Sample records for methanol ocean thermal

  1. THE ROLE OF METHANOL IN THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF TITAN'S PRIMORDIAL OCEAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschamps, Frederic [Institute of Geophysics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Mousis, Olivier [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Sanchez-Valle, Carmen [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lunine, Jonathan I., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@erdw.ethz.c [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key parameter that controls the crystallization of primordial oceans in large icy moons is the presence of anti-freeze compounds, which may have maintained primordial oceans over the age of the solar system. Here we investigate the influence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze candidate, on the crystallization of Titan's primordial ocean. Using a thermodynamic model of the solar nebula and assuming a plausible composition of its initial gas phase, we first calculate the condensation sequence of ices in Saturn's feeding zone, and show that in Titan's building blocks methanol can have a mass fraction of {approx}4 wt% relative to water, i.e., methanol can be up to four times more abundant than ammonia. We then combine available data on the phase diagram of the water-methanol system and scaling laws derived from thermal convection to estimate the influence of methanol on the dynamics of the outer ice I shell and on the heat transfer through this layer. For a fraction of methanol consistent with the building blocks composition we determined, the vigor of convection in the ice I shell is strongly reduced. The effect of 5 wt% methanol is equivalent to that of 3 wt% ammonia. Thus, if methanol is present in the primordial ocean of Titan, the crystallization may stop, and a sub-surface ocean may be maintained between the ice I and high-pressure ice layers. A preliminary estimate indicates that the presence of 4 wt% methanol and 1 wt% ammonia may result in an ocean of thickness at least 90 km.

  2. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skala, Glenn William (Churchville, NY); Hart-Predmore, David James (Rochester, NY); Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  3. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

  5. Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Steve

    Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean Rachael Beale,1; revised 12 June 2013; accepted 16 July 2013; published 16 October 2013. [1] Oceanic methanol, acetaldehyde to Chile (49 N to 39 S) in 2009. Methanol (48­361 nM) and acetone (2­24 nM) varied over the track

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  9. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

  15. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

  16. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  19. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  20. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

  4. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedSands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment. 1978. Renewable ocean energy sources, Part I.on aquaculture and ocean energy systems for the county of310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversion

  8. Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft

  10. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. , and M.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)

  11. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

  13. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites toassessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  14. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  15. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

  16. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites tooperation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  17. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  18. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  19. Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection Energy Conversion The immense size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTECOcean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources off

  20. Water and Methanol Adsorption on MgO(100)/Mo(100) Studied by Electron Spectroscopies and Thermal Programmed Desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Water and Methanol Adsorption on MgO(100)/Mo(100) Studied by Electron Spectroscopies and Thermal, 2000 The adsorption of methanol (CH3OH) and water (D2O) on the MgO(100)/Mo(100) surface at 100 K has covered MgO(100)/Mo(100) surface. On the other hand, the formation of a methanol multilayer desorption

  1. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

  2. NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega · Floating Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC: Georges Claude (Open Cycle OTEC) · 1928 Ougree Experiment, France: Factory Water Outflow (33 °C) & Meuse

  4. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergyTheJump to:Ocean

  5. August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data prompted ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology to be re-considered for use in Hawaii for OTEC development. Keywords- Ocean thermal energy conversion, OTEC, renewable energy, Hawaii

  6. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (FROH A PROPOSED OCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:

  7. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  8. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Sponsored byApplications Division of Ocean Energy Systems Contract W-nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  10. E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)M.S. et al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco-

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in-

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco- logical

  16. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYcruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)at Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  17. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

  18. 2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion COUNTRY NOTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion 573 and personal communication. Valuable inputs were provided by Don Lennard of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion organisation. Australia At an ocean energy workshop held in Townsville, northern Queensland in September 2005

  19. Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirka, Gerhard H.

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

  20. Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverthorne, Katherine E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental of the Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. ,of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference. Sponsored by the

  3. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to:

  5. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thefishery resources at potential OTEC sites. At this time, thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperational

  6. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Luis A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) by Luis A. Vega, Ph.D. Published by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Chapter 7 of "Ocean Energy Recovery: The State of the Art" 1992 #12;Published in Ocean Energy Recovery, pp 152-181, ASCE (1992) ii Table of Contents Tables /Figures

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense New Ventures #12;What is OTEC? OTEC B fiOTEC Benefits: Large Renewable Energy Source 3-5 Terawatts Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

  8. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  9. Vapor Synthesis and Thermal Modification of Supportless Platinum-Ruthenium Nanotubes and Application as Methanol Electrooxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson III, Robert [University of Tennessee (UT); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Papandrew, Alexander B [ORNL; Zawodzinski, Thomas A [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic, mixed-phase, and alloyed bimetallic Pt-Ru nanotubes were synthesized by a novel route based on the sublimation of metal acetylacetonate precursors and their subsequent vapor deposition within anodic alumina templates. Nanotube architectures were tuned by thermal annealing treatments. As-synthesized nanotubes are composed of nanoparticulate, metallic platinum and hydrous ruthenium oxide whose respective thicknesses depend on the sample chemical composition. The Pt-decorated, hydrous Ru oxide nanotubes may be thermally annealed to promote a series of chemical and physical changes to the nanotube structures including alloy formation, crystallite growth and morphological evolution. Annealed Pt-Ru alloy nanotubes and their as-synthesized analogs demonstrate relatively high specific activities for the oxidation of methanol. As-synthesized, mixed-phase Pt-Ru nanotubes (0.39 mA/cm2) and metallic alloyed Pt64Ru36NTs (0.33 mA/cm2) have considerably higher area-normalized activities than PtRu black (0.22 mA/cm2) at 0.65 V vs. RHE.

  10. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  11. Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report includes summaries of the following tasks: (1) OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; (2) OTEC methanol; (3) management decision requirements for OTEC construction; (4) hybrid geothermal - OTEC (GEOTEC) power plant performance estimates; and (5) supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  12. Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report summarizes work of the following tasks as of March 31, 1982: OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential Navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sheet] map I - 732). General Electric Company. Ocean thermalby Washom et al. General Electric (1977), Francis (1977),selected is based on General Electric estimated the ammonia

  14. Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

  15. USE OF MIXTURES AS WORKING FLUIDS IN OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan Zafar Iqbal; Kenneth E. Starling

    Mixtures offer potential advantages over pure compounds as working fluids in ocean thermal energy conversion cycles. Power plant capital costs per unit of energy output can be reduced using mixtures because of increased thermal efficiency and/or decreased heat exchanger size requirements. Mixtures

  16. Role of Water in Methanol Photochemistry on Rutile TiO2(110)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methanol photochemistry or thermal decomposition of methanol to methoxy. However, terminal OH groups (OHt), prepared by coadsorption of water and oxygen atoms, thermally...

  17. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11 JulyOceanOcean

  18. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean » Ocean

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

  20. Heat exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) - electronics subsystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.F.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronics systems supporting the development of biofouling countermeasures for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) are described. Discussed are the thermistor/thermopile amplifiers, heaters, flowmeters, temperature measurement, control systems for chlorination, flow driven brushes, and recirculating sponge rubber balls. The operation and troubleshooting of each electronic subsystem is documented.

  1. atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Baroclinic Adjustment...

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean »

  3. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

  4. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

  5. Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez Buño, Mariana

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

  6. Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, David J. (David James)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai�¢����i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

  8. Method for making methanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mednick, R. Lawrence (Roslyn Heights, NY); Blum, David B. (Wayne, NJ)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  9. Method for making methanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mednick, R. Lawrence (Roslyn Heights, NY); Blum, David B. (Wayne, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofBiofoul- ing and Corrosion of OTEC plants ~ Selected Sites.Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  11. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  12. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wastedenergy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heatthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  13. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Primer L. A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is estimated that, in an annual basis, the amount solar energy absorbed by the oceans is equivalent to at least amount of ocean solar energy does not pose an adverse environmental impact we must first identify of U.S. companies produced more than 50 kW of gross power, with a net output of up to 18 kW from

  15. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  16. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  17. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  18. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  19. Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    August 8, 2002 Present Address: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC,Victoria BC, Canada, V8P 5C2 0 #12;Abstract A reformulation of the simple model

  20. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States Department of Energy W-7405-ENG-48. under contractof Energy undf3r Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER ThisOcean Energy Systems Contract W-7405-ENG-48 August 1980 This

  1. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department of Energy,aspects of the screens for OTEC intake systems. U.S. Energy

  2. Structure of liquid and glassy methanol confined in cylindrical pores Denis Morineau1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Structure of liquid and glassy methanol confined in cylindrical pores Denis Morineau1,2 , Régis scattering analysis of the density and the static structure factor of confined methanol at various and D=35 Å. A change of the thermal expansivity of confined methanol at low temperature is the signature

  3. THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosshandler, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vol. ) in Methanol Furnace , 2 , . . . . . . . . , . , .Velocity Profiles in Methanol Furnace Temperature Profiles:to Pure Methanol . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . C02

  4. Produce syngas for methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farina, G.L. (Foster Wheeler International Corp., Milan (IT))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined reforming, in which an oxygen reforming reactor is added downstream from a conventional tubular reactor to produce syngas for methanol, achieves a substantial reduction in energy consumption with the least impact on the environment. This paper reports that the advantages of this process scheme are as follows: 8% to 10% reduction in the consumption of natural gas per ton of methanol, The size of the primary reformer is reduced, Reduction of syngas compression requirement due to increased syngas pressure, Reduced steam consumption, Production of syngas with the stoichiometric composition required by methanol synthesis. Synthesis gases for the production of methanol and synfuels are basically mixtures of hydrogen and carbon oxides. They have been produced from natural gas by steam reforming, autothermal reforming and noncatalytic partial oxidation.

  5. Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Baroclinic Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghil, Michael

    oscillatory modes dominate. As the two layers become nearly equal, antisymmetric oscillatory modes become of the atmospheric marine boundary layer (AMBL) to oceanic fronts has been studied in observations, as well's dynamics depends on the layer-depth ratio. When the model is nearly equivalent-barotropic, symmetric

  6. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph and we will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply. This situation justifies re-evaluating OTEC should begin to implement the first generation of OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine

  7. MTBE/methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, R.E.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. methanol production has become economically competitive with imports due to de-escalation of natural gas price from $3.07 mm Btu in January 1985 to $2.07 mm Btu by December 1985. This has reversed the earlier supply outlook when it appeared that additional methanol plants would shutdown due to low cost imports. Current gas cost in conjunction with projections for continued excess supply prompted DuPont to restart their 250 mm gpy plant at Beaumont, Texas. Other former producers are contemplating restarting idle units.

  8. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  9. 4, 125164, 2007 Methanol exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 125­164, 2007 Methanol exchange between grassland and the atmosphere A. Brunner et al. Title Discussions Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Methanol (albrecht.neftel@art.admin.ch) 125 #12;BGD 4, 125­164, 2007 Methanol exchange between grassland

  10. The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

  11. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

  12. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

  13. Interaction of methanol and water on MgO,,100... studied by ultraviolet photoelectron and metastable impact electron spectroscopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Interaction of methanol and water on MgO,,100... studied by ultraviolet photoelectron; accepted 27 October 1998 The coadsorption of methanol (CH3OH) and water (D2O) on the MgO 100 /Mo 100 photoelectron spectroscopy UPS HeI , and by thermal programmed desorption TPD . Methanol wets the MgO surface

  14. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving a predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7% to 60% of dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 9 to 35 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20% to 60%. The dependence of oxygen desorption with flow rate could not be determined. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures when flashing occurred, 75% to 95% of dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The uncertainty in results is larger than one would desire. These uncertainties are attributed to the uncertainties and difficulties in the dissolved oxygen measurements. Methods to improve the measurements for future gas desorption studies for warm surface and cold deep seawater under OC-OTEC conditions are recommended. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

  16. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olah, George; Prakash, G.K.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO{sub 2} capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO{sub 2} and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields. ? Direct electrophilic bromination of methane to methyl bromide followed by hydrolysis to yield methanol was investigated on a wide variety of catalyst systems, but hydrolysis proved impractical for large-scale industrial application. ? Bireforming the correct ratio of methane, CO{sub 2}, and water on a NiO / MgO catalyst yielded the right proportion of H{sub 2}:CO (2:1) and proved to be stable for at least 250 hours of operation at 400 psi (28 atm). ? CO{sub 2} capture utilizing supported polyethyleneimines yielded a system capable of adsorbing CO{sub 2} from the air and release at nominal temperatures with negligible amine leaching. ? CO{sub 2} electrolysis to formate and syngas showed considerable increases in rate and selectivity by performing the reaction in a high pressure flow electrolyzer. ? Formic acid was shown to decompose selectively to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} using either Ru or Ir based homogeneous catalysts. ? Direct formic acid fuel cells were also investigated and showed higher than 40% voltage efficiency using reduced loadings of precious metals. A technoeconomic analysis was conducted to assess the viability of taking each of these processes to the industrial scale by applying the data gathered during the experiments to approximations based on currently used industrial processes. Several of these processes show significant promise for industrial scale up and use towards improving our nation’s energy independence.

  17. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostko, Oleg

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1 Appearance energies for pure and protonated methanoland methanol-water clusters evaluated from photoionizationVUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water

  18. Methanol-reinforced kraft pulping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, E.; Olm, L.; Teder, A. (STFI, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of methanol to a high-sulfidity kraft cook on Scandinavian softwood chips was studied under different process conditions. Delignification and the degradation of carbohydrates were accelerated, but the effect on delignification was greater. Thus, methanol addition improved selectivity. The positive effect of methanol could also be observed for modified kraft cooks having a leveled out alkali concentration and lower concentration of sodium ions and dissolved lignin at the end of the cook. Methanol addition had no discernible effect on pulp strength or on pulp bleachability.

