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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Liquefaction of natural gas to methanol for shipping and storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The penetration of natural gas into distant markets can be substantially increased by a new methanol synthesis process under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new methanol process is made possible by the discovery of a catalyst that drops synthesis temperatures from about 275/sup 0/C to about 100/sup 0/C. The new low temperature liquid catalyst can convert synthesis gas completely to methanol in a single pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This characteristic leads to a further major improvement in the methanol plant. As a result of process design factors made possible by the BNL catalyst, the plant required to convert natural gas to methanol is very simple. Conversion of natural gas to methanol requires two chemical reactions, both of which are exothermic, and thus represent a loss of heating value in the feed natural gas. This loss is about 20% of the feed gas energy, and is, therefore, higher than the 10% loss in energy in natural gas liquefaction, which is a simpler physical - not a chemical - change. The energy disadvantage of the methanol option must be balanced against the advantage of a much lower capital investment requirement made possible by the new BNL synthesis. Preliminary estimates show that methanol conversion and shipping require an investment for liquefaction to methanol, and shipping liquefied methanol that can range from 35 to 50% of the capital needed for the LNG plant and LNG tanker fleet. This large reduction in capital requirements is expected to make liquefaction to methanol attractive in many cases where the LNG capital needs are prohibitive. 3 tabs.

O'Hare, T.E.; Sapienza, R.S.; Mahajan, D.; Skaperdas, G.T.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

,"New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas",5,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10...

3

Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

,"New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1031...

5

Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 15 13 15 11 11 9 10 21 79 154 1990's 181 154 180 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Washington Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition

6

Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 48 106 337 1 3 11 2 1 385 315 1990's 56 49 52 78 289 194 709 172 50 64 2000's 101 118 13 42 71 154 13 54 46 47 2010's 12 20 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Minnesota Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

7

District of Columbia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 2 1 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas District of Columbia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition)

8

Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 484 498 984 352 332 373 155 136 743 899 1990's 24 72 126 418 987 609 882 178 80 498 2000's 319 186 48 160 124 382 41 245 181 170 2010's 115 89 116 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Maryland Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

9

Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 57 64 68 23 53 45 44 40 34 82 1990's 81 46 45 84 123 96 301 137 17 12 2000's 44 39 23 143 30 31 46 40 27 3 2010's 2 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Iowa Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition

10

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 3,127 10,532 5,621 3,844 82 221 196 247 254 305 1990's 220 222 132 110 252 75 266 135 80 119 2000's 261 107 103 126 131 132 124 145 123 205 2010's 4 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Pennsylvania Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

11

Missouri Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 65 60 2,129 1,278 326 351 1 1 2 1,875 1990's 0 0 0 0 371 4 785 719 40 207 2000's 972 31 62 1,056 917 15 78 66 6 10 2010's 18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Missouri Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

12

Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 257 951 718 594 102 130 182 109 391 219 1990's 51 92 155 126 0 27 42 18 1 1 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Rhode Island Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

13

Georgia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 24 57 151 84 28 121 124 248 241 292 1990's 209 185 166 199 123 130 94 14 16 12 2000's 73 51 7 14 5 0 3 2 52 2010's 732 701 660 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Georgia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

14

Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 55 135 56 20 13 12 9 0 2 18 1990's 4,410 4,262 3,665 3,597 3,032 1 1 2 0 0 2000's 6 0 0 7 17 0 W 5 2 2 2010's 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Delaware Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition

15

South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9 24 50 1 0 0 0 0 10 16 1990's 10 3 10 9 61 37 87 30 4 5 2000's 13 5 3 57 5 4 0 1 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas South Dakota Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition

16

New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 774 720 582 328 681 509 362 464 492 592 1990's 205 128 96 154 160 90 147 102 103 111 2000's 180 86 66 58 91 84 92 9 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas New Hampshire Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

17

Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 144 1,584 1,077 291 239 343 298 180 245 251 1990's 111 146 40 94 29 68 48 37 33 31 2000's 20 6 6 57 191 273 91 0 0 1 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Connecticut Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

18

South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 74 184 63 73 62 87 31 22 191 201 1990's 17 47 26 34 154 62 178 10 0 18 2000's 63 6 3 15 2 86 75 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas South Carolina Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

19

Tennessee Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 12 42 90 39 25 36 13 26 36 78 1990's 3 8 12 13 84 33 73 19 4 11 2000's 13 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Tennessee Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition

20

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nebraska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9 1,838 63 2,006 2,470 2,689 2,142 2,199 1,948 2,088 1990's 2,361 2,032 1,437 791 890 15 315 134 11 4 2000's 339 6 1 13 39 16 19 33 28 18 2010's 12 9 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Nebraska Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

22

Ohio Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 69,169 69,850 64,812 62,032 43,866 24,444 5,182 18 44 348 1990's 849 891 1,051 992 1,432 904 1,828 1,423 1,194 1,200 2000's 1,442 1,149 79 1,002 492 579 423 608 460 522 2010's 353 296 366 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Ohio Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

23

Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,190 2,993 2,899 2,775 2,449 2,655 2,630 2,461 2,801 2,844 1990's 2,817 2,725 2,711 2,705 2,831 2,793 2,761 2,617 2,715 2,752 2000's 2,769 2,689 2,602 2,602 2,626 2,606 2,613 2,683 2,559 2,447 2010's 2,472 2,467 2,510 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Hawaii Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

24

Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 15,366 21,828 17,586 10,732 6,545 3,668 2,379 1,404 876 692 1990's 317 120 105 61 154 420 426 147 68 134 2000's 26 16 137 324 80 46 51 15 13 10 2010's 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Massachusetts Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply &

25

New Jersey Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9,574 11,504 9,786 9,896 8,616 13,421 12,099 13,774 14,846 14,539 1990's 9,962 14,789 14,362 14,950 7,737 7,291 6,778 6,464 9,082 5,761 2000's 8,296 12,330 3,526 473 530 435 175 379 489 454 2010's 457 392 139 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas New Jersey Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

26

Michigan Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 3 3,038 2,473 2,956 2,773 2,789 2,754 2,483 2,402 2,402 1990's 19,106 15,016 14,694 12,795 13,688 21,378 21,848 22,238 21,967 20,896 2000's 12,423 4,054 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Michigan Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

27

Colorado Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9,868 9,133 8,877 7,927 9,137 8,934 8,095 8,612 10,322 9,190 1990's 15,379 6,778 7,158 8,456 8,168 7,170 6,787 6,314 5,292 4,526 2000's 4,772 5,625 5,771 5,409 5,308 5,285 6,149 6,869 6,258 7,527 2010's 5,148 4,268 4,412 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Colorado Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

28

Indiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 1,602 5,056 3,496 4,142 4,027 2,711 2,351 3,890 4,243 3,512 1990's 3,015 3,077 3,507 3,232 2,457 3,199 3,194 3,580 3,149 5,442 2000's 5,583 5,219 1,748 2,376 2,164 1,988 1,642 635 30 1 2010's 1 5 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Indiana Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

29

Illinois Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 36,713 29,509 19,005 19,734 17,308 19,805 22,980 12,514 9,803 9,477 1990's 8,140 6,869 8,042 9,760 7,871 6,256 3,912 4,165 2,736 2,527 2000's 1,955 763 456 52 14 15 13 11 15 20 2010's 17 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Illinois Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

30

North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 196 417 102 0 8,335 40,370 49,847 51,543 49,014 54,408 1990's 53,144 52,557 58,496 57,680 57,127 57,393 55,867 53,179 54,672 53,185 2000's 49,190 51,004 53,184 53,192 47,362 51,329 54,361 51,103 50,536 53,495 2010's 54,813 51,303 52,541 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas

31

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Methanol to someone by Methanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Methanol Methanol (CH3OH), also known as wood alcohol, is an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act of 1992. As an engine fuel, methanol has chemical and physical fuel properties similar to ethanol. Methanol use in vehicles has declined dramatically since the early 1990s, and automakers no longer

32

The nature and formation of coke in the reaction of methanol to hydrocarbons over chabazite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Reactant: methanol t-butanol 1-heotanol Reaction conditions Temp. (K) LHSV (hr ) 644 1. 0 644 1. 0 644 0. 7 Conversion (g) 1 00 100 99. 9 Hydrocarbon distribution (wt g) methane ethane ethylene propane propylene i-butane n-butane bu...

McLaughlin, Kenneth Woot

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

34

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

35

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Propane Air (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Propane Air (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Propane Air (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

36

,"Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_smd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_smd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:52 AM"

37

,"New Jersey Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_snj_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_snj_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:54 AM"

38

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_shi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_shi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:51 AM"

39

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sri_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sri_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:55 AM"

40

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)" Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_ovi_sla_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_ovi_sla_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

,"North Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_snc_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_snc_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:53 AM"

42

,"Alaska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)" Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na_epg0_ovi_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na_epg0_ovi_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

43

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sct_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sct_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:50 AM"

44

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_smn_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_smn_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:53 AM"

45

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_snm_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_snm_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:54 AM"

46

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:57 AM"

47

,"Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_swa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_swa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:57 AM"

48

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_swi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_swi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:57 AM"

49

,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_snh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_snh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:54 AM"

50

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:51 AM"

51

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_stn_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_stn_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:56 AM"

52

,"Indiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:51 AM"

53

,"Michigan Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:52 AM"

54

,"Virginia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sva_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sva_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:57 AM"

55

,"Georgia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sga_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sga_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:50 AM"

56

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:56 AM"

57

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:53 AM"

58

,"Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sde_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sde_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:50 AM"

59

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:49 AM"

60

,"Illinois Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sil_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sil_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:51 AM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:55 AM"

62

,"Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sia_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sia_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:51 AM"

63

,"Alabama Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:49 AM"

64

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_snd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_snd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:53 AM"

65

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_ssc_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_ssc_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:56 AM"

66

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sma_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sma_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:52 AM"

67

,"Nevada Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_snv_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_snv_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:54 AM"

68

,"Texas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_stx_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_stx_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:56 AM"

69

,"U.S. Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9090us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9090us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:08 AM"

70

,"Colorado Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sco_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sco_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:49 AM"

71

,"Oregon Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sor_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sor_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:55 AM"

72

,"Florida Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:50 AM"

73

,"Vermont Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_svt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_svt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:57 AM"

74

,"Maine Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sme_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sme_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:52 AM"

75

The Methanol Economy Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO{sub 2} capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO{sub 2} and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields. ? Direct electrophilic bromination of methane to methyl bromide followed by hydrolysis to yield methanol was investigated on a wide variety of catalyst systems, but hydrolysis proved impractical for large-scale industrial application. ? Bireforming the correct ratio of methane, CO{sub 2}, and water on a NiO / MgO catalyst yielded the right proportion of H{sub 2}:CO (2:1) and proved to be stable for at least 250 hours of operation at 400 psi (28 atm). ? CO{sub 2} capture utilizing supported polyethyleneimines yielded a system capable of adsorbing CO{sub 2} from the air and release at nominal temperatures with negligible amine leaching. ? CO{sub 2} electrolysis to formate and syngas showed considerable increases in rate and selectivity by performing the reaction in a high pressure flow electrolyzer. ? Formic acid was shown to decompose selectively to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} using either Ru or Ir based homogeneous catalysts. ? Direct formic acid fuel cells were also investigated and showed higher than 40% voltage efficiency using reduced loadings of precious metals. A technoeconomic analysis was conducted to assess the viability of taking each of these processes to the industrial scale by applying the data gathered during the experiments to approximations based on currently used industrial processes. Several of these processes show significant promise for industrial scale up and use towards improving our nations energy independence.

Olah, George; Prakash, G.K.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the production level at the end of August was far lower. At the end of August, an armed group blocked pipelines that connect the El Sharara and El Feel (Elephant) fields to the Zawiya and Mellitah export terminals, respectively, forcing the shutdown of those fields. El Sharara had been

77

Communication China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with the rest coming from natural gas (Peng, 2011). Methanol is commonly used to produce formaldehyde, methylCommunication China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy and the environment online 2 December 2011 Keywords: Methanol economy China Coal-based chemical a b s t r a c t For more than

Jackson, Robert B.

78

Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.ed [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

Tabak, S.A. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States). Central Research Lab.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

methanol.qxd  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Methanol One in a series of fact sheets United States Environmental Protection Agency EPA420-F-00-040 March 2002 www.epa.gov Transportation and Air Quality Transportation and Regional Programs Division C L E A N A L T E R N A T I V E F U E L S C L E A N E R A I R Because of the environ- mental advantages and cost savings, Arizona Checker Leasing Company purchased its first methanol-fueled vehicles in 1993 and cur- rently counts 300 in its fleet of nearly 450 automobiles. The company leases its M85 fuel-flexible vehicles to two cab companies in the Phoenix area. The company purchases its methanol from the California Energy Com- mission, which sells it at a lower, subsidized price. According to the company, methanol has performed just as well as gasoline, providing a safe, reliable, and cost- effective fuel source for the

85

Methanol adsorption in zeolites - A first-priniciples study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methanol to gasoline (MTG) conversion process, using a zeolite catalyst, is of major commercial importance. However, the first step of the reaction, involving methanol adsorption on the zeolite catalyst, is still not well understood. This paper describes first-principles calculations performed on periodic zeolite models to investigate the nature of methanol adsorption. We have examined a number of possible geometries for this adsorption and found that the nature of the adsorbed species can depend on the particular zeolites structure. In more open ring structures, as found in chabazite, the stable form of methanol is found to be protonated, in contrast to results of previous calculations on cluster models. However, in the sodalite structure methanol is found to be simply physisorbed. The vibrational spectra of the adsorbed species have been studied and compared to experimental results. It is found that both chemisorbed methanol and physisorbed methanol give strongly red-shifted O-H stretching frequencies, but the former can be distinguished by the H-O-H bending mode. 50 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Shah, R.; Payne, M.C. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Gale, J.D. [Imperial College, South Kensington (United Kingdom)] [Imperial College, South Kensington (United Kingdom)

1996-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 EIA Glossary Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Release date: February 2005 Next release date: February 2006 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2003 to 2025. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2005, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2005 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and seventeen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2005 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 2003-2005 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

87

Methanol-reinforced kraft pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of methanol to a high-sulfidity kraft cook on Scandinavian softwood chips was studied under different process conditions. Delignification and the degradation of carbohydrates were accelerated, but the effect on delignification was greater. Thus, methanol addition improved selectivity. The positive effect of methanol could also be observed for modified kraft cooks having a leveled out alkali concentration and lower concentration of sodium ions and dissolved lignin at the end of the cook. Methanol addition had no discernible effect on pulp strength or on pulp bleachability.

Norman, E.; Olm, L.; Teder, A. (STFI, Stockholm (Sweden))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal The economics of producing methanol and other fuels aresome discussion of producing methanol as a by-product from

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Methanol production with elemental phosphorus byproduct gas: technical and economic feasibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using a typical, elemental, phosphorus byproduct gas stream in methanol production is assessed. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of a substitute for natural gas. The first part of the study establishes economic tradeoffs between several alternative methods of supplying the hydrogen which is needed in the methanol synthesis process to react with CO from the off gas. The preferred alternative is the Battelle Process, which uses natural gas in combination with the off gas in an economically sized methanol plant. The second part of the study presents a preliminary basic design of a plant to (1) clean and compress the off gas, (2) return recovered phosphorus to the phosphorus plant, and (3) produce methanol by the Battelle Process. Use of elemental phosphorus byproduct gas in methanol production appears to be technically feasible. The Battelle Process shows a definite but relatively small economic advantage over conventional methanol manufacture based on natural gas alone. The process would be economically feasible only where natural gas supply and methanol market conditions at a phosphorus plant are not significantly less favorable than at competing methanol plants. If off-gas streams from two or more phosphorus plants could be combined, production of methanol using only offgas might also be economically feasible. The North American methanol market, however, does not seem likely to require another new methanol project until after 1990. The off-gas cleanup, compression, and phosphorus-recovery system could be used to produce a CO-rich stream that could be economically attractive for production of several other chemicals besides methanol.

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format. Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format. MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Errata - August 25, 2004 1 to117 - Complete set of of Supplemental Tables PDF Table 1. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (New England) XLS PDF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Middle Atlantic) XLS PDF Table 3. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East North Central) XLS PDF Table 4. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West North Central) XLS PDF Table 5. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (South Atlantic) XLS PDF Table 6. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East South Central) XLS PDF Table 7. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West South Central) XLS PDF Table 8. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Mountain)

91

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format Excel logo Spreadsheets are provided in excel 1 to117 - Complete set of Supplemental Tables PDF Energy Consumption by Sector (Census Division) Table 1. New England XLS PDF Table 2. Middle Atlantic XLS PDF Table 3. East North Central XLS PDF Table 4. West North Central XLS PDF Table 5. South Atlantic XLS PDF Table 6. East South Central XLS PDF Table 7. West South Central XLS PDF Table 8. Mountain XLS PDF Table 9. Pacific XLS PDF Table 10. Total United States XLS PDF Energy Prices by Sector (Census Division) Table 11. New England XLS PDF Table 12. Middle Atlantic XLS PDF Table 13. East North Central XLS PDF Table 14. West North Central XLS PDF Table 15. South Atlantic XLS PDF Table 16. East South Central

92

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage supplemental.gif (7420 bytes) (Errata as of 9/13/99) The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1997 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO99, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO99 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of ninety-five tables are presented.

93

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 22, 2000 (Next Release: December, 2001) Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Assumptions to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference Contacts Forecast Homepage EIA Homepage AEO Supplement Reference Case Forecast (1999-2020) (HTML) Table 1. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (New England) Table 2. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Middle Atlantic) Table 3. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East North Central) Table 4. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West North Central) Table 5. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (South Atlantic) Table 6. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East South Central) Table 7. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West South Central) Table 8. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Mountain)

94

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Supplement Tables to the AEO2001 The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1999 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2001, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2001 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of ninety-five tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2001 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 1999 and 2000 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

95

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol

96

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral Intensity With 5% Coal (x ::: 86.9 cm) CalculatedPredictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMethanol as the Fuel B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel C.

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, Supplement B, White River Falls Fish Passage, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

White River Falls are located in north central Oregon approximately 25 miles south of the City of The Dalles. The project site is characterized by a series of three natural waterfalls with a combined fall of 180 ft. In the watershed above the falls are some 120 miles of mainstem habitat and an undetermined amount of tributary stream habitat that could be opened to anadromous fish, if passage is provided around the falls. The purpose of this project is to determine feasibility of passage, select a passage scheme, and design and construct passage facilities. This report provides information on possible facilities that would pass adult anadromous fish over the White River Falls. 25 references, 29 figures, 12 tables. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

812 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 812 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Customer Service Region OCTOBER 2013 DOE/EA-1812/SA-1 DOE/EA-1812 Supplement Analysis 2 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration

100

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Customer Service Region OCTOBER 2013 DOE/EA-1812/SA-1 DOE/EA-1812 Supplement Analysis 2 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

List of Methanol Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methanol Incentives Methanol Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 22 Methanol Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 22) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alcohol Fuel Credit (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Commercial Industrial Ethanol Methanol No Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania) State Grant Program Pennsylvania Commercial Industrial Residential General Public/Consumer Nonprofit Schools Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations Ethanol Methanol Biodiesel No Biodiesel and Alcohol Fuel Blend Sales Tax Exemption (Washington) Sales Tax Incentive Washington Commercial Ethanol Methanol

102

Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene. Abstract: The desorption kinetics of methanol,...

103

Methanol injection and recovery in a large turboexpander plant. [Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol is used to prevent hydrate formation in Petro-Canada's 2000 MMSCFD Empress expander plant. Injection and recovery facilities have operated essentially trouble-free since start-up late in 1979. A portion of the methanol recovery section has been modified to provide removal of the H/sub 2/S and most of the COS from the propane product stream, concurrent with methanol recovery. The Empress straddle plant strips natural gas liquids from pipeline gas leaving Alberta for eastern Canadian and U.S. markets. The original cold oil absorption plant, started up in 1964 and expanded in 1967, recovered over 90% of the propane and virtually all of the heavier components. In 1976, a market for ethane was secured as feedstock for the world-scale ethylene complex under construction in Alberta, and it was decided to replace the cold oil plant with a turboexpander facility. The plant and its operations are described in some detail. 2 refs.

Nelson, K.; Wolfe, L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction : Influence of acid strength on the mechanism of olefin formation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction is a flexible alternative step in the upgrading of natural gas, coal or biomass. By tuning the catalyst and process conditions, (more)

Erichsen, Marius Westgrd

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Importance of cobalt for individual trophic groups in an anaerobic methanol-degrading consortium.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Methanol metabolism Waste Disposal, Fluid...in wastewaters, wastes, and the natural...several chemical industries, such as in the...31) and coal gasification installations...Purdue Industrial Waste Conference, Lafayette...compounds in coal-gasification condensate water...

