Contacts Contact Details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ports Contacts Contact Details Felixstowe Richard Fergusson Pat Mitchell Philip Evans Roland Fry Fax Other GB Ports John Hunter Joanne McAuley Fax 0131-314-6148 Tel : 0131-314-6182 or Tel : 0131

177

Methodology Using MELCOR Code to Model Proposed Hazard Scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates a methodology for using the MELCOR code to model a proposed hazard scenario within a building containing radioactive powder, and the subsequent evaluation of a leak path factor (LPF) (or the amount of respirable material which that escapes a facility into the outside environment), implicit in the scenario. This LPF evaluation will analyzes the basis and applicability of an assumed standard multiplication of 0.5 × 0.5 (in which 0.5 represents the amount of material assumed to leave one area and enter another), for calculating an LPF value. The outside release is dependsent upon the ventilation/filtration system, both filtered and un-filtered, and from other pathways from the building, such as doorways (, both open and closed). This study is presents ed to show how the multiple leak path factorsLPFs from the interior building can be evaluated in a combinatory process in which a total leak path factorLPF is calculated, thus addressing the assumed multiplication, and allowing for the designation and assessment of a respirable source term (ST) for later consequence analysis, in which: the propagation of material released into the environmental atmosphere can be modeled and the dose received by a receptor placed downwind can be estimated and the distance adjusted to maintains such exposures as low as reasonably achievableALARA.. Also, this study will briefly addresses particle characteristics thatwhich affect atmospheric particle dispersion, and compares this dispersion with leak path factorLPF methodology.

Gavin Hawkley

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Systematic Comparison of Operating Reserve Methodologies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating reserve requirements are a key component of modern power systems, and they contribute to maintaining reliable operations with minimum economic impact. No universal method exists for determining reserve requirements, thus there is a need for a thorough study and performance comparison of the different existing methodologies. Increasing penetrations of variable generation (VG) on electric power systems are posed to increase system uncertainty and variability, thus the need for additional reserve also increases. This paper presents background information on operating reserve and its relationship to VG. A consistent comparison of three methodologies to calculate regulating and flexibility reserve in systems with VG is performed.

Ibanez, E.; Krad, I.; Ela, E.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Estimating the Economic Costs of Espionage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who provided invaluable feedback through their participation in the project?s simulation. The team would also like to thank Ms. Janeen Wood, Assistant to the Department Head for International Affairs, and Ms. Rebecca Eaton, Senior Office Associate... have on U.S. corporations.”9 However, ASIS does not reveal the methodology used to establish this relationship and develop the loss estimations. Likewise, Marc Zwillinger and Christian Genetski, Adjunct Professors of Law at Georgetown University...

Bell, Rich; Bennett, J. Ethan; Boles, Jillian R.; Goodoien, David M.; Irving, Jeff W.; Kuhlman, Phillip B.; White, Amanda K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Case Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or the lack thereof, of ground water flow systems driven by similar hydrogeologic and economic conditionsCase Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and Application to the North China Plain of a ground water flow system in the North China Plain (NCP) subject to severe overexploitation and rapid

Zheng, Chunmiao

182

Methodology in Biological Game Simon M. Huttegger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Huttegger and Zollman Methodology in Biological Game Theory ESS Method Describe a game Find all the stable states (ESS) If there is only one, conclude this one is evolutionarily significant #12;Huttegger An Evolutionarily Stable Strategy (ESS) Pooling equilibrium Not an ESS Hybrid equilibrium Not an ESS #12;Huttegger

Zollman, Kevin

183

An International Journal for Epistemology, Methodology and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Synthese An International Journal for Epistemology, Methodology and Philosophy of Science ISSN on . . . : reasoning with infinite diagrams Solomon Feferman #12;1 23 Your article is protected by copyright and all:371­386 DOI 10.1007/s11229-011-9985-6 And so on ...: reasoning with infinite diagrams Solomon Feferman

Feferman, Solomon

184

Optimization Material Distribution methodology: Some electromagnetic examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

730 1 Optimization Material Distribution methodology: Some electromagnetic examples P. Boissoles, H. Ben Ahmed, M. Pierre, B. Multon Abstract--In this paper, a new approach towards Optimization Material to be highly adaptive to various kinds of electromagnetic actuator optimization approaches. Several optimal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

Brereton, S.; Shinn, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hesse, D [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States); Kaninich, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lazaro, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mubayi, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

PART 2. MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN POLLUTION CHAPTER V. MATHEMATICAL MODELS TO ESTIMATE THE ENERGY -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the methodology introduced in a section 5.1, which was used to estimate the atmospheric pollution by the fuelPART 2. MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN POLLUTION CHAPTER V. MATHEMATICAL MODELS TO ESTIMATE THE ENERGY the necessary analysis from the point of view of estimating all the pollution effects in correlation

Baica, Malvina

187

Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

Niski, K; Cohen, J D

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

EMIS Quick User Guide Search page (details on page 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

search terms in foreign languages You can enter search terms in foreign languages by: - Using your: Please note that we have a Cyrillic and Arabic keyboards available through the Search page. EnteringEMIS Quick User Guide Search page (details on page 2) The News page: Access the latest news

Barthelat, Francois

189

Detailed Information on Proposal for US-Monbusho Collaoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C / He /Ceramic Breeder / Be material system - Key: Measure interface thermal resistance at the Si be significant (T-breeding) · Beryllium (typically): Tmax thermal resistance between ceramicDetailed Information on Proposal for UNICEX-Hi US-Monbusho Collaoration Thermal

Abdou, Mohamed

190

Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Detailed Execution Planning for Large Oil and Gas Construction Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed Execution Planning for Large Oil and Gas Construction Projects Presented by James Lozon, University of Calgary There is currently 55.8 billion dollars worth of large oil and gas construction projects scheduled or underway in the province of Alberta. Recently, large capital oil and gas projects

Calgary, University of

192

h~EPA Risk Assessments Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification, movement of radionuclides through environmental pathways, radiation dosimetry, estimating.4 THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY . . * . . 2.5 NUCLEAR REGULATORY COmISSION . . . . . . . . 2.6 DEPARTMENT

193

Theoretical, Methodological, and Empirical Approaches to Cost Savings: A Compendium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication summarizes and contains the original documentation for understanding why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) privatization approach provides cost savings and the different approaches that could be used in calculating cost savings for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Phase I contract. The initial section summarizes the approaches in the different papers. The appendices are the individual source papers which have been reviewed by individuals outside of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the TWRS Program. Appendix A provides a theoretical basis for and estimate of the level of savings that can be" obtained from a fixed-priced contract with performance risk maintained by the contractor. Appendix B provides the methodology for determining cost savings when comparing a fixed-priced contractor with a Management and Operations (M&O) contractor (cost-plus contractor). Appendix C summarizes the economic model used to calculate cost savings and provides hypothetical output from preliminary calculations. Appendix D provides the summary of the approach for the DOE-Richland Operations Office (RL) estimate of the M&O contractor to perform the same work as BNFL Inc. Appendix E contains information on cost growth and per metric ton of glass costs for high-level waste at two other DOE sites, West Valley and Savannah River. Appendix F addresses a risk allocation analysis of the BNFL proposal that indicates,that the current approach is still better than the alternative.

M Weimar

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Estimation of economic impact of freight distribution due to highway closure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main aim of this study is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology to estimate and analyze the economic impact of freight disruption due to highway closure. The costs in this study will be classified into ...

Hu, Shiyin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A tool to estimate materials and manufacturing energy for a product  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study proposes an easy-to-use methodology to estimate the materials embodied energy and manufacturing energy for a product. The tool requires as input the product's Bill of Materials and the knowledge on how these ...

Duque Ciceri, Natalia

196

A planning methodology for arterial streets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-Service Guidelines 4 Sensitivity of Characteristic Input Variables 24 5 Suggested Default Values for use with the Florida Planning Methodology . 25 6 Summary of Characteristic Variables and Operational Conditions 34 7 Comparison of Measured and Predicted Results... for Incremental v/c Ratios 14 Transportation and Development Land Use Cycle 18 General Analytical Format of the Florida Planning Procedure 27 Tabular LOS Output of the ART TAB Arterial Planning Program 28 Frequency of HCM Classifications Among Arterial...

Williams, Marc Daryl

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the dead band'' (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

Egbert, G.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot formation process. (author)

Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Zhang, Hongzhi R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, 1495 East 100 South, Kennecott Research Building, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kubo, Shuichi [Frontier Research Center, Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kim, Kyoung-Oh [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku 1200, Susono, Shizuoka 480-1193 (Japan)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran and co-workers for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet-stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels. (author)

Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Integrated Scenario-based Design Methodology for Collaborative Technology Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information technology innovation with an end-to-end Human and Social Sciences assistance. This methodologyIntegrated Scenario-based Design Methodology for Collaborative Technology Innovation Fabrice Forest Technological innovation often requires large scale collaborative partnership between many heterogeneous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

advanced diagnostic methodology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology Websites Summary: 1 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity Report IEA-PVPS T12-03:2011 12;IEA-PVPS-TASK 12 Methodology...

206

A methodology for forecasting carbon dioxide flooding performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology was developed for forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding performance quickly and reliably. The feasibility of carbon dioxide flooding in the Dollarhide Clearfork "AB" Unit was evaluated using the methodology. This technique is very...

Marroquin Cabrera, Juan Carlos

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Multidimentional Poverty in Bhutan: Estimates and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multidimensional Poverty in Bhutan: Estimates and Policy Implications Maria Emma Santos* and Karma Ura** Abstract This paper estimates multidimensional poverty in Bhutan applying a recently developed methodology by Alkire and Foster (2007... Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET)-Universidad Nacional del Sur, Argentina. ** President, The Centre for Bhutan Studies, Thimphu. Journal of Bhutan Studies 2 1. Introduction Fostered by Sen’s (1985, 1990, 1999) pioneering ‘capability...

Santos, Maria Emma; Ura, Karma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EMCAS, an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMCAS is an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems. It provides a score card of projected or actual system performance for several areas of system operation. In one area, the performance of material control and accounting and security systems, which jointly defend against the insider threat to divert or steal special nuclear material (SNM) using stealth and deceit, is evaluated. Time-dependent and time-independent risk equations are used for both diversion and theft risk calculations. In the case of loss detection by material accounting, a detailed timeliness model is provided to determine the combined effects of loss detection sensitivity and timeliness on the overall effectiveness of the material accounting detection procedure. Calculated risks take into account the capabilities of process area containment/surveillance, material accounting mass balance tests, and physical protection barriers and procedures. In addition, EMCAS evaluates the Material Control and Accounting (MCandA) System in the following areas: (1) system capability to detect errors in the official book inventory of SNM, using mass balance accounting methods, (2) system capability to prevent errors from entering the nuclear material data base during periods of operation between mass balance tests, (3) time to conduct inventories and resolve alarms, and (4) time lost from production to carry out material control and accounting loss detection activities.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.; Bichl, F.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EMCAS: An evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMCAS is an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems. It provides a score card of projected or actual system performance for several areas of system operation. In one area, the performance of material control and accounting and security systems, which jointly defend against the insider threat to divert or steal special nuclear material (SNM) using stealth and deceit, is evaluated. Time-dependent and time-independent risk equations are used for both diversion and theft risk calculations. In the case of loss detection by material accounting, a detailed timeliness model is provided to determine the combined effects of loss detection sensitivity and timeliness on the overall effectiveness of the material accounting detection procedure. Calculated risks take into account the capabilities of process area containment/surveillance, material accounting mass balance tests, and physical protection barriers and procedures. In addition, EMCAS evaluates the Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) System in the following areas: (1) system capability to detect errors in the official book inventory of SNM, using mass balance accounting methods, (2) system capability to prevent errors from entering the nuclear material data base during periods of operation between mass balance tests, (3) time to conduct inventories and resolve alarms, and (4) time lost from production to carry out material control and accounting loss detection activities. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.; Bichl, F.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

GROUNDWATER ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY C. P. Kumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management and conservation. #12;2 The `National Water Policy' adopted by the Government of India in 1987 of India are estimated to be 1123 BCM out of which 690 BCM is surface water resources and 433 BCM

Kumar, C.P.

211

Methodology for Developing the REScheckTM Software through Version 4.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the methodology used to develop Version 4.2 of the REScheck software developed for the 1992, 1993, and 1995 editions of the MEC, and the 1998, 2000, 2003, and 2006 editions of the IECC, and the 2006 edition of the International Residential Code (IRC). Although some requirements contained in these codes have changed, the methodology used to develop the REScheck software for these five editions is similar. REScheck assists builders in meeting the most complicated part of the code?the building envelope Uo-, U-, and R-value requirements in Section 502 of the code. This document details the calculations and assumptions underlying the treatment of the code requirements in REScheck, with a major emphasis on the building envelope requirements.

Bartlett, Rosemarie; Connell, Linda M.; Gowri, Krishnan; Lucas, R. G.; Schultz, Robert W.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Wiberg, John D.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Methodology for the use of proportional counters in pulsed fast neutron yield measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces in full detail a methodology for the measurement of neutron yield and the necessary efficiency calibration, to be applied to the intensity measurement of neutron bursts where individual neutrons are not resolved in time, for any given moderated neutron proportional counter array. The method allows efficiency calibration employing the detection neutrons arising from an isotopic neutron source. Full statistical study of the procedure is descripted, taking into account contributions arising from counting statistics, piling-up statistics of real detector pulse-height spectra and background fluctuations. The useful information is extracted from the net waveform area of the signal arising from the electric charge accumulated inside the detector tube. Improvement of detection limit is gained, therefore this detection system can be used in detection of low emission neutron pulsed sources with pulses of duration from nanoseconds to up. The application of the methodology to detection systems to be...

Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Stewart and Khosla: The Chimera Methodology 1 FINAL DRAFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stewart and Khosla: The Chimera Methodology 1 FINAL DRAFT THE CHIMERA METHODOLOGY: DESIGNING 15213 pkk@ri.cmu.edu Abstract: The Chimera Methodology is a software engineering paradigm that enables the objects have been developed and in­ corporated into the Chimera Real­Time Operating System. Techniques

214

Project Management Methodology | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSEEnergyProject Management Methodology

215

Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cost Estimation Package  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Detailed Chemical Analysis of Two Giants in the SGR DSPH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 8m class telescopes allow for the first time to study stars of external galaxies with the same resolution and S/N ratio which has been so far used for Galactic stars. It is quite likely that this study will shake some of our current beliefs. In this poster we highlight some of the results which have been obtained for two giants in the Sgr dSph thanks to the UVES spectrograph on the ESO 8.2m Kueyen telescope. Further details on the observations and data analysis may be found in Bonifacio et al (2000).