  19. MTBE, methanol prices rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, G.D.L.; Cornitius, T.

    1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After several months of drifting lower in line with declining autumn gasoline prices, tabs for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) have turned around. There has been no big demand surge, but consumers and traders are beginning to build up inventories in advance of a series of midwinter shutdowns and turnarounds by producers. Spot prices, which dropped as low as 75 cts/gal, have rebounded to 90 cts/gal fob. Eager for a positive glimmer, methanol producers posted a 3-cts/gal increase in contract prices this month. It marks the first upward idea since February. In that time contract prices have dropped 75% from $1.55/gal to 39 cts/gal. A hard winter has hit early in much of the US sending natural gas prices up sharply. At the same time, formaldehyde and acetic acid markets remain firm, and with MTBE rebounding, methanol producers feel entitled to a piece of the action. {open_quotes}I don`t buy into this claim that MTBE demand is up and I don`t think producers can justify even a 3-cts/gal increase,{close_quotes} says one. {open_quotes}There is nothing in the economy to warrant a run-up. Housing starts are weaker, and demand is down at least 80,000 bbl/day with the MTBE shutdown.{close_quotes}

  20. Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

  1. Methanol Observation of IRAS 19312+1950: A Possible New Type of Class I Methanol Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Salii, Svetlana V; Zhang, Yong; Yung, Bosco H K; Deguchi, Shuji

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the result of a systematic methanol observation toward IRAS 19312+1950. The properties of the SiO, H2O and OH masers of this object are consistent with those of mass-losing evolved stars, but some other properties are difficult to explain in the standard scheme of stellar evolution in its late stage. Interestingly, a tentative detection of radio methanol lines was suggested toward this object by a previous observation. To date, there are no confirmed detections of methanol emission towards evolved stars, so investigation of this possible detection is important to better understand the circumstellar physical/chemical environment of IRAS 19312+1950. In this study, we systematically observed multiple methanol lines of IRAS 19312+1950 in the lambda=3mm, 7mm, and 13mm bands, and detected 6 lines including 4 thermal lines and 2 class I maser lines. We derived basic physical parameters including kinetic temperature and relative abundances by fitting a radiative transfer model. According to the derived exci...

  2. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  3. amine methanol, ether . Amine amine CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    IP [2012] 7 C O 2 (CO2) . CO2 amine methanol, ether . Amine amine CO2 CO2 .Amine CO2 (functional group) amine amine+ +promoter .Amine CO2 CO2 . . , methanol ether methanol, ether promoter CO2 CO2 H2S, COS CO2 . Methanol rectisol process, di-methylene ether polypropylene glycol selexol (-30oC) . CO2

  4. THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosshandler, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMETHANOL METHANOL / COAL SLURRY j i Ali. @ i o N I. . , .PURE N METHANOL METHANOL I COAL SLURRY u o Obb~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

  5. A flow field enabling operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    A flow field enabling operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated methanol Q. Xu Available online 8 October 2010 Keywords: Fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Concentrated methanol Flow field a b s t r a c t In this work, an anode flow field that allows a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC

  6. Analysis of Mass Transport of Methanol at the Anode of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Analysis of Mass Transport of Methanol at the Anode of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell C. Xu,a Y. L. He transport of methanol at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell DMFC and show that the overall mass current density of an in-house-fabricated DMFC with different flow fields for various methanol

  7. THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosshandler, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral Intensity With 5% Coal (x ::: 86.9 cm) CalculatedPredictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMethanol as the Fuel B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel C.

  8. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  9. assessing cumulative thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models which can be expressed via Ceragioli, Francesca 9 Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion MIT - DSpace Summary: Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a...

  10. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cyclic trimer containing two methanol molecules and a waterTable 1 Appearance energies for pure and protonated methanoland methanol-water clusters evaluated from photoionization

  11. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene. Abstract: The desorption kinetics of methanol,...

  12. Methanol detection in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Martín; J. Martín-Pintado; R. Mauersberger

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a multilevel study of the emission of methanol, detected for the first time in this galaxy, and discuss the origin of its emission. The high observed methanol abundance of a few 10^-9 can only be explained if injection of methanol from dust grains is taken into account. While the overall [CH3OH]/[NH3] ratio is much larger than observed towards other starbursts, the dense high excitation component shows a similar value to that found in NGC 253 and Maffei 2. Our observations suggest the molecular material in M 82 to be formed by dense warm cores, shielded from the UV radiation and similar to the molecular clouds in other starbursts, surrounded by a less dense photodissociated halo. The dense warm cores are likely the location of recent and future star formation within M 82.

  13. Distances to Galactic methanol masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. L. J. Rygl; A. Brunthaler; K. M. Menten; M. J. Reid; H. J. van Langevelde

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first EVN parallax measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in star forming regions of the Galaxy. The 6.7 GHz methanol maser transition is a very valuable astrometric tool, for its large stability and confined velocity spread, which makes it ideal to measure proper motions and parallaxes. Eight well-studied massive star forming regions have been observed during five EVN sessions of 24 hours duration each and we present here preliminary results for five of them. We achieve accuracies of up to 51 $\\mu$as, which still have the potential to be proved by more ideal observational circumstances.

  14. Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commins, M. L; Duncan, C. P.; Estrella, D. J.; Frisch, J. D.; Horne, A. J.; Jones, K.; Johnson, P. W.; Oldson, J. C.; Quinby-Hunt, M. S.; Ryan, C. J.; Sandusky, J. C.; Tatro, M.; Wilde, P.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

  15. Detection of 6.7 GHz methanol absorption towards hot corinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Pandian; S. Leurini; K. M. Menten; A. Belloche; P. F. Goldsmith

    2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers at 6.7 GHz have been found exclusively towards high-mass star forming regions. Recently, some Class 0 protostars have been found to display conditions similar to what are found in hot cores that are associated with massive star formation. These hot corino sources have densities, gas temperatures, and methanol abundances that are adequate for exciting strong 6.7 GHz maser emission. This raises the question of whether 6.7 GHz methanol masers can be found in both hot corinos and massive star forming regions, and if not, whether thermal methanol emission can be detected. We searched for the 6.7 GHz methanol line towards five hot corino sources in the Perseus region using the Arecibo radio telescope. To constrain the excitation conditions of methanol, we observed thermal submillimeter lines of methanol in the NGC1333-IRAS 4 region with the APEX telescope. We did not detect 6.7 GHz emission in any of the sources, but found absorption against the cosmic microwave background in NGC1333-IRAS 4A and NGC1333-IRAS 4B. Using a large velocity gradient analysis, we modeled the excitation of methanol over a wide range of physical parameters, and verify that the 6.7 GHz line is indeed strongly anti-inverted for densities lower than 10^6 cm^-3. We used the submillimeter observations of methanol to verify the predictions of our model for IRAS 4A by comparison with other CH3OH transitions. Our results indicate that the methanol observations from the APEX and Arecibo telescopes are consistent with dense (n ~ 10^6 cm^-3), cold (T ~ 15-30 K) gas. The lack of maser emission in hot corinos and low-mass protostellar objects in general may be due to densities that are much higher than the quenching density in the region where the radiation field is conducive to maser pumping.

  16. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren; Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  17. Low Crossover of Methanol and Water Through Thin Membranes in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low Crossover of Methanol and Water Through Thin Membranes in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Fuqiang State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA Low crossover of both methanol and water through a polymer membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell DMFC is essential for using high concentration

  18. A sandwich structured membrane for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    A sandwich structured membrane for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu i g h t s " A sandwich structured membrane for DMFCs operating with neat methanol is proposed. " The membrane offers better water management for DMFCs operating with neat methanol. " The sandwich structured

  19. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,Methanol...n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,Methanol...n - ,,nÈ145; published online 27 June 2007 The dynamics of an excess electron in size-selected methanol clusters electron6­11 and its cluster counterparts,12­18 water n - . The solvated electron in liquid methanol has

  20. Methanol Masers and Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Sobolev; A. B. Ostrovskii; M. S. Kirsanova; O. V. Shelemei; M. A. Voronkov; A. V. Malyshev

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers which are traditionally divided into two classes provide possibility to study important parts of the star forming regions: Class~II masers trace vicinities of the massive YSOs while class~I masers are likely to trace more distant parts of the outflows where newer stars can form. There are many methanol transitions which produce observed masers. This allows to use pumping analysis for estimation of the physical parameters in the maser formation regions and its environment, for the study of their evolution. Extensive surveys in different masing transitions allow to conclude on the values of the temperatures, densities, dust properties, etc. in the bulk of masing regions. Variability of the brightest masers is monitored during several years. In some cases it is probably caused by the changes of the dust temperature which follow variations in the brightness of the central YSO reflecting the character of the accretion process. A unified catalogue of the class II methanol masers consisting of more than 500 objects is compiled. Analysis of the data shows that: physical conditions within the usual maser source vary considerably; maser brightness is determined by parameters of some distinguished part of the object - maser formation region; class II methanol masers are formed not within the outflows but in the regions affected by their propagation. It is shown that the "near" solutions for the kinematic distances to the sources can be used for statistical analysis. The luminosity function of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers is constructed. It is shown that improvement of the sensitivity of surveys can increase number of detected maser sources considerably.

  1. 6, 39453963, 2006 Methanol inside aged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACPD 6, 3945­3963, 2006 Methanol inside aged tropical biomass burning plumes G. Dufour et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions First space-borne measurements of methanol inside aged tropical biomass. Dufour (gaelle.dufour@lmd.polytechnique.fr) 3945 #12;ACPD 6, 3945­3963, 2006 Methanol inside aged

  2. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  3. Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro Fuel Cells TM Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power A Fuel Cell System Developer-17, 2002 Phoenix, Arizona #12;Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power Outline (1 Energy Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Technology

  4. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  5. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  6. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

  7. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  8. Emissions from two methanol-powered buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullman, T.L.; Hare, C.T.; Baines, T.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from the two methanol-powered buses used in the California Methanol Bus Demonstration have been characterized. The M.A.N. SU 240 bus is powered by M.A.N.'s D2566 FMUH methanol engine, and utilizes catalytic exhaust aftertreatment. The GMC RTS II 04 bus is powered by a first-generation DDAD 6V-92TA methanol engine without exhaust aftertreatment. Emissions of HC, CO, NO/subX/, unburned methanol, aldehydes, total particulates, and the soluble fraction of particulate were determined for both buses over steady-state and transient chassis dynamometer test cycles. Emission levels from the M.A.N. bus were considerably lower than those from the GMC bus, with the exception of NO/subX/. Comparison of emission levels from methanol-and diesel-powered buses indicates that substantial reductions in emissions are possible with careful implementation of methanol fueling.

  9. Methanol production method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  10. Electron-Stimulated Reactions and O-2 Production in Methanol-Covered Amorphous Solid Water Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akin, Minta C.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of molecular products from amorphous solid water (ASW) films capped with methanol is investigated versus methanol coverage (0 - 4 x 1015 cm-2) at 50 K using 100 eV incident electrons. The major ESD products from a monolayer of methanol on ASW are quite similar to the ESD products from bulk methanol film: H2, CH4, H2O, C2H6, CO, CH2O, and CH3OH. For 40 ML ASW films, the molecular oxygen, hydrogen, and water ESD yields from the ASW are suppressed with increasing methanol coverage, while the CH3OH ESD yield increases proportionally to the methanol coverage. The suppression of the water ESD products by methanol is consistent with the non-thermal reactions occurring preferentially at or near the ASW/vacuum interface and not in the interior of the film. The water and molecular hydrogen ESD yields from the water layer decrease exponentially with the methanol cap coverage with 1/e constants of ~ 0.6 x 1015 cm-2 and 1.6 x 1015 cm-2, respectively. In contrast, the O2 ESD from the water layer is very efficiently quenched by small amounts of methanol (1/e ~ 6.5 x 1013 cm-2). The rapid suppression of O2 production by small amounts of methanol is due to reactions between CH3OH and the precursors for the O2 - mainly OH radicals. A kinetic model for the O2 ESD which semi-quantitatively accounts for the observations is presented.

  11. atlantic ocean samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  12. atlantic ocean woce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  13. atlantic ocean bottom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  14. Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

  15. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

  16. Detection of a methanol megamaser in a major-merger galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xi; Baan, Willem A; Qiao, Hai-Hua; Li, Juan; An, Tao; Breen, Shari L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have detected emission from both the 4_{-1}-3_{0} E (36.2~GHz) class I and 7_{-2}-8_{-1} E (37.7~GHz) class II methanol transitions towards the centre of the closest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. The emission in both the methanol transitions show narrow spectral features and have luminosities approximately 8 orders of magnitude stronger than that observed from typical class I methanol masers observed in Galactic star formation regions. The emission is also orders of magnitude stronger than the expected intensity of thermal emission from these transitions and based on these findings we suggest that the emission from the two transitions are masers. These observations provides the first detection of a methanol megamaser in the 36.2 and 37.7 GHz transitions and represents only the second detection of a methanol megamaser, following the recent report of an 84 GHz methanol megamaser in NGC1068. We find the methanol megamasers are significantly offset from the nuclear region and arise towards regions wh...