L Florencio; J A Field; G Lettinga

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer

107

6, 39453963, 2006 Methanol inside aged  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The oxidation of methane (and other hydrocarbons) can also produce methanol primarily via the self reactionACPD 6, 3945­3963, 2006 Methanol inside aged tropical biomass burning plumes G. Dufour et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions First space-borne measurements of methanol inside aged tropical biomass

108

Direct methanol fuel cell and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery (8/16/99)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 16, 1999 August 16, 1999 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEWI-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02 David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery PL-6: F3204 Location: Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington (CESRF) and Prosser Juvenile Research Facility, Prosser, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

110

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (the CAMERE process)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CAMERE process (carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction) was developed and evaluated. The reverse-water-gas-shift reactor and the methanol synthesis reactor were serially aligned to form methanol from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Carbon dioxide was converted to CO and water by the reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (RWReaction) to remove water before methanol was synthesized. With the elimination of water by RWReaction, the purge gas volume was minimized as the recycle gas volume decreased. Because of the minimum purge gas loss by the pretreatment of RWReactor, the overall methanol yield increased up to 89% from 69%. An active and stable catalyst with the composition of Cu/ZnO/ZrO{sub 2}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5:3:1:1) was developed. The system was optimized and compared with the commercial methanol synthesis processes from natural gas and coal.

Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.; Uhm, S.J. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.] [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.; Moon, I. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rozovskii, A.Y.; Lin, G.I. [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Approaches to methanol-tolerant air cathodes for methanol-air fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The achievement of truly methanol-tolerant oxygen cathodes will greatly assist the development of direct methanol-air fuel cells, because the cathode performance will not be affected by the presence of methanol or its oxidation products, which can diffuse across the cell from the anode. In addition, methanol will not be consumed at the cathode. Although platinum-based oxygen cathodes can continue to perform well in the presence of methanol under certain conditions, methanol can be consumed rapidly at such electrodes. Oxygen electrocatalysts were examined in the present work which are largely inactive for methanol oxidation and are also not affected significantly by the presence of methanol. These included heat-treated transition metal macrocycles and hydrated ruthenium dioxide. The most promising electrocatalyst examines thus far is heat-treated iron tetramethoxyphenylporphyrin supported on high area carbon.

Tryk, D.A.; Gupta, S.L.; Aldred, W.H.; Yeager, E.B. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Idaho Supplementation Studies, 1991-1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) will help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho. The objectives are to monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon; monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation and; determine which supplementation strategies (broodstock and release stage) provide the quickest effects on and highest response in natural production without adverse productivity.

Leitzinger, Eric J.; Bowles, Edward C.; Plaster, Kurtis (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Low Crossover of Methanol and Water Through Thin Membranes in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the literature has been focused on developing new electrocatalysts to improve sluggish methanol oxidation and new developed in this work to attain low methanol crossover, low water crossover, and high cell performance diffusion barrier to reduce methanol crossover. In addition, a highly hydrophobic cathode microporous layer

114

Counterflow Extinction of Premixed and Nonpremixed Methanol and Ethanol Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for high temperature ethanol oxidation. Interna- tionaland combustion of methanol and ethanol droplets. Combustionvelocities of methanol, ethanol and isooctane-air mix- u

Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Presentation...

116

Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Abstract: Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed...

117

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel...

118

Spontaneous hydrogen evolution in direct methanol fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical energy conversion device that converts chemical energy of liquid methanol into electrical energy. Because of its (more)

Ye, Qiang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature....

120

Microsoft Word - STEO Supplement.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09 09 1 May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for the Electric Generation Mix in the Southeast 1 Highlights * This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) focuses on changes in the utilization of coal- and natural-gas-fired generation capacity in the electric utility sector as the differential between delivered fuel prices narrows. * Over the last year the price of natural gas delivered to electric generators has fallen dramatically. Current natural gas prices now present increased potential for displacing coal-fired electricity generation with natural-gas-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Clark et al., Supplemental Data SUPPLEMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was then aliquoted to the PCR plate. Primer sequences: #12;Clark et al., Supplemental Data p. 2 C10_RT

Ptak, Susan

122

Methanol synthesis in a trickle bed reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kinetic models for methanol synthesis under the assumption that the rate limiting step was the reaction between an adsorbed CO molecule and two adsorbed H2 molecules. The experiment was conducted over a Cu/ZnO/Cr~03 catalyst in a fixed bed reactor... to account for the large degree of initial deactivation. However, Rozovskii (1980) claimed the opposite and stated that methanol is made from carbon dioxide and no methanol is produced from Hz/CO mixtures over the Cu/ZnO/Alz03 catalyst. Liu et al. (1984...

Tjandra, Sinoto

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Experimental investigation of methanol crossover evolution during direct methanol fuel cell degradation tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methanol crossover and severe degradation are two of the most critical issues hindering the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. The experimental investigations found in the literature show that degradation has both permanent and temporary contributions; the latter can be recovered thanks to a suitable operation interruption. This work reports the experimental characterization of methanol crossover and water content in cathode exhaust during different degradation tests performed in continuous and cycling operation modes. Such investigation evidences a reduction of methanol crossover during the DMFC degradation tests that can be partially restored. Methanol crossover reduction presents both temporary and permanent contributions: the latter could be related to membrane degradation. Moreover the effect of both methanol crossover and electric power reduction on fuel cell efficiency are discussed.

A. Casalegno; F. Bresciani; M. Zago; R. Marchesi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Catalyst for methanol synthesis: Preparation and activation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase composition and structure of the initial and reduced forms of the copper-zinc oxide catalysts for methanol synthesis are discussed. The mechanism of the process is discussed.

T. M. Yurieva

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Panama coal to methanol project. Phase I. Feasibility Study. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Progress Report contains the results of the investigations performed for the Panama Coal to Methanol Project: Technical efforts associated with the gasification technology evaluation; evaluation of other related process technologies; results of the venture analyses, including the efforts made for structuring the project; results of the ongoing financial analyses and cost projections, including potential and use applications of methanol in Japan primarily for combustion turbine-combined cycle steam/electric utilization. At this time, and for the next few years, the Panama-based methanol fuel is more expensive than oil. However, when measured in terms of KWH production cost in Japan, the use of methanol fuel in combustion turbine, combined-cycle operations appears to create less expensive electric power than that produced from conventional coal direct fired operations using imported coal. This cost advantage arises from significantly lower capital costs and enhanced performance efficiencies associated with combined cycle power generators as contrasted with conventional coal plants equipped with scrubbers. Environmental and social land-use benefits are also much greater for the methanol fuel plant. The cost of electricity from a methanol-fueled combined cycle plant is also expected to compare favorably in Japan with electrical costs from a future liquefied natural gas fired plant.

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Methanol's transformation to commodity status stretches supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol is undergoing a renaissance. Beginning in the US in the fourth quarter of 1993, methanol has seen a transformation from a low-growth, low-priced, overly abundant commodity chemical into a high-demand, undersupplied, cost-price driven product. As the economic recovery has spread to the rest of the world, methanol demand has dramatically increased. this meteoric rise has been further sparked in the US by increased use of methanol as an ingredient in gasoline oxygenates required by the federal government. Increased demand has led to the consolidation of producers, a scramble to reopen existing capacity, addition of capacity via product conversion, and plans for various future capacity expansions. Methanol fits alongside the other long-standing, major organic commodity chemicals-ethylbenzene, ethylene, ethylene dichloride, formaldehyde, propylene, styrene, terephthalic acid, and vinyl chloride. Methanol also serves both as a building block for many other chemicals--formaldehyde, acetic acid, and terephthalic acid--and as a solvent for many industrial uses.

Peaff, G.

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. Supplement I. [Additional information on 38 items requested by KY/DNREP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a letter from KY/DNREP, January 19, 1981, ICRC and DOE have prepared the enclosed supplement to the Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Permit Application for Air Contaminant Source for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Each of the 38 comments contained in the letter has been addressed in accordance with the discussions held in Frankfort on January 28, 1981, among representatives of KY/DNREP, EPA Region IV, US DOE, and ICRC. The questions raised involve requests for detailed information on the performance and reliability of proprietary equipment, back-up methods, monitoring plans for various pollutants, composition of wastes to flares, emissions estimates from particular operations, origin of baseline information, mathematical models, storage tanks, dusts, etc. (LTN)

none,

1981-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

132

Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material Supplemental Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 1 Supplemental Material A. Entropy, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 2 occupied, it is ambiguous whether

Smith, Matthew A.

133

A sandwich structured membrane for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this type of fuel cell become a lead- ing candidate to replace batteries in portable applications includA sandwich structured membrane for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu October 2012 Received in revised form 4 December 2012 Accepted 3 January 2013 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct

Zhao, Tianshou

134

Performance of a spark ignition engine fueled with methanol or methanol-gasoline blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engine torque and specific energy consumption of an automotive engine were studied under steady state condition using gasoline, methanol gasoline blends and straight methanol as fuel. At first the engine was run without any modification. Next the diameters of metering orifices in carburetor were modified to give the same excess air factor regardless of fuel type under each fixed engine operating condition. Finally the engine was run with 15% mixture methanol in gasoline by volume using the carburetor modified to have approximately 10% larger fuel flow area than the production carburetor. From the results of this study the effects of using methanol on engine torque and specific energy consumption can be explained on the basis of change in stoichiometry caused by the use of methanol.

You, B.C.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Figure legends supplemental figures Supplemental figure 1.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Kruskal-Wallis-test). Supplemental figure 3. (a) Survival of GFAPcre+/VHL+f/+f /VEGF+f/+f mice (n=19

Kleinfeld, David

137

EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington The Yakima Fisheries Project is co-managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The project consists of the collection of salmonid broodstock, incubation of eggs and rearing of fry in hatcheries, the acclimation and release of smolts, and related ecological studies in the study of natural production. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility,

138

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

and Methanol and Methanol Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Methanol Tax Ethyl alcohol and methyl alcohol motor fuels are taxed at a rate of $0.08 per gallon when used as a motor fuel. Ethyl alcohol is defined as a motor

139

Supplemental Gas Supplies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 18 0 0 0 18 Colorado...................... 0 344 0 0 a 6,443 6,787 Connecticut ................. 0 48 0 0 0 48 Delaware ..................... 0 1 0 0 0 1 Georgia........................ 0 94 0 0 0 94 Hawaii.......................... 2,761 0 0 0 0 2,761 Illinois .......................... 0 488 3,423 0 0 3,912 Indiana......................... 0 539 0 0 b 2,655 3,194 Iowa............................. 0 301 0 0 0 301 Kentucky...................... 0 45 0 0 0 45 Maine........................... 0 61 0 0 0 61 Maryland...................... 0 882 0 0 0 882 Massachusetts ............ 0 426 0 0 0 426 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,848 21,848 Minnesota.................... 0 709 0 0 0 709 Missouri

140

New methanol plant for Kharg Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iran`s National Petrochemical Co. (NPC; Teheran) plans to set up a world scale export-oriented methanol plant on Kharg Island in the Persian Gulf. It says discussions are being held with three Western groups - C. Itoh (Tokyo), H & G (London), and Uhde (Dortmund) - to supply the 660,000-m.t./year facility. The estimated $150-million project would be repaid through export of methanol within three to four years. NPC hopes to conclude talks this year. Strategically located, Kharg Island is described as a good location in peacetime. It already serves as an oil terminal. NPC has an LPG and sulfur complex there.

Alperowicz, N.

1992-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Idaho Supplementation Studies : 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) will help determine the utility of supplementation as a potential recovery tool for decimated stocks of spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Idaho as part of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. The objectives are to: (1) monitor and evaluate the effects of supplementation on presmolt and smolt numbers and spawning escapements of naturally produced salmon; (2) monitor and evaluate changes in natural productivity and genetic composition of target and adjacent populations following supplementation; and (3) determine which supplementation strategies provide the quickest and highest response in natural production without adverse effects on productivity. Field work began in 1991 with the collection of baseline data from treatment and some control streams. Full implementation began in 1992 with baseline data collection on treatment and control streams and releases of supplementation fish into several treatment streams. Field methods included snorkeling to estimate chinook salmon parr populations, PIT tagging summer parr to estimate parr-to-smolt survival, multiple redd counts to estimate spawning escapement and collect carcass information. Screw traps were used to trap and PIT tag outmigrating chinook salmon during the spring and fall outmigration. Weirs were used to trap and enumerate returning adult salmon in select drainages.

Leitzinger, Eric J.; Plaster, Kurtis; Hassemer, Peter

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fluid-bed studies of olefin production from methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With newly developed technology, conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons represents the final link in the production of premium transportation fuels from coal or natural gas. The methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process has been developed. The more readily scaled fixed-bed version is the heart of the New Zealand Gas-to-gasoline complex, which will produce 14,000 BPD high octane gasoline from 120 million SCFD gas. The fluid-bed version of the process, which is also available for commercial license, has a higher thermal efficiency and possesses substantial yield and octane advantages over the fixed-bed. Successful scale-up was completed in 1984 in a 100 BPD semi-works plant near Cologne, West Germany. The project funded jointly by the U.S. and German governments and an industrial consortium comprised of Mobil; Union Rheinsche Braunkohlen Kraftstoff, AG; and Uhde, GmbH. The 100 BPD MTG project was extended recently to demonstrate a related fluid bed process for selective conversion of methanol to light olefins (MTO). The products of the MTO reaction make an excellent feed to the commercially available Mobile-Olefins-to-Gasoline-and-Distillate process (MOGD) which selectively converts olefins to premium transportation fuels . A schematic of the combined processes is shown. Total liquid fuels production is typically greater than 90 wt% of hydrocarbon in the feed. Distillate/gasoline product ratios from the plant can be adjusted over a wide range to meet seasonal demands. This paper describes the initial scale-up of the MTO process from a micro-fluid-bed reactor (1-10 grams of catalyst) to a large pilot unit (10-25 kilograms of catalyst).

Socha, R.F.; Chang, C.D.; Gould, R.M.; Kane, S.E.; Avidan, A.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Methanol-tolerant carbon aerogel-supported PtAu catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PtAu nanoparticles supported on carbon aerogel, namely 2:1 has been synthesized by the microwave-assisted polyol process. The structure of PtAu nanoparticles is characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical property of PtAu catalysts for methanol oxidation is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The results show that Au-modified Pt catalysts exhibit a high methanol tolerance and improved electrochemical catalytic activity, suggesting that carbon aerogel supported PtAu catalysts are better catalysts for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol than conventional Pt catalysts.

Hong Zhu; Zhijun Guo; Xinwei Zhang; Kefei Han; Yubao Guo; Fanghui Wang; Zhongming Wang; Yongsheng Wei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The effect of acid strength on the MTO reaction : Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over H-SAPO-34 and high silica Chabazite (H-SSZ-13).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process for the production of polymer-grade olefins is a possible step in the upgrading of natural gas. The preferred MTO catalyst is (more)

Bleken, Francesca

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ozone Control and Methanol Fuel Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from diesel-type engines and use in stationary...methanol-fueled engine is expected to emit half as much as diesel-fueled engines. In the 2010 simulations...1989)]. A FUNDAMENTAL FEATURE OF NOR-mal...phase of the cell cycle by any combination...

A. G. Russell; D. St. Pierre; J. B. Milford

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a CuSiO2 catalyst. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a...

147

Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are necessary when combining methanol and DME synthesis with a methanol to gasoline (MTG) process in a single reactor bed. A commercial CuZnOAl2O3 catalyst, utilized...

148

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of NO and N02 in a Turbulent Propane/Air Di fusion Flame,"Fuel Methanol Ethanol Ethane Propane i so Octane n - Cetanestage of the secondary Propane, at A spark air line contains

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Photoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,n70460...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been described elsewhere.9 Methanol cluster anions were produced by passing argon through a reservoirPhotoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,MeOH...n - ,,n?70­460... Aster Kammrath Electron solvation in methanol anion clusters, MeOH n - n 70­460 , is studied by photoelectron imaging. Two

Neumark, Daniel M.

151

Molecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrafast hydrogen migration.7,8 The 38 fs 800 nm pump pulse produced methanol monocation, and a probe pulseMolecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong Laser Fields Bishnu Thapa and H surfaces of methanol neutral, monocation, and singlet and triplet dication were explored using the CBS

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

152

Supercritical methanol for polyethylene terephthalate depolymerization: Observation using simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To apply PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol to commercial recycling, the benefits of supercritical methanol usage in PET depolymerization was investigated from the viewpoint of the reaction rate and energy demands. PET was depolymerized in a batch reactor at 573 K in supercritical methanol under 14.7 MPa and in vapor methanol under 0.98 MPa in our previous work. The main products of both reactions were the PET monomers of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) and ethylene glycol (EG). The rate of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was faster than that of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol. This indicates supercritical fluid is beneficial in reducing reaction time without the use of a catalyst. We depicted the simple process flow of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol and in vapor methanol, and by simulation evaluated the total heat demand of each process. In this simulation, bis-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET) was used as a model component of PET. The total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was 2.35 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. That of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol was 2.84 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. The smaller total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol clearly reveals the advantage of using supercritical fluid in terms of energy savings.

Genta, Minoru; Iwaya, Tomoko; Sasaki, Mitsuru [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 865-8555 (Japan); Goto, Motonobu [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 865-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: mgoto@kumamoto-u.ac.jp

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold

154

Enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol: Enhanced methanol production in silica sol-gel matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strategies for effective conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to methanol offer promising new technologies not only for recycling of the greenhouse gas but also for an efficient production of fuel alternatives. Partial hydrogenation of carbon dioxide has been accomplished by means of heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, and photocatalysis. Oxide-based catalysts are predominantly used for industrial fixation of carbon dioxide. A unique approach in this direction involves the use of enzymes as catalysts for conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol. The use of enzymes is particularly appealing since it provides a facile low-temperature route for generation of methanol directly from gaseous carbon dioxide. The authors report an enzymatically coupled sequential reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol by using a series of reactions catalyzed by three different dehydrogenases. Overall, the process involves an initial reduction of CO{sub 2} to formate catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (F{sub ate}DH), followed by reduction of formate to formaldehyde by formaldehyde dehydrogenase (F{sub ald}DH), and finally formaldehyde is reduced to methanol by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). In this process, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) acts as a terminal electron donor for each dehydrogenase-catalyzed reduction.

Obert, R.; Dave, B.C.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

EIS-0265-SA-99: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Supplement Analysis 9: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program The overall objective of the project is to restore as much as possible, the natural character and function of the Longley Meadows wetland complex. This project is a joint partnership among the CTUIR, Grand Rhonda Model Watershed Program, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Natural Resource Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and BPA. This project involves several separate components that are part of a regionwide effort to protect and restore anadromous fish habitat in the Grand Ronde Basin Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (November 2002), DOE/EIS-0265-SA-99 More Documents & Publications EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

156

2.1E Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may include supplemental electric resistance heaters in heatof supplemental electric resistance heaters in heat pumps.frost is melted using electric resistance heat. The capacity

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Colorado Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6,258 7,527 5,148 4,268 4,412 4,112 1967-2013 Propane-Air 2 3 4 21 99 41 1980-2013 Other 6,256 7,525 5,144 4,247 4,313 4,071 1980-2013...

158

Illinois Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15 20 17 1 1 * 1967-2013 Synthetic 0 0 1980-2013 Propane-Air 15 20 17 1 1 * 1980-2013 Refinery Gas 1980-2005 Biomass 0 0 1999-2013 Other 0 0 2005...

159

Ohio Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

460 522 353 296 366 416 1967-2013 Synthetic 0 0 1980-2013 Propane-Air 81 66 40 27 6 34 1980-2013 Biomass 379 456 313 269 360 383 1993-2013...

160

Georgia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

* 52 732 701 660 642 1967-2013 Propane-Air 0 0 0 1980-2013 Biomass 52 732 701 660 642 1993-2013 Other 0 0 0 1980...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 6 2 0 0 0 1967-2013 Synthetic 1980-2005 Propane-Air 7 6 2 1980-2010 Biomass 1993-2005 Other 1980-2005...

162

New Jersey Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

489 454 457 392 139 255 1967-2013 Synthetic 0 0 0 1980-2013 Propane-Air 0 0 1980-2013 Refinery Gas 1980-2005 Biomass 0 0 1993-2013 Other 489 454 457 392 139 255 1980-2013...