P. Bonifacio; P. Molaro

2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Detail Shot Of Mira | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density, andagingabout InfluenzaDetail Shot Of

220

Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

New Measurement Explores Fine Details of Proton Structure | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1,DepartmentMeasurement Explores Fine Details

222

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Detailed Tables  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYearReserves (Billion5:July 22, 20131Detailed

223

Electric Utility Sales and Revenue - EIA-826 detailed data file  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment > Voluntary826 detailed data The Form

224

Blundell 2 Power Plant Details | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey:formBlue Energy Address:Bluestem Electric CoopDetails

225

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof Energy Two CompaniesTwo Studies Reveal Details of

226

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof Energy Two CompaniesTwo Studies Reveal Details ofTwo

227

Atomistic Details of the Associative Phosphodiester Cleavage in Human  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,ArthurMaterialsRibonuclease H. | EMSL Details

228

Sandia National Laboratories: 2014 PV Systems Symposium Details  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards andSan$0.06 per09Engineer AwardDetails

229

Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas-model methodology and data description. [PROLOG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. A linear program is used to select drilling activities for conventional oil and gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using an exogenously specified price path, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas, and for exploration and development in each of six onshore regions. Forecasts of drilling for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) are exogenously determined, and this drilling is included when considering the constraints on drilling rigs. The report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 is a general overview of the model, describing the major characteristics of the methodology and the logical interaction of the various modules. Chapter 3 specifies the structure of the linear program including the equations for the objective function and the constraints. The details of the methodology used to model exploratory, developmental, and deep gas drilling are presented in Chapters 4-6, respectively. Chapter 7 presents a discussion of the economic evaluation which takes place in each discounted cash flow calculation performed by the model. Cost equations are presented, and various user-specified options as to how to incorporate these costs are discussed. Methodological details and equations used to model finding rates and revisions are given in Chapter 8. Possible areas of future enhancements to the PROLOG model are presented in Chapter 9.

Carlson, M.; Kurator, W.; Mariner-Volpe, B.; O'Neill, R.; Trapmann, W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Methodology for Estimating the Parameters of Steam Turbine Generator Shaft Systems for Subsynchronous Resonance Studies .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increase of coal and nuclear power steam turbines over the past few decades combined with transmission line series capacitors creates a potential drawback known… (more)

Sambarapu, Krishna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

METHODOLOGY ARTICLE Open Access Microarray estimation of genomic inter-strain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uses, e.g. as a resource for drug development, as a biofuel resource, or as nutrient- and heavy metal, such as giant kelps, provide habi- tats for many other organisms [2]. Being part of the het- erokont lineage

234

Global methane emissions from landfills: New methodology and annual estimates 19801996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per capita based on energy consumption per capita, a surrogate which reflects population and affluence

235

Estimating amenity values of street trees and woodland views: a methodological review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spatial valuation methods. The review revealed a paucity of nationwide or large-scale valuations of street, and on trade-offs and synergies in ecosystem service provision. Objectives This research aimed to: m review methods and approaches to valuing amenity street trees and woodland views ­ and greenspace generally

236

Yield estimates and comparisons for full custom, standard cell, and gate array design methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the critical areas for the different design metnodologies are presented. The first approach pays specific attention to the intermodule interconnect and module complexity. The resulting critical areas from this first approach are then applied to Okabe...'s and Poisson's yield equations. The second approach is concerned more with the average width and spacing of interconnect and the spacing and number of modules. The critical areas for this second approach are applied to Poisson's equations for comparisons...

Norte, Marcella Evelyn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

COMPARISON OF METHODOLOGIES TO ESTIMATE DIRECT NORMAL IRRADIATION FROM DAILY VALUES OF GLOBAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The reason is that a dual automatic tracker was installed by the end of 1999, providing better DNI 2-axis tracker. Measurements have been recorded every 5 seconds, but for the purpose of this work Sevilla (Spain). Phone: (+34) 954487233. Fax: (+34) 954 487233. E-mail: saramt@esi.us.es 2 Solar Thermal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

238

Quality Guidline for Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvancedJanuaryNETL-2010/????

239

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L. , 2006. Discussion of CO2 emission reduction in ChineseFurther discussion of CO2 emission reduction in Chinesecalculation method of CO2 emissions of cement production.

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Detailed computation of hot-plasma atomic spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present recent evolutions of the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG which combines statistical modelings of levels and lines with fine-structure calculations. The code now includes the Partially-Resolved-Transition-Array model, which allows one to replace a complex transition array by a small-scale detailed calculation preserving energy and variance of the genuine transition array and yielding improved high-order moments. An approximate method for studying the impact of strong magnetic field on opacity and emissivity was also recently implemented. The Zeeman line profile is modeled by fourth-order Gram-Charlier expansion series, which is a Gaussian multiplied by a linear combination of Hermite polynomials. Electron collisional line broadening is often modeled by a Lorentzian function and one has to calculate the convolution of a Lorentzian with Gram-Charlier distribution for a huge number of spectral lines. Since the numerical cost of the direct convolution would be prohibitive, we propose, in order to obtain t...

Pain, Jean-Christophe; Blenski, Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Check Estimates and Independent Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracks Locomotives & Cars Fuel (Diesel, Electric) RoadwaysVehicles Fuel (Diesel, Electric) Design N K,L,N Production

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyUCB-ITS-VWP-2007-7 Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pomper, S.D. , Life Cycle Inventory of a Generic U.S. Family2007. [EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook, ActivitiesVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Methodological Framework for Analysis of Buildings-Related Programs with BEAMS, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) develops official “benefits estimates” for each of its major programs using its Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation (PAE) Team. PAE conducts an annual integrated modeling and analysis effort to produce estimates of the energy, environmental, and financial benefits expected from EERE’s budget request. These estimates are part of EERE’s budget request and are also used in the formulation of EERE’s performance measures. Two of EERE’s major programs are the Building Technologies Program (BT) and the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports PAE by developing the program characterizations and other market information necessary to provide input to the EERE integrated modeling analysis as part of PAE’s Portfolio Decision Support (PDS) effort. Additionally, PNNL also supports BT by providing line-item estimates for the Program’s internal use. PNNL uses three modeling approaches to perform these analyses. This report documents the approach and methodology used to estimate future energy, environmental, and financial benefits using one of those methods: the Building Energy Analysis and Modeling System (BEAMS). BEAMS is a PC-based accounting model that was built in Visual Basic by PNNL specifically for estimating the benefits of buildings-related projects. It allows various types of projects to be characterized including whole-building, envelope, lighting, and equipment projects. This document contains an overview section that describes the estimation process and the models used to estimate energy savings. The body of the document describes the algorithms used within the BEAMS software. This document serves both as stand-alone documentation for BEAMS, and also as a supplemental update of a previous document, Methodological Framework for Analysis of Buildings-Related Programs: The GPRA Metrics Effort, (Elliott et al. 2004b). The areas most changed since the publication of that previous document are those discussing the calculation of lighting and HVAC interactive effects (for both lighting and envelope/whole-building projects). This report does not attempt to convey inputs to BEAMS or the methodology of their derivation.

Elliott, Douglas B.; Dirks, James A.; Hostick, Donna J.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

A detailed spectroscopic study of an Italian fresco  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work we characterized samples of plasters and pictorial layers taken from a fresco in the Acireale Cathedral. The fresco represents the Coronation of Saint Venera, patron saint of this Ionian town. By performing a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the plaster preparation layer by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and of the painting layer by FTIR and confocal Raman microspectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy+energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and XRD, we were able to identify the pigments and the binders present. In particular, Raman investigation was crucial to the characterization of the pigments thanks to the high resolution of the confocal apparatus used. It is worth stressing that the simultaneous use of complementary techniques was able to provide more complete information for the conservation of the artifact we studied.

Barilaro, Donatella; Crupi, Vincenza; Majolino, Domenico; Barone, Germana; Ponterio, Rosina [Dipartimento di Fisica and Instituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia (INFM), Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo, Salita Sperone 31, P.O. Box 55, 98166 Messina (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze dalla Terra, Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo, Salita Sperone 31, P.O. Box 55, 98166 Messina (Italy); Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Sezione di Messina, Via La Farina 237, 98123 Messina (Italy)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Performance estimates for personnel access control systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current performance estimates for personnel access control systems use estimates of Type I and Type II verification errors. A system performance equation which addresses normal operation, the insider, and outside adversary attack is developed. Examination of this equation reveals the inadequacy of classical Type I and II error evaluations which require detailed knowledge of the adversary threat scenario for each specific installation. Consequently, new performance measures which are consistent with the performance equation and independent of the threat are developed as an aid in selecting personnel access control systems.

Bradley, R. G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

Maienschein, J L

2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

DETAILED INTERSTELLAR POLARIMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE PIPE NEBULA AT CORE SCALES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use R-band CCD linear polarimetry collected for about 12,000 background field stars in 46 fields of view toward the Pipe nebula to investigate the properties of the polarization across this dark cloud. Based on archival Two Micron All Sky Survey data, we estimate that the surveyed areas present total visual extinctions in the range 0.6 mag {<=} A{sub V} {<=} 4.6 mag. While the observed polarizations show a well-ordered large-scale pattern, with polarization vectors almost perpendicularly aligned to the cloud's long axis, at core scales one sees details that are characteristics of each core. Although many observed stars present degrees of polarization that are unusual for the common interstellar medium (ISM), our analysis suggests that the dust grains constituting the diffuse parts of the Pipe nebula seem to have the same properties as the normal Galactic ISM. Estimates of the second-order structure function of the polarization angles suggest that most of the Pipe nebula is magnetically dominated and that turbulence is sub-Alvenic. The Pipe nebula is certainly an interesting region to investigate the processes that prevailed during the initial phases of low-mass stellar formation.

Franco, G. A. P. [Departamento de Fisica-ICEx-UFMG, Caixa Postal 702, 30.123-970 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves, F. O.; Girart, J. M., E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.b [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Parell 2a, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

United States Environmental Protection Agency: Use of risk assessment and risk management methodologies. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. This is the primary mission of the Risk Assessment and Management Commission (Risk Commission). The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), created the Risk Commission reflecting Congress' concern over agency use of risk assessment and risk management techniques and methodologies to implement federal laws protective of human health. The Risk Commission is to consider: methods for measuring and describing risks of chronic health effects from hazardous substances; methods to reflect uncertainties associated with estimation techniques, and whether it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology or a consistent standard of acceptable risk for various federal programs.

Lamuro, R.J.

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Types of Cost Estimates  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite decomposition methodology, the solar signature on global surface temperature data using the ACRIM total solar minima during solar cycles 21­23 (1980­2002). We estimate that the ACRIM upward trend might have

Scafetta, Nicola

258

Systems Engineering Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on project, human capital impact. 7 How to estimate Cost? Difficult to know what we are building early on1 Systems Engineering Lecture 3 Cost Estimation Dr. Joanna Bryson Dr. Leon Watts University of Bath: Contrast approaches for estimating software project cost, and identify the main sources of cost

Bryson, Joanna J.

259

Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry, substantial energy savings can be made. Savings are expected to be even greater in the case of new steels, which will require extensive mapping over large experimental ranges of parameters such as voltage, current, speed, heat input and pre-heat.

Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

GRB 050822: Detailed analysis of an XRF observed by Swift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the early X-ray emission from the GRB 050822 as observed by Swift. This burst is likely to be an XRF showing major X-ray flares in its XRT light-curve. The quality of the data allows a detailed spectral analysis of the early afterglow in the X-ray band. During the X-ray flares, a positive correlation between the count rate and the spectral hardness (i.e. higher the count rate is and harder the spectrum is) is clearly seen for the X-ray flares. This behaviour similar to that seen for Gamma-ray pulses indicates that the energy peak of the spectrum is in the XRT energy band and it moves at lower energy with time. We show evidence for the possible detection of the emergence of the forward-shock emission produced at a radius larger than 4 x 10^{16} cm (a forming region clearly different to that producing the prompt emission). Finally, we show that the null detection of a jet break up to T_0+4 x 10^6s in the X-ray light curve of this XRF can be understood: i...

Godet, O; Osborne, J; Zhang, B; Burrows, D N; O'Brien, P T; Hill, J E; Racusin, J; Beardmore, A P; Goad, M R; Falcone, A; Morris, D C; Ziaeepour, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A detail study of defect models for cosmic structure formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate predictions from wide class of `active' models of cosmic structure formation which allows us to scan the space of possible defect models. We calculate the linear cold dark matter power spectrum and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies over all observable scales using a full linear Einstein-Boltzmann code. Our main result, which has already been reported, points to a serious problem reconciling the observed amplitude of the large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization. Here, we describe our methods and results in detail. The problem is present for a wide range of defect parameters, which can be used to represent potential differences among defect models, as well as possible systematic numerical errors. We explicitly examine the impact of varying the defect model parameters and we show how the results substantiate these conclusions. The standard scaling defect models are in serious conflict with the current data, and we show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects or modified stress-energy components would require radical departures from what has become the standard picture.

A. Albrecht; R. A. Battye; J. Robinson

1997-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evolution Effects on Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. With a set of rate equations describing the chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons based on perturbative QCD, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution at RHIC. With considering parton evolution, it is shown that the Debye screening mass and the inverse mean free-path of gluons reduce with increasing proper time in the QGP medium. The parton evolution affects the parton energy loss with detailed balance, both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. The energy absorption can not be neglected at intermediate jet energies and small propagating distance of the energetic parton in contrast with that it is important only at intermediate jet energy in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_T hadron spectra.

Luan cheng; Enke Wang

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Flow Effects on Jet Energy Loss with Detailed Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the presence of collective flow a new model potential describing the interaction of the hard jet with scattering centers is derived based on the static color-screened Yukawa potential. The flow effect on jet quenching with detailed balance is investigated in pQCD. It turns out, considering the collective flow with velocity $v_z$ along the jet direction, the collective flow decreases the LPM destructive interference comparing to that in the static medium. The gluon absorption plays a more important role in the moving medium. The collective flow increases the energy gain from gluon absorption, however, decreases the energy loss from gluon radiation, which is $(1 - v_z )$ times as that in the static medium to the first order of opacity. In the presence of collective flow, the second order in opacity correction is relatively small compared to the first order. So that the total effective energy loss is decreased. The flow dependence of the energy loss will affect the suppression of high $p_T$ hadron spectrum and anisotropy parameter $v_2$ in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

Luan Cheng; Jia Liu; Enke Wang

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Supplemental report on cost estimates'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have completed an analysis of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 budget request for its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) program. The results were presented to an interagency review group (IAG) of senior-Administration officials for their consideration in the budget process. This analysis included evaluations of the underlying legal requirements and cost estimates on which the ERWM budget request was based. The major conclusions are contained in a separate report entitled, ''Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program.'' This Corps supplemental report provides greater detail on the cost analysis.