  17. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rice, Cynthia (Newington, CT); Ren, Xiaoming (Menands, NY); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Niskayuna, NY)

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  18. Methanol in the L1551 Circumbinary Torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn J. White; C. W. M. Fridlund; P. Bergman; A. Beardsmore; Rene Liseau; R. R. Phillips

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations of gaseous methanol in an edge-on torus surrounding the young stellar object L1551 IRS5. The peaks in the torus are separated by ~ 10,000 AU from L1551 IRS5, and contain ~ 0.03 earth masses of cold methanol. We infer that the methanol abundance increases in the outer part of the torus, probably as a result of methanol evaporation from dust grain surfaces heated by the shock luminosity associated with the shocks associated with the jets of an externally located x-ray source. Any methanol released in such a cold environment will rapidly freeze again, spreading methanol throughout the circumbinary torus to nascent dust grains, planitesimals, and primitive bodies. These observations probe the initial chemical conditions of matter infalling onto the disk.

  19. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  20. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulaseFuels and VehiclesMethanol to someone by

  2. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  3. Recovery of methanol in an MTBE process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whisenhunt, D.E.; Byers, G.L.; Hattiangadi, U.S.

    1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process for the manufacture of methyltertiarybutylether (MTBE) in which methanol and a mixture of C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons containing isobutylene are contacted in a reaction zone containing an ion-exchange resin catalyst under suitable conditions to effect the reaction of methanol and isobutylene to produce a reaction product containing MTBE, unreacted methanol, unreacted isobutylene and other C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons, the reaction product is introduced to a fractionation zone wherein it is separated into a bottoms product comprising essentially MTBE and an overhead product containing unreacted methanol, unreacted isobutylene, and other C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons, and the overhead product is introduced to an absorption zone wherein the methanol is absorbed; the improvement is described which comprises utilizing silica gel as adsorbent and regenerating the silica gel adsorbent in a closed loop by contacting the silica gel absorbent with a desorption gas stream at an elevated temperature for a sufficient period of time to remove absorbed methanol, cooling the effluent from the adsorption zone to condense desorbed methanol removing desorbed methanol from the system and recycling the desorption gas to the adsorption zone.

  4. Methanol from biomass via steam gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffman, J.A. [Wright-Malta Corp., Ballston Spa, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    R&D at Wright-Malta on gasification of biomass, and use of this gas in methanol synthesis, has now reached the stage where a demonstration plant is feasible. The gasifier has evolved into a long, slender, slightly declined, graded temperature stationary kiln, with a box beam rotor and twin piston feed. The methanol reactor is envisioned as a smaller, more declined, graded temperature, water-filled kiln, with a multi-pipe rotor. Input to the demo plant will be 100 tons/day of green (45% water) wood chips; output will be 11,000 gal/day of methanol and 7500 lbs/hr of steam. The over-all biomass to methanol system is tightly integrated in its mechanical design to take full advantage of the reactivity of biomass under a slow, steady, steamy pressurized cook, and the biomass pyrolysis and methanol synthesis exotherms. This is expected to yield good energy efficiency, environmental attractiveness, and economical operation.

  5. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts. Abstract: We...

  6. A Theoretical Study of Methanol Oxidation Catalyzed by Isolated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methanol Oxidation Catalyzed by Isolated Vanadia Clusters Supported on the (101) Surface of Anatase. A Theoretical Study of Methanol Oxidation Catalyzed by Isolated Vanadia...

  7. Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell...

  8. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects...

  9. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Abstract: Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed...

  10. Importance of Diffusion in Methanol Photochemistry on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Mingmin; Acharya, Danda P.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Henderson, Michael A.

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoactivity of methanol on the rutile TiO2(110) surface is shown to depend on the ability of methanol to diffuse on the surface and find sites active for its thermal dissociation to methoxy. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) results show that the extent of methanol photodecomposition to formaldehyde is negligible on the clean TiO2(110) surface at 100 K due to a scarcity of sites that can convert (photoinactive) methanol to (photoactive) methoxy. The extent of photoactivity at 100 K significantly increases when methanol is coadsorbed with oxygen, however only those molecules able to adsorb near (next to) a coadsorbed oxygen species are active. Preannealing coadsorbed methanol and oxygen to above 200 K prior to UV irradiation results in a significant increase in photoactivity. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images clearly show that the advent of increased photoactivity in TPD correlates with the onset of methanol diffusion along the surface’s Ti4+ rows at ~200 K. These results demonstrate that optimizing thermal processes (such as diffusion or proton transfer reactions) can be critical to maximizing photocatalytic reactivity on TiO2 surfaces. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle under contract DEAC05-76RL01830. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  11. Role of Water in Methanol Photochemistry on Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemistry of the molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed forms of methanol on the vacuum-annealed rutile TiO2(110) surface was explored using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), both with and without coadsorbed water. Methoxy, and not methanol, was confirmed as the photochemically active form of adsorbed methanol on this surface. UV irradiation of methoxy-covered TiO2(110) lead to depletion of the methoxy coverage and formation of formaldehyde and a surface OH group. Coadsorbed water did not promote either molecular methanol photochemistry or thermal decomposition of methanol to methoxy. However, terminal OH groups (OHt), prepared by coadsorption of water and oxygen atoms, thermally converted molecularly adsorbed methanol to methoxy at 120 K, thus enabling photoactivity. While chemisorbed water molecules had no influence on methoxy photochemistry, water molecules hydrogen-bonded in the second layer to bridging oxygen (Obr) sites inhibited the methoxy photodecomposition to formaldehyde. From this we conclude that Obr sites accept protons from the hole-mediated conversion of methoxy to formaldehyde. These results provide new fundamental understanding of the hole-scavenging role of methanol in photochemical processes on TiO2-based materials and how water influences this photochemistry. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle under contract DEAC05-76RL01830. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greek, B.F. (C and EN, Houston, TX (US))

    1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  13. Total to withdraw from Qatar methanol - MTBE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total is rumored to be withdrawing from the $700-million methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) Qatar Fuel Additives Co., (Qafac) project. The French company has a 12.5% stake in the project. Similar equity is held by three other foreign investors: Canada`s International Octane, Taiwan`s Chinese Petroleum Corp., and Lee Change Yung Chemical Industrial Corp. Total is said to want Qafac to concentrate on methanol only. The project involves plant unit sizes of 610,000 m.t./year of MTBE and 825,000 m.t./year of methanol. Total declines to comment.

  14. Methanol engine conversion feasibility study: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the selection of the surface-assisted ignition technique to convert two-stroke Diesel-cycle engines to methanol fuel. This study was the first phase of the Florida Department of Transportation methanol bus engine development project. It determined both the feasibility and technical approach for converting Diesel-cycle engines to methanol fuel. State-of-the-art conversion options, associated fuel formulations, and anticipated performance were identified. Economic considerations and technical limitations were examined. The surface-assisted conversion was determined to be feasible and was recommended for hardware development.

  15. Methanol Maser Polarization in W3(OH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. T. Vlemmings; L. Harvey-Smith; R. J. Cohen

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first 6.7 GHz methanol maser linear polarization map of the extended filamentary maser structure around the compact HII region W3(OH). The methanol masers show linear polarization up to 8 per cent and the polarization angles indicate a magnetic field direction along the North-South maser structure. The polarization angles are consistent with those measured for the OH masers, taking into account external Faraday rotation toward W3(OH), and confirm that the OH and methanol masers are found in similar physical conditions. Additionally we discuss the Zeeman splitting of the 6.7 GHz methanol transition and present an upper limit of ~22 mG for the magnetic field strength in the maser region. The upper limit is fully consistent with the field strengths derived from OH maser Zeeman splitting.

  16. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Devinder (Port Jefferson, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

    1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  17. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Devinder (Port Jefferson, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  18. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    . NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

  19. Mit Methanol iridiumkatalysiert C-C-Bindungen knpfen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Karsten

    Mit Methanol iridiumkatalysiert C-C-Bindungen knüpfen i Die Reaktivität von Methanol (1) beruht meist auf dem nucleophilen Sauerstoffatom. Obwohl Methanol industriell im Monsanto-Prozess carbo, dass Methanol iridiumkatalysiert leicht an Allene (2) addiert. Damit entstehen 2,2-disub- stituierte

  20. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  1. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  2. Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yimin (Los Alamos, NM); Zelenay, Piotr (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of Pt.sub.3Cr/C so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  3. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yimin (Los Alamos, NM); Zelenay, Piotr (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  4. Methanol plant ship: Appendix. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The document is an appendix to the final report on a proposed methanol plant ship off of the coast of Trinidad. The document incorporates the results of the redetermination of capital required to implement the project. It also presents a revised cost analysis, with better accuracy, for the project. The projected operating revenues and revised expenses are also given. As a continuation of the information presented in the final report, the methanol market and proposed products are discussed in the report.

  5. Methanol synthesis in a trickle bed reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Sinoto

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemicals, which can not be synthesized directly and in high selectivity from synthesis gas (King and Grate, 1985). Methanol synthesis was first shown to be feasible by Mittash and Schneider (1913). In the 1920s, BASF introduced the first industrial... that illustrated a significant achievement in catalyst specificity because methanol is thermodynamically the least favorable product of all other products which can be synthesized from synthesis gas. The first industrial process developed by BASF in 1920s used a...

  6. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  7. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  8. Technology and economics of gas utilization: Methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seddon, D.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the current and emerging technology for the conversion of natural gas into methanol and assesses its impact on the production economics. Technologies of potential use for offshore developments of large gas reserves or associated gas are discussed. New technologies for the production of methanol synthesis-gas, such as autothermal reforming and GHR technology, are described and the economic advantages over conventional steam reforming are quantified. New methanol synthesis technology, such as slurry phase reactors, are outlined but appear to offer little advantage over conventional technology for offshore gas utilization. The purification of methanol for fuel and chemical grade product is outlined and the cost of transport presented. The data presented gives an overview of the production costs for production of methanol from large gas reserves (> 1Tcf, 25--35PJ/a) and smaller scale reserves (10--20MMscfd, 4--10PJ/a). The variation of the production cost of methanol with gas price indicates that the gas price is the principal economic consideration. However, adoption of new technology will improve production economics by an amount equivalent to an incremental gas cost of about $0.5/GJ. For gas reserves of low development cost, the adoption of new technology is not a prerequisite to economic viability.

  9. Pd and Pd-Cu Alloy Deposited Nafion Membranes for Reduction of Methanol Crossover in Direct Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Pd and Pd-Cu Alloy Deposited Nafion Membranes for Reduction of Methanol Crossover in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells J. Prabhuram, T. S. Zhao,*,z Z. X. Liang, H. Yang, and C. W. Wong Department Kong, China To reduce methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cells DMFCs , Nafion 115 membrane

  10. Preferential oxidation of methanol and carbon monoxide for gas cleanup during methanol fuel processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Inbody, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol fuel processing generates hydrogen for low-temperature, PEM fuel cell systems now being considered for transportation and other applications. Although liquid methanol fuel is convenient for this application, existing fuel processing techniques generate contaminants that degrade fuel cell performance. Through mathematical models and laboratory experiments chemical processing is described that removes CO and other contaminants from the anode feed stream.

  11. Electronic Effect in Methanol Dehydrogenation on Pt Surfaces: Potential Control during Methanol Electrooxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    advanced insight into the design of an optimal catalyst as the anode for direct methanol fuel cells. SECTION: Energy Conversion and Storage; Energy and Charge Transport Fuel cells are promising alternative energy conversion. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs

  12. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

  13. Effect of the cathode gas diffusion layer on the water transport behavior and the performance of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao , W.W. Yang Department Direct methanol fuel cell Passive operation Neat methanol operation a b s t r a c t The passive operation of a direct methanol fuel cell with neat methanol requires the water that is pro- duced at the cathode

  14. Falling MTBE demand bursts the methanol bubble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiesmann, G.; Cornitius, T.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol spot markets in Europe and the US have been hit hard by weakening demand from methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) producers. In Europe, spot prices for domestic T2 product have dropped to DM620-DM630/m.t. fob from early-January prices above DM800/m.t. and US spot prices have slipped to $1.05/gal fob from $1.35/gal. While chemical applications for methanol show sustained demand, sharp methanol hikes during 1994 have priced MTBE out of the gasoline-additive market. {open_quotes}We`ve learned an important lesson. We killed [MTBE] applications in the rest of the world,{close_quotes} says one European methanol producer. Even with methanol currently at DM620/m.t., another manufacturer points out, MTBE production costs still total $300/m.t., $30/m.t. more than MTBE spot prices. Since late 1994, Europe`s 3.3-million m.t./year MTBE production has been cut back 30%.

  15. Methanol from biomass via steam gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffman, J.A. [Wright-Malta Corp., Ballston Spa, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    R & D at Wright-Malta on gasification of biomass, and use of this gas in methanol synthesis, has now reached the stage where a demonstration plant is feasible. The gasifier has evolved into a long, slender, slightly declined, graded temperature series of stationary kiln sections, with box beam rotors and twin piston feed. The methanol reactor is envisioned as a smaller, more declined, graded temperature, water-filled stationary kiln, with a multi-pipe rotor. Input to the demo plant will be 100 tons/day of green (45% water) wood chips; output is projected at 11,000 gal/day of methanol and 7500 lbs/hr of steam. The over-all biomass to methanol system is tightly integrated in its mechanical design to take full advantage of the reactivity of biomass under a slow, steady, steamy pressurized cook, and the biomass pyrolysis and methanol synthesis exotherms. This is expected to yield good energy efficiency, environmental attractiveness, and economical operation.