163

Coal to methanol to gasoline by the hydrocarb process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HYDROCARB Process converts coal or any other carbonaceous material to a clean carbon fuel and co-product gas or liquid fuel. By directing the co-product to liquid methanol, it becomes possible to produce methanol at costs as low as $0.13 to $0.14/gal as shown in Table 1 for a Western Lignite and Table 2 for an Eastern Bituminous coal. In the case of Western lignite, it is assumed that the carbon black fuel product can be sold at $3.00/MMBtu ($18/Bbl FOE) and for the Eastern coal at $2.50/MMBtu ($15/Bbl FOE). A methanol market is expected to develop due to the need for an automotive fuel with reduced pollutant emissions. However, should the methanol market not materialize as expected, then methanol can be readily converted to conventional gasoline by the addition of an MTG, methanol to gasoline process step. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report broadly defines the scope of supplementation plans and activities in the Columbia Basin. It provides the foundation for more detailed analysis of supplementation in subsequent reports in this series. Topics included in this report are: definition of supplementation, project diversity, objectives and performance standards, uncertainties and theory. Since this is a progress report, the content is subject to modification with new information. The supplementation theory will continue to evolve throughout the duration of RASP and beyond. The other topics in this report are essentially complete and are not expected to change significantly. This is the first of a series of four reports which will summarize information contained in the larger, RASP progress and completion reports. Our goal is to make the findings of RASP more accessible by grouping related topics into smaller but complete narratives on important aspects of supplementation. We are planning to publish the following reports under the general title Supplementation in the Columbia River Basin: Part 1, Background, Description, Performance Measures, Uncertainty and Theory; Part 2, Theoretical Framework and Models; Part 3, Planning Guidelines; and Part 4, Regional Coordination of Research and Monitoring. Supplementation is expected to be a major contributor to the planned increase in salmon and steelhead production in the Columbia Basin. The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) uses three approaches to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin: (1) enhance fish production; (2) improve passage in the mainstem rivers; and (3) revise harvest management to support the rebuilding of fish runs (NPPC 1987). The fish production segment calls for a three-part approach focused on natural production, hatchery production, and supplementation. Supplementation is planned to provide over half of the total production increases. The Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated as a result of a request by NPPC to address long-standing concerns about the need to coordinate supplementation research, monitoring and evaluation. Such coordination was also recommended by the Supplementation Technical Work Group. In August 1990, the NPPC gave conditional approval to proceed with the final design of the Yakima Production Project. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund immediately a supplementation assessment to reevaluate, prioritize and coordinate all existing and planned supplementation monitoring and evaluation activities in the basin. Providing for the participation of the fishery agencies and tribes and others having expertise in this area. RASP addresses four principal objectives: (1) provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities and identify critical uncertainties associated with supplementation, (2) construct a conceptual framework and model which estimates the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and prioritizes uncertainties, (3) provide guidelines for the development of supplementation projects, (4) develop a plan for regional coordination of research and monitoring. These objectives, once attained, will provide the technical tools fishery managers need to carry out the Council's direction to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead. RASP has further divided the four broad objectives into 12 technical topics: (1) definition of supplementation; (2) description of the diversity of supplementation projects; (3) objectives and performance standards; (4) identification of uncertainties; (5) supplementation theory; (6) development of a conceptual model of supplemented populations; (7) development of spreadsheet model of risks and benefits of supplementation; (8) classification of stocks, streams, and supplementation strategies; (9) regional design of supplementation evaluation and monitoring; (10) guidelines for planning supplementation projects (11) application of the spreadsheet model to supplementation planning; and (12)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or otherwise restricted information Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Chris Roger and David Mountz October 1, 2009 2009 Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff...

167

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Supplemental  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2003 to 2030. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2006, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2006 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and seventeen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2006 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 2004-2006 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

170

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Supplemental  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2005 to 2030. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2007, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2007 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and eighteen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2007 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Projections for 2006 and 2007 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term projections and are based on more current information than the AEO.

171

Role of the zeolitic environment in catalytic activation of methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most significant industrial applications of zeolites exploits the ability of the microporous aluminosilicate environment to catalyze the methanol to gasoline (MTG) process. The industrial process proceeds at elevated temperatures ({approximately} 700 K) and methanol pressures which correspond to a loading of {approximately} 5--6 methanol molecules per acidic hydroxyl group, which is believed to be the active site. The authors present an extensive study of the initial stages of the methanol to gasoline conversion in the framework of the ab initio molecular dynamics approach. They investigate the effect of different zeolite environments, methanol loading, and temperature and show that, for understanding the initial adsorption and activation of the adsorbed species, all three factors need to be considered simultaneously. The results allow them to develop a simple model for the activation of the methanol molecule, which elucidates the role of both the zeolite framework and the methanol solvent. The zeolite framework plays an active role in methanol protonation. The solvent significantly softens the C-O bond of the methoxonium, rendering it very anharmonic. High mobility of the methoxonium cation, promoted by some zeolite frameworks, prevents it from forming hydrogen bonds with the active sites and the solvent leading to the activation of the methoxonium species. This picture is shown to be consistent with the experimental infrared spectra.

Stich, I. [Angstrom Technology Partnership, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Angstrom Technology Partnership, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Gale, J.D. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry] [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Terakura, K. [National Inst. for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Higashi, Ibaraki (Japan)] [National Inst. for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Higashi, Ibaraki (Japan); [Japan Science and Technology Corp., Kawaguchi, Saitama (Japan); Payne, M.C. [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Adsorption of intact methanol on Ru,,0001... Pawel Gazdzicki,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in applications such as the direct methanol fuel cell, where Ru/Pt alloys are used as catalysts for dehydration and hydrogen/ deuterium as suggested in the literature is therefore discarded. At very low coverages or by annealing a low coverage methanol layer, hydrogen bonding leads to cluster formation, as evidenced

173

Economic feasibility study of a wood gasification-based methanol plant: A subcontract report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an economic feasibility study for a wood-gasification-based methanol plant. The objectives were to evaluate the current commercial potential of a small-scale, wood-fed methanol plant using the SERI oxygen-blown, pressurized, down-draft gasifier technology and to identify areas requiring further R and D. The gasifier gas composition and material balance were based on a computer model of the SERI gasifier since acceptable test data were not available. The estimated capital cost was based on the Nth plant constructed. Given the small size and commercial nature of most of the equipment, N was assumed to be between 5 and 10. Only large discrepancies in gasifier output would result in significant charges in capital costs. 47 figs., 55 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from CO/CO2...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from COCO2H2H2O Mixtures: the Source of C in Methanol and the Role of Water Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from COCO2H2H2O...

175

Imaging Adsorbate O-H Bond Cleavage: Methanol on TiO2(110). ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adsorbate O-H Bond Cleavage: Methanol on TiO2(110). Imaging Adsorbate O-H Bond Cleavage: Methanol on TiO2(110). Abstract: We investigated methanol adsorption and dissociation on...

176

Methanol adsorption and decomposition on rhodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decomposition of methanol on rhodium probed from {approximately}200 atomic sites of the (001) or (111) planes or Rh field emitter crystals but randomly with regard to crystallographic zones was studied by pulsed field desorption mass spectrometry. High electric field pulses were used to quantitatively desorb the final products, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, thus achieving steady-state conditions. Substantial amounts of methoxy (mainly desorbed as CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions) were also present at the surface. Applying a steady electric field, F{sub R} {ge} 4 V/nm, between the field pulses, led to a deceleration of the decomposition reaction and to increase of the amount of adsorbed CH{sub 3}O and CH{sub 2}O species. There were indicators that the rate-determining step of the reaction is C-H bond cleavage in adsorbed methoxy to form the CH{sub 2}O intermediate. This was supported by the observation of a kinetic isotope effect in the formation of CD{sub 2}O and CHDO from methyl-d{sub 2}-alcohol, CHD{sub 2}OH. Here, the C-H bond breaking to form the CD{sub 2}O was found to be twice as fast as the breaking of the C-D bond which results in CHDO. Field ion microscopy was applied to investigate the influence of the reaction on the structure of the whole hemispherical single crystal surface. There were neither topographic changes nor corrosion of the Rh surface after field-free exposure to 2 Pa methanol at temperatures up to 423 K.

Chuah, G.K.; Kruse, N.; Schmidt, W.A.; Block, J.H.; Abend, G. (Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Conversion of methanol to gasoline commercial plant study. Coal to gasoline via methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the joint sponsorship of the German Federal Minister of Research and Technology (BMFT) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), a research program was initiated concerning the ''Conversion of Methanol to Gasoline (MTG), Engineering, Construction and Operation of a Demonstration Plant''. The purpose of the 100 BPD demonstration plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of and to obtain data required for scale-up of the fluid-bed MTG process to a commercial size plant. As per requirements of Annex 3 of the Governmental Agreement, this study, in addition to the MTG plant, also includes the facilities for the production of methanol. The feedstock basis for the production of methanol shall be coal. Hence this study deals with the production of gasoline from coal (CTG-Coal to Gasoline). The basic objective of this study is to assess the technical feasibility of the conversion of methanol to gasoline in a fluid-bed system and to evaluate the process economies i.e., to evlauate the price of the product in relation to the price of the feedstock and plant capacity. In connection with technical feasibility, the scale up criteria were developed from the results obtained and experience gathered over an operational period of 8600 hours of the ''100 BPD Demonstration Plant''. The scale up philosophy is detailed in chapter 4. The conditions selected for the design of the MTG unit are detailed in chapter 5. The scope of the study covers the production of gasoline from coal, in which MTG section is dealt with in detail (refer to chapter 5). Information on other plant sections in this study are limited to that sufficient to: generate overall mass balance; generate rate of by-products and effluents; incorporate heat integration; generate consumption figures; and establish plant investment cost.

Thiagarajan, N.; Nitschke, E.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

179

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 9. Economics of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed feasibility study of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida encompasses all phases of production - from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The project includes the following components: (1) production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; (2) establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; and (3) engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-year methanol production facility. In addition, the potential environmental impacts of the whole project were examined, safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol were analyzed, and site specific cost estimates were made. The economics of the project are presented here. Each of the three major components of the project - tissue culture lab, energy plantation, and methanol refinery - are examined individually. In each case a site specific analysis of the potential return on investment was conducted.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIS-0246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis 246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon. Title to the land will be held by The Nature Conservancy, who will convey permanent mitigation rights to BPA in the form of a conservation easement. These newly acquired parcels will become part of the existing 330-acre Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Area. Passive management practices may take place on the land until a wildlife mitigation and management plan is developed and approved for the property. Bonneville Power Administration and The Nature Conservancy, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, EIS-0246-SA-18 (October

182

Research on methanol-burning, two-stroke engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In looking for the possibility of burning methanol in the two-stroke marine diesel engine, Mitsubishi decided that its investigations would be for a pure methanol-burning engine. Since ignition of methanol by the straight forward diesel cycle is not attainable, Mitsubishi decided to use glow plugs for ignition. The result has been the adaptation of the 450 mm bore test engine, at Nagasaki, with a special cylinder head carrying two methanol precombustion chambers and two main methanol injectors. Results from the tests at Nagasaki showed that NO[sub x] formation was no more than 500 ppm at full load, while thermal efficiency was at least equal to that of a straight diesel engine. A base model ship for Japanese coastal waters operation is being studied. Plans of the ship have been sent to the Japanese classification society, NK, and they include a separate methanol treatment room and storage tanks. The committee concluded that a methanol-engined ship of about 1000 dwt can be operated economically with a relatively small increase in freight rate. Lower crew costs are part of that equation, because of an expected decrease in machinery maintenance. Conceptual approval for the project is now being sought with NK. 2 figs.

Wilson, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Method of converting environmentally pollutant waste gases to methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A continuous flow method is described of converting environmentally pollutant by-product gases emitted during the manufacture of silicon carbide to methanol comprising: (a) operating a plurality of batch furnaces of a silicon carbide manufacturing plant thereby producing silicon carbide and emitting by-product gases during the operation of the furnaces; (b) staggering the operation of the batch furnaces to achieve a continuous emission of the by-product gases; (c) continuously flowing the by-product gases as emitted from the batch furnaces directly to a methanol manufacturing plant; (d) cleansing the by-product gases of particulate matter, including removing the element sulfur from the by-product gases, as they are flowed to the methanol manufacturing plant, sufficiently for use of the by-product gases in producing methanol; and (e) immediately producing methanol from the by-product gases at the methanol manufacturing plant whereby the producing of silicon carbide is joined with the producing of methanol as a unified process.

Pfingstl, H.; Martyniuk, W.; Hennepin, A. Ill; McNally, T.; Myers, R.; Eberle, L.

1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

Enforcement Guidance Supplements (EGS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplements (EGS) Supplements (EGS) EGS 05-01: Contractor Investigation, Causal Analysis, and Corrective Actions (09/23/2005) EGS 03-02: Revision to Occurrence Report-Based Noncompliance Tracking System Reporting Criteria (09/05/2003) EGS 03-01: Supplemental Guidance Concerning the Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 (07/21/2003) EGS 02-01: Enforcement Position Relative to 10 CFR 835 Bioassay Accreditation (02/21/2002) EGS 01-02: Management and Independent Assessment (12/17/2001) EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapons Program Enforcement Issues (10/15/2001) EGS 00-04: Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 and Compliance Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR Subpart C (10/26/2000) EGS 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of 10 CFR 830 (09/12/2000)

185

Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Al Al b any, OR * Mo rg antow n , WV * Pitt, bu rg h , PA August 12, 20 II Dear Reader: The enclosed document, Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for General Motors LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative (supplemental EA; DOElEA- I 723S), was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500 to 1508) and DOE NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). DOE prepared this supplemental EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing financial assistance under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act; Public Law 111-5, 123 Stat. liS) to General Motors Limited Liability Company (GM) for its proposed project

186

First methanol-to-gasoline plant nears startup in New Zealand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sometime during the summer 1985, New Zealand Synthetic Fuels Co. was scheduled to begin operating its new plant at Motunui, New Zealand. It marks the first commercial application of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Moreover, as the result of a modular approach directed by Bechtel Corp. personnel, the plant represents a major construction success. It is also the first example of a new technology that may seriously challenge traditional Fischer-Tropsch chemistry as a route to synthetic fuels and organic feedstocks. The MTG plant will produce 14,000 barrels per day of gasoline with an octane number rating of 92 to 94 (according to research results). This amount is about one third of present New Zealand demand. The gasoline will be made by catalytic conversion of methanol coming from two plants, each producing about 220 metric tons per day for the single-train MTG plant. The methanol, in turn, is derived from reforming of natural gas from offshore fields in the Tasman Sea.

Haggin, J.

1985-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Maternal Supplement Use During Pregnancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: There is little consensus regarding the need for vitamin and mineral supplementation during pregnancy. The composition and use of supplements among pregnant women varies greatly. Toxicity or inadequacy of nutrients could have health...

Bratton, Mallory Michelle

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have found novel nanocatalysts that lower the barrier to converting carbon dioxide (CO2)-an abundant greenhouse gas-into methanol (CH3OH)-a key commodity used to produce...

189

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt...

190

Perovskite-Based Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Perovskite-Based Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells ... The addition of Ru substantially improves the CO tolerance of the catalyst, and there has been a great deal of research on the optimization of the alloy composition and structure. ...

Aidong Lan; Alexander S. Mukasyan

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Converting CO2 emissions and hydrogen into methanol vehicle fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are new possibilities for transforming the ecological position of the metal-producing industries by utilizing their green-house gas emissions with electrolytically produced hydrogen to generate methanol ...

Bragi rnason; Thorsteinn I. Sigfsson

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC Jump to: navigation, search Name Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation (DMFCC) Place Altadena, California Zip 91001 Product DMFCC is focused on providing intellectual property protection and disposable fuel cartridge for the direct methanol fuel cell industry. Coordinates 34.185405°, -118.131529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.185405,"lon":-118.131529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning the Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 Enforcement Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning the Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 In October 2000, the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) issued Enforcement Guidance Supplement (EGS) 00-04, "Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 and Compliance Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR subpart C." That EGS, in part, delineated a set of criteria that OE would use to determine whether to apply its enforcement discretion, in this case through the use of Consent Orders. Those criteria provided both guidance to DOE contractors regarding situations for which the use of

194

Catalytic decomposition of methanol at various temperatures and several liquid hourly space velocities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRIBUTION FOR COMPOSITE CATALYST B POSSIBLE REACTOR CONFIGURATION FOR THE PRODUCTION OF A GASEOUS FUEL ~Pa e 12 15 21 23 26 28 33 35 37 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Methanol can be produced from coal, and natural gas from foreign sources can... increase in 0 temperature resulted in a rapid increase in the production of C02, CO, C2H4, H2 and CH4 with a corresponding decrease in the production of dimethyl ether. In the case of zinc oxide catalyst the formation of dimethyl ether was almost...

Gupta, Yashpal Satyapal

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported on MCM-48  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Methanol reacts reversibly, at a ratio of approximately 1 methanol per V, with one V-O-Si to produce both V-state reaction conditions, CH2O is produced as the dominant product of methanol oxidation at temperatures belowMechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported

Bell, Alexis T.

196

Design of Extraction Column Methanol Recovery System for the TAME Reactive Distillation Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, methanol recovery 1. Introduction A process of producing TAME via reactive distillation has been presented the bulk of the reaction between C5 and methanol to produce TAME and a reactive distillation. MethanolDesign of Extraction Column Methanol Recovery System for the TAME Reactive Distillation Process

Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

197

Structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded methanol oligomers: Vibrational transient hole burning studies of spectral diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-d in a solution containing 0.8% methanol-d/23% methanol-h in carbon tetrachloride. Methanol-d molecules that both-d in an isotopically mixed solu- tion of methanol dissolved in carbon tetrachloride.11­13 The first step involved

Fayer, Michael D.

198

First principles Tafel kinetics of methanol oxidation on Pt(111)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrocatalytic methanol oxidation is of fundamental importance in electrochemistry and also a key reaction in direct methanol fuel cell. To resolve the kinetics at the atomic level, this work investigates the potential-dependent reaction kinetics of methanol oxidation on Pt(111) using the first principles periodic continuum solvation model based on modified-PoissonBoltzmann equation (CM-MPB), focusing on the initial dehydrogenation elementary steps. A theoretical model to predict Tafel kinetics (current vs potential) is established by considering that the rate-determining step of methanol oxidation (to CO) is the first CH bond breaking (CH3OH(aq)?CH2OH*+H*) according to the computed free energy profile. The first CH bond breaking reaction needs to overcome a large entropy loss during methanol approaching to the surface and replacing the adsorbed water molecules. While no apparent charge transfer is involved in this elementary step, the charge transfer coefficient of the reaction is calculated to be 0.36, an unconventional value for charge transfer reactions, and the Tafel slope is deduced to be 166mV. The results show that the metal/adsorbate interaction and the solvation environment play important roles on influencing the Tafel kinetics. The knowledge learned from the potential-dependent kinetics of methanol oxidation can be applied in general for understanding the electrocatalytic reactions of organic molecules at the solidliquid interface.

Ya-Hui Fang; Zhi-Pan Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

2.1E Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECFD Efficiency of diesel engine (Btu/Btu) THLOF Ratio ofDIESEL-OIL COAL METHANOL OTHER-FUEL ELEC-NET-SALE ELEC-BUY/SELL calculated calculated English ENERGY/UNIT Btu

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

Doug Strickland

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

LWX-0014 Supplemental Order  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner: Ronald A. Sorri Date of Filing: September 26, 1994 Case Number: LWX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated December 16, 1993, issued by the undersigned Hearing Officer of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint filed by Ronald A. Sorri (Sorri) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Ronald A. Sorri, 23 DOE & 87,503 (1993) (Sorri). In the December 16 Decision, I found that Sorri had proven by a preponderance of the evidence that he engaged in activities protected under Part 708 and that these activities were a contributing

202

Enforcement Guidance Supplement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EGS:01-02 Appendix E- Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 17, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF PRICE-ANDERSON ENFORCEMENT SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-02: Management and Independent Assessment Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. OE typically issues such guidance in the form of Enforcement Guidance Supplements (EGSs), which provide information or recommendations only and impose no requirements or actions on DOE contractors.

203

EIS-0236-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement -S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Stockpile Stewardship and Management This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al. The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably

204

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington BPA, YIN and WDFW are proposing to collect broodstock, incubate eggs and rear fry in hatcheries; acclimate and release smolts; and study the natural production, ecological interactions, long-term fitness, and culturing/genetics of spring and fall chinook and coho salmon in the Yakima River basin. In the Klickitat basin, salmonid life history and physical habitat data would be collected. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-1: Supplement Analysis for Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington (May 1999)

205

EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for fish and wildlife impacts caused by the construction and operation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project. Title to the land will be transferred to the Coeur d'Alene Tribe for wildlife habitat protection and enhancement. The goal of this project is to protect and restore riparian, wetland, floodplain and river corridor systems to help enhance water quality and in-stream habitat in the St. Joe Watershed. Bonneville Power Administration and The Nature Conservancy, Supplement

206

EIS-0220: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis 20: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis determination EIS-0220: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis determination Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site DOE has now further decided, because of health and safety vulnerabilities, to stabilize the remaining TRR spent nuclear fuel located in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) at the SRS, using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities. The TRR spent nuclear fuel to be stabilized consists of the equivalent of 310 fuel rods (some of the rods were fragmented due to conditions in Taiwan) in 62 aluminum canisters stored underwater in RBOF. DOE has decided to stabilize the TRR spent nuclear fuel because additional TRR spent fuel in at least two of the canisters has failed, and DOE

207

Methanol fumigation of a light duty automotive diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Oldsmobile 5.7 l V-8 diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of this study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluable organic extract was also made using both the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the Bacillus subtilis Comptest. Results are presented for a test matrix consisting of twelve steady state operating conditions chosen to reflect over-the-road operation of a diesel engine powered automobile. Generally methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. While the biological activity of the raw particulate was generally found to be lower than that of the soluble organic fraction, the fumigation of methanol appears to enhance this activity in both cases.