NONE

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Soils Activity Mobility Study: Methodology and Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a three-level approach for estimation of sediment transport to provide an assessment of potential erosion risk for sites at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) that are posted for radiological purposes and where migration is suspected or known to occur due to storm runoff. Based on the assessed risk, the appropriate level of effort can be determined for analysis of radiological surveys, field experiments to quantify erosion and transport rates, and long-term monitoring. The method is demonstrated at contaminated sites, including Plutonium Valley, Shasta, Smoky, and T-1. The Pacific Southwest Interagency Committee (PSIAC) procedure is selected as the Level 1 analysis tool. The PSIAC method provides an estimation of the total annual sediment yield based on factors derived from the climatic and physical characteristics of a watershed. If the results indicate low risk, then further analysis is not warranted. If the Level 1 analysis indicates high risk or is deemed uncertain, a Level 2 analysis using the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE) is proposed. In addition, if a sediment yield for a storm event rather than an annual sediment yield is needed, then the proposed Level 2 analysis should be performed. MUSLE only provides sheet and rill erosion estimates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center-Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) provides storm peak runoff rate and storm volumes, the inputs necessary for MUSLE. Channel Sediment Transport (CHAN-SED) I and II models are proposed for estimating sediment deposition or erosion in a channel reach from a storm event. These models require storm hydrograph associated sediment concentration and bed load particle size distribution data. When the Level 2 analysis indicates high risk for sediment yield and associated contaminant migration or when there is high uncertainty in the Level 2 results, the sites can be further evaluated with a Level 3 analysis using more complex and labor- and data-intensive methods. For the watersheds analyzed in this report using the Level 1 PSIAC method, the risk of erosion is low. The field reconnaissance surveys of these watersheds confirm the conclusion that the sediment yield of undisturbed areas at the NNSS would be low. The climate, geology, soils, ground cover, land use, and runoff potential are similar among these watersheds. There are no well-defined ephemeral channels except at the Smoky and Plutonium Valley sites. Topography seems to have the strongest influence on sediment yields, as sediment yields are higher on the steeper hill slopes. Lack of measured sediment yield data at the NNSS does not allow for a direct evaluation of the yield estimates by the PSIAC method. Level 2 MUSLE estimates in all the analyzed watersheds except Shasta are a small percentage of the estimates from PSIAC because MUSLE is not inclusive of channel erosion. This indicates that channel erosion dominates the total sediment yield in these watersheds. Annual sediment yields for these watersheds are estimated using the CHAN-SEDI and CHAN-SEDII channel sediment transport models. Both transport models give similar results and exceed the estimates obtained from PSIAC and MUSLE. It is recommended that the total watershed sediment yield of watersheds at the NNSS with flow channels be obtained by adding the washload estimate (rill and inter-rill erosion) from MUSLE to that obtained from channel transport models (bed load and suspended sediment). PSIAC will give comparable results if factor scores for channel erosion are revised towards the high erosion level. Application of the Level 3 process-based models to estimate sediment yields at the NNSS cannot be recommended at this time. Increased model complexity alone will not improve the certainty of the sediment yield estimates. Models must be calibrated against measured data before model results are accepted as certain. Because no measurements of sediment yields at the NNSS are available, model validation cannot be performed. This is also true for the models used in the L

Silvas, Alissa; Yucel, Vefa

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring...

270

Methodology for Assesment of Urban Water Planning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-51 1973 Methodology for Assessment of Urban Water Planning Objectives W.L. Meier B.M. Thornton Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Meier, W. L.; Thornton, B. M.

271

Energy Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators in Brazil: A Methodology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Impact Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators in Brazil: A Methodology for Impact Evaluation Focus...

272

National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

273

Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Methodology for Carbon Accounting of Grouped Mosaic and Landscape...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grouped Mosaic and Landscape-scale REDD Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Methodology for Carbon Accounting of Grouped Mosaic and Landscape-scale...

275

New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Salvador M. Aceves, Daniel L. Flowers, J. Ray Smith, Lee Davisson, Francisco Espinosa-Loza, Tim Ross,...

276

Detailed Geophysical Fault Characterization in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Between the years 1951 and 1992, 659 underground nuclear tests took place in Yucca Flat; most were conducted in large, vertical excavations that penetrated alluvium and the underlying Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Radioactive and other potential chemical contaminants at the NTS are the subject of a long-term program of investigation and remediation by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, under its Environmental Restoration Program. As part of the program, the DOE seeks to assess the extent of contamination and to evaluate the potential risks to humans and the environment from byproducts of weapons testing. To accomplish this objective, the DOE Environmental Restoration Program is constructing and calibrating a ground-water flow model to predict hydrologic flow in Yucca Flat as part of an effort to quantify the subsurface hydrology of the Nevada Test Site. A necessary part of calibrating and evaluating a model of the flow system is an understanding of the location and characteristics of faults that may influence ground-water flow. In addition, knowledge of fault-zone architecture and physical properties is a fundamental component of the containment of the contamination from underground nuclear tests, should such testing ever resume at the Nevada Test Site. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a detailed understanding of the geometry and physical properties of fault zones in Yucca Flat. This study was designed to investigate faults in greater detail and to characterize fault geometry, the presence of fault splays, and the fault-zone width. Integrated geological and geophysical studies have been designed and implemented to work toward this goal. This report describes the geophysical surveys conducted near two drill holes in Yucca Flat, the data analyses performed, and the integrated interpretations developed from the suite of geophysical methodologies utilized in this investigation. Data collection for this activity started in the spring of 2005 and continued into 2006. A suite of electrical geophysical surveys were run in combination with ground magnetic surveys; these surveys resulted in high-resolution subsurface data that portray subsurface fault geometry at the two sites and have identified structures not readily apparent from surface geologic mapping, potential field geophysical data, or surface effects fracture maps.

Theodore H. Asch; Donald Sweetkind; Bethany L. Burton; Erin L. Wallin

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

When the Details Matter – Sensitivities in PRA Calculations That Could Affect Risk-Informed Decision-Making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) continues its efforts to increase its use of risk information in decision making, the detailed, quantitative results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations are coming under increased scrutiny. Where once analysts and users were not overly concerned with figure of merit variations that were less than an order of magnitude, now factors of two or even less can spark heated debate regarding modeling approaches and assumptions. The philosophical and policy-related aspects of this situation are well-recognized by the PRA community. On the other hand, the technical implications for PRA methods and modeling have not been as widely discussed. This paper illustrates the potential numerical effects of choices as to the details of models and methods for parameter estimation with three examples: 1) the selection of the time period data for parameter estimation, and issues related to component boundary and failure mode definitions; 2) the selection of alternative diffuse prior distributions, including the constrained noninformative prior distribution, in Bayesian parameter estimation; and 3) the impact of uncertainty in calculations for recovery of offsite power.

Dana L. Kelly; Nathan O. Siu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines: Experiments and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are being considered as an alternative to diesel engines. The HCCI concept involves premixing fuel and air prior to induction into the cylinder (as is done in current spark-ignition engine) then igniting the fuel-air mixture through the compression process (as is done in current diesel engines). The combustion occurring in an HCCI engine is fundamentally different from a spark-ignition or Diesel engine in that the heat release occurs as a global autoignition process, as opposed to the turbulent flame propagation or mixing controlled combustion used in current engines. The advantage of this global autoignition is that the temperatures within the cylinder are uniformly low, yielding very low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}, the chief precursors to photochemical smog). The inherent features of HCCI combustion allows for design of engines with efficiency comparable to, or potentially higher than, diesel engines. While HCCI engines have great potential, several technical barriers exist which currently prevent widespread commercialization of this technology. The most significant challenge is that the combustion timing cannot be controlled by typical in-cylinder means. Means of controlling combustion have been demonstrated, but a robust control methodology that is applicable to the entire range of operation has yet to be developed. This research focuses on understanding basic characteristics of controlling and operating HCCI engines. Experiments and detailed chemical kinetic simulations have been applied to the characterize some of the fundamental operational and design characteristics of HCCI engines. Experiments have been conducted on single and multi-cylinder engines to investigate general features of how combustion timing affects the performance and emissions of HCCI engines. Single-zone modeling has been used to characterize and compare the implementation of different control strategies. Multi-zone modeling has been applied to investigate combustion chamber design with respect to increasing efficiency and reducing emissions in HCCI engines.

Flowers, D L

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Appendix 3-3-The complete model formulation for detailed multiple release software product simulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation model In this appendix the model formulations for the detailed simulation model (discussed

Rahmandad, Hazhir

283

Radiochemical Analysis Methodology for uranium Depletion Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides sufficient material for a test sponsor with little or no radiochemistry background to understand and follow physics irradiation test program execution. Most irradiation test programs employ similar techniques and the general details provided here can be applied to the analysis of other irradiated sample types. Aspects of program management directly affecting analysis quality are also provided. This report is not an in-depth treatise on the vast field of radiochemical analysis techniques and related topics such as quality control. Instrumental technology is a very fast growing field and dramatic improvements are made each year, thus the instrumentation described in this report is no longer cutting edge technology. Much of the background material is still applicable and useful for the analysis of older experiments and also for subcontractors who still retain the older instrumentation.

Scatena-Wachel DE

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

D&D Waste Estimate Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Closure Project (Site) includes several multi-year decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects which, over the next four years, will dismantle and demolish four major plutonium facilities, four major uranium facilities, and over 400 additional facilities of different types. The projects are currently generating large quantities of transuranic, low-level, mixed, hazardous, and sanitary wastes. A previous paper described the initial conceptual estimates and methods, and the evolution of these methods based on the actual results from the decommissioning of a ''pilot'' facility. The waste estimating method that resulted from that work was used for the waste estimates incorporated into the current Site baseline. This paper discusses subsequent developments on the topic of waste estimating that have occurred since the baseline work. After several months of operation under the current Site baseline, an effort was initiated to either validate or identify improvements to the waste basis-of-estimate. Specific estimate and estimating method elements were identified for additional analysis based on the element's potential for error and the impact of that error on Site activities. The analysis took advantage of actual, more detailed data collected both from three years additional experience in decommissioning a second plutonium facility and from experience in deactivating certain non-plutonium facilities. It compared the actual transuranic and low-level waste generation against their respective estimates based on overall distribution and for individual media (i.e. equipment type), and evaluated trends. Finally, it projected the quantity of lead-characteristic low-level mixed waste that will be generated from plutonium building decommissioning and upgraded the decommissioning waste estimates of the non-plutonium buildings.

Sanford, P. C.; Templeton, J. H.; Stevens, J. L.; Dorr, K.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination F.B. da Silva S.D. Scott-mail: halab@mit.edu #12;2 Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination by F.B. da Silva, S.D. Scott, and M.L. Cummings Executive Summary Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems, despite

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

286

ORNL/TM-2008/105 Cost Methodology for Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL/TM-2008/105 Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Resource and Engineering Systems Environmental Sciences Division COST METHODOLOGY FOR BIOMASS FEESTOCKS ....................................................................................................... 3 2.1.1 Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics Model (IBSAL).......................... 6 2

Pennycook, Steve

287

A Methodology for the Derivation of Parallel Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Methodology for the Derivation of Parallel Programs Joy Goodman Department of Computer Science, University of Glasgow Abstract. I am currently developing a methodology for deriving paral­ lel programs from equational reasoning, a more efficient parallel program in a variety of languages and styles can be derived

Goodman, Joy

288

A New Methodology for Aircraft HVDC Power Systems design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Methodology for Aircraft HVDC Power Systems design D. Hernández, M. Sautreuil, N. Retière, D-mail: olivier.sename@gipsa-lab.inpg.fr Abstract ­ A new methodology for aircraft HVDC power systems design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

289

Frontier efficiency methodologies to measure performance in the insurance industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frontier efficiency methodologies to measure performance in the insurance industry: Overview¨ur Mathematik und Wirtschaftswissenschaften UNIVERSIT¨AT ULM #12;Frontier efficiency methodologies to measure The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on frontier efficiency measurement in the insurance

Ulm, Universität

290

A Case Study applying Process and Project Alignment Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Case Study applying Process and Project Alignment Methodology Paula Ventura Martins1 & Alberto process and (2) analyze projects, starting an SPI effort. In order to evaluate ProPAM, a study case Martins A Case Study Applying & Alberto Rodrigues da Silva Process and Project Alignment Methodology 64

da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

291

Web Based Simulations for Virtual Scientific Experiment: Methodology and Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These are the keywords. Web based simulation, Virtual Scientific Experiment, e-learning 1. INTRODUCTION Until now Technology for Enhanced Learning 1 #12;Web Based Simulations for Virtual Scientific Experiment: MethodologyWeb Based Simulations for Virtual Scientific Experiment: Methodology and Tools Giovannina Albano

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

PDF Approach Hybrid Methodology Validation DEVELOPMENT OF A HYBRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PDF Approach Hybrid Methodology Validation DEVELOPMENT OF A HYBRID EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN METHOD CNRS / INPT / UPS PhD Defense X. PIALAT Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Method (HELM) #12;PDF Approach Hybrid Methodology Validation Introduction Gas-Particle Flows Applications pollutant dispersion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

293

Vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2008 benefits analysis, methodology and results --- final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Vehicle Technologies (VT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, and (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 08 the Heavy Vehicles program continued its involvement with various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. These changes are the result of a planning effort that first occurred during FY 04 and was updated in the past year. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY08 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the VT program for internal project management purposes.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

Estimating Externalities of Hydro Fuel Cycles, Report 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three major objectives of this hydropower study: (1) to implement the methodological concepts that were developed in the background document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles and, by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the hydroelectric fuel cycle (different fuel cycles have unique characteristics that need to be addressed in different ways); (2) to develop, given the time and resources, the best range of estimates of externalities associated with hydroelectric projects, using two benchmark projects at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information that is available to support the estimation of externalities associated with the hydroelectric fuel cycle and, by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities and a better method for estimating them. As set forth in the agreement between the US and the EC, the study is explicitly and intentionally not directed at any one audience. This study is about a methodology for estimating externalities. It is not about how to use estimates of externalities in a particular policy context.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG-1150 constitutes a full-scope reassessment of the risks to the public from several light water reactor plants with various containment types. Emphasis has been placed on determining the magnitude and character of the uncertainties, rather than focusing upon a point estimate. The risk-reduction potential of proposed plant modifications (backfits and procedural changes) has also been studied, and their costs and benefits have been evaluated. It has been found that the risks from internal events are generally lower than previously evaluated in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). However, certain unresolved phenomenological issues cause the tops of the uncertainty bands to appear at levels that are comparable to or higher than the RSS point estimates. The issues that are important vary from plant to plant. Most of the postulated plant modifications do not appear to be cost-effective, although a few procedural changes are possible exceptions. Several reviews of this work are in progress, and a second iteration is being performed to include external events, incorporate new technical information, and address comments.