  16. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofouling and Corrosion of OTEC Plants at Selected Sites.the Placement of a Moored OTEC Plant. Atlantic OceanographicThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  17. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters DOE AWARD NO. DE sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) uses large flowsFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  18. Comparison of Methanol Exposure Routes Reported to Texas Poison Control Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Givens, Melissa; Kalbfleisch, Kristine; Bryson, Scott

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    guidelines on the treatment of methanol poisoning, J ToxicolHantson PE, Acute methanol intoxication: physiopathology,The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors, Crit Rev Toxicol.

  19. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  20. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

  1. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Sobolev, A. M. [Astronomical Observatory, Ural Federal University, Lenin avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lo, N., E-mail: Simon.Ellingsen@utas.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago, Casilla 36-D (Chile)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  2. Methanex considers methanol, MTBE in Qatar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    CW has learned that Methanex Corp. is considering entering one of two methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) projects in Qatar. Executive v.p. Michael Wilson says that part of the company`s New Zealand plant could be moved to a site in Qatar, which would lower capital costs for the possible project by $75 million-$100 million. Both Qatar General Petroleum Corp. and Qatar Fuel Additives are developing methanol and MTBE projects at Umm Said, Qatar. Methanex says its goal is to ensure low-cost feedstocks.

  3. andean uplift ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 419 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  4. antartic ocean radiocarbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 362 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  5. Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonnell, Leo W. (Macungie, PA); Perka, Alan T. (Macungie, PA); Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

  6. Prediction of Transport Properties by Molecular Simulation: Methanol and Ethanol and their mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport properties of liquid methanol and ethanol are predicted by molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular models for the alcohols are rigid, non-polarizable and of united-atom type. They were developed in preceding work using experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data only. Self- and Maxwell-Stefan diffusion coefficients as well as the shear viscosity of methanol, ethanol and their binary mixture are determined using equilibrium molecular dynamics and the Green-Kubo formalism. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics is used for predicting the thermal conductivity of the two pure substances. The transport properties of the fluids are calculated over a wide temperature range at ambient pressure and compared with experimental and simulation data from the literature. Overall, a very good agreement with the experiment is found. For instance, the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity are predicted with average deviations of less 8% for the pure alcohols and 12% for the mixture. The predicted thermal...

  7. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  8. Electron-Stimulated Reactions and O-2 Production in Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and O-2 Production in Methanol-Covered Amorphous Solid Water Films. Electron-Stimulated Reactions and O-2 Production in Methanol-Covered Amorphous Solid Water Films. Abstract: The...

  9. Experimental Investigation on the Interaction of Water and Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation on the Interaction of Water and Methanol with Anatase-TiO2(101). Experimental Investigation on the Interaction of Water and Methanol with Anatase-TiO2(101). Abstract:...

  10. Site Competition During Coadsorption of Acetone with Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Competition During Coadsorption of Acetone with Methanol and Water on TiO2(110). Site Competition During Coadsorption of Acetone with Methanol and Water on TiO2(110)....

  11. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a CuSiO2 catalyst. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a...

  12. Level Alignment of a Prototypical Photocatalytic System: Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Level Alignment of a Prototypical Photocatalytic System: Methanol on TiO2(110). Level Alignment of a Prototypical Photocatalytic System: Methanol on TiO2(110). Abstract:...

  13. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts Print Wednesday, 03 December 2014 00:00 Researchers have found novel nanocatalysts that...

  14. Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface. Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001)...

  15. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  16. Methanol emission from low mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Maret; C. Ceccarelli; A. G. G. M. Tielens; E. Caux; B. Lefloch; A. Faure; A. Castets; D. R. Flower

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of methanol lines in a sample of Class 0 low mass protostars. Using a 1-D radiative transfer model, we derive the abundances in the envelopes. In two sources of the sample, the observations can only be reproduced by the model if the methanol abundance is enhanced by about two order of magnitude in the inner hot region of the envelope. Two other sources show similar jumps, although at a lower confidence level. The observations for the other three sources are well reproduced with a constant abundance, but the presence of a jump cannot be ruled out. The observed methanol abundances in the warm gas around low mass protostars are orders of magnitude higher than gas phase chemistry models predict. Hence, in agreement with other evidences, this suggest that the high methanol abundance reflects recent evaporation of ices due to the heating by the newly formed star. The observed abundance ratios of CH3 OH, H2 CO, and CO are in good agreement with grain surface chemistry models. However, the absolute abundances are more difficult to reproduce and may point towards the presence of multiple ice components in these regions.

  17. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  18. THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosshandler, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of NO and N02 in a Turbulent Propane/Air Di fusion Flame,"Fuel Methanol Ethanol Ethane Propane i so Octane n - Cetanestage of the secondary Propane, at A spark air line contains

  19. Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Raymond W.

    Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

  20. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  1. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water, methanol + water, and ethanol + water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kouichi; Kojima, Kazuo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Minoura, Tsuyoshi [Mitui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system methanol + ethanol + water and its constituent binary systems of methanol + water and ethanol + water at 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15 K. The apparatus that was used made it possible to control the measured temperature and total pressure by computer. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  2. Dissociative recombination of protonated methanol W. D. Geppert,*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Tom

    Dissociative recombination of protonated methanol W. D. Geppert,*a M. Hamberg,a R. D. Thomas,a F. O located in Stockholm, Sweden. Analysis of the data yielded the result that formation of methanol or deuterated methanol accounted for only 3 and 6% of the total rate in CH3OH2 + and CD3OD2 + , respectively

  3. Fuel Cells Bulletin February 2005 Effect of methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    FEATURE Fuel Cells Bulletin February 2005 12 Effect of methanol concentration on passive DMFC performance The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has attracted extensive interest from scientists energy density of methanol (6100 W h/kg at 25°C) is much higher than that of gaseous fuels.[1­6] Recently

  4. Competition between vitrification and crystallization of methanol at high pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    Competition between vitrification and crystallization of methanol at high pressure Marco J. P methanol at high pressure up to 33 GPa at room temperature with x-ray diffraction, optical polarization and vitrification is observed when methanol is superpressed beyond the freezing pressure of 3.5 GPa: between 5

  5. Homogeneous Catalysis Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Homogeneous Catalysis Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol Catalyzed, with CÀH Activation (generated by dissolution[6] of Au2O3) react with methane at 1808C to selectively generate methanol (as a mixture of the ester and methanol) in high yield (Table 1, entries 1 and 2). As expected, the irreversible

  6. Bimetallic Cluster Provides a Higher Activity Electrocatalyst for Methanol Oxidation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Bimetallic Cluster Provides a Higher Activity Electrocatalyst for Methanol Oxidation* Brenda L:Ru nanoparticles on carbon (PtRu/C) for use as an electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. This bimetallic carbonyl support particles. Cyclic voltammo- grams of methanol oxidation from the two catalysts showed

  7. Methanol maser survey using the EVN Anna Bartkiewicz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Langevelde, Huib Jan

    Methanol maser survey using the EVN Anna Bartkiewicz Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus-mail: langevelde@jive.nl We present the results of a five year campaign observing 6.7 GHz methanol masers towards a new type of masers. We discuss the origin of elliptically shaped methanol masers in massive star

  8. First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol Reinhard Beer,1 Mark W) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have. Citation: Beer, R., et al. (2008), First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

  9. Adsorption of intact methanol on Ru,,0001... Pawel Gazdzicki,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adsorption of intact methanol on Ru,,0001... Pawel Gazdzicki,1 Per Uvdal,2 and Peter Jakob1,a 1 the adsorption of methanol on the clean Ru 0001 surface at T 80 K. Thereby, clear evidence for intact adsorption upon adsorption of methanol on Ru 0001 , even at low temperatures, as well as partial recombinative

  10. Effects of Methanol on the Retinal Function of Juvenile Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, Christian

    Effects of Methanol on the Retinal Function of Juvenile Rats C. Plaziac1 , P. Lachapelle2 , C Received 18 April 2002; accepted 22 July 2002 Abstract We have investigated the effect of methanol exposure recorded prior to and up to 72 h after the administration of methanol. Data were compared to a control

  11. Molecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong Laser Fields Bishnu Thapa and H surfaces of methanol neutral, monocation, and singlet and triplet dication were explored using the CBS in the presence of a 2.9 × 1014 W/cm2 800 nm laser field for methanol monocation on the ground state potential

  12. Structure of crystalline methanol at high pressure David R. Allan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    Structure of crystalline methanol at high pressure David R. Allan Department of Physics structure, including all atomic positions, of methanol at high pressure and room temperature pressure of methanol is 3.5 GPa. In practice however, it is very easy to superpress the liquid phase

  13. Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface Studies of Aqueous Methanol Solutions by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency methanol (CH3OH) and aqueous methanol solutions were investigated using broad bandwidth sum frequency of methanol molecules at the air-liquid interfaces of neat methanol and aqueous methanol solutions. However

  14. Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Erickson

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  15. The Energetics of Ocean Heat Transport ANAND GNANADESIKAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    between mechanical energy supply and thermal energy transport associated with the ocean circulation modeling studies of ocean tide generation and energy conversion (Simmons et al. 2004; Arbic et al. 2004a of recent papers have argued that the mechanical energy budget of the ocean places constraints on how

  16. Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various decomposition of ocean heat transport into thermal wind, gyre, and Ekman components for a rough estimateTransport across 48°N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic

  17. METHANOL AS A TRACER OF FUNDAMENTAL CONSTANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levshakov, S. A. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Saint Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Reimers, D., E-mail: lev@astro.ioffe.rssi.ru, E-mail: mgk@mf1309.spb.edu, E-mail: st2e101@hs.uni-hamburg.de [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universitaet Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methanol molecule CH{sub 3}OH has a complex microwave spectrum with a large number of very strong lines. This spectrum includes purely rotational transitions as well as transitions with contributions of the internal degree of freedom associated with the hindered rotation of the OH group. The latter takes place due to the tunneling of hydrogen through the potential barriers between three equivalent potential minima. Such transitions are highly sensitive to changes in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, {mu} = m{sub e}/m{sub p}, and have different responses to {mu}-variations. The highest sensitivity is found for the mixed rotation-tunneling transitions at low frequencies. Observing methanol lines provides more stringent limits on the hypothetical variation of {mu} than ammonia observation with the same velocity resolution. We show that the best-quality radio astronomical data on methanol maser lines constrain the variability of {mu} in the Milky Way at the level of |{Delta}{mu}/{mu}| < 28 x 10{sup -9} (1{sigma}) which is in line with the previously obtained ammonia result, |{Delta}{mu}/{mu}| < 29 x 10{sup -9} (1{sigma}). This estimate can be further improved if the rest frequencies of the CH{sub 3}OH microwave lines will be measured more accurately.

  18. 786 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 32, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2007 Peer-Reviewed Technical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    acknowledged as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity gradients have been suggested. Ocean thermal energy conversion is possible in locations with large temperature

  19. Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Tropical Cyclone Forecast Models Using GODAE Nowcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

    in available thermal energy associated with energetic boundary currents and ocean eddies require their accurate temperature (SST) cooling. The potential for the ocean to support intensification depends on the thermal energy available to the storm, which in turn depends on both the temperature and thickness of the upper-ocean

  20. Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    's coasts great danger. As ocean is the energy source for intensification [Emanuel, 1999; Shay et al., 2000; Lin et al., 2005, 2008; Wu et al., 2007; I.-I. Lin et al., Upper ocean thermal structure to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

  1. Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Erickson

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  2. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blum, David B. (108 Tall Oaks Dr., Wayne, NJ 07470); Gelbein, Abraham P. (45 Headley Rd., Morristown, NJ 07960)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  3. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  4. advanced direct methanol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Direct Methanol Materials Science Websites Summary: increases the overall cost of the cell, reducing the fuel conversion efficiency. An alternative to H2): Application to...

  5. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts Print Researchers have found novel nanocatalysts that lower the barrier to converting carbon dioxide (CO2)-an abundant greenhouse...

  6. Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "Fuel Cells for Portable Power." Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications Novel Materials...

  7. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment IV. Health and safety aspects of the eucalypt biomass to methanol energy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic eucalyptus-to-methanol energy process is described and possible health and safety risks are identified at all steps of the process. The toxicology and treatment for exposure to these substances are described and mitigating measures are proposed. The health and safety impacts and risks of the wood gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to those of the coal liquefaction and conversion system. The scope of this report includes the health and safety risks of workers (1) in the laboratory and greenhouse, where eucalyptus seedlings are developed, (2) at the biomass plantation, where these seedlings are planted and mature trees harvested, (3) transporting these logs and chips to the refinery, (4) in the hammermill, where the logs and chips will be reduced to small particles, (5) in the methanol synthesis plant, where the wood particles will be converted to methanol, and (6) transporting and dispensing the methanol. Finally, the health and safety risks of consumers using methanol is discussed.

  8. Structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded methanol oligomers: Vibrational transient hole burning studies of spectral diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded methanol oligomers: Vibrational transient hole burning resolved pump-probe experiments have been conducted on the deuterated hydroxyl stretch of methanol-d in a solution containing 0.8% methanol-d/23% methanol-h in carbon tetrachloride. Methanol-d molecules that both

  9. 11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Chris

    , and individual seafarers for better knowledge of the ever-changing conditions in the sea. SST is an ocean, anditisneededasakeyinputtoforecastingsystemstoconstrainthemodeledupper- ocean circulation and thermal structure, and for the exchange of energy SSTs off the East Asian

  10. Communication China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    but scarce oil and natural gas. Adapting to such limitations, it has developed a chemical industry, with the rest coming from natural gas (Peng, 2011). Methanol is commonly used to produce formaldehyde, methylCommunication China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy and the environment

  11. The Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey--I: Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagadheep D. Pandian; Paul F. Goldsmith; Avinash A. Deshpande

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an unbiased survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the Galactic plane carried out using the 305 m Arecibo radio telescope. A total of 18.2 square degrees was surveyed with uniform sampling at 35.2 deg methanol masers are clustered, reflecting the formation of massive stars in clusters.