Houser, K.R.; Lestz, S.S.; Dukovich, M.; Yasbin, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

210

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

211

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

212

Supplementation Strategies for Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

situations is to stimulate, B-6067 10-97 Supplementation Strategies for Beef Cattle Ted McCollum III* *Professor and Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, The Texas A&M University System. 2 Figure 1. Three possible situations encountered in a supplementation... situations is to stimulate, B-6067 10-97 Supplementation Strategies for Beef Cattle Ted McCollum III* *Professor and Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, The Texas A&M University System. 2 Figure 1. Three possible situations encountered in a supplementation...

McCollum III, Ted

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Perovskite anode electrocatalysis for direct methanol fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation explores direct methanol fuel cells incorporating perovskite anode electrocatalysts. Preliminary electrochemical performance was addressed following incorporation of electrocatalysts into polymer electrolyte (Nafion 417) fuel cells. Perovskite electrocatalysts demonstrating activity towards direct methanol oxidation during cyclic voltammetry measurements included, respectively, SrRu[sub 0.5]Pt[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], SrRu[sub 0.5]Pd[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], SrPdO[sub 3], SmCoO[sub 3], SrRuO[sub 3], La[sub 0.8]Ce[sub 0.2]CoC[sub 3],SrCo[sub 0.5]Ti[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], and La[sub 0.8]Sr[sub 0.2]CoO[sub 3] where SrRu[sub 0.5]Pt[sub 0.5]P[sub 3] gave methanol oxidation currents up to 28 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.45 V vs. SCE. Correlations were found between electrocatalyst solid-state and thermodynamic parameters corresponding to, respectively, molecular electronic polarizability, the optical dielectric constant, the perovskite spin-only magnetic moment, the number of d-electrons in perovskite A and B lattice sites, and the average metal-oxygen binding energy for the perovskite lattice, and corresponding fuel cell performance. This may have future merit for the prediction of new electrocatalyst family members for promoting direct methanol oxidation. Methanol diffusion from anode to cathode compartments appears to be a major obstacle to the development of polymer electrolyte methanol fuel cells.

White, J.H.; Sammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Supplement Tables - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplement Tables to the AEO99 Supplement Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Annual Energy Outlook 1999 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage furtherinfo.gif (5474 bytes) The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441), Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gas Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; or Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. Detailed questions about the forecasts and related model components may be addressed to the following analysts:

216

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplement Analysis Proposed Silo 3 Alternatives at the FEMP March 1, 1991 EIS-0026-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Transuranic Waste Characterization And Repackaging...

217

ATOM-ECONOMICAL PATHWAYS TO METHANOL FUEL CELL FROM BIOMASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economical production of alcohol fuels from biomass, a feedstock low in carbon and high in water content, is of interest. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a Liquid Phase Low Temperature (LPLT) concept is under development to improve the economics by maximizing the conversion of energy carrier atoms (C,H) into energy liquids (fuel). So far, the LPLT concept has been successfully applied to obtain highly efficient methanol synthesis. This synthesis was achieved with specifically designed soluble catalysts, at temperatures < 150 C. A subsequent study at BNL yielded a water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for the production of hydrogen from a feedstock of carbon monoxide and H{sub 2}O at temperatures < 120 C. With these LPLT technologies as a background, this paper extends the discussion of the LPLT concept to include methanol decomposition into 3 moles of H{sub 2} per mole of methanol. The implication of these technologies for the atom-economical pathways to methanol fuel cell from biomass is discussed.

MAHAJAN,D.; WEGRZYN,J.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4In2O3 Model...

220

Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenati...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A new blending agent and its effects on methanol-gasoline fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major difficulty encountered with the use of methanol-gasoline blends as SI engine fuel is their tendency to phase separation due to the hydrophilic properties of methanol. Phase separation can lead to some utilization problems. Using a blending agent for the methanol-gasoline system is the common approach taken towards solving the phase separation problem. In this study introduces fraction of molasses fuel oil as an effective new blending agent for methanol-gasoline fuel.

Karaosmanoglu, F.; Isigiguer-Erguedenler, A.; Aksoy, H.A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and later COP and the industrial partners investigated the use of syngas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort were to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from syngas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The intended result of the project was to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that would be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The EECP study conducted in Phase 1 of the IMPPCCT Project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there were minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the syngas. However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase 2 was to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase 1 RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies were designed to address the technical concerns that would mak

Conocophillips

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Supplement Analysis Plutonium Consolidation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9-SA-4 9-SA-4 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS STORAGE OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE In April 2002, DOE decided to immediately consolidate long-term storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of surplus, non-pit weapons-usable plutonium then stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) (DOE, 2002a). That 2002 decision did not affect an earlier DOE decision made in the January 21, 1997, Record of Decision (ROD, DOE, 1997) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Storage and Disposition PEIS, DOE, 1996) to continue storage of non-pit surplus plutonium at Hanford, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Los Alamos

225

Nov 2007 STEO Supplement  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

07 07 1 November 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Why Are Oil Prices So High? 1 Crude oil prices have increased dramatically in recent years. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices, which remained around $20 per barrel during the 1990's, rose, on average, from about $31 per barrel in 2003 to $57 per barrel in 2005, and to $66 per barrel in 2006. In 2007, WTI crude oil prices have climbed further, to average over $85 per barrel in October, topping $90 per barrel at the end of the month. The EIA believes that the following supply and demand fundamentals are the main drivers behind recent oil price movements: 1) Strong world economic growth driving growth in oil use, 2) Moderate non-Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries

226

Methanol adsorbates on the DMFC cathode and their effect on the cell performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methanol adsorbates on the DMFC cathode and their effect on the cell performance J. Prabhuram, T performance was due to the permeated methanol adsorbates on platinum sites of the cathode, which impede utilized to get rid of the methanol adsorbates from the cathode electrochemically by sweeping from 0 to 1

Zhao, Tianshou

227

Performance modeling and cell design for high concentration methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) it reduces the fuel efficiency (methanol is reacted without producing electrical current). We canChapter 50 Performance modeling and cell design for high concentration methanol fuel cells C. E The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has become a lead- ing contender to replace the lithium-ion (Li

228

Correlating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this process is a limiting factor in the performance of direct methanol fuel cells, which produce electricityCorrelating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by micelle encapsulation and supported on -Al2O3 during the oxidation of methanol

Kik, Pieter

229

Towards the optimal integrated production of biodiesel with internal recycling of methanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the syngas reacts to produce methanol. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the process have been long studied [18, 19, 24]. Recently a new path to produce methanol from glycerol has been proposed the design and the energy efficiency as well as to decide whether it is profitable to produce methanol

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

230

Seasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2002] and photochemical produc- tion from hydrocarbon precursors. Methanol is often the most abundantSeasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets December 2005; published 21 February 2006. [1] Acetone and methanol have been measured hourly at a rural

Cohen, Ronald C.

231

Catalysis Today 53 (1999) 433441 New insights into methanol synthesis catalysts from X-ray absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O and Cr2O3 mixtures and produced methanol in low yields from CO­H2 mixtures at high temperatures (593Catalysis Today 53 (1999) 433­441 New insights into methanol synthesis catalysts from X a consistent structural picture of methanol synthesis catalysts. Copper metal is the principal Cu species

Iglesia, Enrique

232

Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2012 BP Methanol Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issues in the well heads. To counteract this problem, methanol is injected into the produced water stream-effective system that would remove methanol from the produced water stream. Objectives Our objective was to reduce the methanol concentration of either one of two produced water samples. Specifically, our goal was to reduce

Demirel, Melik C.

233

EIS-0220: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

record of decision and supplement analysis record of decision and supplement analysis determination EIS-0220: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis determination Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site DOE has now further decided, because of health and safety vulnerabilities, to stabilize the remaining TRR spent nuclear fuel located in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) at the SRS, using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities. The TRR spent nuclear fuel to be stabilized consists of the equivalent of 310 fuel rods (some of the rods were fragmented due to conditions in Taiwan) in 62 aluminum canisters stored underwater in RBOF. DOE has decided to stabilize the TRR spent nuclear fuel because additional TRR spent fuel in at least two of the canisters has failed, and DOE

234

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 In October 2000, the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) issued Enforcement Guidance Supplement (EGS) 00-04, "Factual...

235

II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws and regulations applicable to each program, including the requirements specific to each program that should be tested using the guidance in this part. Compliance Requirements, Audit Objectives, and Suggested Audit Procedures At the end of this General Compliance Supplement is a matrix that outlines the compliance requirements, including special tests and provisions, that are applicable to programs performed under

236

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process. Peroxide formation of dimethyl ether in methanol mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic peroxides could form when dimethyl ether in methanol is stored for three to six months at a time. The objective of this work was to determine the level of peroxide formation from dimethyl ether in reagent grade methanol and raw methanol at room temperature under 3 atmospheres (45 psig) of air. Raw methanol is methanol made from syngas by the LPMEOH Process without distillation. Aliphatic ethers tend to react slowly with oxygen from the air to form unstable peroxides. However, there are no reports on peroxide formation from dimethyl ether. After 172 days of testing, dimethyl ether in either reagent methanol or raw methanol at room temperature and under 60--70 psig pressure of air does not form detectable peroxides. Lack of detectable peroxides suggests that dimethyl ether or dimethyl ether and methanol may be stored at ambient conditions. Since the compositions of {approximately} 1.3 mol% or {approximately} 4.5 mol% dimethyl ether in methanol do not form peroxides, these compositions can be considered for diesel fuel or an atmospheric turbine fuel, respectively.

Waller, F.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2003 2003 There were two corrections to Table 117 in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 Supplemental Tables: 1. The Total rows for all three table sections (Crude Oil, Light Refined Products, and Heavy Refined Products) were adjusted to accurately reflect the summation of the regions listed in the section. (Change made on 3/20/2003) 2. The final column, representing the growth rate from 2001 to 2025, for the Heavy Refined Products section was corrected. (Change made on 3/20/2003) 3. The regional sulfur dioxide emissions in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 supplemental tables 60-72 were updated. Previously, this row in each table had contained the national total. (Change made on 4/7/03) 4. Supplement tables 60-73 were updated to correct Fuel Consumption for Petroleum, Natural Gas,

238

EIS-0246-SA-38: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Supplement Analysis 8: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-38: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead River System, Flathead County, Montana BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study.

239

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 20, 2003 March 20, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-133: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 19, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-132: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 12, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-06: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project March 10, 2003 EIS-0225-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Continued Operation of the National Nuclear Security Administration, Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components March 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-130: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 7, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-129: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 6, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-128: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program

240

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 14, 2001 September 14, 2001 EIS-0265-SA-62: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program and the Hood River Fisheries Project September 13, 2001 EIS-0246-SA-17: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Management Program September 11, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-26: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program September 5, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-28: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program September 5, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-25: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 17, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-23: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 17, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-22: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, King and Snohomish Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

FTCP Issue Paper Supplemental Competencies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Competencies DOCUMENT NUMBER FTCP-12- 003 PROBLEM: There is no approved process for issuing supplemental competencies. BACKGROUND: Supplemental competencies cover important skills and abilities that are less than an entire function or position, and for which an entire Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) is not appropriate. The Human Factors Engineering (HFE) competencies issued by the FTCP in March 2012 are an example. The FTCP established a working group to develop HFE competencies, and the Panel provided them for use. Another example is the Safety System Oversight (SSO) function, which does not have (or require) a dedicated FAQS, but does need some oversight-related supplemental competencies. It is likely that other disciplines or

242

2.1E Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplement 2.IE Update AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP ENHANCEMENTScurve for air source electric and gas heat pumps do not useP E = PSZ HEAT-SOURCE = GAS-HEAT-PUMP A four-pipe G H P air

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Tax Refund for Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

245

Investigation of operating range in a methanol fumigated diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An experimental study was conducted to investigate the operating range and combustion characteristics in a methanol fumigated diesel engine. The test engine was a six-cylinder, turbocharged direct injection engine with methanol injected into the intake manifold of each cylinder. The experimental results showed that the viable diesel methanol dual fuel (DMDF) operating range in terms of load and methanol substitution percent (MSP) was achieved over a load range from 6% to 100%. The operating range was restricted by four bounds: partial burning, misfire, roar combustion and knock. The lower bound of the operating range was the partial burn bound, which occurred under very low load conditions with high MSP. As the load increased to medium load, MSP reached its maximum value of about 76%, and the onset of misfire provided the right bound for normal operation. At medium to high load, maximum MSP began to decrease. DMDF combustion with excessive MSP was extremely loud with high pressure rise rate, which defined the roar combustion bound. As it increased to nearly full load, measured pressure traces in-cylinder showed strong acoustic oscillations. The appearance of knock provided the upper bound of the operating range. In general, as the load increased, the characters of the combustion changed from partial burn to misfire to roar combustion and to knocking. The range between these four bounds and the neat diesel combustion bound constituted the viable operating range. Over the viable operating range, DMDF combustion worsened the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) at light load while boosted it at medium and high load.

Quangang Wang; Lijiang Wei; Wang Pan; Chunde Yao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

Adzic, Radoslav

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Recent advances in high-performance direct methanol fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant. Power densities as high as 320 mW/cm{sup 2} have been demonstrated. Demonstration of five-cell stack based on the liquid-feed concept have been successfully performed by Giner Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 2000 hours of life-testing have been completed on these stacks. These fuel cells have been also been demonstrated by USC to operate on alternate fuels such as trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane and trioxane. Reduction in the parasitic loss of fuel across the fuel cell, a phenomenon termed as {open_quotes}fuel crossover{close_quotes} has been achieved using polymer membranes developed at USC. As a result efficiencies as high as 40% is considered attainable with this type of fuel cell. The state-of-development has reached a point where it is now been actively considered for stationary, portable and transportation applications. The research and development issues have been the subject of several previous articles and the present article is an attempt to summarize the key advances in this technology.

Narayanan, S.R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T.I. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to electric energy in a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell was demon- strated. Although hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells): Application to Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Jeremy Kua and William A. Goddard III* Contribution from and designing new catalysts. We find that methanol dehydrogenation is most facile on Pt, with the hydrogens

Goddard III, William A.

249

EIS-0265-SA-100: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-100: Supplement Analysis Oregon Fish Screening Project, Screen Replacements Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program...

250

EIS-0312-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan The attached Supplement Analysis for Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's)...

251

EIS-0312-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Supplement Analysis for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS (DOE...

252

EIS-0285-SA-142: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-142: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

253

EIS-0290-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0290-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Naval Reactors Facility Sludge Pan Container Disposition Project DOEEIS-0290-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Naval Reactors...

254

EIS-0026-SA-09: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SA-09: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-SA-09: Supplement Analysis Supplement Analysis for a Proposal to Temporarily Store Defense Transuranic Waste Prior to Disposal at the Waste...

255

EIS-0026-SA-05: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

-SA-05: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Wide Operations, Carlsbad, New Mexico This supplement analysis examines changes to...

256

EIS-0265-SA-90: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-90: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program Naches River Water Treatment Plant Intake Screening Project (September 2002) Supplement...

257

EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement This Supplemental DEIS evaluates the...

258

Supplemental Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Supplemental Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplemental Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplemental Analysis for the Final...

259

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability. Supplement 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove {sup 137}CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

262

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

263

SNL/CA Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22-SA-01 22-SA-01 Supplement Analysis for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California [September 2012] U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office This page intentionally left blank COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TITLE: Supplement Analysis for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California (DOE/EA-1422-SA-01) CONTACT: For further information concerning this Supplement Analysis, contact Ms. Susan Lacy Environmental Team Leader Sandia Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration P. O. Box 5400, MS 0184 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5400 Phone: (505) 845-5542

264

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1 June 2008 Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1 June 2008 Foreword COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

265

Microsoft Word - Price Probabilities Supplement.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 1 April 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Probabilities of Possible Future Prices 1 EIA introduced a monthly analysis of energy price volatility and forecast uncertainty in the October 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). Included in the analysis were charts portraying confidence intervals around the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures prices of West Texas Intermediate (equivalent to light sweet crude oil) and Henry Hub natural gas contracts. The March 2010 STEO added another set of charts listing the probability of the future realized price exceeding or falling below given price levels (see Figures 1A and 1B for West Texas Intermediate crude oil price probabilities). These charts are also available as spreadsheets allowing users to input their own prices to

266

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the U.S.  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Options for sustainable and/or energy-secure transportation L. Bromberg and W.K. Cheng Prepared by the Sloan Automotive Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139 September 27, 2010 Finalized November 2, 2010 Revised November 28, 2010 Final report UT-Battelle Subcontract Number:4000096701 1 Abstract Methanol has been promoted as an alternative transportation fuel from time to time over the past forty years. In spite of significant efforts to realize the vision of methanol as a practical transportation fuel in the US, such as the California methanol fueling corridor of the 1990s, it did not succeed on a large scale. This white paper covers all important aspects of methanol as a transportation fuel.

267

Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 10, 2004 August 10, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 10, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-168: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 9, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-167: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 6, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-166: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 4, 2004 EIS-0310-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States August 4, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence August 4, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program August 2, 2004 EIS-0265-SA-164: Supplement Analysis

269

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 2, 2003 October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis August 27, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County August 22, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington May 21, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana May 20, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-32: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program

270

Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

Becker, G.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

California Energy Commission SUPPLEMENTAL STAFF REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Commission SUPPLEMENTAL STAFF REPORT SUPPLEMENTAL INITIAL STUDY AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor MAY 2012 CEC4002012002SP #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Joe Loyer Primary Author Maziar Shirakh, P.E. Project Manager

272

Recommendations for the Supplement Analysis Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has prepared this guidance regarding Supplement Analyses.The guidance discusses decisions regarding whether to prepare a Supplement Analysis (SA), the substantive content of the analysis, procedural aspects of preparing an SA, and the outcomes that can result.

273

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » NEPA Documents » Supplement Analyses (SA) Services » NEPA Documents » Supplement Analyses (SA) Supplement Analyses (SA) A document that DOE prepares in accordance with DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR 1021.314(c)) to determine whether a supplemental or new EIS should be prepared pursuant to CEQ NEPA regulations (40 CFR 1502.9(c). If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. Documents Available for Download October 10, 2013 EA-1812: Final Supplement Analysis Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips Counties, CO September 10, 2013 EIS-0310-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Nuclear Infrastructure Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis Determination for Plutonium-238 Production for Radioisotope Power Systems June 14, 2013 EA-1562-SA-1: Supplement Analysis

274

Structures, intermolecular rotation barriers, and thermodynamic properties of chlorinated methanols and chlorinated methyl hydroperoxides.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermochemical property data on chlorinated methanols and methyl hydroperoxides are important in oxidation, combustion and atmospheric photochemistry of chlorocarbons, Enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacities are (more)

Sun, Hongyan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A KINETIC S'FUDY OF METHANOL SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY REACTOR USING  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

by industry. Air Products and Chemicals company with funding from the Department of Energy built a 5 tonday plant employing the liquid phase methanol process technique where...

276

Understanding the effect of modifying elements in supported vanadia bilayered catalysts for methanol oxidation to formaldehyde  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that methanol initially adsorbs dissociatively producingmethanol dissociatively adsorbs across a V-O- support bond, producingmethanol dissociatively adsorbs across a V-O-Si bond producing

Vining, William Collins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A self-regulated passive fuel-feed system for passive direct methanol fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Unlike active direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) that require liquid pumps and gas compressors to supply reactants, the design of passive DMFCs eliminates these ancillary (more)

Chan, Yeuk Him

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute methanol toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... ) to acetaldehyde to acetate to acetyl CoA Methanol ...

279

Fabrication of mDMFC and Effect of Methanol Modification on its Performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were characterized with low operation temperature, high energy density, rapid activation, easy to obtain, easy to carry, safety, stability and (more)

Lu, Chang-Wei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

EIS-0350-SA-02: Final Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Supplement Analysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Supplement to Loan Guarantee Solicitation Announcement | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for projects that employ innovative energy efficiency, renewable energy, and advanced transmission and distribution technologies Supplement to Loan Guarantee Solicitation...

282

EIS-0236-S4: Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S4: Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Complex Transformation The National...