Benjamin, A.S.; Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Methods to estimate equipment and materials that are candidates for removal during the decontamination of fuel processing facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology presented in this report provides a model for estimating the volume and types of waste expected from the removal of equipment and other materials during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of canyon-type fuel reprocessing facilities. This methodology offers a rough estimation technique based on a comparative analysis for a similar, previously studied, reprocessing facility. This approach is especially useful as a planning tool to save time and money while preparing for final D and D. The basic methodology described here can be extended for use at other types of facilities, such as glovebox or reactor facilities.

Duncan, D.R.; Valero, O.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Hyre, R.A.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Millar, J.S.; Reddick, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fusion integral experiments and analysis and the determination of design safety factors - I: Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of the neutronics experimentation and analysis in fusion neutronics research and development programs is discussed. A new methodology was developed to arrive at estimates to design safety factors based on the experimental and analytical results from design-oriented integral experiments. In this methodology, and for a particular nuclear response, R, a normalized density function (NDF) is constructed from the prediction uncertainties, and their associated standard deviations, as found in the various integral experiments where that response, R, is measured. Important statistical parameters are derived from the NDF, such as the global mean prediction uncertainty, and the possible spread around it. The method of deriving safety factors from many possible NDFs based on various calculational and measuring methods (among other variants) is also described. Associated with each safety factor is a confidence level, designers may choose to have, that the calculated response, R, will not exceed (or will not fall below) the actual measured value. An illustrative example is given on how to construct the NDFs. The methodology is applied in two areas, namely the line-integrated tritium production rate and bulk shielding integral experiments. Conditions under which these factors could be derived and the validity of the method are discussed. 72 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Oyama, Y.; Maekawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Contact Details of Local Forestry Commission and DARDNI Plant Health Inspectors at Points of Entry UK Principle Ports Inspector Contact Details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Principle Ports Inspector Contact Details Grangemouth, Greenock, Inverkeithing, Inverness, Leith, Barry, Port Talbot, Swansea, Neath, Newport, Bristol(Avonmouth), Sharpness Sid Martin Tel/Fax: 01792

299

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cooling load estimation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Estimating design costs for first-of-a-kind projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern scientific facilities are often outcomes of projects that are first-of-a-kind, that is, minimal historical data are available for project costs and schedules. However, at Fermilab, there was an opportunity to execute two similar projects consecutively. In this paper, a comparative study of the design costs for these two projects is presented using earned value methodology. This study provides some insights into how to estimate the cost of a replicated project.

Banerjee, Bakul; /Fermilab

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Developing Standard Logic for a Detailed Engineering Project Schedule in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning Meeting (IPPM) for a standard detailed engineering project in the process industry will be used to develop scheduling logic for use in developing detail engineering project schedules. However, because the IPPM does not clearly distinguish...

Miller-Karns, Kara A.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

: Helmholtz machine estimation .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Helmholtz machine density estimation . . : . . . (supervised learning) , (active learning) (query learning) [1, 3]. . (unsupervised learning), . , [5]. . Helmholtz machine , . Helmholtz machine : Helmholtz machine [2] . Helmholtz machine (generative network) (recognition network) . , , . Helmholtz machine (self

305

Operated device estimation framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution...

Rengarajan, Janarthanan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimation of food consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

Callaway, J.M. Jr.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cost Estimating Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

Incorporation of Detailed Chemical Mechanisms in Reactive Flow Simulations Using Element-Flux Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ignition (HCCI) combustion with detailed chemistry by using the proposed on-the-fly reduction scheme detailed characterizations of in-cylinder behaviors in stratified HCCI engines by incorporating detailed was proposed for HCCI engines in which homogeneous charge was used. However, although termed "homogeneous

Androulakis, Ioannis (Yannis)

309

Optimizing a physical security configuration using a highly detailed simulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing a physical security configuration using a highly detailed simulation model Marechal, T. Email: tommarechal@hotmail.com Abstract This chapter focuses on using a highly detailed simulation model. In this chapter describes the use of a highly detailed simulation model to find a superior security configuration

Smith, Alice E.

310

A Quasi-Dynamic HVAC and Building Simulation Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their design and simulated in a computationally efficient manner. The methodology represents a system as interconnected, object-oriented sub-models known as components. Fluids and their local properties are modeled using discrete, incompressible objects known...

Davis, Clinton Paul

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Methodology to Measure Retrofit Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation develops a methodology to measure retrofit energy savings and the uncertainty of the savings in commercial buildings. The functional forms of empirical models of cooling and heating energy use in commercial buildings are derived from an engineering...

Kissock, John Kelly

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Average System Cost Methodology : Administrator's Record of Decision.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant features of average system cost (ASC) methodology adopted are: retention of the jurisdictional approach where retail rate orders of regulartory agencies provide primary data for computing the ASC for utilities participating in the residential exchange; inclusion of transmission costs; exclusion of construction work in progress; use of a utility's weighted cost of debt securities; exclusion of income taxes; simplification of separation procedures for subsidized generation and transmission accounts from other accounts; clarification of ASC methodology rules; more generous review timetable for individual filings; phase-in of reformed methodology; and each exchanging utility must file under the new methodology within 20 days of implementation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of the ten major participating utilities, the revised ASC will substantially only affect three. (PSB)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

AIAA 2001-1535 A SYMBOLIC METHODOLOGY FOR THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wind turbines, etc. Over the last decade the advent of composites and the pursuit to build lighter is applied to a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine. The pa- per presents a new methodology for modeling

Patil, Mayuresh

314

Architectural Approaches, Concepts and Methodologies of Service Oriented Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architectural Approaches, Concepts and Methodologies of Service Oriented Architecture Master Thesis. Introduction to Service Oriented Architecture........................................... 2.1 Evolution Middleware (MOM)........................................... 2.5 Definition of Service Oriented Architecture

Moeller, Ralf

315

Good Experimental Methodologies and Simulation in Autonomous Mobile Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Good Experimental Methodologies and Simulation in Autonomous Mobile Robotics Francesco Amigoni and Viola Schiaffonati Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Laboratory, Dipartimento di Elettronica e to characterize analytically, as it is often the case in autonomous mobile robotics. Although their importance

Amigoni, Francesco

316

Reservoir characterization using experimental design and response surface methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research combines a statistical tool called experimental design/response surface methodology with reservoir modeling and flow simulation for the purpose of reservoir characterization. Very often, it requires large number of reservoir simulation...

Parikh, Harshal

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hanford Site baseline risk assessment methodology. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This methodology has been developed to prepare human health and environmental evaluations of risk as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act remedial investigations (RIs) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facility investigations (FIs) performed at the Hanford Site pursuant to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement. Development of the methodology has been undertaken so that Hanford Site risk assessments are consistent with current regulations and guidance, while providing direction on flexible, ambiguous, or undefined aspects of the guidance. The methodology identifies Site-specific risk assessment considerations and integrates them with approaches for evaluating human and environmental risk that can be factored into the risk assessment program supporting the Hanford Site cleanup mission. Consequently, the methodology will enhance the preparation and review of individual risk assessments at the Hanford Site.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

DOE 2009 Geothermal Risk Analysis: Methodology and Results (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes the methodology and results for a probabilistic risk analysis of research, development, and demonstration work-primarily for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program.

Young, K. R.; Augustine, C.; Anderson, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Software Interoperability Tools: Standardized Capability-Profiling Methodology ISO16100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software Interoperability Tools: Standardized Capability-Profiling Methodology ISO16100 Michiko, qwang@seu.ac.jp Abstract. The ISO 16100 series has been developed for Manufacturing software for developing general software applications including enterprise applications. In this paper, ISO 16100

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

320

Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes transmission cost allocation methodologies for transmission projects developed to maintain or enhance reliability, to interconnect new generators, or to access new resources and enhance competitive bulk power markets, otherwise known as economic transmission projects.

Fink, S.; Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hydrogen Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Hydrogen Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress summarizes the processes used to set Hydrogen Program goals and milestones. Published in August 2006, it fulfills the requirement under se

322

Protein MAS NMR methodology and structural analysis of protein assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodological developments and applications of solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy, with particular emphasis on the analysis of protein structure, are described in this thesis. ...

Bayro, Marvin J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Towards a Pan-European property index : methodological opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the methodological opportunities of index construction for the Pan-European property index, whose release is planned by the company Investment Property Databank (IPD). To address the question of temporal ...

Helfer, Friederike, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Proposed Methodology for LEED Baseline Refrigeration Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This PowerPoint presentation summarizes a proposed methodology for LEED baseline refrigeration modeling. The presentation discusses why refrigeration modeling is important, the inputs of energy models, resources, reference building model cases, baseline model highlights, example savings calculations and results.

Deru, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Combining Modeling Methodologies for Improved Understanding of Smart Material Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining Modeling Methodologies for Improved Understanding of Smart Material Characteristics Material Systems and Structures February 2, 1998 ABSTRACT Smart materials are complex materials performance capabilities but the synergistic response of the smart material and companion structure. Behavior

Lindner, Douglas K.

326

A Methodology for Automated Verification of Rosetta Specification Transformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particular semantic vocabulary and modeling style. The following dissertation proposes a framework, semantics and methodology for automated verification of safety preservation over specification transformations between domains. Utilizing the ideas of lattice...

Lohoefener, Jennifer Lee

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

EXPLORATION Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013 President's Budget Request 3,821.2 3,712.8 3,932.8 4,076.5 4,076.5 4 Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013EXPLORATION EXP-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

328

Economic Methodology for South Texas Irrigation Projects - RGIDECON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology October 31, 2002 page 10 of 28 free component for time preference, a risk premium, and an inflation premium3 (Rister et al. 1999). The relationship between these three components is considered multiplicative (Leatham; Hamilton), i.e., the overall...TR-203 October 2002 Economic Methodology for South Texas Irrigation Projects – RGIDECON© M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell John R. C. Robinson John R. Ellis Allen W. Sturdivant Department of Agricultural Economics Texas Agricultural Experiment...

Ellis, John R.; Robinson, John R.C.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward

329

A methodological approach to the complexity measurement of software designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulffilment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Computer Science A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: Willi m M. L' (Co-Chair of C ittee...

Williams, Clay Edwin

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Economic and Financial Methodology for South Texas Irrigation Projects – RGIDECON©  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agencies; Debbie Helstrom, Jeff Walker, and Nick Palacios. These engineers with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) have provided valuable feedback on the methodology and data as well as insights on accommodating the requirements... and Financial Methodology August 2009 page 18 of 29 Helstrom, Debbie. Project Engineer, Texas Water Development Board, Austin, TX. Personal communications, Spring - Summer 2002. Infoplease.com. "Conversion Factors." ? 2002 Family Education Network. http...

Rister, M. Edward; Rogers, Callie S.; Lacewell, Ronald; Robinson, John; Ellis, John; Sturdivant, Allen

331

A methodology of mathematical models with an application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A METHODOLOGY OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS WITH AN APPLICATION A Thesis by RICHARD BRIAN WOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972... Major Subject: Mathematics A METHODOLOGY OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS WITH AN APPLICATION A Thesis by RICHARD BRIAN WOOD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1972 ABSTRACT A...

Wood, Richard Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Application of the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC Fire PRA Methodology to a DOE Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology to DOE facility presented several challenges. This paper documents the process and discusses several insights gained during development of the fire PRA. A brief review of the tasks performed is provided with particular focus on the following: • Tasks 5 and 14: Fire-induced risk model and fire risk quantification. A key lesson learned was to begin model development and quantification as early as possible in the project using screening values and simplified modeling if necessary. • Tasks 3 and 9: Fire PRA cable selection and detailed circuit failure analysis. In retrospect, it would have been beneficial to perform the model development and quantification in 2 phases with detailed circuit analysis applied during phase 2. This would have allowed for development of a robust model and quantification earlier in the project and would have provided insights into where to focus the detailed circuit analysis efforts. • Tasks 8 and 11: Scoping fire modeling and detailed fire modeling. More focus should be placed on detailed fire modeling and less focus on scoping fire modeling. This was the approach taken for the fire PRA. • Task 14: Fire risk quantification. Typically, multiple safe shutdown (SSD) components fail during a given fire scenario. Therefore dependent failure analysis is critical to obtaining a meaningful fire risk quantification. Dependent failure analysis for the fire PRA presented several challenges which will be discussed in the full paper.

Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Richard Yorg; Heather Lucek; Jim Bouchard; Ray Jukkola; Duan Phan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging with Motion Estimation and Liliana Borcea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Callaghan George Papanicolaou Abstract We introduce from first principles a synthetic aperture radar (SAR calibrated small apertures, (b) preliminary motion estimation from the data using the Wigner transform-band persistent surveillance SAR is a specific application that is covered by our analysis. Detailed numerical

Papanicolaou, George C.

334

A new methodology for determining recombination parameters using an RF photoconductance instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of minority-carrier lifetime in silicon wafers provide an effective technique for process control and device-physics optimization. For example, detailed measurements of minority-carrier lifetime vs. injection level can allow a nearly complete experimental optimization of a solar cell design and process. This extended abstract describes a methodology that allows this fully characterization by using a relatively simple RF photoconductance-decay tool. By analyzing the quasi-steady-state photoconductance as a function of incident light intensity, information corresponding to an I{sub sc}-V{sub oc} curve can be obtained from a non-contacted silicon wafer. This information is available at various stages during the solar cell fabrication process. The use of steady-state photoconductance instead of transient photoconductance makes use of simple electronics and light sources, yet it has the capability to measure lifetimes down into the 100 ns range.

Sinton, R.A.; Cuevas, A. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Estimating monthly and state-level NO sub x , SO sub 2 , VOC and CO sub 2 emissions using the MSCET database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Month and State Current Emission Trends (MSCET) database. It describes the methodology used to estimate NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC, and CO{sub 2} emissions and the data sources used by the methodology. Selected emissions results from the database are presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Cilek, C.M.; Kohout, E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Estimating monthly and state-level NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC and CO{sub 2} emissions using the MSCET database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Month and State Current Emission Trends (MSCET) database. It describes the methodology used to estimate NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC, and CO{sub 2} emissions and the data sources used by the methodology. Selected emissions results from the database are presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Cilek, C.M.; Kohout, E.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Recursive bias estimation for high dimensional smoothers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multivariate nonparametric analysis, sparseness of the covariates also called curse of dimensionality, forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to biased smoothers. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose to iteratively correct the bias initial estimator by an estimate of the latter obtained by smoothing the residuals. We examine in detail the convergence of the iterated procedure for classical smoothers and relate our procedure to L{sub 2}-Boosting. We apply our method to simulated and real data and show that our method compares favorably with existing procedures.

Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzner-lober, Eric [UHB, FRANCE; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

EXPERIMENT DETAILS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the Future of DOE Science WilliamEVDETAILS

340

E-Print Network 3.0 - association dataset methodological Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dataset methodological Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: association dataset methodological Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IOWA STATE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Clean Development Mechanism agricultural methodologies could help California to achieve AB 32 goals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agricultural methodologies could help California to achieveIts methodologies can help inform the implementation ofproject meth- odologies could help California realize its

Dinar, Ariel; Larson, Donald F; Frisbie, J. Aapris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator of the Generaland Douglas Miller, Maximum Entropy Econometrics, Wiley andCalifornia Davis MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators by

Paris, Quirino

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; - calculated separately for the most important radionuclides produced in nuclear weapons tests. Those would averages for all tests. 2. Provide a list of references regarding: (1) the history of nuclear weapons to the Population of the Continental U.S. from Nevada Weapons Tests and Estimates of Deposition Density

344

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River April 21,1994 TheTechnid Steering Panel of the Hanford - Environmental Dose Reconstruction than 40years, the U.S. Government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford

345

Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

Nollet, B. K.; Hvasta, M.; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

BARI, R.; ET AL.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A Methodology for the Neutronics Design of Space Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for the neutronics design of space power reactors is presented. This methodology involves balancing the competing requirements of having sufficient excess reactivity for the desired lifetime, keeping the reactor subcritical at launch and during submersion accidents, and providing sufficient control over the lifetime of the reactor. These requirements are addressed by three reactivity values for a given reactor design: the excess reactivity at beginning of mission, the negative reactivity at shutdown, and the negative reactivity margin in submersion accidents. These reactivity values define the control worth and the safety worth in submersion accidents, used for evaluating the merit of a proposed reactor type and design. The Heat Pipe-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters space reactor core design is evaluated and modified based on the proposed methodology. The final reactor core design has sufficient excess reactivity for 10 years of nominal operation at 1.82 MW of fission power and is subcritical at launch and in all water submersion accidents.

King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

Webinar: Guidance for Filling Out a Detailed H2A Production Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Guidance for Filling Out a Detailed H2A Production Case Study, originally presented on July 9, 2013.

351

River Corridor Cleanup Contract Fiscal Year 2006 Detailed Work Plan: DWP Summary, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This detailed work plan provides the scope, cost, and schedule for the Fiscal Year 2006 activities required to support River Corridor cleanup objectives within the directed guidance.

Project Integration

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - anatomically detailed mri-derived Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(e.g. grey matter). Small details Source: Duncan, James S. - Departments of Diagnostic Radiology & Electrical Engineering, Yale University Collection: Biology and Medicine Page:...

353

On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Centre Intégré de Cancérologie de la Montérégie, Hôpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact of different covariance data is studied by comparing two of the presently most complete nuclear data covariance libraries (ENDF/B-VII.1 and SCALE 6.0), which reveals a high dependency of the uncertainty estimates on the source of covariance data. The burn-up benchmark Exercise I-1b proposed by the OECD expert group "Benchmarks for Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) for the Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs" is studied as an example application. The burn-up simulations are performed with the SCALE 6.0 tool suite.

Carlos Javier Diez; Oliver Buss; Axel Hoefer; Dieter Porsch; Oscar Cabellos

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

DOE safety goals comparison using NUREG-1150 PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scope Level 3 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) including external events has been performed for N Reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) Category A production reactor. This four-year, multi-million dollar task was a joint effort by Westinghouse Hanford Company, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Technical lead in external events and NUREG-1150 methodology was provided by SNL. SAIC led the effort in the Level 1 analysis for the internally initiated events. Westinghouse Hanford supported the task in many key areas, such as data collection and interpretation, accident progression, system interaction, human factor analyses, expert elicitation, peers review, etc. The main objective of this Level 3 PRA are to assess the risks to the public and onsite workers posed by the operation of N Reactor, to identify modifications to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed DOE and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford and SNL for estimating individual health risks, and the comparison of the N Reactor results and DOE quantitative nuclear safety guidelines. This paper is devoted to DOE quantitative safety guidelines interpretation and comparison; the NRC safety objectives are also presented in order to compare N Reactor results to commercial nuclear power plants included in the NUREG-1150 study. 7 refs., 7 tabs.

Wang., O.S.; Zentner, M.D.; Rainey, T.E.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Expert opinion in risk analysis; The NUREG-1150 methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk analysis of nuclear power generation often requires the use of expert opinion to provide probabilistic inputs where other sources of information are unavailable or are not cost effective. In the Reactor Rise Reference Document (NUREG-1150), a methodology for the collection of expert opinion was developed. The resulting methodology presented by the author involves a ten-step process: selection of experts, selection of issues, preparation of issue statements, elicitation training, preparation of expert analyses by panel members, discussion of analyses, elicitation, recomposition and aggregation, and review by the panel members. These steps were implemented in a multiple meeting format that brought together experts from a variety of work places.

Hora, S.C.; Iman, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Numerical Methodology to Evaluate Fast Reactor Sodium Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, a numerical methodology for sodium combustion has been developed for the safety evaluation of a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor. The methodology includes a fast-running zone model computer program for safety evaluation, a field model program for multidimensional thermal hydraulics, and a chemical reaction analysis program based on chemical equilibrium theory. Two recently performed experiments have been analyzed using the computer programs, and the numerical results are in good agreement with the experiments. Although sodium combustion is a complex phenomenon, use of these computer programs gives better understanding of the coupled thermal hydraulics and chemical reaction.

Yamaguchi, Akira; Takata, Takashi; Okano, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program FY 2006. Benefits analysis : methodology and results - final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the approach to estimating benefits and the analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identification of technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 05 the Heavy Vehicles program activity expanded its technical involvement to more broadly address various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. This broadening of focus has continued in the activities planned for FY 06. These changes are the result of a planning effort that occurred during FY 04 and 05. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. These benefits estimates, along with market penetrations and other results, are then modeled as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY06 Budget Request.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Use of Cost Estimating Relationships  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference 2008 Pledges: Methodology and Assumptions Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2008 Washington International Renewable Energy Conference (WIREC) was held in Washington, D.C., from March 4-6, 2008, and involved nearly 9,000 people from 125 countries. The event brought together worldwide leaders in renewable energy (RE) from governments, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to discuss the role that renewables can play in alleviating poverty, growing economies, and passing on a healthy planet to future generations. The conference concluded with more than 140 governments, international organizations, and private-sector representatives pledging to advance the uptake of renewable energy. The U.S. government authorized the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the carbon dioxide (CO2) savings that would result from the pledges made at the 2008 conference. This report describes the methodology and assumptions used by NREL in quantifying the potential CO2 reductions derived from those pledges.

Babiuch, B.; Bilello, D. E.; Cowlin, S. C.; Mann, M.; Wise, A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MRI based diffusion and perfusion predictive model to estimate stroke Stephen E. Rosea,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MRI based diffusion and perfusion predictive model to estimate stroke evolution Stephen E. Rosea and perfusion images acquired in the acute stage of stroke. The validity of this methodology was tested on novel patient data including data acquired from an independent stroke clinic. Regions-of-interest (ROIs

McLachlan, Geoff

362

ESTIMATING BIODIVERSITY OF DRY FORESTS AND CORAL REEFS WITH HYPERPECTRAL DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATING BIODIVERSITY OF DRY FORESTS AND CORAL REEFS WITH HYPERPECTRAL DATA: A NASA EPSCOR effective biodiversity assessment methodologies for a gradient of Neotropical habitats from coastal marine is to develop remote-sensing derived surrogates of biodiversity that are applicable across different ecosystems

Gilbes, Fernando

363

Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary focus of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project is to develop a flexible methodology for setting target guidelines with which to assess energy efficiency in commercial building design. The proposed methodology has several innovative features. In this report, the authors document their work to define the software development concepts upon which the overall Targets methodology will be based. Three task reports are included here. Development of the user interface--that critical connection through which the human end-user (architect, engineer, planner, owner) will apply the methodology--is described in Section 2. In Section 3, the use of the software engineering process in Targets model development efforts is described. Section 4 provides details on the data and system integration task, in which interactions between and among all the major components, termed modules, of the Targets model were examined to determine how to put them together to create a methodology that is effective and easy to use. 4 refs., 26 figs.

Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); Hall, J.D. (Deringer Group, Riva, MD (USA)); Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., New York, NY (USA)); McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA)); Alley, P.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Estimating Corn Grain Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can collect samples from a corn field and use this data to calculate the yield estimate. An interactive grain yield calculator is provided in the Appendix of the pdf version of this publication. The calculator is also located in the publication.... Plan and prepare for sample and data collection. 2. Collect field samples and record data. 3. Analyze the data using the interactive grain yield calculator in the Appendix. Plan and prepare for sample and data collection Predetermine sample locations...

Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Range-separated density-functional theory with random phase approximation: Detailed formalism and illustrative applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range-separated density-functional theory with random phase approximation: Detailed formalism-body theory, we present the details of a formally exact adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation density-functional´an, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 096404 (2009). Range-separated density-functional theory approaches combining

Boyer, Edmond

366

New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ted #12;Scambos of the NSIDC produced detailed ice loss maps from 2001 to 2009 for the main tributaryNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane UMBC (410) 455-5793 alane@umbc.edu Katherine Leitzell National Snow and Ice Data Center University

Cambridge, University of

367

Topological Reconstruction of Complex 3D Buildings and Automatic Extraction of Levels of Detail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and outdoor topology of a detailed 3D building model from its geometry and to extract different levelsTopological Reconstruction of Complex 3D Buildings and Automatic Extraction of Levels of Detail A is needed for most of the applications using 3D building models after the architects design it. While

Boyer, Edmond

368

EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy EconoGrid is a detailed simulation model, implemented in SLX1 , of a grid compute economy that implements selected of users. In a grid compute economy, computing resources are sold to users in a market where price

369

Cyclic Testing of Concrete-Filled Circular Steel Bridge Piers having Encased Fixed-Based Detail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyclic Testing of Concrete-Filled Circular Steel Bridge Piers having Encased Fixed-Based Detail elements during earthquakes, this paper reports on cyclic inelastic tests executed to determine the maximum strength and ductility of four concrete-filled circular steel piers joined to a foundation detail proposed

Bruneau, Michel

370

Evaluation of Location-Specific Predictions by a Detailed Simulation Model of Aedes aegypti Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Location-Specific Predictions by a Detailed Simulation Model of Aedes aegypti Buster is a stochastic, spatially explicit simulation model of Aedes aegypti populations, designed of Location-Specific Predictions by a Detailed Simulation Model of Aedes aegypti Populations. PLoS ONE 6(7): e

Lloyd, Alun

371

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations. Many of the technologies on the list were in fact used during the characterization of Yucca Mountain and elsewhere by LBNL personnel. The study also includes emerging technologies and identifies the need to develop better estimation of important parameters for repository siting. Notable emerging technologies include 3-D seismic and satellite-based remote sensing and wireless micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors. They enable cost-effective and ubiquitous monitoring to be applied for site characterization. We list and classify the types of uncertainties involved in site characterization. Uncertainties can exist in all aspects of site characterization: data, interpretation, conceptualization, and modeling. We use the Swedish program to exemplify such uncertainties. We also devote a chapter on geochemical issues regarding the interaction between groundwater and natural and engineered barrier materials. A recommendation has been made to take advantage of the recent advancement in geochemical modeling capabilities in natural systems. Although it is not of immediate relevance at the preliminary investigation stage, it serves as a good reminder that geochemical investigation efforts should not be overlooked at any stage in the repository program. We construct a synthetic preliminary-investigation site based on an extensive data set available from a geoscientific project in Japan, which we use as a 'real' site to evaluate uncertainties resulting from hydrogeological modeling and examine strategies for characterizing a new site. We plan various preliminary-investigation configurations and conduct preliminary numerical investigations at the synthetic site. We construct a model of the 'real' site for each PI configuration, make predictions of particle travel times, and compare against the 'real' data obtained from the 'real' model. We conclude that drilling as many as nine boreholes does not necessarily improve the understanding of the site compared to drilling as few as three boreholes, unless there is an underlying structure that is larger than the spacing of the boreholes. The

Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

MOUNTAIN WEATHER PREDICTION: PHENOMENOLOGICAL CHALLENGES AND FORECAST METHODOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOUNTAIN WEATHER PREDICTION: PHENOMENOLOGICAL CHALLENGES AND FORECAST METHODOLOGY Michael P. Meyers of the American Meteorological Society Mountain Weather and Forecasting Monograph Draft from Friday, May 21, 2010 of weather analysis and forecasting in complex terrain with special emphasis placed on the role of humans

Steenburgh, Jim

373

A Polygon-based Methodology for Mining Related Spatial Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as countries, and in that they can be used for the modeling of spatial events, such as air pollution. MoreoverA Polygon-based Methodology for Mining Related Spatial Datasets Sujing Wang, Chun-Sheng Chen clusters. This paper claims that polygon analysis is particularly useful for mining related, spatial

Eick, Christoph F.

374

Introduction Data Methodology Liquidity Hoarding in the Interbank Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Armantier & Copeland, 2012) · Or transactions from only a part of the market (eMid) · Secured lendingIntroduction Data Methodology Liquidity Hoarding in the Interbank Market: Evidence from Mexican Interbank Overnight Loan and Repo Transactions Marco J. van der Leij1 Seraf´in Mart´inez-Jaramillo2 Jos

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

375

Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in European Seas A. M offshore is generally larger than at geographically nearby onshore sites, which can offset the higher installation, operation and maintenance costs associated with offshore wind parks. Successful offshore wind

Pryor, Sara C.