  12. Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over PdZnOAl2O3 Catalysts. Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over PdZnOAl2O3 Catalysts. Abstract: A PdZnOAl2O3...

  13. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Christopher J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  14. Importance of Diffusion in Methanol Photochemistry on TiO2(110...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Importance of Diffusion in Methanol Photochemistry on TiO2(110). Importance of Diffusion in Methanol Photochemistry on TiO2(110). Abstract: The photoactivity of methanol on the...

  15. Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from CO/CO2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from COCO2H2H2O Mixtures: the Source of C in Methanol and the Role of Water Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from COCO2H2H2O...

  16. Understanding the effect of modifying elements in supported vanadia bilayered catalysts for methanol oxidation to formaldehyde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vining, William Collins

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Si Figure 1.1. Schematic of methanol oxidation over isolatedSiO 2 catalysts for methanol oxidation, 163-171, Copyright (rate constant at 550 K for methanol oxidation plotted versus

  17. Volume$3, number 3 CHEMICAL. PHYSICS LETTERS 1 Februrf 1978 INTERACTION OF METHANOL WITH RUTHENIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Volume$3, number 3 CHEMICAL. PHYSICS LETTERS 1 Februrf 1978 INTERACTION OF METHANOL WITH RUTHENIUM of methanol with a clean methods. Methanol dissociates upon adsorption at 300 K and yields Ha(g) and chemisorbed CO as the domiwt

  18. EFFECTS OF METAL-SUPPORT INTERACTIONS ON THE SYNTHESIS OF METHANOL OVER PALLADIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryndin, Yu A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Synthesis of Methanol over Palladium by Yu. A.ABSTRACT The synthesis of methanol and other products fromThe specific activity for methanol synthesis decreased in

  19. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  20. Mobil plans methanol plant in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobil Chemical (Houston) is in discussions with Nigerian National Petroleum Corp. (NNPC; Lagos) on a joint venture methanol plant at Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The U.S. firm has invited process owners to submit proposals for a 1-million m.t./year unit and hopes to select the technology by the end of this year. Three proposals have been submitted: Lurgi, offering its own low-pressure process; John Brown/Davy, with the ICI process; and M.W. Kellogg, proposing its own technology. Shareholding in the joint venture is yet to be decided, but it is likely to be a 50/50 tie-up. Marketing of Mobil's share or of the entire tonnage would be handled by Mobil Petrochemical International (Brussels). The plant could be onstream in late 1996.

  1. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  2. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  3. aircraft-and satellite-based ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 339 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  4. Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  6. The production of methanol by the Brookhaven National Laboratory process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.B.; Williams, J.J.; Johnson, A.R.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop a capital cost estimate and methanol production costs for a new methanol process under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The cost of fuel delivered to the US Gulf Coast is compared with fuel produced by a conventional methanol process and a liquefied natural gas (LNG) process. The new methanol process is made possible by the development of a new liquid phase catalyst. The new liquid catalyst system can convert synthesis gas almost completely to methanol in a SINGLE pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This catalyst system reduces synthesis reaction temperatures from about 260{degree}C to about 100{degree}C, permitting isothermal synthesis conditions, in contrast to the temperature gradients in currently available pelleted, solid catalysts. Natural gas feedstock can be processed at pressures under 250 psia. Since nitrogen in the synthesis gas can be tolerated, the autothermal reforming step (combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming over a nickel catalyst) uses preheated air rather than oxygen. However, even with nitrogen present, the volume of gas fed to the reactor can still be smaller than the volume of gas that must be circulated in a conventional reactor, which operates with low conversions and requires high recycle volumes. The characteristics of the BNL system permits a major improvement in methanol plant design and economics. 11 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, Stephen; Mountz, David; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  8. ICI and Penspen in Nigerian and Qatari methanol deals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.K. consulting and engineering company Penspen Ltd. (London) has signed a second joint venture agreement in Qatar and has selected the ICI (London) methanol process. The technology will also be used in a world-scale methanol plant in Nigeria that Penspen is helping to set up. Under the first agreement, signed on January 1 with Qatar General Petroleum Corp. (QGPC), a 50/50 venture is being formed to build a $370-million, 2,000-m.t./day methanol plant at Umm Said. ICI will provide its low-pressure technology and help market 75% of the output. Completion is due late 1994.

  9. Melt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia M.

    We examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a ...

  10. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  11. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, Richard S. (1 Miller Ave., Shoreham, NY 11786); Slegeir, William A. (7 Florence Rd., Hampton Bays, NY 11946); O'Hare, Thomas E. (11 Geiger Pl., Huntington Station, NY 11746); Mahajan, Devinder (14 Locust Ct., Selden, NY 11784)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  12. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  13. Coadsorption of methanol and isobutene on HY zeolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogelbauer, A.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lercher, J.A. [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop a better understanding of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) synthesis on zeolites, the coadsorption of methanol and isobutene on HY zeolite was investigated using IR spectroscopy. Initial adsorption of isobutene alone at 35{degree}C led to rapid oligomerization yielding strongly bound oligomers. The subsequent coadsorption of methanol did not induce any changes in the zeolite-adsorbate complexes. TPD following the coadsorption showed that the Bronsted acid sites could be restored by temperature treatment above approximately 300{degree}C. When methanol was adsorbed first and isobutene was subsequently coadsorbed, MTBE was formed even at 35{degree}C on the catalyst surface. MTBE desorbed easily at a temperature of 70{degree}C, restoring a major fraction of the Bronsted acid sites. Methanol was concluded to decrease the probability of oligomerization by effectively competing for the acid sites. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Methanol plant ship: implementation study. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study compiled the economic, commercial and financing requirements of a floating plant ship with a production capacity of 3,000 tons of methanol a day. The raw material for the methanol production would be supplied from a natural gas reserve off the coast of Trinidad. The report has a separate section for each aspect of the plant ship project, such as methanol storage; logistics of transporting methanol to the United States; the required sub-sea installation to bring natural gas to the plant ship; and plant ship design and equipment. It gives a detailed description of a proposed organizational structure and its tax consequences. The project's financial requirements and economic impact are examined. The environmental consequences and other operator issues are analyzed. Tables and figures accompany the report.

  15. Evaluation of reformed methanol as an automotive engine fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCall, David M

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coal, oil shale, tar sands, and renewable resources [12], of which there are abundant supplies. Also, methanol could be distributed through the present fuel distribution network with some minor modifications. Hydrogen has also be investi- gated...

  16. Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the U.S. were coal, oil shale, and biomass. Natural gas (produced from coal and oil shale, methanol produced frommethanol was rated below oil shale and other coal-liquid

  17. Characterization of Microexplosion Phenomena of Methanol-Glycerol Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Ge-Yi

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions even when combusting glycerol-based mixtures. In this research, microexplosion phenomena of methanol-in-glycerol mixtures have been studied using a high speed camera and an acoustic sensor system. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm has been...

  18. THE METHANOL MASER EMISSION IN W51 C.J. PHILLIPS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Langevelde, Huib Jan

    THE METHANOL MASER EMISSION IN W51 C.J. PHILLIPS1 and H.J. VAN LANGEVELDE2 1 CSIRO; E-mail: chris.7-GHz methanol maser emission towards W51. In the W51 Main region, the bulk of the methanol is offset from an UCHII region. This probably indicates the methanol emission arises at the interface

  19. Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported on MCM-48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported-1462 ReceiVed: August 16, 2006; In Final Form: October 10, 2006 The mechanism of methanol oxidation. Methanol reacts reversibly, at a ratio of approximately 1 methanol per V, with one V-O-Si to produce both V

  20. Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Exfoliated and Functionalized Calcium Niobate Nanosheets in Water and Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    and Methanol Elizabeth C. Carroll, Owen C. Compton, Dorte Madsen, Frank E. Osterloh, and Delmar S. Larsen-order kinetics on a sub-nanosecond time scale that depended on the nanosheet size. Methanol was used and methanol solutions. Methanol is known as an efficient sacrificial electron donor for layered metal oxide

  1. Author's personal copy Modeling of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Author's personal copy Modeling of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao 2011 Keywords: Fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Neat methanol Mass transport Model a b s t r a c t A mathematical model is developed to simulate the fundamental transport phenomena in a passive direct methanol

  2. Theoretical characterization of the hydrogen-bond interaction of diacetamide with water and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    and methanol Minh Tho Nguyen, Natalie Leroux and The re` se Zeegers-Huyskens* Department of Chemistry formed from interaction of diacetamide with water and methanol. In both water and methanol complexes/6-31G** level being [44 kJ mol~1 for the water complex and [48 kJ mol~1 for the methanol complex

  3. 6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND TRACERS OF GALACTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND TRACERS OF GALACTIC STRUCTURE A Dissertation Jagadheep Dhanasekara Pandian ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS transition of methanol is the strongest of methanol masers, and is the second strongest maser transition ever

  4. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    l l,eve l Ventil.u:ion ( el OTEC H . . ard Level (f) Type ofW.E. and R.N. Manley, 1979. OTEC Commercialization Analysis.Assessment for Operational OTEC Platforms A Progress Report.

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Production, however, is peaking and humanity will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply and higher make available to its customers. Baseload plant An energy plant devoted to the production of baseload generated by the production of electricity that are not included in the price charged to consumers

  7. Synthesis of Pt{sub 3}Sn alloy nanoparticles and their catalysis for electro-oxidation of CO and methanol.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Li, D.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Soled, S.; Henao, J. D.; Sun, S. (Materials Science Division); (Brown Univ.); (Exxon Mobil Res. Eng. Co.)

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse Pt{sub 3}Sn alloy nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by a controlled coreduction of Pt(II) acetylacetonate and Sn(II) acetylacetonate at 180-280 C in 1-octadecene. In the synthesis, oleylamine was used as a reducing agent, and oleylamine/oleic acid served as surfactants. The sizes of the Pt{sub 3}Sn NPs were tuned from 4 to 7 nm by controlling the metal salt injection temperatures from 180 to 240 C. These monodisperse Pt3Sn NPs were highly active for CO and methanol oxidation in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} solutions, and their activity and stability could be further improved by a postsynthesis thermal treatment at 400 C in Ar + 5% H{sub 2} for 1 h. They are promising as a practical catalyst for CO and methanol oxidation reactions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell conditions.

  8. Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Jeremy Kua and William A. Goddard III* Contribution from functional theory (B3LYP)], we calculated the 13 most likely intermediate species for methanol oxidation

  9. Catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of catalytic gasification of bagasse to produce methanol. In previous studies, a catalytic steam gasification process was developed which converted wood to methanol synthesis gas in one step using nickel based catalysts in a fluid-bed gasifier. Tests in a nominal 1 ton/day process development unit (PDU) gasifier with these same catalysts showed bagasse to be a good feedstock for fluid-bed gasifiers, but the catalysts deactivated quite rapidly in the presence of bagasse. Laboratory catalyst screening tests showed K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on the bagasse to be a promising catalyst for converting bagasse to methanol synthesis gas. PDU tests with 10 wt % K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on bagasse showed the technical feasibility of this type of catalyst on a larger scale. A high quality synthesis gas was produced and carbon conversion to gas was high. The gasifier was successfully operated without forming agglomerates of catalyst, ash, and char in the gasifier. There was no loss of activity throughout the runs because catalysts is continually added with the bagasse. Laboratory tests showed about 80% of the potassium carbonate could be recovered and recycled with a simple water wash. An economic evaluation of the process for converting bagasse to methanol showed the required selling price of methanol to be significantly higher than the current market price of methanol. Several factors make this current evaluaton using bagasse as a feedstock less favorable: (1) capital costs are higher due to inflation and some extra costs required to use bagasse, (2) smaller plant sizes were considered so economies of scale are lost, and (3) the market price of methanol in the US has fallen 44% in the last six months. 24 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  11. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Ferrin, Peter A.; Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Nilekar, Anand U.; Koh, Shirlaine; Bae, Sang Eun; Brankovic, Stanko R.; Strasser, Peter; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed surfaces as reactivity descriptors, we screen bulk and surface alloy catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation activity. Using these two descriptors, we illustrate that a good methanol electro-oxidation catalyst must have three key properties: (1) the ability to activate methanol, (2) the ability to activate water, and (3) the ability to react off surface intermediates (such as CO* and OH*). Based on this analysis, an alloy catalyst made up of Cu and Pt should have a synergistic effect facilitating the activity towards methanol electro-oxidation. Using these two reactivity descriptors, a surface PtCu3 alloy is proposed to have the best catalytic properties of the Pt–Cu model catalysts tested, similar to those of a Pt–Ru bulk alloy. To validate the model, experiments on a Pt(111) surface modified with different amounts of Cu adatoms are performed. Adding Cu to a Pt(111) surface increases the methanol oxidation current by more than a factor of three, supporting our theoretical predictions for improved electrocatalysts.