283

Recommendations for the Supplement Analysis Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recommendations Recommendations for the Supplement Analysis Process July 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Recommendations for the Supplement Analysis Process July 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance printed on recycled paper Recommendations for the Supplement Analysis Process Contents

284

Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 21, 2002 June 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 20, 2002 EIS-0170-SA-01: Supplement Analysis System Operation Review EIS, Bonneville Power Administration, and B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, British Columbia, Canada June 19, 2002 EIS-0265-SA-83: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program June 11, 2002 EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program May 31, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-58: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program May 24, 2002 EIS-0183-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Klondike Wind Project - Power Purchase Agreement, Contract Number 02PB-11093 Near Wasco, Sherman County, Oregon May 23, 2002 EIS-0246-SA-24: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program May 21, 2002

288

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 15, 2011 August 15, 2011 EIS-0399-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Montana-Alberta Tie Ltd. 230-kV Transmission Line Project August 4, 2011 EIS-0348-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory August 4, 2011 EIS-0348-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA July 12, 2011 EIS-0407-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Abengoa Biorefinery Project, near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas July 11, 2011 EIS-0281-SA-01: Supplemental Analysis Reestablishing Long -Term Pulse Mode Testing Capability at the Annular Core Research Reactor, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico July 8, 2011 EIS-0240-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis

289

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 30, 2001 March 30, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 27, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 9, 2001 EIS-0285-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 1, 2001 EIS-0189: Supplement Analysis Tank Waste Remediation System December 1, 2000 EIS-0200-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) November 1, 2000 EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities September 20, 2000 EIS-0238-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory

290

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 27, 2002 February 27, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-46: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 27, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-45: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 27, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-43: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 20, 2002 EIS-0265-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Gourlay Creek Fish Ladder Project February 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-40: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 15, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-42: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 5, 2002 EIS-0229-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials in the K-Area Material Storage Facility at The Savannah River Site

291

Testing maser-based evolutionary schemes: A new search for 37.7-GHz methanol masers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22-m antenna to search for 37.7-GHz (7(-2) - 8(-1}E) methanol masers towards a sample of thirty six class II methanol masers. The target sources are the most luminous class II methanol masers not previously searched for this transition, with isotropic peak 12.2-GHz maser luminosity greater than 250 Jy/kpc^2 and isotropic peak 6.7-GHz maser luminosity greater than 800 Jy/kpc^2. Seven new 37.7-GHz methanol masers were detected as a result of the search. The detection rate for 37.7-GHz methanol masers towards a complete sample of all such class II methanol maser sites south of declination -20 deg is at least 30 percent. The relatively high detection rate for this rare methanol transition is in line with previous predictions that the 37.7-GHz transition is associated with a late stage of the class II methanol maser phase of high-mass star formation. We find that there is a modest correlation between the ratio of the 6.7- and 37.7-GHz maser peak intensit...

Ellingsen, S P; Voronkov, M A; Dawson, J R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory Ricardo B. Metz Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 USA Abstract Gas such as methanol has attracted great experimental and theoretical interest due to its importance as an industrial

Metz, Ricardo B.

293

Mechanism of O2 Activation and Methanol Production by (Di(2-pyridyl)methanesulfonate)PtII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conversion of methane to methanol at low temper- ature is crucial for transportation of shale gas produced it to methanol and its derivatives. In this system, the kinetics of the oxidation of Pt(II) is important because activation and selective conversion of Pt(II) monomethyl complex (dpms)PtII Me(OH2) to its monomethyl Pt

Goddard III, William A.

294

Techno-Economic Assessment and Environmental Impact of Shale Gas Alternatives to Methanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Techno-Economic Assessment and Environmental Impact of Shale Gas Alternatives to Methanol ... Recent discoveries of shale gas reserves have promoted a renewed interest in gas-to-liquid technologies for the production of fuels and chemicals. ... In this work, an economic and environmental analysis for the production of methanol from shale gas is presented. ...

Laura M. Julin-Durn; Andrea P. Ortiz-Espinoza; Mahmoud M. El-Halwagi; Arturo Jimnez-Gutirrez

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydrogen Bond Dissociation and Reformation in Methanol Oligomers Following Hydroxyl Stretch Relaxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bond Dissociation and Reformation in Methanol Oligomers Following Hydroxyl Stretch, 2002 Vibrational relaxation and hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol-d dissolved in CCl4 have been-d molecules both accepting and donating hydrogen bonds at 2500 cm-1 . Following vibrational relaxation

Fayer, Michael D.

296

Performance and endurance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operated on methanol reformate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance and endurance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operated on methanol reformate Samuel September 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: High temperature PEM Fuel cell Methanol Impedance spectroscopy]. The report forecasts even more success for fuel cells in the near future. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel

Kær, Søren Knudsen

297

Effect of Transient Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions on the OCV of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Transient Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions on the OCV of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells in the mass transport of various species and electrochemical reactions in DMFCs compared with hydrogen- fueled of a direct methanol fuel cell DMFC was observed to undergo an overshoot before it stabilized during

Zhao, Tianshou

298

Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- bonding configuration between the methanol and the water molecules at the surface and in the bulk when the methanol molecule resides in the interfacial region. Introduction Oxygenated hydrocarbons play reactions in this atmospheric region.3 However, the sources and sinks of these oxygenated hydrocarbons

299

PART V: DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

year (volume delivered directly to consumers multiplied by average Btu content per unit volume) and dividing by the total volume delivered directly to consumers during that...

300

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development and demonstration of advanced technologies for direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons (methanol, methane, propane)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct methanol fuel cells use methanol directly as a fuel, rather than the reformate typically required by fuel cells, thus eliminating the reformer and fuel processing train. In this program, Giner, Inc. advanced development of two types of direct methanol fuel cells for military applications. Advancements in direct methanol proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (DMPEMFC) technology included developement of a Pt-Ru anode catalyst and an associated electrode structure which provided some of the highest DMPEMFC performance reported to date. Scale-up from a laboratory-scale single cell to a 5-cell stack of practical area, providing over 100 W of power, was also demonstrated. Stable stack performance was achieved in over 300 hours of daily on/off cycling. Direct methanol aqueous carbonate fuel cells were also advanced with development of an anode catalyst and successful operation at decreased pressure. Improved materials for the cell separator/matrix and the hardware were also identified.

Kosek, J.A.; LaConti, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Influence of Chain Dynamics on the Far Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Methanol-Water Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Far-infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the low frequency ({center_dot} 100 cm{sup -1}) intermolecular modes of methanol in mixtures with water. With the aid of a first principles molecular dynamics simulation on an equivalent system, a detailed understanding about the origin of the low frequency IR modes has been established. The total dipole spectrum from the simulation suggests that the bands appearing in the experimental spectra at approximately 55 cm{sup -1} and 70 cm{sup -1} in methanol and methanol-rich mixtures arise from both fluctuations and torsional motions occurring within the methanol hydrogen-bonded chains. The influence of these modes on both the solvation dynamics and the relaxation mechanisms in the liquid are discussed within the context of recent experimental and theoretical results that have emerged from studies focusing on the short time dynamics in the methanol hydrogen bond network.

Woods, K.N.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL; ,

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dinh (PI) Dinh (PI) Thomas Gennett National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives Develop cost-effective, reliable, durable fuel cells for portable power applications (e.g., cell phones, computers, etc.) that meet all DOE targets. Note that the energy density (Wh/L), volumetric (W/L), and specific power (W/kg) all depend on knowing the weight and volume of the entire DMFC system as well as the volume and concentration of fuel, which are system specific (power application and manufacturer dependent). In our model study the surface power density levels on HOPG will allow for indirect evaluation of our system to DOE's energy density

304

Process for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen from methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen which comprises contacting methanol vapor at a temperature of 200 degrees to 300 degrees C with an indirectly heated zinc containing catalyst to obtain an effluent gas in which the components of carbon monoxide and hydrogen constitute at least 90% by volume of said gas. At least a part of the impurities from said effluent gas are removed and said effluent gas is deparated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by adsorption. The effluent gas can be separated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by use of a plurality of adsorbers containing zeolite-type molecular sieve material where the zeolite is substantially permeable to hydrogen but sorbs carbon monoxide.

Jockel, H.; Marschner, F.; Moller, F.W.; Mortel, H.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Enhanced self-diffusion of adsorbed methanol in silica aerogel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular transport of a two-component system of liquid and vapor in a porous medium can be anomalously increased owing to fast exchange between the two phases [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 43 (1989)]. We have investigated this phenomenon measuring the self-diffusion coefficient of methanol adsorbed in a 98% porosity aerogel using nuclear magnetic resonance field gradient techniques. We found enhancement of several orders of magnitude from which we determined the ballistic mean-free path in the vapor phase. We have grown globally uniform anisotropic aerogels and applied the diffusion measurements to characterize the anisotropy. Our results are important for understanding the novel properties of superfluid He3 confined within an aerogel framework and for application to other physical systems.

Jeongseop A. Lee; A. M. Mounce; Sangwon Oh; A. M. Zimmerman; W. P. Halperin

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey > Overview Survey > Overview Overview Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line Highlights on Federal Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the Government. Extensive analysis of the data was not conducted because this report represents the 881 responding buildings (buildings for which interviews were completed) and cannot be used to generalize about Federal buildings in each region. Crosstabulations of the data from the 881 buildings are provided in the Detailed Tables section.

307

CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

r r r r r t r r t r r r * r r r r r r CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA ,FACILITY RECORDS 1970 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMlSSION NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE LAS VEGAS, NEVADA September 1970 Prepared By Holmes & Narver. Inc. On-Continent Test Division P.O. Box 14340 Las Vegas, Nevada 338592 ...._- _._--_ .. -- - - - - - - .. .. - .. - - .. - - - CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA FACILITY RECORDS 1970 This page intentionally left blank - - .. - - - PURPOSE This facility study has been prepared in response to a request of the AEC/NVOO Property Management Division and confirmed by letter, W. D. Smith to L. E. Rickey, dated April 14, 1970, STS Program Administrative Matters. The purpose is to identify each facility, including a brief description, the acquisition cost either purchase and/or construction, and the AE costs if identi- fiable. A narrative review of the history of the subcontracts

308

The Analysis of Hydrocarbon Products Obtained From Methanol Conversion to Gasoline Using Open Tubular GC Columns and Selective Olefin Absorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......SCOT column. Run conditions are...Table I. GC Run Conditions for Methanol Derived Gasolines Carrier Gas...minor amounts of straight-chain isomers...dependent upon process run conditions. These...methanol derived gasolines were similar in......

M.G. Bloch; R.B. Callen; J.H. Stockinger

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Mathematical Modeling of Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Z. H. Wang* and C. Y. Wang*,z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density and high Tafel slope.1 Methanol crossover further causes lower open-circuit voltage OCV and waste

311

Effect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly increase the methanol-crossover rate, producing an unfavorable * Corresponding author. DepartmentEffect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu a , S.Y. Shen a , Y.L. He b , T.S. Zhao a

Zhao, Tianshou

312

Correlating catalytic methanol oxidation with the structure and oxidation state of size-1 selected Pt nanoparticles2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), which produce electricity from11 liquid fuel without1 Correlating catalytic methanol oxidation with the structure and oxidation state of size-1 * Corresponding author: roldan@ucf.edu9 Keywords: platinum; methanol oxidation; operando; XAS; EXAFS; alumina

Kik, Pieter

313

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 2, 2002 December 2, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-113: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program November 25, 2002 EIS-0265-SA-100: Supplement Analysis Oregon Fish Screening Project, Screen Replacements November 22, 2002 EIS-0265-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program November 18, 2002 EA-1282-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project November 1, 2002 EIS-0203-SA-01: Supplement Analysis INEEL Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management October 31, 2002 EIS-0026-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Disposal of Certain Rocky Flats Plutonium-Bearing Materials at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant October 28, 2002

314

EA-1212-SA-01: Final Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Supplement Analysis for the Environmental Assessment for the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory

315

EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington

316

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3 Federal Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings...

317

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Compression and Flyer Plate Experiments Involving Plutonium at the Z and Saturn Accelerators September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis YakimaKlickitat Fisheries...

318

EIS-0451: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impact Statement Hooper Springs Transmission Project, Caribou County, Idaho Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) BPA prepared a supplemental draft EIS to evaluate an additional...

319

Supplemental Comments of the Plumbing Manufacturers Instititute...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Comments of the Plumbing Manufacturers Instititute Regarding the Economic Impacts of the Proposed Definition of "Showerhead," Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-NOA-0016...

320

EIS-0491: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental 1: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0491: Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, by constructing and operating natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities. FERC is now announcing a second scoping period to invite scoping comments on modifications to the initial proposal (additional pipeline, compression, and metering facilities). EIS-0491-FERC-SNOI-2013.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Wensheng He, David Mountz, Tao Zhang, Chris Roger July 17, 2012 2 Outline Background on Arkema's polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) blend membrane technology Overview of membrane properties and performance Summary 3 Membrane Technology Polymer Blend * Kynar ® PVDF * Chemical and electrochemical stability * Mechanical strength * Excellent barrier against methanol * Polyelectrolyte * H + conduction and water uptake Flexible Blending Process  PVDF can be compatibilized with a number of polyelectrolytes  Process has been scaled to a pilot line Property Control * Morphology: 10-100s nm domains * Composition can be tailored to minimize methanol permeation, while optimizing

322

Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Pd4/In2O3 has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and microkinetic modeling. In this study, three possible routes in the reaction network of CO2 + H2 ? CH3OH + H2O have been examined. Our DFT results show that the HCOO route competes with the RWGS route whereas a high activation barrier kinetically blocks the HCOOH route. DFT results also suggest that H2COO* + H* ? H2CO* +OH* and cis-COOH* + H* ?CO* + H2O* are the rate limiting steps in the HCOO route and the RWGS route, respectively. Microkinetic modeling results demonstrate that the HCOO route is the dominant reaction route for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. We found that the activation of H adatom on the small Pd cluster and the presence of H2O on the In2O3 substrate play important roles in promoting the methanol synthesis. The hydroxyl adsorbed at the interface of Pd4/In2O3 induces the transformation of the supported Pd4 cluster from a butterfly structure into a tetrahedron structure. This important structure change not only indicates the dynamical nature of the supported nanoparticle catalyst structure during the reaction but also shifts the final hydrogenation step from H2COH to CH3O.

Ye, Jingyun; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

VIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising SupplementVIRGINIA BUSINESSVIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising Supplement INNINNOOVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIVATIOwww.vt.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising SupplementVIRGINIA BUSINESSVIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising Supplement.vt.edu Owww.vt.edu OOwww.vt.edu Owww.vt.edu ONN #12;VIRGINIA BUSINESS Advertising Supplement IDEASATWORK VT2-added byproducts and,in the process,reducing pollutants flowing into the Chesapeake Bay; and improving automated

Buehrer, R. Michael

324

Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

Behrens, Malte

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

SUPPLEMENT:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......levels of school education. This would build...to lever more science into the curriculum. Posters for sale. Sets of six colour posters have been bought...Schools and College Education Department at...astronomy, space science and geophysics......

Report of Council: To the 179th Annual General Meeting of the Society

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Supplement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...there is a deadline of July 1, 1975, for submis- sion...presently contains more than 500 mineral species and is...13 p., 13 figs., 1 tbl.) The texture, thickness...least 16,000 km2 and 7,500 km2, respectively. Their...between 40,000 yr and 1.84 m.y. ago. Were...

327

Precursors of the copper-zinc oxide methanol synthesis catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coprecipitated hydroxycarbonate precursor of the methanol synthesis and shift reaction catalyst based on 30 at.% copper and 70 at.% zinc oxide, which was previously reported to be a mixture of hydrozincite Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 and rosasite (Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2 (R. G. Herman, K. Klier, G. W. Simmons, B. P. Finn, J. B. Bulko, and T. P. Kobylinski, J. Catal. 56, 407, 1979) or a single-phase hydrozincite (G. Petrini, F. Montino, A. Bossi, and G. Gaybassi, in Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis. Preparation of Catalysis III (G. Poncelet, P. Grange, and P. A. Jacobs, Eds.), Vol. 16, p. 735. Elsevier, The Netherlands, 1983), is herein shown to be a single-phase aurichalcite (Cu0.3Zn0.7)5(CO3)2(OH)6. The orthorhombic B2212 aurichalcite is crystallograpically distinct from the monoclinic \\{C2m\\} hydrozincite, although these two compounds have the same ratio of metal ions to carbonate and hydroxyl anions. Both aurichalcite and hydrozincite are chemically and structurally distinct from the monoclinic \\{P21a\\} rosasite. The earlier erroneous assignments are attributed to the structural similarity of the three hydroxycarbonates in question. An energy-dispersive characteristic X-ray emission analysis of individual particles in the scanning transmission electron microscope reveals a uniform distribution of copper and zinc at the analytical concentration CuZn = 3070. Precursors with less than 30% copper consist of mixtures of aurichalcite and hydrozincite.

P.B. Himelfarb; G.W. Simmons; K. Klier; R.G. Herman

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

Murph, S.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Low-energy electron scattering from methanol and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measured and calculated differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering from two primary alcohols, methanol (CH3OH) and ethanol (C2H5OH), are reported. The measurements are obtained using the relative flow method with helium as the standard gas and a thin aperture as the collimating target gas source. The relative flow method is applied without the restriction imposed by the relative flow pressure conditions on helium and the unknown gas. The experimental data were taken at incident electron energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100eV and for scattering angles of 5130. There are no previous reports of experimental electron scattering differential cross sections for CH3OH and C2H5OH in the literature. The calculated differential cross sections are obtained using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Comparison between theory and experiment shows that theory is able to describe low-energy electron scattering from these polyatomic targets quite well.

M. A. Khakoo, J. Blumer, K. Keane, C. Campbell, H. Silva, M. C. A. Lopes, C. Winstead, V. McKoy, R. F. da Costa, L. G. Ferreira, M. A. P. Lima, and M. H. F. Bettega

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

Conversion of methanol to light olefins on SAPO-34: kinetic modeling and reactor design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design of an MTO reactor, accounting for the strong exothermicity of the process. Multi-bed adiabatic and fluidized bed technologies show good potential for the industrial process for the conversion of methanol into olefins....

Al Wahabi, Saeed M. H.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Study of methanol-to-gasoline process for production of gasoline from coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process is an efficient way to produce liquid ... The academic basis of the coal-to-liquid process is described and two different synthesis processes are focused on: Fixed MTG process

Tian-cai He; Xiao-han Cheng; Ling Li

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Methanol-to-gasoline(MTG)conversion over ZSM-5. A temperature programmed surface reaction study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conversion of methanol to gasoline over zeolite ZSM-5 has been studied by temperature programmed surface reaction (TPSR). The technique is able to monitor the two steps in the process: the dehydration of m...

M. Jayamurthy; S. Vasudevan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 9 Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells G. Lu & C, including two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport. We explain how the better understanding

334

Design of high-ionic conductivity electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon-supported porous electrodes are used in low-temperature fuel cells to provide maximum catalyst surface area, while taking up little volume and using minimum catalyst material. In Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs), ...

Schrauth, Anthony J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hydrogen-bonded complexes of serotonin with methanol and ethanol: a DFT study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density functional theoretical studies on hydrogen-bonded complexes of serotonin with methanol/ethanol have been carried out in a systematic ... -hydroxyl group. Serotonin-molecules strongly bind with ethanol tha...

A. Mano Priya; L. Senthilkumar; P. Kolandaivel

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reaction of a Fluorine Atom with Methanol: Potential Energy Surface Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction of a Fluorine Atom with Methanol: Potential Energy Surface Considerations ... The latter two energetic features nicely explain why 40% of the laboratory products follow the less exothermic pathway A. ...

Hao Feng; Katherine R. Randall; Henry F. Schaefer; III

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Supplement to The Imnaha Subbasin Plan Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004 draft Imnaha Subbasin Assessment and Imnaha Subbasin Management Plan (available at www in these documents. This supplement was reviewed by the Imnaha Technical and Planning Teams during the fall of 2004. This supplement is presented in four sections that correspond to information requested by the Northwest Power

338

Development of microprocessor control for a V-6 engine fueled by prevaporized methanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL FOR A V 6 ENGINE FUELED BY PREVAPORIZED METHANOL A Thesis by DONALD F. SCHNEIDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19SS Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL FOR A V 6 ENGINE FUELED BY PREVAPORIZED METHANOL A Thesis by DONALD F. SCHNEIDER Approved as to style and content by: JP& r~ R. R. Davison...

Schneider, Donald F.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Influence of Chain Dynamics on theFar-Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Far-infrared absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency ({center_dot} 100 cm{sup -1}) intermolecular interactions in liquid methanol. Using an intense source of far-infrared radiation, modes are elucidated at approximately 30 cm{sup -1} and 70 cm{sup -1} in the absorption spectrum. These modes are believed to arise from intermolecular bending and librational motions respectively and are successfully reproduced in an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of methanol.