377

PROJECT SELF-EVALUATION METHODOLOGY: THE HEALTHREATS PROJECT CASE STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT SELF-EVALUATION METHODOLOGY: THE HEALTHREATS PROJECT CASE STUDY Martin Znidarsic1 , Marko presents an approach to self-evaluation in collaborative research projects. The approach is taken from a case study of the project Healthreats, where it is used in practice. Aims and focuses of self

Bohanec, Marko

378

A methodology for simultaneous modeling and control of chemical processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feedback Control System The Methodology IV APPLICATION TO A TEXTBOOK PROBLEM IMC Controller Structure RLS Algorithm Design Method. Linear Model Description . Simulation with Different Initial System Output Values . . . . Simulation with Different... and Initial System Output Values. Simulation with Different Disturbance Gains. . . . VI CASE STUDY: APPLICATION OF THIS FEEDBACK SYSTEM TO A TENNESSEE EASTMAN TESTBED PROBLEM, . . . Problem Description. Reactor Control and Process Identification. VII...

Zeng, Tong

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Navigocorpus: A Database for Shipping Information A Methodological and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Maritime History XXIII, 2 (2011) 241-262" #12;Jean-Pierre Dedieu, et al. the database on-line beginningNavigocorpus: A Database for Shipping Information ­ A Methodological and Technical Introduction and stored them in databases which are generally organized according to the nature of the sources used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

RETI Resource Valuation Methodology Cost of Generation Calculator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) · Cost of equity investment in capital · Cost of financing capital · Taxes, including investmentRETI Resource Valuation Methodology Cost of Generation Calculator The Cost of Generation Calculator determines the levelized cost of generating power over the life of the resource, and is an input

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

SOC Testing Methodology and Practice Cheng-Wen Wu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOC Testing Methodology and Practice Cheng-Wen Wu Department of Electrical Engineering National- troller chip we practice a novel SOC test integration plat- form, solving real problems in test scheduling, test IO reduc- tion, timing of functional test, scan IO sharing, embedded memory built-in self-test

Boyer, Edmond

383

Numerical Optimization Methodology for the Design of Power Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health effects from overhead power line conductors [6,7]. Even though no conclusive evidence has been of utility companies have been involved in a redesign of their overhead transmission lines to avoid potentialNumerical Optimization Methodology for the Design of Power Equipment Gaurav Tewari* My M. Hua

Mamishev, Alexander

384

Does help help? Introducing the Bayesian Evaluation and Assessment methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does help help? Introducing the Bayesian Evaluation and Assessment methodology Joseph E. Beck1--and how--help helps students has not been a well studied problem in the ITS community. In this paper we present three approaches for evaluating the efficacy of the Reading Tutor's help: creating experimental

Mostow, Jack

385

A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL ENGINES 1 Gianluca Zito ,2 Ioan is illustrated by means of an automotive case study, namely a variable geometry turbocharged diesel engine identification procedure is illustrated. In section 3 a diesel engine system, used to test the procedure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

Architecture Rationalization: A Methodology for Architecture Verifiability, Traceability and Completeness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architecture Rationalization: A Methodology for Architecture Verifiability, Traceability-mail: {atang, jhan}@it.swin.edu.au Abstract Architecture modeling is practiced extensively in the software of architecture designs. Deficiencies in any of these three areas in an architecture model can be costly and risky

Han, Jun

387

Methodology to quantify leaks in aerosol sampling system components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and that approach was used to measure the sealing integrity of a CAM and two kinds of filter holders. The methodology involves use of sulfur hexafluoride as a tracer gas with the device being tested operated under dynamic flow conditions. The leak rates...

Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

Chang, Shen-Lin (Woodridge, IL); Lottes, Steven A. (Naperville, IL); Zhou, Chenn Q. (Munster, IN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Implementing an ICE: A methodology for the design, development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing an ICE: A methodology for the design, development and installation of Interactive for the design, development and implementation of ICEs (Interactive Collaborative Environments) in real world with the Edinburgh Napier ICE, a multi-user, multi-surface, multi-touch blended interaction digitally augmented space

Deussen, Oliver

390

Problems addressed in this course Teaching methodology, material, exams, contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The first look at a genome - Sequence analysis Bioinformatics - Lecture 1 Louis Wehenkel Department. The first look at a genome - Sequence analysis Problems addressed in this course Teaching methodology, material, exams, contacts Chapter 1. The first look at a genome - Sequence analysis Introduction

Wehenkel, Louis

391

SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.6 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 Crosscutting Space Tech Development 120.4 187.7 293.8 272.1 266.6 259.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE

392

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stress estimation- Part 3: hydraulic fracturing (HF) and /orHayashi, K. 1999. Hydraulic fracturing reopening pressureobtained primarily from hydraulic fracturing tests performed

Karasaki, Kenzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A Layered Architecture for Describing Information System Development Methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the development process such as requirements engineering, while others cover the whole system development life cycle. Some include project management and estimation techniques while others focus only

Han, Jun

394

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XI; Recommendations on the Design and Analysis of Radiotelemetry Studies of Salmonid Smolts to Estimate Survival and Passage Efficiencies, 1991-1998 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the feasibility of extracting detailed survival and passage efficiency estimates from a properly designed smolt radiotelemetry study.

Skalski, John R. (University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Fisheries Research Institute, Seattle, WA); Giorgi, Albert E.; Stevenson, John R. (BioAnalysts, Inc., Redmond, WA)

1998-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Freedom car and vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2007 benefits analysis, methodology and results -- final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 05 the Heavy Vehicles program activity expanded its technical involvement to more broadly address various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. This broadening of focus has continued in subsequent activities. These changes are the result of a planning effort that occurred during FY 04 and 05. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY07 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the FCVT program for internal project management purposes.

SIngh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation has been used, as common practice, to estimate the CO2 storage capacity of depleted reservoirs. However, this method is time consuming, expensive and requires detailed input data. This investigation proposes an analytical method...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor and shield masses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple mathematical model (RSMASS) has been developed to provide rapid estimates of reactor and shield masses for space-based reactor power systems. Approximations are used rather than correlations or detailed calculations to estimate the reactor fuel mass and the masses of the moderator, structure, reflector, pressure vessel, miscellaneous components, and the reactor shield. The fuel mass is determined either by neutronics limits, thermal/hydraulic limits, or fuel damage limits, whichever yields the largest mass. RSMASS requires the reactor power and energy, 24 reactor parameters, and 20 shield parameters to be specified. This parametric approach should be applicable to a very broad range of reactor types. Reactor and shield masses calculated by RSMASS were found to be in good agreement with the masses obtained from detailed calculations.

Marshall, A.C.; Aragon, J.; Gallup, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Drift design methodology and preliminary application for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excavation stability in an underground nuclear waste repository is required during construction, emplacement, retrieval (if required), and closure phases to ensure worker health and safety, and to prevent development of potential pathways for radionuclide migration in the post-closure period. Stable excavations are developed by appropriate excavation procedures, design of the room shape, design and installation of rock support reinforcement systems, and implementation of appropriate monitoring and maintenance programs. In addition to the loads imposed by the in situ stress field, the repository drifts will be impacted by thermal loads developed after waste emplacement and, periodically, by seismic loads from naturally occurring earthquakes and underground nuclear events. A priori evaluation of stability is required for design of the ground support system, to confirm that the thermal loads are reasonable, and to support the license application process. In this report, a design methodology for assessing drift stability is presented. This is based on site conditions, together with empirical and analytical methods. Analytical numerical methods are emphasized at this time because empirical data are unavailable for excavations in welded tuff either at elevated temperatures or under seismic loads. The analytical methodology incorporates analysis of rock masses that are systematically jointed, randomly jointed, and sparsely jointed. In situ thermal and seismic loads are considered. Methods of evaluating the analytical results and estimating ground support requirements for all the full range of expected ground conditions are outlines. The results of a preliminary application of the methodology using the limited available data are presented. 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Hardy, M.P. [Agapito (J.F.T.) and Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Bauer, S.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=EERE-2014-BT-STD...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

http:www.regulations.govdocumentDetail;DEERE-2014-BT-STD-0031-0002 EERE-2014-BT-STD-0031-0002 spreadsheet Sheet "Summary Switching" - Before ME1 19421032v.1 http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Proof Details for "Performance Analysis of Godard-Based Blind Channel Identification"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Proof Details for "Performance Analysis of Godard-Based Blind Channel Identification" Philip) The bulk of the proof is spent analyzing the righthand term above. E ^^h(0) i - ^h(0) i 2 2 = E ^^h(0) i 2

Schniter, Philip

402

INITIATIVE MOBILE APPS DEVELOPMENT Description and details about the program or initiative that is being proposed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INITIATIVE ­ MOBILE APPS DEVELOPMENT Description and details about the program or initiative using mobile technologies. Adoption of these technologies will allow UWM to communicate with students university vision? What guiding values are applied? Access: Mobile technologies provide more options

Saldin, Dilano

403

Embedding methods for massing and detail design in computer generated design of skyscrapers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a new digital system to construct the massing and details of skyscrapers. It extracts underlying rules and design conventions from significant projects in contemporary skyscraper design practice. These ...

Chen, Shouheng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

School of Electrical & Computer Engineering -Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Computer Engineering - Undergraduate (continued) 2010 Employment Employer Title City State General Motors2010 School of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail Engineering undergraduate students from the Class of 2010. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison

Lipson, Michal

405

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Keywords: Methyl decanoate; Methyl decenoate; Surrogate; Oxidation; Biodiesel fuels; Kinetic modeling; Engine; Low

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

406

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed 19, 2012 (received for review July 22, 2012) Emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles composition, mass distribu- tion, and organic aerosol formation potential of emissions from gasoline

Silver, Whendee

407

Detailed mining study phase 3: Saba Yoi lignite deposit. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study, conducted by John T. Boyd Company, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand. The report presents Phase 3 of the feasibility study conducted for the development of the Saba Yoi Coal Mine. The study focuses on technical issues related to the development of the project including geological data and detailed mine development and scheduling. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) General Statement; (2) Summarized Findings; (3) Background; (4) Geology and Resources; (5) Geotechnical/Hydrogeological; (6) Detailed Mine Development; (7) Detailed Mine Production Scheduling; (8) Detailed Mine Analysis; (9) Mine Development and Facilities; (10) Mine Labor and Wages; and (11) Project Economics.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and against the SenseWear, a dedicated commercial product for energy expenditure estimation. Keywords: humanEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

Lu?trek, Mitja

409

A methodology to quantify the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry casks during security-related scenarios.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing the risk to the public and the environment from a release of radioactive material produced by accidental or purposeful forces/environments is an important aspect of the regulatory process in many facets of the nuclear industry. In particular, the transport and storage of radioactive materials is of particular concern to the public, especially with regard to potential sabotage acts that might be undertaken by terror groups to cause injuries, panic, and/or economic consequences to a nation. For many such postulated attacks, no breach in the robust cask or storage module containment is expected to occur. However, there exists evidence that some hypothetical attack modes can penetrate and cause a release of radioactive material. This report is intended as an unclassified overview of the methodology for release estimation as well as a guide to useful resource data from unclassified sources and relevant analysis methods for the estimation process.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Luna, Robert Earl

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

An assessment of current and proposed methodologies for estimating effective dose equivalent from non-uniform external photon radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

voluntarily from various nuclear power plants throughout the United States were used. The data were analyzed with respect to the current practice of assigning the highest whole body multibadging dosimeter reading as the dose of record pursuant to 10 CFR (Code...

Hay, Michael Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Using Decline Curve Analysis, Volumetric Analysis, and Bayesian Methodology to Quantify Uncertainty in Shale Gas Reserve Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. [ ( ) ] .................................................................................. (4) In Eq. (4), ? is a dimensionless exponent parameter and ? is the characteristic time parameter, months. Can and Kabir (2012) analyzed production data from 820 wells from three different shale formations (220 wells in the Bakken oil shale...

Gonzalez Jimenez, Raul 1988-

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Implementation impacts of PRL methodology. [PRL (Plutonium Recovery Limit)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department's previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Enzyme and methodology for the treatment of a biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enzyme isolated from an extremophilic microbe, and a method for utilizing same is described, and wherein the enzyme displays optimum enzymatic activity at a temperature of greater than about 80.degree. C., and a pH of less than about 2, and further may be useful in methodology including pretreatment of a biomass so as to facilitate the production of an end product.

Thompson, Vicki S.; Thompson, David N.; Schaller, Kastli D.; Apel, William A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Communicating about feminism and implementing feminist practices in research methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

illustrate the power that the negative stigma surrounding feminism has on individuals. Even many people who support feminist values feel the need to separate themselves from the feminist movement by refusing to call themselves "feminists. " Although... researchers advocate other methodological changes that make thc rcscarch process more consistent with feminist values. They oflen find the imbalance of power that exists between the researcher and research participants to be one of the most serious problems...

Barnard, Megan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A General Methodology for Designing Self-Organizing Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our technologies complexify our environments. Thus, new technologies need to deal with more and more complexity. Several efforts have been made to deal with this complexity using the concept of self-organization. However, in order to promote its use and understanding, we must first have a pragmatic understanding of complexity and self-organization. This paper presents a conceptual framework for speaking about self-organizing systems. The aim is to provide a methodology useful for designing and controlling systems developed to solve complex problems. First, practical notions of complexity and self-organization are given. Then, starting from the agent metaphor, a conceptual framework is presented. This provides formal ways of speaking about "satisfaction" of elements and systems. The main premise of the methodology claims that reducing the "friction" or "interference" of interactions between elements of a system will result in a higher "satisfaction" of the system, i.e. better performance. The methodology discusses different ways in which this can be achieved. A case study on self-organizing traffic lights illustrates the ideas presented in the paper.

Carlos Gershenson

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

416

Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversary's task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Anisotropic mesh adaptation for solution of finite element problems using hierarchical edge-based error estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new technology for generating meshes minimizing the interpolation and discretization errors or their gradients. The key element of this methodology is construction of a space metric from edge-based error estimates. For a mesh with N{sub h} triangles, the error is proportional to N{sub h}{sup -1} and the gradient of error is proportional to N{sub h}{sup -1/2} which are optimal asymptotics. The methodology is verified with numerical experiments.

Lipnikov, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Agouzal, Abdellatif [UNIV DE LYON; Vassilevski, Yuri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this independent review will permit NREL and DOE to better understand the credibility of the TIAX cost estimation process and to implement changes in future cost analyses, if necessary. The Team found the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells to be reasonable and, using 2005 cell stack technology and assuming production of 500,000 units per year, to have calculated a credible cost of $108/kW.