  12. Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Ethan H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean – namely the thickness and concentration of perennial ice coverage – is crucial in allowing the water column to retain thermal energy

  13. Improving simulations of the upper-ocean by inclusion of4 surface waves in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence scheme5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean33 via wave breaking and non-breaking wave35 upper-ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each other using36 one. The behaviors of the Mellor-Yamada39 scheme, as well as the simulated upper-ocean thermal structure

  14. Clustering Dynamics in Water/Methanol Mixtures: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study at 205 K < T < 295 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Clustering Dynamics in Water/Methanol Mixtures: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study at 205 K functional groups in water/methanol mixtures at different methanol molar fractions (XMeOH ) 0, 0.04, 0.1, 0 in the mixtures, at all the methanol molar fractions, are faster than those of pure water and methanol because

  15. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  16. Perovskite anode electrocatalysis for direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.H.; Sammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation explores direct methanol fuel cells incorporating perovskite anode electrocatalysts. Preliminary electrochemical performance was addressed following incorporation of electrocatalysts into polymer electrolyte (Nafion 417) fuel cells. Perovskite electrocatalysts demonstrating activity towards direct methanol oxidation during cyclic voltammetry measurements included, respectively, SrRu[sub 0.5]Pt[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], SrRu[sub 0.5]Pd[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], SrPdO[sub 3], SmCoO[sub 3], SrRuO[sub 3], La[sub 0.8]Ce[sub 0.2]CoC[sub 3],SrCo[sub 0.5]Ti[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], and La[sub 0.8]Sr[sub 0.2]CoO[sub 3] where SrRu[sub 0.5]Pt[sub 0.5]P[sub 3] gave methanol oxidation currents up to 28 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.45 V vs. SCE. Correlations were found between electrocatalyst solid-state and thermodynamic parameters corresponding to, respectively, molecular electronic polarizability, the optical dielectric constant, the perovskite spin-only magnetic moment, the number of d-electrons in perovskite A and B lattice sites, and the average metal-oxygen binding energy for the perovskite lattice, and corresponding fuel cell performance. This may have future merit for the prediction of new electrocatalyst family members for promoting direct methanol oxidation. Methanol diffusion from anode to cathode compartments appears to be a major obstacle to the development of polymer electrolyte methanol fuel cells.

  17. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  18. Single-cell protein from methanol with Enterobacter aerogenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnan, S.O.; Abodreheba, A.O.

    1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An identified Enterobacter aerogenes utilizing methanol as a sole carbon source was studied for the optimization of biomass production and the reduction of its nucleic acid content. Results indicated that the highest yield and conversion were obtained at 0.5% methanol. The addition of seawater as a source of trace elements has an adverse effect. However, the addition of urea as source of nitrogen enhanced the growth of E. aerogenes. Heat shock at 60 degrees C for one minute followed by incubation at 50 degrees C for 2 hours caused 72.6% reduction in the nucleic acid. 12 references.

  19. An Investigation of Different Methods of Fabricating Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kwame (Kwame J.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol fuel cells are electrochemical conversion devices that produce electricity from methanol fuel. The current process of fabricating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is tedious and if it is not sufficiently ...

  20. Imaging Adsorbate O-H Bond Cleavage: Methanol on TiO2(110). ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O-H Bond Cleavage: Methanol on TiO2(110). Abstract: We investigated methanol adsorption and dissociation on bridge-bonded oxygen vacancies of TiO2(110) (1×1) surface...

  1. A Comparative Study of the Adsorption of Water and Methanol in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Adsorption of Water and Methanol in Zeolite BEA: A Molecular Simulation Study. A Comparative Study of the Adsorption of Water and Methanol in Zeolite BEA: A Molecular...

  2. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on...

  3. Supplementary Information for Methanol as a sensitive probe for spatial and temporal variations of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supplementary Information for Methanol as a sensitive probe for spatial and temporal variations.757 0.68(5) Table I. Methanol (12 CH16 3 OH) maser transitions and accurate rest frequencies taken from

  4. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam...

  5. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Experimental and Model Validation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Experimental and Model Validation Study M. Mench, J. Scott, S. Thynell boundary Fuel cell performance Current density distribution measurements Conclusions #12;3 Method, flow rate, species inlet and fuel cell temperature, and humidity. Transparent polycarbonate windows

  6. Discovery of two new methanol masers in NGC 7538

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pestalozzi; V. Minier; F. Motte; J. Conway

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: NGC7538 is known to host a 6.7 and 12.2GHz methanol maser cospatial with a Ultra Compact (UC) HII region, IRS1. Aims: We report on the serendipitous discovery of two additional 6.7GHz methanol masers in the same region, not associated with IRS1. Methods: Interferometry maser positions are compared with recent single-dish and interferometry continuum observations. Results: The positions of the masers agree to high accuracy with the 1.2mm continuum peak emission in NGC7538 IRS9 and NGC7538 S. This clear association is also confirmed by the positional agreement of the masers with existing high resolution continuum observations at cm and/or mm wavelengths. Conclusions: Making use of the established strong relation between methanol masers and high-mass star formation, we claim that we have accurately positioned the high-mass protostars within the regions where they are detected. The variety of objects hosting a 6.7GHz methanol maser in NGC7538 shows that this emission probably traces different evolutionary stages within the protostellar phase.

  7. Methanol market slowly tightens as Brazil starts soaking up material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the US methanol market's response to mandated oxygen requirements in reformulated gasoline has been disappointing, the European market has surprisingly been tightening in recent weeks and looks set for a price rise in first-quarter 1993. The tightness is being felt mainly in the Mediterranean market, where the Libyan methanol plant is running at only 70% because of problems with gas feedstock supplies. More significantly, the Brazilian government has now given the go-ahead for a yearlong extension on imports of methanol for use as an ethanol replacement in fuel blending. The new authorization sets a monthly import limit of 48,000 m.t. during that period. Libya is an important supplier of methanol to the Brazilian market and has already shipped about 20,000 m.t. since the authorization was given. Another major supplier to Brazil is Russia, from its two giant 750,000-m.t./year plants at Gubakha and Tomsk. The material is shipped from the terminal at Yuzhnyy on the Black Sea, in Ukrainian territory since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  8. Process Design and Integration of Shale Gas to Methanol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehlinger, Victoria M.

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    pathways for the production of methanol from shale gas. The composition of the shale gas feedstock is assumed to come from the Barnett Shale Play located near Fort Worth, Texas, which is currently the most active shale gas play in the US. Process...

  9. Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

  10. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  11. Complete Quantitative online Analysis of Methanol Electrooxidation Prod-ucts via Electron Impact and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    1 Complete Quantitative online Analysis of Methanol Electrooxidation Prod- ucts via Electron Impact for application in energy re- lated electrocatalysis is demonstrated using continuous methanol oxidation over

  12. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  13. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  14. Influence of upper-ocean stratification on tropical cyclone-induced surface cooling in the Bay of Bengal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in oceanic stratification rather than to differences in TC wind energy input. During the postmonsoon season, a deeper thermal stratification combined with a considerable upper-ocean freshening strongly inhibits that TCs primarily draw their energy from evaporation at the ocean surface [Riehl, 1950]. TCs generally

  15. A New Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Methanol Hong Wei Xiang,a...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    A New Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Methanol Hong Wei Xiang,a... Arno Laesecke for the viscosity of methanol is presented that is valid over the entire fluid region, including vapor, liquid coefficient is developed from experimental data and applied to methanol. The high-density contribution

  16. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval1 evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval1 evaluation and constraints Information1 2 3 #12; 3 1 FigureS1.Comparison of TES, IASI and airborne methanol measurements using GEOS-Chem as2 an intercomparison platform. Methanol abundance as modeled by GEOS-Chem (base-case3 simulation

  17. Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 265271 Simultaneous oxygen-reduction and methanol-oxidation reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 265­271 Simultaneous oxygen-reduction and methanol-reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol- oxidation reaction (MOR) at the cathode of a DMFC. Good agreements between a significant poisoning effect on the ORR by the presence of methanol at the cathode. The results also indicated

  18. Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2012 BP Methanol Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2012 BP ­ Methanol Separation issues in the well heads. To counteract this problem, methanol is injected into the produced water stream at the well site. Methanol, however, is toxic to humans, animals, and plants, and must be removed before

  19. Global budget of methanol: Constraints from atmospheric observations Daniel J. Jacob,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qinbin

    Global budget of methanol: Constraints from atmospheric observations Daniel J. Jacob,1 Brendan D of atmospheric methanol to examine the consistency between observed atmospheric concentrations and current of methanol in the model is 7 days; gas-phase oxidation by OH accounts for 63% of the global sink, dry

  20. Performance modeling and cell design for high concentration methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 50 Performance modeling and cell design for high concentration methanol fuel cells C. E The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has become a lead- ing contender to replace the lithium-ion (Li density of liquid methanol (CH3OH) fuel is 4800 Wh l-1 , whereas the theoretical energy density of Li

  1. Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory-phase transition metal oxide cations can convert methane to methanol. Methane activation by MO+ is discussed such as methanol has attracted great experimental and theoretical interest due to its importance as an industrial

  2. Performance and endurance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operated on methanol reformate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    Performance and endurance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operated on methanol reformate Samuel September 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: High temperature PEM Fuel cell Methanol Impedance spectroscopy a b s t r a c t This paper analyzes the effects of methanol and water vapor on the performance

  3. Effect of Transient Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions on the OCV of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Effect of Transient Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions on the OCV of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells of a direct methanol fuel cell DMFC was observed to undergo an overshoot before it stabilized during. Available electronically August 16, 2005. Direct methanol fuel cells DMFCs are considered as a hopeful

  4. PPPL-3457 PPPL-3457 Broadening and Shifting of the Methanol 119 m Gain Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL-3457 PPPL-3457 UC-70 Broadening and Shifting of the Methanol 119 µm Gain Line of Linear and Shifting of the Methanol 119 mm Gain Line of Linear and Circular Polarization by Collision with Chiral handedness of a circularly polarized probe. The broadening of the 119 mm line of the methanol molecule

  5. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Wenpeng Liu*,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Wenpeng Liu*,a and Chao that performance and design of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell DMFC is controlled not only by electrochemical kinetics and methanol crossover but also by water transport and by their complex interactions

  6. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  7. The effect of methanol concentration on the performance of a passive DMFC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    The effect of methanol concentration on the performance of a passive DMFC J.G. Liu, T.S. Zhao *, R-breathing liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), with no external pumps or other auxiliary devices, was designed, fabricated and tested with different methanol concentrations. It was found that the cell

  8. Methanol adsorbates on the DMFC cathode and their effect on the cell performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Methanol adsorbates on the DMFC cathode and their effect on the cell performance J. Prabhuram, T in the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) occurred after the cell had been operated at a higher temperature with higher methanol concentrations as compared with the polarization data collected under

  9. Correlating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    Correlating Catalytic Methanol Oxidation with the Structure and Oxidation State of Size-Selected Pt nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by micelle encapsulation and supported on -Al2O3 during the oxidation of methanol the pretreatment. KEYWORDS: platinum, methanol oxidation, operando, XAFS, EXAFS, XANES, alumina, nanoparticle, size

  10. Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission J.-K. Lee March 9 A B S T R AC T We report the discovery of H2 line emission associated with 6.67-GHz methanol emission was found associated with an ultracompact H II region IRAS 14567­5846 and isolated methanol maser

  11. PoS(IXEVNSymposium)036 Mapping the Milky Way structure with methanol and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunthaler, Andreas

    PoS(IXEVNSymposium)036 Mapping the Milky Way structure with methanol and water masers Luca VLBA and VERA results in measuring trigonometric parallaxes of methanol and water maser sourcesS(IXEVNSymposium)036 Mapping the Milky Way structure with methanol and water masers Luca Moscadelli 1. Introduction

  12. Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by FeO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by Fe.1063/1.1448489 I. INTRODUCTION The direct oxidation of methane to an easily transport- able liquid such as methanol process and as the simplest model for alkane oxidation.1,2 Although no direct, efficient methane­methanol

  13. Development of high-power electrodes for a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of high-power electrodes for a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell C. Lim, C.Y. Wang for a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were fabricated by using a novel method of modi®ed Na.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cells; Membrane-electrode assembly (MEA); Polymer

  14. Mechanism of O2 Activation and Methanol Production by (Di(2-pyridyl)methanesulfonate)PtII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Mechanism of O2 Activation and Methanol Production by (Di(2- pyridyl)methanesulfonate)PtII Me observed for the SN2 functionalization to form methanol by two isomeric (dpms)PtIV Me(OH)2 complexes, one conversion of methane to methanol at low temper- ature is crucial for transportation of shale gas produced

  15. Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser of methylamine (CH3NH2 + ), methanol (CH3OH+ ), and methyl fluoride (CH3F+ ) cations by short, intense laser 7 m laser pulses. This work is motivated by recent studies of methanol cations by Yamanouchi and co

  16. Partial oxidation of methanol over highly dispersed vanadia supported on silica SBA-15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Partial oxidation of methanol over highly dispersed vanadia supported on silica SBA-15 C. Hessa 2005; accepted 6 August 2005 The partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde (FA) was studied over vanadia partly agglomerates into vanadia crystallites during methanol oxidation. KEY WORDS: supported

  17. Molecular Hydrogen from Methanol Maser Sources { Out ow from the Earliest Stage of Star Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Michael

    Molecular Hydrogen from Methanol Maser Sources { Out ow from the Earliest Stage of Star Formation in its natal molecular cloud. The strong methanol maser transition 5 1 { 6 0 A + at 6.7 GHz has also been that methanol maser emission usually occurs in massive star forming regions but away from the UCHII regions

  18. Passive film-induced stress and mechanical properties of a-Ti in methanol solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Passive film-induced stress and mechanical properties of a-Ti in methanol solution Zhi Qin and film mechanical properties on a-Ti in methanol solution with varying water content was investigated. Film-induced stress in the methanol solution was measured by the flow stress differential method

  19. PoS(IXEVNSymposium)039 EVN observations of the methanol masers in Cep A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Langevelde, Huib Jan

    PoS(IXEVNSymposium)039 EVN observations of the methanol masers in Cep A Karl Torstensson Leiden observations of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser in the high mass star-forming re- gion Cepheus A. The maser emission field of the methanol masers shows an infall sig- nature rather than a rotation signature. We present

  20. Dramatic Reduction of Water Crossover in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells by Cathode Humidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration methanol fuel cells, the water transport coefficient through the membrane must be reducedDramatic Reduction of Water Crossover in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells by Cathode Humidification much higher than 60°C and in active air-flowing direct methanol fuel cell systems with high power

  1. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment V. The Florida eucalyptus energy farm: environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall environmental impact of the eucalyptus to methanol energy system in Florida is assessed. The environmental impacts associated with the following steps of the process are considered: (1) the greenhouse and laboratory; (2) the eucalyptus plantation; (3) transporting the mature logs; (4) the hammermill; and (5) the methanol synthesis plant. Next, the environmental effects of methanol as an undiluted motor fuel, methanol as a gasoline blend, and gasoline as motor fuels are compared. Finally, the environmental effects of the eucalypt gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to the coal liquefaction and conversion system.