Woods, K.N.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL; ,

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Conversion of synthesis gas and methanol to hydrocarbons using zeolite catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conversion on siiicalite were studied. Various catalysts based on the small-pore zeolites chabazite and erionite, combined with a methanol synthesis component, zinc oxide, were prepared. Certain of the catalysts contained either sulfur or selenium as a... conversion on siiicalite were studied. Various catalysts based on the small-pore zeolites chabazite and erionite, combined with a methanol synthesis component, zinc oxide, were prepared. Certain of the catalysts contained either sulfur or selenium as a...

Matthews, Michael Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

H.R. 4837, The Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005, was signed into law on October 13, 2004. The Act provides for construction to support the operations of the U.S. Armed Forces and for military family housing. It also provides funds to help citizens in Florida and elsewhere in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and other natural disasters. In addition, it authorizes construction of an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Renewable Energy Supplemental  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Renewable Energy Supplemental Environmental Projects Renewable Energy Supplemental Environmental Projects Supplemental Environmental Projects are a policy vehicle that can provide funding for renewable energy projects. Renewable energy projects can stimulate the economy, help ensure energy security, and improve the quality of the air and water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designed Supplemental Environmental Projects to give companies that violate environmental regulations an alternative to standard fines. When a company violates environmental regulations, it has the option to pay a fine to the state or federal government or volunteer to fund environmentally friendly projects. These projects can provide a positive outcome for the company and the community. For more information on supplemental environmental projects,

345

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 5, 2008 February 5, 2008 EIS-0378-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Port Angeles-Juan de Fuca Transmssion Project September 5, 2007 EIS-0229: Supplement Analysis (September 2007) Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site September 3, 2007 EIS-0026-SA-06: Supplement Analysis Transportation of Transuranic Waste in TRUPACT-III Containers, Carlsbad Field Office March 29, 2007 EIS-0359-SA-01: Draft Supplement Analysis Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DOE/EIS-0359-SA-01 and DOE/EIS-0360-SA-01) March 29, 2007 EIS-0360-SA-01: Draft Supplement Analysis Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride

346

EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Columbia Basin Riparian Conservation Easement Program. The action area for the...

347

EA-1611-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Assessment Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado DOE's Western Area Power Administration issued a draft supplemental EA that...

348

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program Reviews Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-02: Price-Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) Program...

349

EIS-0285-SA-134: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-134: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Bandon-Rogue-Gold Beach transmission...

350

EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Lynch Creek to LaGrande-Cowlitz No. 1...

351

EIS-0285-SA-101: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-101: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Spokane Region Vegetation Management for Substations and Non-Electric...

352

EIS-0285-SA-126: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-126: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Alvey Fairview 230kV transmission line...

353

EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Murry-Custer No.1 transmission line...

354

EIS-0285-SA-113: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-113: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program To perform remedial vegetation management for keeping vegetation a...

355

EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance Vegetation...

356

EIS-0285-SA-112: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-112: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for portions of the Ross-Alcoa transmission...

357

EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and...

358

DOE response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed test procedure for residential clothes washers DOE response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed test...

359

EIS-0285-SA-100: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-100: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Libby-Conkelly, 12 to 264...

360

EIS-0285-SA-150: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-150: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the East Ellensburg Tap, 16 to 319...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIS-0285-SA-37: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

37: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-37: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Monroe-Custer No.1 Transmission Line...

362

EIS-0285-SA-34: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

34: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the McNary-Ross Transmission Line ROW...

363

EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the...

364

EIS-0005-FS: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program, Facility Location on Supplement, Southwest Oregon Area Service, Buckley-Summer Lake 500 kV Line, Supplemental

365

EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Carlsbad Area Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal...

366

EIS-0026-SA-07: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site-Wide Operations, Carlsbad Field Office The Proposed Action is to continue the...

367

Hydrogen as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines Hydrogen as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

368

EIS-0350-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0350-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos...

369

EIS-0030-S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

30-S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0030-S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1980 Program,...

370

EIS-0082-S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0082-S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to...

371

EIS-0380: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

380: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Continued...

372

EIS-0288-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0288-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor The Draft...

373

MTBE Prices Responded to Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: On top of the usual factors impacting gasoline prices, natural gas has had some influence recently. MTBE is an oxygenate used in most of the RFG consumed in the U.S. Generally, it follows gasoline prices and its own supply/demand balance factors. But this winter, we saw it respond strongly to natural gas prices. MTBE is made from methanol and isobutylene, which in turn come from methane and butane. Both methane and butane come from natural gas streams. Until this year, the price of natural gas has been so low that it had little effect. But the surge that occurred in December and January pulled MTBE up . Keep in mind that about 11% MTBE is used in a gallon of RFG, so a 30 cent increase in MTBE is only about a 3 cent increase in the price of RFG. While we look ahead at this summer, natural gas prices should be

374

Natural gas annual 1992. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data for the Nation from 1930 to 1992, and by State from 1967 to 1992. The Supplement of this report presents profiles of selected companies.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Volume II Appendices A through J U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S 1 June 2008 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS To ensure a more reader-friendly document, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) limited the use of acronyms and abbreviations in this Repository supplemental environmental impact statement. In addition, acronyms and abbreviations are defined the first time they are used in each chapter or appendix. The acronyms and abbreviations used in the text of this document are listed below. Acronyms and abbreviations used in tables and figures because of

376

Supplement to AEO99 - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 as of 9/13/99 1. Tables 36-43 which contain supplementary data for the industrial sector have been revised. These revisions were made to better reflect energy consumption that had been incorrectly allocated to the individual industrial sectors. The revisions do not affect the total industrial consumption reported in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999. (change made on 2/9/99) 2. Tables 59-71 which contain regional electric generator data have been revised. These revisions were made to cogeneration and net energy for load values. (change made on 3/19/99) 3. The historical Lower 48 average and regional crude oil wellhead prices for 1997 were incorrectly reported in Table 79 of the Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999. The correct prices are as follows:

377

Supplemental Data S1 Nuclear Trapping Shapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kniri-1 rnroe-1 pp es ca1 /TM3, Sb1 flies [S1, S2] for producing embryos with defects in nuclear density min shaking in a mixture of heptane and methanol. Next, embryos were quickly rehydrated and trans. This produced high-resolution images (512 3 512 pixels 16 bits depth) from the focal plane either in the middle

Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

378

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Alternative production strategies for greenhouse tomatoes using supplemental lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The yield response of greenhouse tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. Vendor) was examined under both natural light conditions (light available from the sun) and with the addition of 6.48 moles m?2 day?1 supplemental light from a high-pressure sodium (HPS) source. Tomato crop yield significantly increased as plant population density increased when HPS lighting was employed. No significant yield increase was obtained with increased plant density under natural light conditions. Four production strategies (representing four combinations of plant density and the number of trusses produced per plant) were tested. A significant yield increase was obtained with HPS lighting relative to the unlit control for all of the production strategies used. Similar total yields were obtained regardless of the production strategy when HPS lighting was used.

Richard J. McAvoy; Harry W. Janes

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Microsoft Word - supplement Analysis SWEIS82302.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38SA2 38SA2 Supplement Analysis Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory August 13, 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Supplement Analysis for the SWEIS Page 1 August 13, 2002 Introduction This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Enforcement Guidance Supplement (EGS) 00-04  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement Enforcement Guidance Supplement EGS: 00-04 Appendix E- Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 23, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-04: Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 and Compliance Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR Subpart C DOE' s Operational Procedures for Enforcement (June 1998), which supercede the DOE Enforcement Handbook (1087-95), provides the Office of Enforcement and Investigation with the opportunity to issue interim enforcement guidance from time to time with

382

Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

DOE Publishes Supplemental Proposed Determination for Miscellaneous Residential Refrigeration Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy has published a supplemental proposed determination regarding miscellaneous residential refrigeration products.

384

EIS-0026-S: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico

385

EIS-0423-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

386

Experimental Evaluation of a Pt-based Heat Exchanger Methanol Reformer for a HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Included in this reaction is the decomposition of methanol, which produces CO: CH3OH CO + 2H2 (90.5 kJ mol a picture of the methanol reformer which has been designed to produce hydrogen for a 1 kWe HTPEM fuel cellExperimental Evaluation of a Pt-based Heat Exchanger Methanol Reformer for a HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack

Berning, Torsten

387

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released Date: February 2006 Released Date: February 2006 Next Release Date: February 2007 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) New England 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel 0.313 0.330 0.337 0.301 0.294 0.294 0.293 0.293 0.292 0.291 0.288 0.286 0.284 0.282 0.278 Kerosene 0.012 0.014 0.014 0.016 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.014 0.014 0.014 0.014 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.029 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.029 0.030 0.030 0.031 0.031 0.031 0.032 0.032 0.032 0.033 0.033 Petroleum Subtotal 0.354 0.375 0.381 0.346 0.338 0.339 0.338 0.338 0.337 0.337 0.334 0.332 0.330 0.328 0.325 Natural Gas 0.200 0.191 0.193 0.191 0.191 0.193 0.193 0.195 0.196 0.197 0.197

388

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

390

Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

is a regular monthly supplement to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook. (http:www.eia.doe.govemeusteopubcontents.html) Contact: Bob Ryan (Robert.Ryan@eia.doe.gov) Energy...

391

Prediction of Experimental Methanol Decomposition Rates on Platinum from First Principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portion of this work was conducted at EMSL, a national scientific user facility. A microkinetic model for methanol decomposition on platinum is presented. The model incorporates competitive decomposition pathways, beginning with both OH and CH bond scission in methanol, and uses results from density functional theory (DFT) calculations [Greeley and Mavrikakis, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 7193, Greeley and Mavrikakis, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 3910]. Results from reaction kinetics experiments show that the rate of H2 production increases with increasing temperature and methanol concentration in the feed and is only nominally affected by the presence of CO or H2 with methanol. The model, based on the values of binding energies, pre-exponential factors and activation energy barriers derived from first principles calculations, accurately predicts experimental reaction rates and orders. The model also gives insight into the most favorable reaction pathway, the rate-limiting step, the apparent activation energy, coverages, and the effects of pressure. It is found that the pathway beginning with the CH bond scission (CH3OH?H2COH?HCOH?CO) is dominant compared with the path beginning with OH bond scission. The cleavage of the first CH bond in methanol is the rate-controlling step. The surface is highly poisoned by CO, whereas COH appears to be a spectator species.

Kandoi, Shampa; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Sanchez-Castillo, Marco A.; Evans, Steven T.; Gokhale, Amit A.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

In-situ characterization of adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts by FT-IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts during reaction conditions. A copper carbonyl, bidentate formate, and methoxy species were identified as stable surface groups. An adsorbed formaldehyde species was unstable at the reaction temperature, but could be observed on the catalyst surface at the beginning of the reaction. Surface species were very similar for feed mixtures of 1) carbon monoxide and hydrogen, 2) carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and 3) formic acid and hydrogen. The role of copper in methanol synthesis catalysts was to increase the adsorption of carbon monoxide to form a linear carbonyl species. This carbonly promoted the hydrogenation of formate groups. The formate species was adsorbed on a zinc site (Zn/sub ..beta../) different from the zinc site (Zn/sub ..gamma../) on which formaldehyde and methoxy groups were adsorbed. The rate-determining step in methanol synthesis was determined to be the reaction of hydrogen from a hydroxyl species adsorbed on another zinc site (Zn/sub ..cap alpha../) with a methoxy group to yield methanol. It was established that at the experimental conditions used in this study, the methanol synthesis reaction was far from equilibrium while the water-gas shift reaction was near equilibrium.

Edwards, J.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

In situ characterization of adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts by FT-IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts during reaction conditions. A copper carbonyl, bidentate formate, and methoxy species were identified as stable surface groups. An adsorbed formaldehyde species was unstable at the reaction temperature, but could be observed on the catalyst surface at the beginning of the reaction. Surface species were very similar for feed mixtures of (1) carbon monoxide and hydrogen, (2) carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and (3) formic acid and hydrogen. The role of copper in methanol synthesis catalysts was to increase the adsorption of carbon monoxide to form a linear carbonyl species. This carbonyl promoted the hydrogenation of formate groups. The formate species was adsorbed on a zinc site (Zn/sub ..beta../) different from the zinc site (Zn/sub ..gamma../) on which formaldehyde and methoxy groups were adsorbed. The rate-determining step in methanol synthesis was determined to be the reaction of hydrogen from a hydroxyl species adsorbed on another zinc site (Zn/sub ..cap alpha../) with a methoxy group to yield methanol. It was established that at the experimental conditions used in this study, the methanol synthesis reaction was far from equilibrium while the water-gas shift reaction was near equilibrium. 186 references, 83 figures, 28 tables.

Edwards, J.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Factors and Feeds for Supplementing Beef Cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decreases, and so does diet quality. Then, supple- mentation may become necessary even if animal numbers are reduced. Factors and Feeds for Supplementing Beef Cows Stephen P. Hammack and Ronald J. Gill* *Extension Beef Cattle Specialist and Extension Live... decreases, and so does diet quality. Then, supple- mentation may become necessary even if animal numbers are reduced. Factors and Feeds for Supplementing Beef Cows Stephen P. Hammack and Ronald J. Gill* *Extension Beef Cattle Specialist and Extension Live...

Hammack, Stephen P.; Gill, Ronald J.

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is mandated by Congress to be the agency that collects, analyzes, and disseminates impartial, comprehensive data about energy including the volume consumed, its customers, and the purposes for which it is used. The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP`s specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country. The purpose of the FBSS was threefold: (1) to understand the characteristics of Federal buildings and their energy use; (2) to provide a baseline in these three Federal regions to measure future energy use in Federal buildings as required in EPACT; and (3) to compare building characteristics and energy use with the data collected in the CBECS.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Kinetics of liquid phase catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the kinetics of the liquid phase catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether investigated. The experiments were carried out under low concentrations of feed in a 1-L stirred autoclave, according to a statistical experimental design. The inert liquid phase used for this investigation was a 78:22 blend of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oils. A complete thermodynamic analysis was carried out in order to determine the liquid phase concentrations of the dissolved species. A global kinetic model was developed for the rate of dimethyl ether synthesis in terms of the liquid phase concentration of methanol. The activation energy of the reaction was found to be 18,830 cal/gmol. Based on a step-wise linear regression analysis of the kinetic data, the order of the reaction which gave the best fit was 0.28 with respect to methanol.

Gogate, M.R.; Lee, B.G.; Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kulik, C.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

WIDESPREAD METHANOL EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE ROLE OF COSMIC RAYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4{sub -1} to 3{sub 0} E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66' Multiplication-Sign 18' (160 Multiplication-Sign 43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of 16.6 km s{sup -1} taken from 41 channels of a Very Large Array continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2-1) and CH{sub 3}OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km s{sup -1} clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25 + 0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H{sub 2}. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH{sub 3}OH abundance of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7} on a chemical timescale of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years. The average methanol abundance produced by the release of methanol from grain surfaces is consistent with the available data.

Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Royster, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cotton, W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower St. London, WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Wardle, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

Study of the methanol conversion to ethylene and propylene using small pore size zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of the study of the kinetics of the reaction of methanol to olefins. A combined selectivity to ethylene and propylene of 90% is readily achieved by selecting a proper set of operating conditions. The investigation encompassed the study of external and internal diffusion, adsorption and reaction. Instantaneous and overall material balances were developed, and a minimization technique was used to calculate the rate of formation of coke, the amount of coke deposition on the catalyst, and the hydrogen to carbon ratio. This procedure allowed the adjustment of several parameters in order to satisfy the material balances. The results were used to calculate the rate constants of the proposed model. The results indicated that the dehydration of methanol was inhibited by the adsorption of methanol. In general low methanol partial pressures, achieved by decreasing the total pressure in the case of pure methanol feeds, or by diluting methanol with water or nitrogen, increased the selectivity toward olefins. All the catalysts studied showed deactivation due to the accumulation of aromatic compounds (coke), which had a hydrogen to carbon ration close to 1.1. The maximum amount of coke that can be deposited on the catalyst was about 0.16 grams coke/gram catalyst. The catalyst was regenerated by burning the coke with air. Residence time distribution experiments using a step input change showed that perfect mixing could be obtained with 200 grams of powder catalyst of 30-100 microns particle size by using flow rates smaller than 5 cc/sec measured at reactor conditions, and impeller speeds higher than 12 rev/sec.

Vera-Castaneda, E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Zeolite pore size determination by methanol-to-gasoline conversion test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of methanol over a shape selective zeolite to high octane gasoline is a well known process. In this work, a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) conversion test is utilized for the pore size determination of zeolites with active sites. The dimension of a zeolite`s pores is revealed by the size distribution of its MTG hydrocarbon products. A simple fixed bed MTG test unit capable of on-line sampling for direct gas chromatographic analysis and the collection of liquid and gaseous products for GC-MS analysis is described. The size distributions of MTG hydrocarbon products are presented for several small, intermediate, and large pore zeolites.

Yuen, L.; Zones, S.I. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Kinetic Behavior of the SAPO-18 Catalyst in the Transformation of Methanol into Olefins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor (Figure 1) is a vertical cylinder of S-316 stainless steel of 20-mm internal diameter and a total length of 465 mm, which is located within a ceramic chamber heated by an electric resistance. ... Figure 12 Evolution with time on stream of the ratio between the composition of methanol and dimethyl ether at the reactor outlet at 400 C and for different values of space time. ... (16)?Marchi, A. J.; Froment, G. F. Catalytic Conversion of Methanol to Light Alkenes on SAPO Molecular Sieves. ...

Ana G. Gayubo; Raquel Vivanco; Ainhoa Alonso; Beatriz Valle; Andrs T. Aguayo

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

Supplement of "Inversion of and emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' $ 9 -pinene @ ¤ ¦ other hydrocarbons ¦§ carbon monoxide ¦ ¤ % ¤ methanol ¦ ¤ ¡¥ formaldehyde¦ ¤ ¥¨ ¦ ¤ `$ dimethyl sulfide ¦§¨ ¡ carbon disulfide ¤ ¡¥¨ hydrogen sulfide 7 E $ oxygen atom (excited state ppbv hydrogen £ ¡¥ : 311 ppbv nitrous oxide ¦§ ©¨ : 0.5 ppbv carbonyl sulfide ozone ¤ ¡¥ ©¡ hydrogen

Meskhidze, Nicholas

407

EIS-0423-S1: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Supplemental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0423-S1: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Draft Supplemental Environmental...

408

Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

409

Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass efficient energy production has long been sought to solve energy and environmental problems. Fuel cells

Zhao, Tianshou

410

976 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 4, AUGUST 2006 Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

976 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 4, AUGUST 2006 Methanol Steam Reformer without mass transport considerations. The 1-D model provided a rapid analytical tool to assess is achieved through on-chip resis- tive heaters, whereby methanol steam reforming reactions were studied over

Malen, Jonathan A.

411

The role of specific solvent modes in the non-radiative relaxation of an excess electron in methanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in methanol A.A. Mosyak, O.V. Prezhdo1 , P.J. Rossky* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University electronic excited state of an excess electron in methanol. Compared to water, we find that the presence volume combine to produce a three-fold decrease in the magnitude of the non- adiabatic coupling

412

Droplet Dynamics Changes in Electrostatic Sprays of Methanol-Water Mixtures Zohra Olumee, John H. Callahan, and Akos Vertes*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity, dielectric constant, surface tension, viscosity, and density) and on the spraying conditionsDroplet Dynamics Changes in Electrostatic Sprays of Methanol-Water Mixtures Zohra Olumee, John H generated from methanol-water mixtures. We investigated spraying conditions close to those of electrospray

Vertes, Akos

413

Supplemental photosynthetic lighting for greenhouse tomato production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of supplemental light on the growth and productivity of greenhouse tomatoes grown to a single cluster on movable benches is examined, and the economic feasibility of such a system is evaluated. Experiments were conducted to quantify the tomato plants' response to various levels of supplemental light in terms of growth rate and yield at various stages in their development (e.g., seedling, flowering plant, etc.). The 1984--85 experiments showed that supplemental photosynthetic lighting nearly doubled tomato yields, from 0.48 to 0.86 lbs/plant. Subsequent experiments in 1985--86 identified the best tomato varieties for this treatment and further increased yields to 1.3 lbs/plant. In addition, the use of supplemental lighting was found to hasten tomato crop maturity. An economic analysis was performed on the 1985--86 empirical data using the tax rates and provisions then in force. It indicated that a 10-acre greenhouse could provide an after-tax internal rate of return of 10% to 12% using only equity financing. This return could likely be increased to 15--18% with the use of combined debt/equity financing. Using supplemental lighting on 10,000 acres of greenhouse production would require an estimated 7.5 billion kWh of additional electricity per year and, at 4.7 cents/kWh, generate an estimated $350 million in additional utility revenues. 48 refs., 34 figs., 24 tabs.