Wheeler, D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

El-Bassioni, A.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Estimating Externalities of Coal Fuel Cycles, Report 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The agreement between the US DOE and the EC established the specific objectives of the study: (a) to develop a methodological framework that uses existing data and models to quantify the external costs and benefits of energy; (b) to demonstrate the application of the framework to estimate the externalities of the coal, biomass, oil, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, photovoltaic, and wind fuel cycles (by agreement with the EC, the US addressed the first six of these); and (c) to identify major gaps in the availability of information to quantify impacts, damages, benefits, and externalities of fuel cycles; and to suggest priorities for future research. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities, and a better method for estimating them.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Steel-framed buildings: Impacts of wall detail configurations on the whole wall thermal performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is the influence of architectural wall details on the whole wall thermal performance. Whole wall thermal performance analysis was performed for six light gage steel-framed wall systems (some with wood components). For each wall system, all wall details were simulated using calibrated 3-D finite difference computer modeling. The thermal performance of the six steel-framed wall systems included various system details and the whole wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house. Currently, predicted heat losses through building walls are typically based on measurements of the wall system clear wall area using test methods such as ASTM C 236 or are calculated by one of the procedures recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals that often is carried out for the clear wall area exclusively. In this paper, clear wall area is defined as the part of the wall system that is free of thermal anomalies due to building envelope details or thermally unaffected by intersections with other surfaces of the building envelope. Clear wall experiments or calculations normally do not include the effects of building envelope details such as corners, window and door openings, and structural intersections with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In steel-framed wall systems, these details typically consist of much more structural components than the clear wall. For this situation, the thermal properties measured or calculated for the clear wall area do not adequately represent the total wall system thermal performance. Factors that would impact the ability of today`s standard practice to accurately predict the total wall system thermal performance are the accuracy of the calculation methods, the area of the total wall that is clear wall, and the quantity and thermal performance of the various wall system details.

Kosny, J.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Methodology for Frequency Domain Analysis of Wave Energy Converters with Periodically Varying Physical of Mechanical Engineering) ABSTRACT Within a wave energy converter's operational bandwidth, device operation

Victoria, University of

425

Analysis Methodology for Large Organizations' Investments in Energy Retrofit of Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a formal methodology that supports large organizations' investments in energy retrofit of buildings. The methodology is a scalable modeling approach based on normative models and Bayesian calibration. Normative models are a light...

Heo, Y.; Augenbroe, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

An integrated methodology for the performance and reliability evaluation of fault-tolerant systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a new methodology for the integrated performance and reliability evaluation of embedded fault-tolerant systems used in aircraft, space, tactical, and automotive applications. This methodology uses a ...

Domínguez-García, Alejandro D. (Alejandro Dan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

An Experimental Methodology to Evaluate Concept Generation Procedures Based on Quantitative Lifecycle Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents an experimental methodology to measure how concept generation procedures can affect the anticipated lifecycle performance of engineering systems design concepts. The methodology is based on objective ...

Cardin, Michel-Alexandre

428

System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After;System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing

de Weck, Olivier L.

429

Methodology for the Determination of Potential Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a methodology to determine potential energy savings of buildings with limited information. This methodology is based upon the simplified energy analysis procedure of heating, ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems...

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A methodology for in-situ calibration of steam boiler instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a broadly useful diagnostic methodology to engineers and plant managers for finding the in-situ operating characteristics of power plant boilers when metered data is either missing or obviously erroneous. The methodology is able...

Wei, Guanghua

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The potential for reducing carbon emissions from increased efficiency : a general equilibrium methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a methodology for analyzing the potential for reduction in carbon emissions through increased fuel efficiency and provides an illustration of the method. The methodology employed is a multisectoral, ...

Blitzer, Charles R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Demonstration Integrated Knowledge-Based System for Estimating Human Error Probabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is currently comprised of at least 40 different methods that are used to analyze, predict, and evaluate human performance in probabilistic terms. Systematic HRAs allow analysts to examine human-machine relationships, identify error-likely situations, and provide estimates of relative frequencies for human errors on critical tasks, highlighting the most beneficial areas for system improvements. Unfortunately, each of HRA's methods has a different philosophical approach, thereby producing estimates of human error probabilities (HEPs) that area better or worse match to the error likely situation of interest. Poor selection of methodology, or the improper application of techniques can produce invalid HEP estimates, where that erroneous estimation of potential human failure could have potentially severe consequences in terms of the estimated occurrence of injury, death, and/or property damage.

Auflick, Jack L.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Implementation of the PR&PP methodology: the role of formal expert elicitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the methodology developed by the GenIV International Forum's (GIF's) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group is an expert elicitation. Although the framework of the methodology is structured and systematic, it does not by itself constitute or require a formal elicitation. However, formal elicitation can be utilized in the PR&PP context to provide a systematic, credible and transparent qualitative analysis and develop input for quantitative analyses. This section provides an overview of expert elicitations, a discussion of the role formal expert elicitations can play in the PR&PP methodology, an outline of the formal expert elicitation process and a brief practical guide to conducting formal expert elicitations. Expert elicitation is a process utilizing knowledgeable people in cases, for example, when an assessment is needed but physically based data is absent or open to interpretation. More specifically, it can be used to: (1) predict future events; (2) provide estimates on new, rare, complex or poorly understood phenomena; (3) integrate or interpret existing information; or (4) determine what is currently known, how well it is known or what is worth learning in a field. Expert elicitation can be informal or formal. The informal application of expert judgment is frequently used. Although it can produce good results, it often provides demonstrably biased or otherwise flawed answers to problems. This along with the absence of transparency can result in a loss of confidence when experts speak on issues. More formal expert elicitation is a structured process that makes use of people knowledgeable in certain areas to make assessments. The reason for advocating formal use is that the quality and accuracy of expert judgment comes from the completeness of the expert's understanding of the phenomena and the process used to elicit and analyze the data. The use of a more formal process to obtain, lU1derstand and analyze expert judgment has led to an improved acceptance of expert judgment because of the rigor and transparency of the results.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for each spectral group. For a given isotope, the source spectrum is folded with the response for each group. The summed contribution from all isotopes determines the total dose from the RAM in the container.

Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

Monte Carol-based validation of neutronic methodology for EBR-II analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous-energy Monte Carlo code VIM (Ref. 1) has been validated extensively over the years against fast critical experiments and other neutronic analysis codes. A high degree of confidence in VIM for predicting reactor physics parameters has been firmly established. This paper presents a numerical validation of two conventional multigroup neutronic analysis codes, DIF3D (Ref. 4) and VARIANT (Ref. 5), against VIM for two Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) core loadings in detailed three-dimensional hexagonal-z geometry. The DIF3D code is based on nodal diffusion theory, and it is used in calculations for day-today reactor operations, whereas the VARIANT code is based on nodal transport theory and is used with increasing frequency for specific applications. Both DIF3D and VARIANT rely on multigroup cross sections generated from ENDF/B-V by the ETOE-2/MC[sup 2]-II/SDX (Ref. 6) code package. Hence, this study also validates the multigroup cross-section processing methodology against the continuous-energy approach used in VIM.

Liaw, J.R.; Finck, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation by Mitch A. Clement entitled: A Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation written by Mitch A) A Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation Thesis directed by Professor

438

Application of life cycle assessment methodology at Ontario Hydro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ontario Hydro is an electrical utility located in Ontario, Canada. In 1995, Ontario Hydro adopted Sustainable Energy Development Policy and Principles that include the governing principle: {open_quotes}Ontario Hydro will integrate environmental and social factors into its planning, decision-making, and business practices.{close_quotes} Life cycle assessment was identified as a useful tool for evaluating environmental impacts of products and processes in support of decision-making. Ontario Hydro has developed a methodology for life cycle assessment (LCA) that is consistent with generally accepted practices, practical, and suitable for application in Ontario Hydro Business Units. The methodology is based on that developed by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) but follows a pragmatic and somewhat simplified approach. In scoping an LCA, the breadth and depth of analysis are compatible with and sufficient to address the stated goal of the study. The depth of analysis is tied to (i) the dollar value of the commodity, process or activity being assessed, (ii) the degree of freedom available to the assessor to make meaningful choices among options, and (iii) the importance of the environmental or technological issues leading to the evaluation. A pilot study was completed to apply the methodology to an LCA of the light vehicle fleet (cars, vans and light pick-up trucks) at Ontario Hydro. The objective of the LCA was to compare the life cycle impacts of alternative vehicle fuel cycles: gasoline, diesel, natural gas, propane, and alcohol; with particular focus on life cycle emissions, efficiency and cost. The study concluded that for large vehicles (1/2 ton and 3/4 ton) that travel more than 35000 km/year, natural gas and propane fuelling offer both cost reduction and emissions reduction when compared to gasoline vehicles.

Reuber, B.; Khan, A. [Ontario Hydro, Ontario (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

A methodology for evaluating ``new`` technologies in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As obsolescence and spare parts issues drive nuclear power plants to upgrade with new technology (such as optical fiber communication systems), the ability of the new technology to withstand stressors present where it is installed needs to be determined. In particular, new standards may be required to address qualification criteria and their application to the nuclear power plants of tomorrow. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber optic communication systems, and suggests a methodology for identifying when accelerated aging should be performed during qualification testing.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Holcomb, D.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Photovoltaic-system costing-methodology development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented are the results of a study to expand the use of standardized costing methodologies in the National Photovoltaics Program. The costing standards, which include SAMIS for manufacturing costs and M and D for marketing and distribution costs, have been applied to concentrator collectors and power-conditioning units. The M and D model was also computerized. Finally, a uniform construction cost-accounting structure was developed for use in photovoltaic test and application projects. The appendices contain example cases which demonstrate the use of the models.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methodology and Analysis Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,Information Administration390 2.387 2.372Methodology and

442

Methodology to Quantify Non-Program Savings Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovation Portal BiomassUsingDataMethodology to

443

A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

POINTWISE ESTIMATES AND MONOTONICITY FORMULAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POINTWISE ESTIMATES AND MONOTONICITY FORMULAS WITHOUT MAXIMUM PRINCIPLE MARCELO MONTENEGRO;2 MARCELO MONTENEGRO AND ENRICO VALDINOCI In this paper, a central role will be played by the following

445

Linear Constrained Moving Horizon Estimator With Pre-Estimating Observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the literature, e.g. Rao et al. (2001, 2003); Alessandri et al. (2003, 2004). The idea of MHE is to estimate of robustness in the presence of uncertainties such as noise, disturbances and modeling errors, see Alessandri in the literature, e.g. Rao et al. (2001, 2003); Alessandri et al. (2003, 2004). The pre-estimator leads

Johansen, Tor Arne

446

Parameter Estimation of Gravitational Waves from Precessing BH-NS Inspirals with higher harmonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precessing black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries produce a rich gravitational wave signal, encoding the binary's nature and inspiral kinematics. Using the lalinference\\_mcmc Markov-chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation code, we use two fiducial examples to illustrate how the geometry and kinematics are encoded into the modulated gravitational wave signal, using coordinates well-adapted to precession. Even for precessing binaries, we show the performance of detailed parameter estimation can be estimated by "effective" estimates: comparisons of a prototype signal with its nearest neighbors, adopting a fixed sky location and idealized two-detector network. We use detailed and effective approaches to show higher harmonics provide nonzero but small local improvement when estimating the parameters of precessing BH-NS binaries. That said, we show higher harmonics can improve parameter estimation accuracy for precessing binaries ruling out approximately-degenerate source orientations. Our work illustrates quantities gravitational wave measurements can provide, such as reliable component masses and the precise orientation of a precessing short gamma ray burst progenitor relative to the line of sight. "Effective" estimates may provide a simple way to estimate trends in the performance of parameter estimation for generic precessing BH-NS binaries in next-generation detectors. For example, our results suggest that the orbital chirp rate, precession rate, and precession geometry are roughly-independent observables, defining natural variables to organize correlations in the high-dimensional BH-NS binary parameter space.

R. O'Shaughnessy; B. Farr; E. Ochsner; H. S. Cho; V. Raymond; C. Kim; C. H. Lee

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Frequency tracking and parameter estimation for robust quantum state estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of tracking the state of a quantum system via a continuous weak measurement. If the system Hamiltonian is known precisely, this merely requires integrating the appropriate stochastic master equation. However, even a small error in the assumed Hamiltonian can render this approach useless. The natural answer to this problem is to include the parameters of the Hamiltonian as part of the estimation problem, and the full Bayesian solution to this task provides a state estimate that is robust against uncertainties. However, this approach requires considerable computational overhead. Here we consider a single qubit in which the Hamiltonian contains a single unknown parameter. We show that classical frequency estimation techniques greatly reduce the computational overhead associated with Bayesian estimation and provide accurate estimates for the qubit frequency.

Ralph, Jason F. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Jacobs, Kurt [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts at Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, Massachusetts 02125 (United States); Hill, Charles D. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Detailed Analysis of Urban Station Siting for California Hydrogen Highway Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.energy.ca.gov/gasoline/gasoline_stations/index.html.estimates range from 10% of existing gasoline stations to30% of gasoline stations. Two of the studies[7,8] further

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part II: Methodological guidance for a better practice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We perform a critical review of 222 LCA studies of solid waste management systems. • We analyse the past LCA practice against the ISO standard and ILCD Handbook guidance. • Malpractices exist in many methodological aspects with large variations among studies. • Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. • We provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs.

Laurent, Alexis, E-mail: alau@dtu.dk [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Clavreul, Julie [Residual Resources Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bernstad, Anna [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bakas, Ioannis [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Niero, Monia [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); ECO – Ecosystems and Environmental Sustainability, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Gentil, Emmanuel [Copenhagen Resource Institute, 1215 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Residual Resources Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hauschild, Michael Z. [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Methodology and Process for Condition Assessment at Existing Hydropower Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower Advancement Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop and implement a systematic process with a standard methodology to identify the opportunities of performance improvement at existing hydropower facilities and to predict and trend the overall condition and improvement opportunity within the U.S. hydropower fleet. The concept of performance for the HAP focuses on water use efficiency how well a plant or individual unit converts potential energy to electrical energy over a long-term averaging period of a year or more. The performance improvement involves not only optimization of plant dispatch and scheduling but also enhancement of efficiency and availability through advanced technology and asset upgrades, and thus requires inspection and condition assessment for equipment, control system, and other generating assets. This paper discusses the standard methodology and process for condition assessment of approximately 50 nationwide facilities, including sampling techniques to ensure valid expansion of the 50 assessment results to the entire hydropower fleet. The application and refining process and the results from three demonstration assessments are also presented in this paper.

Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL] [ORNL; Cones, Marvin [Mesa Associates, Inc.] [Mesa Associates, Inc.; March, Patrick [Hydro Performance Processes, Inc.] [Hydro Performance Processes, Inc.; Dham, Rajesh [U.S. Department of Energy] [U.S. Department of Energy; Spray, Michael [New West Technologies, LLC.] [New West Technologies, LLC.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNL’s established renewable resource assessment methodology.

Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

PREPARED TESTIMONY OF ROBERT B. WEISENMILLER, PH.D. Qualifying Facilities: Resource Planning and Avoided Costs Methodology ................................ 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning and Avoided Costs Methodology ................................ 1 Energy and Capacity Payments............................................................................. 15 Qualifying Facilities: Resource Planning and Avoided Costs Methodology 1. CPUC Order Instituting Testimony on Long Run Avoided Cost Methodology for the California Manufacturers Association, Department

454

Impaired Oral Reading in Surface Dyslexia: Detailed Comparison of a Patient and a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impaired Oral Reading in Surface Dyslexia: Detailed Comparison of a Patient and a Connectionist connectionist network. ¤ Both MP and the network exhibit the characteristic pattern of surface dyslexia system masters some but not all exception words, and that surface dyslexia arises when this system

Plaut, David C.

455

A Detailed Analysis of the Nonlinear Dynamics of the Electric Step Motor J. Reiss, F. Alin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Detailed Analysis of the Nonlinear Dynamics of the Electric Step Motor J. Reiss, F. Alin* , M.robert@univ-reims.fr Abstract The electric step motor is an electromechanical device which converts electrical pulses of stationarity in the system. We show that the electric step motor may function as a low-dimensional chaotic

Reiss, Josh

456

urrent practice in the vehicle dynamics and control community is to validate detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost and inherent danger in testing aggressive vehicle controllers using full-sized vehicles, a scaleC urrent practice in the vehicle dynamics and control community is to validate detailed simulation results using a full-sized vehicle. For university-based research, this ap- proach is often prohibitively

Brennan, Sean

457

Detailed Studies of a HighDensity Polarized Hydrogen Gas Target for Storage Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed Studies of a High­Density Polarized Hydrogen Gas Target for Storage Rings Kirsten Zapfe 1 (1996) 293 Abstract A high­density target of polarized atomic hydrogen gas for applications in storage rings was produced by injecting atoms from an atomic beam source into a T­shaped storage cell

458

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always OSHA has developed extensive regulations detailing operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always OSHA has developed extensive regulations detailing operator Operation Safety Tip #3 Chance takers are accident makers. #12;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet. Please refrain from reading the information

Minnesota, University of

459

Detailed design report for an operational phase panel-closure system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Westinghouse), Waste Isolation Division (WID), IT Corporation has prepared a detailed design of a panel-closure system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Preparation of this detailed design of an operational-phase closure system is required to support a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application and a non-migration variance petition. This report describes the detailed design for a panel-closure system specific to the WIPP site. The recommended panel-closure system will adequately isolate the waste-emplacement panels for at least 35 years. This report provides detailed design and material engineering specifications for the construction, emplacement, and interface-grouting associated with a panel-closure system at the WIPP repository, which would ensure that an effective panel-closure system is in place for at least 35 years. The panel-closure system provides assurance that the limit for the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOC) will be met at the point of compliance, the WIPP site boundary. This assurance is obtained through the inherent flexibility of the panel-closure system.

NONE

1996-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

460

Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Buildings account for 40% of the total primary energy consumption in the U.S., with 22% consumed% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share is projected to increase for the foreseeable futureLBNL-6192E Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings and accurate data to inform MELs energy use. Introduction Background Buildings account for 40% of the total

Culler, David E.

462

Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial office building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share Buildings account for 40% of the total primary energy con- sumption in the U.S., with 22% consumed

California at Berkeley, University of

463

*Please note: Some details in syllabus are subject to change City University London and Utrecht University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Please note: Some details in syllabus are subject to change City University London and Utrecht on the course website) In-residence London/Utrecht: 8 July ­ 10 August 2012 Programme requires a total of seven and Utrecht, the Netherlands. This innovative programme provides an ideal opportunity for students to develop

Martin, Ralph R.

464

Combining Global and Local Virtual Lights for Detailed Glossy Illumination Tomas Davidovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach Figure 1: Comparison of our approach with Virtual Spherical Lights (VSLs). Left: VSLs fail of these algorithms in design applications. Recently, virtual spherical lights [Hasan et al. 2009] were introducedCombining Global and Local Virtual Lights for Detailed Glossy Illumination Tom´as Davidovic

Bala, Kavita

465

2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction of Chemical Species of Wisconsin-Madison Copyright © 2008 SAE International ABSTRACT Diesel particulate filters are designed to reduce the mass emissions of diesel particulate matter and have been proven to be effective

Wu, Mingshen

466

Chemistry Major, Biological Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major, Biological Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact Professor Richard Ernst (ernst@chem.utah.edu; 801-581-8639) Chemistry Core Courses (required of all majors): CHEM 1210, 1220 General Chemistry I, II (4, 4) both SF (or 1211/1221 honors versions) CHEM 1215, 1225 General

Simons, Jack

467

Chemistry Major, Geology Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major, Geology Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact Professor Richard Ernst (ernst@chem.utah.edu; 801-581-8639) Chemistry Core Courses (required of all majors): CHEM 1210, 1220 General Chemistry I, II (4, 4) both SF (or 1211/1221 honors versions) CHEM 1215, 1225 General

Simons, Jack

468

Chemistry Major, Professional Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major, Professional Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact Professor Richard Ernst (ernst@chem.utah.edu; 801-581-8639) Chemistry Core Courses (required of all majors): CHEM 1210, 1220 General Chemistry I, II (4, 4) both SF (or 1211/1221 honors versions) CHEM 1215, 1225

Simons, Jack

469

Chemistry Major, Business Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major, Business Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact Professor Richard Ernst (ernst@chem.utah.edu; 801-581-8639) Chemistry Core Courses (required of all majors): CHEM 1210, 1220 General Chemistry I, II (4, 4) both SF (or 1211/1221 honors versions) CHEM 1215, 1225 General

Simons, Jack

470

COMBINED THERMAL MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION FOR THE DETAILED ANALYSIS OF FOUR OCCUPIED LOW-ENERGY BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMBINED THERMAL MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION FOR THE DETAILED ANALYSIS OF FOUR OCCUPIED LOW-ENERGY BUILDINGS U.D.J. Gieseler, F.D. Heidt1 , W. Bier Division of Building Physics and Solar Energy, University energy and temperature measurements of occupied buildings very well. These buildings repre- sent small

Gieseler, Udo D. J.

471

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for biodiesel components methyl stearate and methyl oleate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for biodiesel components methyl stearate and methyl are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate renewable sources, can reduce net emissions of greenhouse gases. An important class of biodiesel fuels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

472

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for soy and rapeseed biodiesel fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for soy and rapeseed biodiesel fuels C.K. Westbrooka chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for the five major components of soy biodiesel and rapeseed biodiesel fuels. These components, methyl stearate, methyl oleate, methyl linoleate, methyl

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD (Item 7a, Face Page) $ CONSORTIUM/CONTRACTUAL COSTS FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS TOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD $ PHS 398 (Rev. 6/09) Page

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

474

Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR NEXT BUDGET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR NEXT BUDGET by category) OTHER EXPENSES (Itemize by category) SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR NEXT BUDGET PERIOD $ CONSORTIUM FOR NEXT BUDGET PERIOD (Item 8a, Face Page) $ Page Form Page 2PHS 2590 (Rev. 08/12) #12;

Baker, Chris I.

475

Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD (Item 7a, Face Page) $ CONSORTIUM/CONTRACTUAL COSTS FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS TOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD $ Page Form Page 4 PHS 398

Baker, Chris I.

476

Crucial role of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses in HRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses one major cause for large uncertainties in human reliability analysis (HRA) results, that is, an absence of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses. All too often this crucial step in the HRA process is done in a cursory fashion using word of mouth or written procedures which themselves may incompletely or inaccurately represent the human action sequences and human error vulnerabilities being analyzed. The paper examines the potential contributions these detailed analyses can make in achieving quantitative and qualitative HRA results which are: (1) creditable, that is, minimize uncertainty, (2) auditable, that is, systematically linking quantitative results and qualitative information from which the results are derived, (3) capable of supporting root cause analyses on human reliability factors determined to be major contributors to risk, and (4) capable of repeated measures and being combined with similar results from other analyses to examine HRA issues transcending individual systems and facilities. Based on experience analyzing test and commercial nuclear reactors, and medical applications of nuclear technology, an iterative process is suggested for doing detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses using documentation reviews, open-ended and structured interviews, direct observations, and group techniques. Finally, the paper concludes that detailed analyses done in this manner by knowledgeable human factors practitioners, can contribute significantly to the credibility, auditability, causal factor analysis, and combining goals of the HRA.

Ryan, T.G.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

biodiversity over the past two decades, but, except for a few flagship species, detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity over the past two decades, but, except for a few flagship species, detailed studies disturbance from increased navigation are also likely to negatively impact the riverine biodiversity. To alleviate these problems and conserve biodiversity, establishing nature reserves in biodiversity hotspots

Li, Zhanqing

478

Detailed Analysis of the Microbial Population in Malaysian Spontaneous Cocoa Pulp Fermentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are the key players of this fermentationDetailed Analysis of the Microbial Population in Malaysian Spontaneous Cocoa Pulp Fermentations), Leuven, Belgium, 3 Barry Callebaut AG, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract The fermentation of cocoa pulp is one

479

Change of Personal Details Form Current Name and Date of Birth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from list below. Change of Name Change of Date of Birth (Primary) (Secondary) -Birth Certificate (or extract) -Citizenship Papers -Medicare Card -Passport -Birth Certificate (or Extract) -Valid DriversChange of Personal Details Form Current Name and Date of Birth Current Name Date of Birth Correct

480

Presented at 1999 EWEC Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades John F. Mandell and Herbert J. Sutherland* Daniel D. SamborskyPresented at 1999 EWEC Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue Wind Energy Technology Dept. Dept. of Chemical Engineering Sandia National Laboratories Montana State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methodological details estimation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Rental Rates & Details Karen Clark Events Coordinator Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rental Rates & Details Karen Clark · Events Coordinator · Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum Washington_clark@ wustl.edu kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu Updated 10.08.14 Consider the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum for your next event. Designed by the award-winning architect Fumihiko Maki, the Kemper Art Museum

Subramanian, Venkat

482

Examples of Cost Estimation Packages  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

483

Methodology for quantification of waste generated in Spanish railway construction works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two equations for C and D waste estimation in railway construction works are developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed C and D waste is the most generated category during railway construction works. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tunnel construction is essential to quantify the waste generated during the works. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a relationship between C and D waste generated and railway functional units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methodology proposed can be used to obtain new constants for other areas. - Abstract: In the last years, the European Union (EU) has been focused on the reduction of construction and demolition (C and D) waste. Specifically, in 2006, Spain generated roughly 47 million tons of C and D waste, of which only 13.6% was recycled. This situation has lead to the drawing up of many regulations on C and D waste during the past years forcing EU countries to include new measures for waste prevention and recycling. Among these measures, the mandatory obligation to quantify the C and D waste expected to be originated during a construction project is mandated. However, limited data is available on civil engineering projects. Therefore, the aim of this research study is to improve C and D waste management in railway projects, by developing a model for C and D waste quantification. For this purpose, we develop two equations which estimate in advance the amount, both in weight and volume, of the C and D waste likely to be generated in railway construction projects, including the category of C and D waste generated for the entire project.

Guzman Baez, Ana de [Departamento de Construccion y Vias Rurales, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villoria Saez, Paola; Rio Merino, Mercedes del [Departamento de Construcciones Arquitectonicas y su Control, Escuela Universitaria de Arquitectura Tecnica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avda. Juan de Herrera 6, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia Navarro, Justo, E-mail: justo.gnavarro@upm.es [Departamento de Construccion y Vias Rurales, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Estimating the Wind Resource in Uttarakhand: Comparison of Dynamic Downscaling with Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous estimates of the wind resources in Uttarakhand, India, suggest minimal wind resources in this region. To explore whether or not the complex terrain in fact provides localized regions of wind resource, the authors of this study employed a dynamic down scaling method with the Weather Research and Forecasting model, providing detailed estimates of winds at approximately 1 km resolution in the finest nested simulation.

Lundquist, J. K.; Pukayastha, A.; St. Martin, C.; Newsom, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Risk Assessment Methodology Based on the NISTIR 7628 Guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earlier work describes computational models of critical infrastructure that allow an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the impact of loss per stakeholder resulting from security breakdowns. Here, we consider how to identify, monitor and estimate risk impact and probability for different smart grid stakeholders. Our constructive method leverages currently available standards and defined failure scenarios. We utilize the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Interagency or Internal Reports (NISTIR) 7628 as a basis to apply Cyberspace Security Econometrics system (CSES) for comparing design principles and courses of action in making security-related decisions.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hauser, Katie R [ORNL] [ORNL; Lantz, Margaret W [ORNL] [ORNL; Mili, Ali [New Jersey Insitute of Technology] [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Systems Analysis supports engineering economic analyses and trade-studies, and requires a requisite reference cost basis to support adequate analysis rigor. In this regard, the AFCI program has created a reference set of economic documentation. The documentation consists of the “Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) Cost Basis” report (Shropshire, et al. 2007), “AFCI Economic Analysis” report, and the “AFCI Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies Report.” Together, these documents provide the reference cost basis, cost modeling basis, and methodologies needed to support AFCI economic analysis. The application of the reference cost data in the cost and econometric systems analysis models will be supported by this report. These methodologies include: the energy/environment/economic evaluation of nuclear technology penetration in the energy market—domestic and internationally—and impacts on AFCI facility deployment, uranium resource modeling to inform the front-end fuel cycle costs, facility first-of-a-kind to nth-of-a-kind learning with application to deployment of AFCI facilities, cost tradeoffs to meet nuclear non-proliferation requirements, and international nuclear facility supply/demand analysis. The economic analysis will be performed using two cost models. VISION.ECON will be used to evaluate and compare costs under dynamic conditions, consistent with the cases and analysis performed by the AFCI Systems Analysis team. Generation IV Excel Calculations of Nuclear Systems (G4-ECONS) will provide static (snapshot-in-time) cost analysis and will provide a check on the dynamic results. In future analysis, additional AFCI measures may be developed to show the value of AFCI in closing the fuel cycle. Comparisons can show AFCI in terms of reduced global proliferation (e.g., reduction in enrichment), greater sustainability through preservation of a natural resource (e.g., reduction in uranium ore depletion), value from weaning the U.S. from energy imports (e.g., measures of energy self-sufficiency), and minimization of future high level waste (HLW) repositories world-wide.

David E. Shropshire

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Development of risk assessment methodology for municipal sludge incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by the series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, surface disposal, incineration and ocean disposal. In particular, these reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with incineration of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The procedures are structured to allow calculation of technical criteria for sludge disposal/reuse options based on the potential for adverse health or environmental impacts. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.