  2. Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

  3. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  4. Emissions characterization of two methanol-fueled transit buses. Final report, April-September 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullman, T.L.; Hare, C.T.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust emissions from the two methanol-powered buses used in the California Methanol Bus Demonstration have been characterized. The M.A.N. SU 240 bus is powered by M.A.N.'s D2566 FMUH methanol engine, and utilizes catalytic exhaust aftertreatment. The GMC RTS II 04 bus is powered by a first-generation DDAD 6V-92TA methanol engine without exhaust aftertreatment. Emissions of HC, CO, NO, unburned methanol, aldehydes, total particulates, and soluble fraction of particulate were determined for both buses over steady-state and transient chassis dynamometer test cycles. Emission levels from the M.A.N. bus were considerably lower than those from the GMC bus, with the exception of NO. Comparison of emission levels from methanol- and diesel-powered buses indicates that substantial reduction in emissions (especially particulate and NO) are possible with careful implementation of methanol fueling.

  5. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  6. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  7. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  8. Methanol Along the Path from Envelope to Protoplanetary Disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interstellar methanol is considered to be a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. A physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disc. An axisymmetric 2D semi-analytic model generates the time-dependent density and velocity distributions, and full continuum radiative transfer is performed to calculate the dust temperature and the UV radiation field at each position as a function of time. A comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is employed to compute the chemical abundances along infall trajectories. Two physical scenarios are studied, one in which the dominant disc growth mechanism is viscous spreading, and another in which continuous infall of matter prevails. The results show that the infall path influences the abundance of methanol entering each type of disc, ranging from complete loss of methanol to an enhancement by a factor of > 1 relative to the prestellar phase. Critical ch...

  9. Vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esteve, X.; Chaudhari, S.K.; Coronas, A. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain). Dept. of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium (P-T-x) for the methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether binary system were obtained by the static method in the range of temperatures from 293.15 to 423.15 K at 10 K intervals. The modified vapor pressure apparatus used is described. The Kuczynsky method was used to calculate the liquid and vapor composition and the activity coefficients of methanol from the initial composition of the sample and the measured pressure and temperature. The results were correlated by the NRTL and UNIQUAC temperature dependent activity coefficient models. This system shows nearly ideal behavior at 323.15 K, but positive deviations from ideality at lower temperatures and negative deviations at higher temperatures are observed. The activity coefficients become more negative with the increase in temperature and mole fraction of methanol. The excess molar enthalpy using the Gibss-Helmholtz equation and the NRTL and UNIQUAC parameters were calculated at 303.15 K and compared with experimental data. This binary system shows promise as a working pair for high-temperature heat pump applications.

  10. Effect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Effect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu a , S.Y. Shen a , Y.L. He b , T.S. Zhao a cells Direct methanol fuel cells Neat methanol Water concentration a b s t r a c t This paper reports

  11. Unbiased water and methanol maser surveys of NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Ho-Gyu, E-mail: arl@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776, Daedeokdae-ro Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of unbiased 22 GHz H{sub 2}O water and 44 GHz class I CH{sub 3}OH methanol maser surveys in the central 7' × 10' area of NGC 1333 and two additional mapping observations of a 22 GHz water maser in a ?3' × 3' area of the IRAS4A region. In the 22 GHz water maser survey of NGC 1333 with a sensitivity of ? ? 0.3 Jy, we confirmed the detection of masers toward H{sub 2}O(B) in the region of HH 7-11 and IRAS4B. We also detected new water masers located ?20'' away in the western direction of IRAS4B or ?25'' away in the southern direction of IRAS4A. We could not, however, find young stellar objects or molecular outflows associated with them. They showed two different velocity components of ?0 and ?16 km s{sup –1}, which are blue- and redshifted relative to the adopted systemic velocity of ?7 km s{sup –1} for NGC 1333. They also showed time variabilities in both intensity and velocity from multi-epoch observations and an anti-correlation between the intensities of the blue- and redshifted velocity components. We suggest that the unidentified power source of these masers might be found in the earliest evolutionary stage of star formation, before the onset of molecular outflows. Finding this kind of water maser is only possible through an unbiased blind survey. In the 44 GHz methanol maser survey with a sensitivity of ? ? 0.5 Jy, we confirmed masers toward IRAS4A2 and the eastern shock region of IRAS2A. Both sources are also detected in 95 and 132 GHz methanol maser lines. In addition, we had new detections of methanol masers at 95 and 132 GHz toward IRAS4B. In terms of the isotropic luminosity, we detected methanol maser sources brighter than ?5 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup –1} from our unbiased survey.

  12. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean ’engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

  13. OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE OAH'U REGIONAL OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) site off the south coast of Oah'u as well as the circulation of Mamala analyses of the observing systems were conducted at the outflow plume depth of a potential pilot Ocean

  14. The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Roger

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigate the conversion of gravitational energy into viscous heating and the thermal equilibration betweenDirect numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean H. Ichikawa,1,2 S. Labrosse,1 and K of metal in a magma ocean. The model, using a fully Lagrangian approach called the moving particle semi

  16. Ocean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal agitation -internal energy of the fluid is typically 10 orders of magnitude greater thanOcean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics P.B. Rhines & S. Häkkinen #12;· Many basic tenets of ocean circulation are being challenged, and they relate

  17. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiji, Ashok

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

  18. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  19. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  20. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to:1999) |Methanol Fuel

  1. air-breathing direct methanol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Direct Methanol Materials Science Websites Summary: increases the overall cost of the cell, reducing the fuel conversion efficiency. An alternative to H2): Application to...

  2. Indirect conversion of coal to methanol and gasoline: product price vs product slate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wham, R.M.; McCracken, D.J.; Forrester, R.C. III

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts process analysis and engineering evaluation studies for the Department of Energy to provide, on a consistent basis, technical and economic assessments of processes and systems for coal conversion and utilization. Such assessments permit better understanding of the relative technical and economic potential of these processes. The objective of the work described here was to provide an assessment of the technical feasibility, economic competitiveness, and environmental acceptability of selected indirect coal liquefaction processes on a uniform, consistent, and impartial basis. Particular emphasis is placed on production of methanol as a principal product or methanol production for conversion to gasoline. Potential uses for the methanol are combustion in peaking-type turbines or blending with gasoline to yield motor fuel. Conversion of methanol to gasoline is accomplished through the use of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Under the guidance of ORNL, Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Houston Division, prepared four conceptual process designs for indirect conversion of a Western subbituminous coal to either methanol or gasoline. The conceptual designs are based on the use of consistent technology for the core of the plant (gasification through methanol synthesis) with additional processing as necessary for production of different liquid products of interest. The bases for the conceptual designs are given. The case designations are: methanol production for turbine-grade fuel; methanol production for gasoline blending; gasoline production with coproduction of SNG; and gasoline production maximized.

  3. Liquid-liquid equilibrium of cyclohexane-n-hexane-methanol mixtures; Effect of water content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Kikic, I. (Istituto di Chimica Applicata e Industriale, University of Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (IT))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the ternary system cyclohexane-n-hexane-methanol and for the binary systems n-hexane-methanol and cyclohexane-methanol are presented over a temperature range from 284 to 298{Kappa} at pressure of 0.1 MPa. Attention is given to the effect of the purity of methanol as far as the water content is concerned. The data are correlated by means of excess Gibbs energy models (NRTL and UNIQUAC), and the binary interaction parameters are reported.

  4. Catalytic decomposition of methanol at various temperatures and several liquid hourly space velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Yashpal Satyapal

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to quantitatively analyze the products of the reactions. Based on the results obtained, a scheme is presented by which methanol can be converted to a gaseous fuel consisting of dimethyl ether (50K), carbon monoxide ( 16 . 67K) and hyrdogen (33 . 33K) . Dedicated... is produced by catalytically dehydrating methanol over a y-alumina catalyst to produce dimethyl ether and dehydrogenating methanol to CO and H& over a methanol synthesis catalyst and then mixing these gases in the proportion of 50% dimethyl ether, 33. 33K...

  5. H-D Substitution in Interstellar Solid Methanol: A Key Route for D Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiro Nagaoka; Naoki Watanabe; Akira Kouchi

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Deuterium enrichment of interstellar methanol is reproduced experimentally for the first time via grain-surface H-D substitution in solid methanol at an atomic D/H ratio of 0.1. Although previous gas-grain models successfully reproduce the deuterium enrichments observed in interstellar methanol molecules (D/H of up to 0.4, compared to the cosmic ratio of $\\sim 10^{-5})$, the models exclusively focus on deuterium fractionation resulting from the successive addition of atomic hydrogen/deuterium on CO. The mechanism proposed here represents a key route for deuterium enrichment that reproduces the high observed abundances of deuterated methanol, including multiple deuterations.

  6. Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR.,* L. K. SHAY, AND J. K. BREWSTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides the thermal energy for intensification, errors and biases in the ocean compo- nent of coupled TCEvaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR December 2009) ABSTRACT An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea

  7. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ellingsen, S. P. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A., E-mail: Shari.Breen@csiro.au [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  8. Water and Climate 2. Circulation of ocean and atmosphere; climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to high latitude and part of that thermal energy is FW: latent heat Gill Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics integrated vertically (annual mean) ERA40 Atlas ECMWF HIGH: ICTZ, monsoon regions, Amazon.... convergent March 2005 from satellite radiometer AMSR-E. Ranges up to 6.5 cm FW in tropics #12;#12;Relative humidity

  9. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  10. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Liming [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Fu, Honggang, E-mail: fuhg@vip.sina.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  11. Methanol Fractionation of Softwood Kraft Lignin: Impact on the Lignin Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Tomonori [ORNL] [ORNL; Perkins, Joshua H [ORNL] [ORNL; Vautard, Frederic [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolnai, Balazs [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologies to tune lignin properties for high-performance lignin-based materials is crucial for the utilization of lignin in various applications. Here, the effect of methanol (MeOH) fractionation on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition, and chemical structure of lignin were investigated. Repeated MeOH fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin successfully removed the low-molecular-weight fraction. The separated high-molecular-weight lignin showed a Tg of 211 C and a char yield of 47%, much higher than those of asreceived lignin (Tg 153 C, char yield 41%). The MeOH-soluble fraction of lignin showed an increased low-molecular-weight fraction and a lower Tg (117 C) and char yield (32%). The amount of low-molecular-weight fraction showed a quantitative correlation with both 1/Tg and char yield in a linear regression. This study demonstrated the efficient purification or fractionation technology for lignin; it also established a theoretical and empirical correlation between the physical characteristics of fractionated lignins.

  12. Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

  13. Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

  14. Methanol Reformer System Modeling and Control using an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    Methanol Reformer System Modeling and Control using an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System East, Denmark Introduction This work presents a control strategy for a reformed methanol fuel cell system, which uses a reformer to produce hydrogen for a HTPEM fuel cell. Such systems can advantageously

  15. Control of a methanol reformer system using an Adaptive NeuroFuzzy Inference System approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    Control of a methanol reformer system using an Adaptive NeuroFuzzy Inference System approach, Denmark Introduction This work presents a stoichiometry control strategy for a reformed methanol fuel cell system, which uses a reformer to produce hydrogen for an HTPEM fuel cell. One such system is the Serenus

  16. Control and experimental characterization of ap methanol reformer for a 350W HTPEM FC system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

    Control and experimental characterization of ap methanol reformer for a 350W HTPEM FC system Søren@et.aau.dk 33 #12;From prototype to commercial product dk 4 www.serenergy.dk #12;Integrated methanol reformerC Reformer temperature 200-300oC System parameters Weight 13.7 kg Volume 27 L sja@et.aau.dk 5 #12

  17. Experimental Observations in the Morita Baylis-Hillman Reaction in Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Robert Erik

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -energy profile for a Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction in methanol. Although the majority of this dissertation will be about the Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction in methanol, it could not have been fully accomplished without having to study the Morita Baylis...