Godfriaux, B.L.; Wittman, W.K. (Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Newark, NJ (USA)); Janes, H.W.; McAvoy, R.J.; Putman, J.; Logendra, S. (Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA). Dept. of Horticulture and Forestry); Mears, D.R.; Giacommelli, G.; Giniger, M. (Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA). Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Selective Production of Hydrogen for Fuel Cells Via Oxidative Steam Reforming of Methanol Over CuZnAl Oxide Catalysts: Effect of Substitution of Zirconium and Cerium on the Catalytic Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

H2 fuel, for fuel cells, is traditionally produced from methanol by the endothermic steam reforming of methanol (SRM). Partial oxidation of methanol (POM), which is highly exothermic, has also been suggested as ....

S. Velu; K. Suzuki

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A Mercury-Catalyzed, High-Yield System for the Oxidation of Methane to Methanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...con-version of methane to methanol with...for commercial economics. See N. D. Parkyns...How-ever, most methane (CH4) is in locations...desirable to convert methane into liquid products...process termed steam reforming (l): CH4 + H2O-C...

Roy A. Periana; Douglas J. Taube; Eric R. Evitt; Daniel G. Lffler; Paul R. Wentrcek; George Voss; Toshihiko Masuda

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ultrasonic studies in binary solutions of pyridine with water, methanol, and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The velocity and absorption of ultrasound at 19.5 MHz were studied as a function of the concentration in binary solutions of pyridine with water methanol and ethanol. In addition the compressibility and volume viscosity were calculated. Molecular processes are suggested to explain the variation of the ultrasonic properties of these binary solutions with respect to concentration.

K. N. Thomas; F. B. Stumpf

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Surfactant effects on methanol oxidation at PtRu/C coated glassy carbon electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stock solution of 0.5M H2SO4...was prepared with Millipore water. Standard addition of methanol was made to have a concentration in the range of 02M. The solution was stirred using a magnetic stirrer. The mi...

N. Karthikeyan; V. V. Giridhar; D. Vasudevan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight olefins in a fluidized bed reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

followed by a polimerization of the divalent carbenoid species to explain the olefinic formation. H-CH, -OH -----~ HaO + :CHa n:CH, -----~ (CH, )n n=2, 3, 4, 5 Swabb and Gates (1972), in their study of the dehydration of methanol over H...

Garza Tobias, Ricardo

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Determination of Syngas Premixed Gasoline and Methanol Combustion Products at Chemical Equilibrium via Lagrange Multipliers Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(10) Several patents for generating hydrogen-rich syngas out of methanol to combust the syngas in an automotive engine have been published. ... On the other hand, the high flame speed of hydrogen causes higher NOx emissions and combustion instability when syngas is combusted with a near-stoichiometric air/fuel ratio. ...

Osman Sinan Ssl; Ipek Becerik

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Numerical study on the combustion and emission characteristics of a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An improved multi-dimensional model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics mechanism was applied to investigate the combustion and emission characteristics of a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine. The fuel was supplied separately by directly injecting diesel fuel into cylinder well before top dead center, while premixing methanol through the intake port in the tested methanol/diesel RCCI engine. The effects of mass fraction of premixed methanol, start of injection (SOI) of diesel and initial in-cylinder temperature at intake valve closing (IVC) on engine combustion and emission were investigated in detail. The results show that both methanol mass fraction and SOI have a significant impact on cetane number (CN) distribution, i.e. fuel reactivity distribution, which determines the ignition delay and peak of heat release rate (HRR). Due to larger area with high-temperature region and more homogeneous fuel distribution with increased methanol, and the oxygen atom contained by methanol molecule, all the emissions are reduced with moderate methanol addition. Advanced SOI with high combustion temperature is favorable to hydrocarbon (HC) and soot reduction, yet not to the decrease of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Both increasing methanol fraction and advancing the SOI are beneficial to improve fuel economy and avoid engine knock. Moreover, it was revealed that the initial temperature must be increased with increased methanol fraction to keep the 50% burn point (CA50) constant, which results in decrease of the equivalent indicated specific fuel consumption (EISFC) and all emissions, except for slight increase in \\{NOx\\} due to the higher burning temperature.

Yaopeng Li; Ming Jia; Yaodong Liu; Maozhao Xie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Influence of preparation method on performance of Cu(Zn)(Zr)-alumina catalysts for the hydrogen production via steam reforming of methanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol (SRM)...?C. Reverse water gas shift reaction and methanol decomposition reactions also take place simultaneously with the steam reforming react...

Sanjay Patel; K. K. Pant

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Supplement: Commodity Index Report | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supplement: Commodity Index Report Supplement: Commodity Index Report Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Supplement: Commodity Index Report Dataset Summary Description Shows index traders in selected agricultural markets. These traders are drawn from the noncommercial and commercial categories. The noncommercial category includes positions of managed funds, pension funds, and other investors that are generally seeking exposure to a broad index of commodity prices as an asset class in an unleveraged and passively-managed manner. The commercial category includes positions for entities whose trading predominantly reflects hedging of over-the-counter transactions involving commodity indices, for example, a swap dealer holding long futures positions to hedge a short commodity index exposure opposite institutional traders, such as pension funds.

424

Definition: Operating Reserve - Supplemental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supplemental Supplemental Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Operating Reserve - Supplemental The portion of Operating Reserve consisting of: Generation (synchronized or capable of being synchronized to the system) that is fully available to serve load within the Disturbance Recovery Period following the contingency event; or, Load fully removable from the system within the Disturbance Recovery Period following the contingency event.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electricity networks, the operating reserve is the generating capacity available to the system operator within a short interval of time to meet demand in case a generator goes down or there is another disruption to the supply. Most power systems are designed so that, under normal conditions, the operating reserve is always at least the capacity of the

425

Total replacement of soybean oil-meal in growing pig diets : Use of peas supplemented with tryptophan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total replacement of soybean oil-meal in growing pig diets : Use of peas supplemented or 40 p. 100) with a lucerne protein concentrate (10 or 5 p. 100) used as natural source of tryptophan (trial 2). As compared to control diets (maize-soybean oil-meal), the utilization of peas (winter variety

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMMATIC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0-SA-02 0-SA-02 September 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS (DOE/EIS-031 0-SA-02) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1.0 1.6 2.0 3.0 4.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.1 3.2 4.1 4.2 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 1 Overview ........................................................................................................................ . 1 Background ..................................................................................................................... 2 Purpose and Need for this Supplement Analysis ............................................................ 6

427

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMMATIC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 0-SA-02 1 0-SA-02 September 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS (DOE/EIS-031 0-SA-02) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1.0 1.6 2.0 3.0 4.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.1 3.2 4.1 4.2 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 1 Overview ........................................................................................................................ . 1 Background ..................................................................................................................... 2 Purpose and Need for this Supplement Analysis ............................................................ 6

428

EIS-0281-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0281-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Installation of a Petawatt Laser System in TA-IV Department of Energy has identified a need to revitalize High Energy...

429

EIS-0251-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EIS-0251-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0251-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Container System for the Management of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Located at the INEEL The Proposed Action...

430

EIs-0285-0455: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIs-0285-0455: Supplement Analysis EIs-0285-0455: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS-- (Bandon-Rogue No. 1) PP&A Project 2178 The project...

431

EIS-0243-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0243-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada to Address the Increase in Activities Associated with...

432

EIS-0026-SA-04: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Use of the 10-160B Transportation Cask for RH-TRU Waste Shipments to WIPP, Carlsbad Field Office DOE is proposing to use...

433

A High-Yield, Liquid-Phase Approach for the Partial Oxidation of Methane to Methanol using SO3 as the Oxidant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach for producing methanol from methane in a three-step, liquid phase process is reported is hydrolyzed in the presence of an organic solvent, to produce an organic phase con- taining methanol the facile separation of methanol. Con- centrated sulfuric acid is produced as a by-product, which can either

Bell, Alexis T.

434

Block and Tub Supplements for Grazing Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Block and Tub Supplements for Grazing Beef Cattle Rick Machen, Texas Cooperative Extension Jim Drouillard, Kansas State University Joe Harris, Westway Corporation B lock supplements are a convenient mechanism for delivering supplemental... have off-ranch employment and like the convenience and comfort of knowing sup- Rick Machen E-178 3-03 plement is continuously available. Large operators use blocks because they save time and labor. 2 As with other supplements, blocks and tubs can vary...

Machen, Richard V.

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

NONE

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Supplement to the Annual Radiological Environmental Operating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The attachment to this letter contains a supplemental corrective update to the referenced report for calendar year 2004. There are no new regulatory commitments contained in this submittal We trust that the information provided is adequate; however, should you have questions or require additional information, please contact me at (802) 258-4236. Sincerely,

Vermont Yankee; Aames M. Devincentis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Supplemental Data Molecular Cell, Volume 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and RNAi S2-NP cells were maintained in Schneider's medium (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) supplemented with 10% FBS and 1% Pen-Strep (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). Cells were transfected with an expression construct (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). 30 µg total RNAs from cultured cells (with or without -elimination) or RNAs from

Higgins, Darren

438

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Supplemental Data The Arabidopsis Chromatin-Modifying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 45S siR Nucleolar dot observed: Dispersed nuclear signal: No signal: # nuclei observed 100 0 0 n = 75 = 62 0 9 91 n = 72 0 29 71 n = 76 5S siR Nucleolar dot observed: Dispersed nuclear signal: No signal1 Supplemental Data The Arabidopsis Chromatin-Modifying Nuclear siRNA Pathway Involves a Nucleolar

Jacobsen, Steve

440

A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) < Cu(111) < Pd/Cu(111) < Rh/Cu(111) < Pt/Cu(111) < Ni/Cu(111). On Au/Cu(111) and Cu(111), the formate pathway dominates the methanol production. Doping Au does not help the methanol synthesis on Cu(111). Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ni are able to promote the methanol production on Cu(111), where the conversion via the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.

Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methanol supplemental natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

442

COMMERCIAL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF THE LIQUID PHASE METHANOL (LPMEOH) PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Clean Coal Technology Program to demonstrate the production of methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), has completed the 69-month operating phase of the program. The purpose of this Final Report for the ''Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process'' is to provide the public with details on the performance and economics of the technology. The LPMEOH{trademark} Demonstration Project was a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the DOE and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). The DOE's cost share was $92,708,370 with the remaining funds coming from the Partnership. The LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit is located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee. The technology was the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} Process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern coal gasifiers. Originally tested at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU), a small, DOE-owned process development facility in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst, and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. The LPMEOH{trademark} Demonstration Project accomplished the objectives set out in the Cooperative Agreement with DOE for this Clean Coal Technology project. Overall plant availability (defined as the percentage of time that the LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit was able to operate, with the exclusion of scheduled outages) was 97.5%, and the longest operating run without interruption of any kind was 94 days. Over 103.9 million gallons of methanol was produced; Eastman accepted all of the available methanol for use in the production of methyl acetate, and ultimately cellulose acetate and acetic acid.

E.C. Heydorn; B.W. Diamond; R.D. Lilly

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

EIS-0407-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-SA-01: Supplement Analysis -SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0407-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project, near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas This EIS analyzed the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental impacts of the design, construction, and startup of a biomass-to-ethanol and energy production facility--the Biorefinery Project. The Supplement Analysis examines the potential environmental impacts of the Modified Proposed Action and addresses whether the potential environmental impacts are within the range of the potential environmental impacts analyzed in the FEIS. Supplement Analysis for the Final environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project, near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas (EIS-0407-SA-1) (July 2011)

444

EVN observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers from Medicina survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report VLBI observations of methanol masers in the brightest 5(1)-6(0) A+ transition at 6.7 GHz in NGC 281W, 18151-1208 and 19388+2357. Using the fringe rate method absolute positions were obtained for all observed sources. A linear ordered structure with a velocity gradient was revealed in NGC 281W. Under assumption that such structure is an edge-on Keplerian disk around the central object with a mass of 30Msun located at a distance of 3.5 kpc from the Sun, we estimated that methanol masers are situated at the distance about 400 a.u. from the center of the disk. A second epoch of observations was reported for L1206, GL2789 and 20062+3550. The upper limits on the relative motions of maser spots are estimated to be 4.7 km/s and 28 km/s for L1206 and GL2789 respectively.

Voronkov, M A; Palagi, F; Tofani, G

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

EVN observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers from Medicina survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report VLBI observations of methanol masers in the brightest 5(1)-6(0) A+ transition at 6.7 GHz in NGC 281W, 18151-1208 and 19388+2357. Using the fringe rate method absolute positions were obtained for all observed sources. A linear ordered structure with a velocity gradient was revealed in NGC 281W. Under assumption that such structure is an edge-on Keplerian disk around the central object with a mass of 30Msun located at a distance of 3.5 kpc from the Sun, we estimated that methanol masers are situated at the distance about 400 a.u. from the center of the disk. A second epoch of observations was reported for L1206, GL2789 and 20062+3550. The upper limits on the relative motions of maser spots are estimated to be 4.7 km/s and 28 km/s for L1206 and GL2789 respectively.

M. A. Voronkov; V. I. Slysh; F. Palagi; G. Tofani

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Prediction of Transport Properties by Molecular Simulation: Methanol and Ethanol and their mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport properties of liquid methanol and ethanol are predicted by molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular models for the alcohols are rigid, non-polarizable and of united-atom type. They were developed in preceding work using experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data only. Self- and Maxwell-Stefan diffusion coefficients as well as the shear viscosity of methanol, ethanol and their binary mixture are determined using equilibrium molecular dynamics and the Green-Kubo formalism. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics is used for predicting the thermal conductivity of the two pure substances. The transport properties of the fluids are calculated over a wide temperature range at ambient pressure and compared with experimental and simulation data from the literature. Overall, a very good agreement with the experiment is found. For instance, the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity are predicted with average deviations of less 8% for the pure alcohols and 12% for the mixture. The predicted thermal...

Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Theoretical model for methanol formation from CO and H/sub 2/ on zinc oxide surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models are developed for the polar (0001) and nonpolar (1010) surfaces of ZnO in order to consider methanol formation from adsorbed carbon monoxide and hydrogen atoms. The heats of adsorption of H/sub x/CO and OH/sub x/CO (x = 0-3) species involved in methanol formation are computed to determine the enthalpy changes of reaction. Reaction sequences involving formyl or formate intermediates are considered. The reaction mechanism is catalyzed by the Cu/sup +/ to proceed through a methoxy intermediate on Cu/sup +//ZnO with a lower of the energy pathway. The ZnO surfaces are poor donors and function primarily as acceptors of electron density from CO. The donor role of Cu/sup +/ is demonstrated on the polar surface by increasing the heat of adsorption of acceptor adspecies and decreasing the heat of adsorption of donor adspecies. 22 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

Baetzold, R.C.

1985-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

Mechanism of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors examine possible mechanisms of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen on supported copper catalysts. Two broad categories of reaction mechanism can be identified: (a) Type I: Carbon monoxide, adsorbed on the copper surface, is hydrogenated by the addition of hydrogen atoms while the C-O bond remains intact. A second C-O bond is neither formed nor broken. (b) Type II: Carbon monoxide (or a partially hydrogenated intermediate, e.g., HCO) reacts with an oxygen atom on the catalyst surface to give an intermediate, typically a formate, which contains two C-O bonds. Subsequent reaction leads overall to methanol and the reformation of the surface oxygen atom. Both mechanisms are discussed.

Fakley, M.E.; Jennings, J.R.; Spencer, M.S. (ICI Chemicals and Polymers Ltd, Billingham, Cleveland (England))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of methanol decomposition on Cu(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dynamics of methanol decomposition on Cu(100) at room temperature over a time scale of minutes. Mechanisms of reaction were found using min-mode following saddle point searches based upon forces and energies from density functional theory. Rates of reaction were calculated with harmonic transition state theory. The dynamics followed a pathway from CH3-OH, CH3-O, CH2-O, CH-O and finally C-O. Our calculations confirm that methanol decomposition starts with breaking the O-H bond followed by breaking C-H bonds in the dehydrogenated intermediates until CO is produced. The bridge site on the Cu(100) surface is the active site for scissoring chemical bonds. Reaction intermediates are mobile on the surface which allows them to find this active reaction site. This study illustrates how the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method can model the dynamics of surface chemistry from first principles.

Xu, Lijun; Mei, Donghai; Henkelman, Graeme A.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over several years, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Low-energy positron scattering from methanol and ethanol: Total cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report total cross sections for positron scattering from two primary alcohols, methanol (CH3OH) and ethanol (C2H5OH). The energy range of the present study is 0.140eV. The ethanol measurement appears to be original while for methanol we compare our data to the only previous result from Kimura and colleagues [Adv. Chem. Phys. 111, 537 (2000)], with a significant discrepancy between them being found at the lower energies. Positronium formation threshold energies for both species, deduced from the present respective total cross section data sets, are found to be consistent with those expected on the basis of their known ionization energies. There are currently no theoretical results against which we can compare our total cross sections.

Antonio Zecca, Luca Chiari, A. Sarkar, Kate L. Nixon, and Michael J. Brunger

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effect of under-inhibition with methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate control process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrate control can be achieved by chemical injection. Currently, methanol and ethylene glycol are the most widely used inhibitors in offshore hydrate control operations. To achieve effective hydrate inhibition, a sufficient amount of inhibitor must be injected to shift the thermodynamic equilibrium condition for hydrate formation outside the pipeline operating pressure and temperature. Recently published field experiments showed that hydrate blockages form more readily in under-inhibited systems than in systems completely without inhibitor. A laboratory study is conducted to determine the effect of low concentration (1--5wt%) methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate formation process. The results show that, although these chemicals are effective hydrate inhibitors when added in sufficient quantities, they actually enhance the rate of hydrate formation when added at low concentrations to the water. Furthermore, the presence of these chemicals seems to affect the size of the forming hydrate particles.

Yousif, M.H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

EIS-0203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Supplement Analysis 2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fule Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs This second Supplement Analysis (2005 SA) examined the changes to activities at the INL Site since the 2002 SA. The 2005 Supplement Analysis did not re-do the analyses conducted in the 2002 SA but evaluated actions from that time forward. The 2005 SA reviewed all NEPA documentation prepared since the 2002 Supplement Analysis to determine what operations have already received NEPA analysis and where previously existing analysis had been supplemented. It also examined INL Site operations program by program to determine what changes had taken place and whether they were

456

EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE's Golden Field Office has prepared the supplemental EA in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The University of Maine is proposing to use Congressionally directed federal funding, from DOE, to deploy, test and retrieve one 1/8-scale floating wind turbine (20kw) prototype in Castine Harbor, offshore of Castine Maine. This test would be conducted prior to testing at the site 2 miles from Monhegan Island (evaluated under DOE/EA 1792). EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment - Appendix A More Documents & Publications EA-1792-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment

457

EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

65-SA-165: Supplement Analysis 65-SA-165: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-165: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS, - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence, DOE/EIS-0265-SA-165 (August 2004) More Documents & Publications EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-58: Supplement Anlalysis

458

EIS-0225-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Supplement Analysis 1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0225-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components - AL-R8 Sealed Insert Container This SA is submitted according to the requirements for determining the need for supplemental EISs (10 CFR 1021.3(4) in DOE's regulations for NEPA implementation. This SA specifically addresses the issue of another type of container for the pit repackaging system. DOE/EIS-0225, Supplement Analysis for Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components - AL-R8 Sealed Insert Container (August 1998) More Documents & Publications EIS-0225-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0225-SA-04: Supplement Analysis

459

EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

73-SA-01: Supplement Analysis 73-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife propose to expand their monitoring and evaluation for the Grande Ronde spring chinook supplementation program to take additional data on summer steelhead that are trapped at the existing adult collection weirs on the upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek. Supplement Analysis for the Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program EA (DOE/EA-1173/SA-01) (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EA-1173: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0340: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

460

EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment 792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE's Golden Field Office has prepared the supplemental EA in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The University of Maine is proposing to use Congressionally directed federal funding, from DOE, to deploy, test and retrieve one 1/8-scale floating wind turbine (20kw) prototype in Castine Harbor, offshore of Castine Maine. This test would be conducted prior to testing at the site 2 miles from Monhegan Island (evaluated under DOE/EA 1792). EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1792-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment - Appendix A More Documents & Publications EA-1792-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment

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461

EIS-0203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis 203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fule Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs This second Supplement Analysis (2005 SA) examined the changes to activities at the INL Site since the 2002 SA. The 2005 Supplement Analysis did not re-do the analyses conducted in the 2002 SA but evaluated actions from that time forward. The 2005 SA reviewed all NEPA documentation prepared since the 2002 Supplement Analysis to determine what operations have already received NEPA analysis and where previously existing analysis had been supplemented. It also examined INL Site operations program by program to determine what changes had taken place and whether they were

462

Methanol synthesis from CO2 over Cu/ZnO catalysts prepared from various coprecipitated precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various precursors of Cu/ZnO catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation methods. By varying the conditions of coprecipitation, precursors having different structures (aurichalcite, malachite, hydrozincite, or their mixture) were obtained at given Cu/Zn ratios, ranging from 30/70 to 70/30. In a wide range of the Cu/Zn ratios, the catalysts derived from the precursors containing aurichalcite exhibited high performance in the methanol synthesis from CO2.

Shin-ichiro Fujita; Yoshinori Kanamori; Agus Muhamad Satriyo; Nobutsune Takezawa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Kinetics of methyl radical-hydroxyl radical collisions and methanol decomposition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH{sub 3} + OH bimolecular reaction and the dissociation of methanol are studied theoretically at conditions relevant to combustion chemistry. Kinetics for the CH{sub 3} + OH barrierless association reaction and for the H + CH{sub 2}OH and H + CH{sub 3}O product channels are determined in the high-pressure limit using variable reaction coordinate transition state theory and multireference electronic structure calculations to evaluate the fragment interaction energies. The CH{sub 3} + OH {yields} {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O abstraction reaction and the H{sub 2} + HCOH and H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}CO product channels feature localized dynamical bottlenecks and are treated using variational transition state theory and QCISD(T) energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The {sup 1}CH{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O product channel has two dynamical regimes, featuring both an inner saddle point and an outer barrierless region, and it is shown that a microcanonical two-state model is necessary to properly describe the association rate for this reaction over a broad temperature range. Experimental channel energies for the methanol system are reevaluated using the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach. Pressure dependent, phenomenological rate coefficients for the CH{sub 3} + OH bimolecular reaction and for methanol decomposition are determined via master equation simulations. The predicted results agree well with experimental results, including those from a companion high-temperature shock tube determination for the decomposition of methanol.

Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase methanol (LPMEOH) Process A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program seeks to offer the energy marketplace more efficient and environmentally benign coal utilization technology options by demonstrating them in industrial settings. This document is a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of one of the projects selected in Round III of the CCT Program, the commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process, initially described in a Report to Congress by DOE in 1992. Methanol is an important, large-volume chemical with many uses. The desire to demonstrate a new process for the production of methanol from coal, prompted Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to submit a proposal to DOE. In October 1992, DOE awarded a cooperative agreement to Air Products to conduct this project. In March 1995, this cooperative agreement was transferred to Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership), a partnership between Air Products and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman). DOE provided 43 percent of the total project funding of $213.7 million. Operation of the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit, which is sited at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee, commenced in April 1997. Although operation of the CCT project was completed in December 2002, Eastman continues to operate the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit for the production of methanol. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information from Volume 2 of the project's Final Report (Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Co., L.P. 2003), as well as other references cited.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

Total electron scattering cross sections for methanol and ethanol at intermediate energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute total cross section (TCS) measurements of electron scattering from gaseous methanol and ethanol molecules are reported for impact energies from 60 to 500 eV, using the linear transmission method. The attenuation of intensity of a collimated electron beam through the target volume is used to determine the absolute TCS for a given impact energy, using the BeerLambert law to first approximation. Besides these experimental measurements, we have also determined TCS using the additivity rule.

D G M Silva; T Tejo; J Muse; D Romero; M A Khakoo; M C A Lopes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optimization of direct conversion of wet algae to biodiesel under supercritical methanol conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrated a one-step process for direct liquefaction and conversion of wet algal biomass containing about 90% of water to biodiesel under supercritical methanol conditions. This one-step process enables simultaneous extraction and transesterification of wet algal biomass. The process conditions are milder than those required for pyrolysis and prevent the formation of by-products. In the proposed process, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) can be produced from polar phospholipids, free fatty acids, and triglycerides. A response surface methodology (RSM) was used to analyze the influence of the three process variables, namely, the wet algae to methanol (wt./vol.) ratio, the reaction temperature, and the reaction time, on the \\{FAMEs\\} conversion. Algal biodiesel samples were analyzed by ATR-FTIR and GCMS. Based on the experimental analysis and RSM study, optimal conditions for this process are reported as: wet algae to methanol (wt./vol.) ratio of around 1:9, reaction temperature and time of about 255C, and 25min respectively. This single-step process can potentially be an energy efficient and economical route for algal biodiesel production.

Prafulla D. Patil; Veera Gnaneswar Gude; Aravind Mannarswamy; Shuguang Deng; Peter Cooke; Stuart Munson-McGee; Isaac Rhodes; Pete Lammers; Nagamany Nirmalakhandan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Integrating Glycerol to Methanol vs. Glycerol to Ethanol within the Production of Biodiesel from Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, we use a superstrucutre optimization approach for the comparison between traditional biodiesel plants and the integration of glycerol to methanol production or its use to obtain ethanol within the production of biodiesel from algae. In the first case the glycerol is reformed, either autoreforming or steam reforming, the raw syngas purified and whose composition (H2:CO ratio) is adjusted for the production of methanol. The methanol once purified is used for the transesterification of the oil produced from the algae. In the second case we take advantage of the fact that the algae composition allows the simultaneous production of ethanol and biodiesel. The starch is liquified and saccharified to obtain glucose that is fermented to ethanol. On the other hand, the oil is transesterified with ethanol to produce biodiesel, either using an enzymatic or an homogeneous catalysts. The glycerol is fermented to ethanol. Both water-ethanol, streams from glucose and from glycerol are fed to a multieffect column and later to a molecular sieve. The dehydrated ethanol is used for the transesterification of the oil while the excess is sold as biofuel. Glycerol as byproduct is still interesting as long as its price is over $0.05 /kg. In terms of integrated facilities, the use of glycerol to produce ethanol requires almost twice the investment, but the production cost is a fourth lower with an increased production of biofuels by 50 %.

Mariano Martn; Ignacio Grossmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

On the effect of gas diffusion layers hydrophobicity on direct methanol fuel cell performance and degradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Degradation and mass transport phenomena management are two of the main issues hindering direct methanol fuel cell commercialization. Water and methanol crossover through the membrane, regulated by both anode and cathode gas diffusion layers hydrophobic properties, is widely studied in the literature, while the effect of mass transport phenomena evolution on the direct methanol fuel cell degradation has not been investigated yet. This work aims to present a combined experimental and modeling analysis on the effect of the gas diffusion layers hydrophobicity on DMFC degradation, through the comparison of performance characterization and degradation tests of two different fuel cells. In one of them, the lower diffusion layer hydrophobicity and the absence of anode microporous layer determines the onset of cathode flooding, negatively affecting performance and degradation. However, the cathode surface area loss is similar between the two fuel cells, meaning that flooding does not involve modifications in cathode permanent degradation mechanisms, but it mainly determines the amplification of the cathode surface area loss effects.

F. Bresciani; C. Rabissi; M. Zago; R. Marchesi; A. Casalegno

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Conversion of methanol to gasoline. Operation of the demonstration plant. Milestone report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100 BPD fluid-bed methanol to gasoline (MTG) demonstration plant operation has exceeded the original process objectives. Specifically, the results show: stable unit operation is achieved with excellent gas/catalyst mixing resulting in complete methanol conversion; bed temperature control is readily accomplished, although the process is highly exothermic; catalyst attrition is low, which confirms the mechanical strength of the catalyst - the small make-up used for activity control at normal conditions exceeds the low attrition rate; process parameters can be varied to obtain the desired gasoline yield and quality; and engineering design parameters have been confirmed at the pilot plant stage and a scale-up to a commercial-size MTG fluid-bed system is now deemed feasible. The results obtained gave a broad basis for the conceptual design of a coal-based commercial-size plant for the production of MTG gasoline. This study is presently in preparation and will be completed by the middle of 1985. The conceptual design will be based on a 2500 tonnes/day methanol plant feeding a single MTG fluid-bed reactor. Six trains will be used for a maximum plant capacity of 15,000 tonnes/day. 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Edwards, M.; Gierlich, H.; Gould, R.; Thiagarajan, N.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Coking of zeolites during methanol conversion: Basic reactions of the MTO-, MTP- and MTG processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deactivation of acidic zeolite catalysts during methanol conversion is investigated for elucidating how spatial constraints interfere mechanistically. Detailed product composition including retained organic matter is determined in a time resolved mode. At 270300C with H-ZSM-5, first unsaturated hydrocarbons are formedmethane being the indicative co-product. Then the reaction rate increases auto-catalytically, but soon declines because of exhaustive pore filling. The retained organic matter consists mainly of ethyl-trimethyl-benzene- and isopropyl-dimethyl-benzene molecules. Alkylation of benzene rings with ethene and propene produces the deactivating molecules. At 475C, alkylation of benzene rings with olefins has shifted to the reverse, reactivating the H-ZSM-5 catalyst. Coke forms slowly on the surface of H-ZSM-5 crystallites. Spatial constraints suppress the formation of 2-ring aromatics. With the wide pore zeolite H-Y, fast deactivation is noticedbigger aromatic molecules can be formed and are retained. Methanol reactions on the protonic catalyst sites are visualized as CH3+ attack for methylation and dehydrogenation, methane being the hydrogen-rich co-product. Methanol conversion on zeolites H-ZSM-58, H-EU-1 and H-Beta is comparatively investigated. Zone ageing is discussed for favorable reactor design. It is shown, how a multi-compound product composition is the source of information for elucidating complex reaction mechanisms.

Hans Schulz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The effect of ZnO in methanol synthesis catalysts on Cu dispersion and the specific activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ZnO in Cu/ZnO catalysts prepared by the coprecipitation method has been studied using measurements of the surface area of Cu, the specific activity for the methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO2

T. Fujitani; J. Nakamura

474

Membranen aus [(A)n(B)m]x-Multiblockcopolymeren fr den Einsatz in der Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzelle (DMFC).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Aramide and arylene ether multiblock copolymers of (AB)n-type with various degrees of sulfonation have been prepared for use in direct methanol fuel cells. Aramid- und (more)

Taeger, Antje

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Vibrational relaxation of the free terminal hydroxyl stretch in methanol oligomers: Indirect pathway to hydrogen bond breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vibrational relaxation of methanol-d MeOD in carbon tetrachloride has been investigated via ultrafast infrared such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or alkanes. Unlike water, which is only sparingly soluble in nonpolar

Fayer, Michael D.

476

Influence of continuous and discontinuous supplemental lighting on the daily variation in gaseous exchange in greenhouse cucumber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stomatal conductance, transpiration, net photosynthesis and internal CO2 concentration were measured on the fifth leaf of 36- to 43-day-old cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants. Three series of measurements followed the variations during a diurnal period in gaseous exchange of plants under three light regimes. One group of plants received supplemental lighting split into two periods (04:0008:00 and 16:0022:00) for a continuous 18-h photoperiod. A second group was illuminated between 19:00 and 05:00 for a discontinuous 18-h photoperiod. The last group received only natural light (control). Supplemental lighting increased the stomatal conductance and transpiration. Extending the photoperiod with supplemental lighting increased the net photosynthesis rate and extended the period of CO2 assimilation. The internal CO2 concentration varied inversely with the CO2 assimilation rate. The continuity or discontinuity of the photoperiod did not affect gaseous exchange.

Gilles Turcotte; Andr Gosselin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Promotive SMSI effect for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to methanol on a Pd/CeO{sub 2} catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports strong metal support interaction (SMSI) appearing in supported palladium catalysts which improves greatly the selectivity and lifetime of the catalysts for methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide into valuable chemicals and fuels such as methanol has recently been recognized as one of the promising recycling technologies for emitted CO{sub 2}. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Cold flow tudy of a fluidized bed reactor for catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixture of rare-earth chlorides, to selectively convert methanol to ethylene, propylene and propane with carbon yields of 70 to 90 percent. Chang Clarence and Silvestri (1977) claimed the use of erionite, zeolite T, zeolite ZK-5, chabazite and other... mixture of rare-earth chlorides, to selectively convert methanol to ethylene, propylene and propane with carbon yields of 70 to 90 percent. Chang Clarence and Silvestri (1977) claimed the use of erionite, zeolite T, zeolite ZK-5, chabazite and other...

Mehta, Shirish Ramniklal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Publication and Tables Overview > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS buildings and floorspace by selected agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Separater Bar Separater Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey, 1993 (file size 1.15 MB) pages: 183 Selected Sections Main Text (file size 161,775 bytes) pages: 17. - Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Contacts Preface Contents Introduction At a Glance Highlights on Federal Buildings Detailed Tables Appendices Appendix A. How the Survey Was Conducted (file size 45,191 bytes) pages: 8.

480

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 1 to 116 Complete set of Supplemental Tables Complete set of Supplemental Tables. Need help, please contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Regional Energy Consumption and Prices by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Table 1. New England Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 2. Middle Atlantic Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 3. East North Central Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 4. West North Central

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481

Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a companion document to the Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94), (DOE/EIA-0383(94)), released in Jan. 1994. Part I of the Supplement presents the key quantitative assumptions underlying the AEO94 projections, responding to requests by energy analysts for additional information on the forecasts. In Part II, the Supplement provides regional projections and other underlying details of the reference case projections in the AEO94. The AEO94 presents national forecasts of energy production, demand and prices through 2010 for five scenarios, including a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. These forecasts are used by Federal, State, and local governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers in the public and private sectors.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A Comparative Study of the Adsorption of Water and Methanol in Zeolite BEA: A Molecular Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were carried out to study the equilibrium adsorption concentration of methanol and water in all-silica zeolite BEA over the wide temperature and pressure ranges. For both water and methanol, their adsorptive capacity increases with increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. The onset of methanol adsorption occurs at much lower pressures than water adsorption at all temperatures. Our GCMC simulation results also indicate that the adsorption isotherms of methanol exhibit a gradual change with pressure while water adsorption shows a sharp first-order phase transition at low temperatures. To explore the effects of Si/Al ratio on adsorption, a series of GCMC simulations of water and methanol adsorption in zeolites HBEA with Si/Al=7, 15, 31, 63 were performed. As the Si/Al ratio decreases, the onsets of both water and methanol adsorption dramatically shift to lower pressures. The type V isotherm obtained for water adsorption in hydrophobic BEA progressively changes to type I isotherm with decreasing Si/Al ratio in hydrophilic HBEA. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

Nguyen, Van T.; Nguyen, Phuong T.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Wick, Collin D.; Do, Duong D.

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Underground coal gasification (UCG) gas to methanol and MTG-gasoline: an economic and sensitivity study, Task B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, identified as Task B, examines the technical and economic aspects of the production of methanol and MTG-Gasoline using gas from an underground coal gasification (UCG) facility. The report is a sequel to a previous study performed in 1981 and identified as Task A. The Task A report, titled Cost Saving Concepts on the Production of Methanol from Underground Gasified Coal, examined the economics of producing fuel grade methanol using UCG gas. In this study we examine the economics of producing MTG-Gasoline as well as a number of other aspects of the economics of upgrading UCG gas. Capital and operating costs for three different capacities of MTG-Gasoline plant are presented. These are 1600 BPD, 4800 BPD, and 9600 BPD. These capacities are equivalent to fuel grade methanol plants having capacities of 4000 BPD, 12,000 BPD, and 24,000 BPD - the methanol capacities considered in the previous studies. The economics of the MTG-Gasoline plant were developed using published information and our best estimate of the processing steps in the MTG-Gasoline process. As part of this study, several sensitivity studies were undertaken to examine the sensitivity of both methanol and MTG-Gasoline product cost to changes in technical and economic parameters. Table 1.1 lists the various sensitivity studies undertaken. All cost figures are in first quarter 1982 dollars.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

DLA Energy: Your Supplemental Energy Contracting Venue  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WARFIGHTER SUPPORT STEWARDSHIP EXCELLENCE WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT WARFIGHTER SUPPORT STEWARDSHIP EXCELLENCE WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT WARFIGHTER-FOCUSED, GLOBALLY RESPONSIVE, FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE SUPPLY CHAIN LEADERSHIP DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY AMERICA'S COMBAT LOGISTICS SUPPORT AGENCY WARFIGHTER SUPPORT STEWARDSHIP EXCELLENCE WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT DLA Energy Your Supplemental Energy Contracting Avenue Cynthia Obermeyer Contracting Officer DLA Energy April 2012 2 WARFIGHTER SUPPORT STEWARDSHIP EXCELLENCE WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT WARFIGHTER-FOCUSED, GLOBALLY RESPONSIVE, FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE SUPPLY CHAIN LEADERSHIP WARFIGHTER-FOCUSED, GLOBALLY RESPONSIVE, FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE SUPPLY CHAIN LEADERSHIP

485

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35) Joe Deherrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Project- Denny Jones Ranch Project No: 200002700 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.2 Control of Predators and

486

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 10, 2003 October 10, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36) Joe DeHerrera- KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project-Implemetation of Wildlife Mitigation Plan Project No: 200000900 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.0 Species Manangement

487

Natural System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

488

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

EA-1374-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EA-1374-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplement Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-03 (April 2003)

490

EIS-0285-SA-123: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-123: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management on Malin-Hilltop. Trees are located under and adjacent to conductors. Should a fire occur, these trees are a hazard to the line and could cause serious damage to the conductors, resulting in significant problems for the transmission grid. BPA plans on controlling these trees by removal. In addition, sagebrush along access roads and within 30 feet of structures will be mowed for fire prevention purposes. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-123) Malin-Hilltop (February 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0285-SA-118: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-133: Supplement Analysis

491

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities.This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

492

EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement This Supplemental DEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of continuing to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility at LLNL with respect to any potential or confirmed contamination in the area by hazardous, toxic, and/or radioactive materials." EIS-0236-S1-DEIS-1999.pdf EIS-0236-S1-DEIS-Figures-1999.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0236-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236: Record of Decision DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Volume II:

493

EIS-0285-SA-32: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

32: Supplement Analysis 32: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-32: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Walla Walla County, Washington Re-vegetation Plot Study along the Lower Monumental-McNary Transmission Line ROW. The study area sections are located near structures 38/4 and 39/3. The line is a 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 165 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as indicated on the attached checklist. DOE/EIS-0285-SA-32, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, Walla Walla County, Washington (November 2001) More Documents & Publications EIS-0285-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-64: Supplement Analysis

494

EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington The purpose of this Supplement Analysis is to determine if a Supplemental EIS is needed to analyze the use of the WDFW's existing Yakima Hatchery for rearing and possibly incubating coho. Additional acclimation and research activities for coho are also analyzed. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03, Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington (March 2000)

495

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities The purpose of this Supplement Analysis is to determine if a Supplemental EIS is needed to analyze the construction/modification upgrades to the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) fall chinook and coho experimental facilities at the Prosser and Marion Drain Hatcheries. Construction/modifications are in support of the experimental acclimation, rearing and incubating activities for coho and fall chinook. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (November 2000)

496

EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

36-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact 36-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement This Supplemental DEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of continuing to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility at LLNL with respect to any potential or confirmed contamination in the area by hazardous, toxic, and/or radioactive materials." EIS-0236-S1-DEIS-1999.pdf EIS-0236-S1-DEIS-Figures-1999.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0236-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Volume II:

497

EIS-0203-SA-04: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Supplement Analysis 4: Supplement Analysis EIS-0203-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Naval Reactors Facility Sludge Pan Container Disposition Project The NRF SPC Disposition Project would provide for the receipt, storage, characterization, certification and preparation of RH-TRU waste for transportation and disposition at WIPP. Currently, the 92 SPCs containing the RH-TRU waste are stored in hot cells and storage areas at NRF. Removing the RH-TRU waste would allow NRF operations to use the hot cells and storage for other projects. DOE/EIS-0203-F-SA-04 & DOE/EIS-0290-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Naval Reactors Facility Sludge Pan Container Disposition Project (May 2009) More Documents & Publications EIS-0203-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0203-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0203: Record of Decision

498

EA-1429-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9-SA-01: Supplement Analysis 9-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EA-1429-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Security Perimeter Project This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if previous Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) environmental assessments (EAs), including EA-1429 Environmental Assessment for Proposed Access Control and Traffic Improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico adequately address the environmental effects of a proposed modification to the location and alignment of a bypass road at Technical Area (TA) 3, or if this EA or others need to be supplemented. Supplement Analysis Security Perimeter Project, DOE/EA-1429-SA (February 2003) More Documents & Publications EA-1429: Final Environmental Assessment

499

EIS-0285-SA-119: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Supplement Analysis 9: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-119: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line Bonneville Power Administration proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Total right-of-way acreage is approximately 182.8 acres. Approximately 17 miles of access roads will be cleared. Approximately 136 tower sites will be treated. Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119) Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line (January 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0285-SA-125: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-124: Supplement Analysis

500

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of