  18. APPLICATION OF MEMS TECHNOLOGY TO MICRO DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL Xiaowei Liu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    APPLICATION OF MEMS TECHNOLOGY TO MICRO DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL Xiaowei Liu* , Chunguang Suo, email: lxw@hit.edu.cn) ABSTRACT In view of micro fuel cells, the silicon processes are employed for microfabrication of the micro direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Using the MEMS technology we have successfully made

  19. Design of Extraction Column Methanol Recovery System for the TAME Reactive Distillation Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

    Design of Extraction Column Methanol Recovery System for the TAME Reactive Distillation Process system for TAME reactive distillation process using extraction column with water as a solvent. The design distillation column which was optimized to recover methanol and recycle water to the extraction column. Other

  20. Hydrogen Bond Dissociation and Reformation in Methanol Oligomers Following Hydroxyl Stretch Relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Dissociation and Reformation in Methanol Oligomers Following Hydroxyl Stretch, 2002 Vibrational relaxation and hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol-d dissolved in CCl4 have been-d molecules both accepting and donating hydrogen bonds at 2500 cm-1 . Following vibrational relaxation

  1. The Reactivity Limit for Methanol Oxidation on Platinum/Ruthenium Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Reactivity Limit for Methanol Oxidation on Platinum/Ruthenium Catalysts A. Wieckowski 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Pt/Ru Decorated (UIUC) PtRu Alloy (JM) E = 0.4 V Oxidation in 0.5 M Methanol

  2. Methanol masers : Reliable tracers of the early stages of high-mass star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Ellingsen

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The GLIMPSE and MSX surveys have been used to examine the mid-infrared properties of a statistically complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The GLIMPSE point sources associated with methanol masers are clearly distinguished from the majority, typically having extremely red mid-infrared colors, similar to those expected of low-mass class 0 young stellar objects. The intensity of the GLIMPSE sources associated with methanol masers is typically 4 magnitudes brighter at 8.0 micron than at 3.6 micron. Targeted searches towards GLIMPSE point sources with [3.6]-[4.5] > 1.3 and an 8.0 micron magnitude less than 10 will detect more than 80% of class II methanol masers. Many of the methanol masers are associated with sources within infrared dark clouds (IRDC) which are believed to mark regions where high-mass star formation is in its very early stages. The presence of class II methanol masers in a significant fraction of IRDC suggests that high-mass star formation is common in these regions. Different maser species are thought to trace different evolutionary phases of the high-mass star formation process. Comparison of the properties of the GLIMPSE sources associated with class II methanol masers and other maser species shows interesting trends, consistent with class I methanol masers tracing a generally earlier evolutionary phase and OH masers tracing a later evolutionary phase.

  3. A novel electrode architecture for passive direct methanol fuel cells R. Chen, T.S. Zhao *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    A novel electrode architecture for passive direct methanol fuel cells R. Chen, T.S. Zhao 6 November 2006 Abstract The supply of cathode reactants in a passive direct methanol fuel cell: Fuel cell; Passive DMFC; Metal foam; Mass transfer resistance; Cell performance; Oxygen transport 1

  4. Electrochimica Acta 52 (2006) 14091416 Optimization of cathode catalyst layer for direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) features a large thickness and mass transport loss due to higher Pt loading electrolyte fuel cells, as a result of an optimum balance of proton transport and oxygen diffusion. Different rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell; Cathode; Catalyst layer; Porosity distribution

  5. Experimental Observations in the Morita Baylis-Hillman Reaction in Methanol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Robert Erik

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -energy profile for a Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction in methanol. Although the majority of this dissertation will be about the Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction in methanol, it could not have been fully accomplished without having to study the Morita Baylis...

  6. Spectroscopy and dynamics of mixtures of water with acetone, acetonitrile, and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectroscopy and dynamics of mixtures of water with acetone, acetonitrile, and methanol Dean S mixtures of water with acetone, acetonitrile, and methanol over their entire range of compositions have and acetonitrile mixtures. Spatial distribution functions are reported for the acetone/water system. © 2000

  7. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  8. Methanol masers as tools to study high-mass star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Pestalozzi

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution I will attempt to show that the study of galactic 6.7 and 12.2GHz methanol masers themselves, as opposed to the use of methanol masers as signposts, can yield important conclusions contributing to the understanding of high-mass star formation. Due to their exclusive association with star formation, methanol masers are the best tools to do this, and their large number allows to probe the entire Galaxy. In particular I will focus on the determination of the luminosity function of methanol masers and on the determination of an unambiguous signature for a circumstellar masing disc seen edge-on. Finally I will try to point out some future fields of research in the study of methanol masers.

  9. Investigation of the flame speeds of propane/methanol gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foote, K.L.; Villareal, J.

    1985-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests was conducted in an acoustically tuned flame tube in order to determine the laminar burning velocities in air of various propane/methanol gas mixtures. The experimental method is explained in detail, along with the tabular results. A 90% propane, 10% methanol mixture is shown to have a maximum burning velocity of 40.8 cm/s. A 65% propane, 35% methanol mixture has a maximum velocity of 41.8 cm/s. These maximum flame speeds are shown to be about the same as that of pure propane by the same method. Gulder has found evidence that the presence of methanol in some hydrocarbon fuels may actually inhibit combustion, but we see no apparent modifications in the combustion of propane when mixed with methanol.

  10. Modeling of the anode side of a direct methanol fuel cell with analytical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosquera, Martín A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, analytical solutions were derived (for any methanol oxidation reaction order) for the profiles of methanol concentration and proton current density by assuming diffusion mass transport mechanism, Tafel kinetics, and fast proton transport in the anodic catalyst layer of a direct methanol fuel cell. An expression for the Thiele modulus that allows to express the anodic overpotential as a function of the cell current, and kinetic and mass transfer parameters was obtained. For high cell current densities, it was found that the Thiele modulus ($\\phi^2$) varies quadratically with cell current density; yielding a simple correlation between anodic overpotential and cell current density. Analytical solutions were derived for the profiles of both local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer and local anodic current density in the catalyst layer. Under the assumptions of the model presented here, in general, the local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer cannot be expressed as an explicit fun...

  11. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  12. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  13. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  14. Supporting information Figure S1: Pump-rePump-Probe kinetics of peridinin in methanol. Peridinin was excited at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Supporting information Figure S1: Pump-rePump-Probe kinetics of peridinin in methanol. Peridinin spectra (black lines) measured after excitation of peridinin in methanol at 400 nm and dumping at 3 ps

  15. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have demonstrated robust operation when tested at various orientations, temperatures, and humidity levels. Durability testing has progressed significantly over the course of the program. MEA, engine, and system level steady state testing has demonstrated degradation rates acceptable for initial product introduction. Test duration of over 5000 hrs has been achieved at both the MEA and breadboard system level. P3 level prototype life testing on engines (stacks with reactant conditioning) showed degradation rates comparable to carefully constructed lab fixtures. This was a major improvement over the P2 and P1 engine designs, which exhibited substantial reductions in life and performance between the lab cell and the actual engine. Over the course of the work on the P3 technology set, a platform approach was taken to the system design. By working in this direction, a number of product iterations with substantial market potential were identified. Although the main effort has been the development of a prototype charger for consumer electronic devices, multiple other product concepts were developed during the program showing the wide variety of potential applications.

  16. Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350WControl and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350Wp high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell systemhigh temperature polymer electrolyte memb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Control and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350WControl and experimental characterization of a methanol reformer for a 350Wp high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, 9220 Aalborg East, Denmarkp gy gy g y pp g Introd ction Steam reforming of methanol for a HTPEM f el

  17. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  18. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  19. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  20. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    point · Warm/hot ocean · Water-saturated atmosphere · Consumption of liquid water · hydration: continents and oceans Hot oceanic water Quartz Hydrated, oxidized rock Partially altered rock Unaltered rock · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds

  1. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  2. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative “passive water recovery” MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

  3. Experimental Evaluation of a Pt-based Heat Exchanger Methanol Reformer for a HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Experimental Evaluation of a Pt-based Heat Exchanger Methanol Reformer for a HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack as e.g. methanol as the hydrogen carrier and reforming it to a hydrogen rich gas can solve some of these storage issues. The work presented here examines the use of a heat exchanger methanol reformer for use

  4. 976 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 4, AUGUST 2006 Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malen, Jonathan A.

    976 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 4, AUGUST 2006 Methanol Steam Reformer of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabri- cated is achieved through on-chip resis- tive heaters, whereby methanol steam reforming reactions were studied over

  5. In Proc of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Symposium, 199th Electrochem.l Soc. Mtg, Washington DC, 3/01.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    In Proc of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Symposium, 199th Electrochem.l Soc. Mtg, Washington DC, 3/01. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF LIQUID-FEED DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS Z. H. Wang and C. Y. Wang Electrochemical methanol fuel cells (DMFC). Diffusion and convection of both gas and liquid phases are considered

  6. Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189­195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol management in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is very critical and complicated because of many interacting rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell; Water transport; Mathematical modeling; Three

  7. The role of specific solvent modes in the non-radiative relaxation of an excess electron in methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in methanol A.A. Mosyak, O.V. Prezhdo1 , P.J. Rossky* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University electronic excited state of an excess electron in methanol. Compared to water, we find that the presence in methanol. The first solvation shell dominates the electronic coupling, most strongly through rotational

  8. Methanol as a Sensitive Probe for Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methanol as a Sensitive Probe for Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Proton-to-Electron Mass, corresponding to the 51 ! 60Aþ and 20 ! 3À1E transitions in methanol (CH3OH), respectively, are among transitions in the ground state of methanol to a variation of the proton-to- electron mass ratio. We show

  9. Effect of surface composition of Pt-Au alloy cathode catalyst on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Effect of surface composition of Pt-Au alloy cathode catalyst on the performance of direct methanol 2010 Available online 12 June 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Catalyst Active Site Pt-Au alloy a b s t r a c t A pure Pt cathode catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells is not only

  10. Methanol Reaction with Sulfuric Acid: A Vibrational Spectroscopic Study Lisa L. Van Loon and Heather C. Allen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methanol Reaction with Sulfuric Acid: A Vibrational Spectroscopic Study Lisa L. Van Loon 43210 ReceiVed: May 27, 2004; In Final Form: August 19, 2004 The reaction between methanol and sulfuric peak in the 800 cm-1 region, not present in either the neat methanol or concentrated sulfuric acid

  11. Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation and Raman Spectroscopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational SumVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 4, 2008 The uptake of methanol at the air-liquid interface of 0-96.5 wt % sulfuric methanol and H2SO4 to form methyl hydrogen sulfate. The surface is saturated with the methyl species after

  12. arXiv:0812.0905v2[astro-ph]9Dec2008 Distances to Galactic methanol masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Langevelde, Huib Jan

    arXiv:0812.0905v2[astro-ph]9Dec2008 Distances to Galactic methanol masers Kazi L. J. Rygl Max parallax measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in star forming regions of the Galaxy. The 6.7 GHz methanol maser transition is a very valuable astrometric tool, for its large stability and confined

  13. arXiv:1102.0854v1[astro-ph.GA]4Feb2011 Studies of methanol maser rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Buizer, James Michael

    arXiv:1102.0854v1[astro-ph.GA]4Feb2011 Studies of methanol maser rings Anna Bartkiewicz, Marian present the results of studies of a new class of 6.7 GHz methanol maser sources with a ring- like emission-like distribution of methanol maser spots. Using the Gemini telescopes we found mid-infrared (MIR) counterparts

  14. Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. II. Amino acid composition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digestion of milk protein and methanol-grown bacteria protein in the preruminant calf. II. Amino of milk and of methanol-grown bacteria in the terminal small intestine and the hindgut of the preruminant exclusively by skim-milk powder ; 50.5 p. 100 of the protein of the bacte- ria diet was supplied by methanol

  15. arXiv:0812.0905v1[astro-ph]4Dec2008 Distances to Galactic methanol masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunthaler, Andreas

    arXiv:0812.0905v1[astro-ph]4Dec2008 Distances to Galactic methanol masers Kazi L. J. Rygl£ Max parallax measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in star forming regions of the Galaxy. The 6.7 GHz methanol maser transition is a very valuable astrometric tool, for its large stability and confined

  16. Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass cells ­ direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We present a comprehensive review of the state

  17. Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported on High Surface Area Anatase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported for methanol oxidation on both TiO2 and V/TiO2 was investigated using temperature- programmed experiments/TiO2 sample consists predominantly of isolated VO4 units after calcination. Methanol was found

  18. Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported on High Surface Area Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde on Isolated Vanadate Sites Supported, California 94720-1462 ReceiVed: NoVember 20, 2007; In Final Form: February 6, 2008 The oxidation of methanol that the vanadium is present as isolated VO4 units in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Methanol was found to adsorb

  19. Prediction of the Size Distributions of Methanol-Ethanol Clusters Detected in VUV Laser/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Prediction of the Size Distributions of Methanol-Ethanol Clusters Detected in VUV Laser distributions and geometries of vapor clusters equilibrated with methanol-ethanol (Me-Et) liquid mixtures were distributions of vapor clusters equilibrated with liquids, ranging from neat alcohols1,2 to methanol-ethanol (Me

  20. Effects of Methanol on the Thermodynamics of Iron(III) [Tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)]porphyrin Chloride Dissociation and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Effects of Methanol on the Thermodynamics of Iron(III) [Tetrakis in acetonitrile but is catalytically active if the solvent contains methanol. It was suggested that the precursor to the active species is (F20TPP)Fe(OCH3) in methanol-containing solvents. The present study was aimed

  1. Test method for the measurement of methanol emissions from stationary sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pate, B.A.; Peterson, M.R.; Rickman, E.E.; Jayanty, R.K.M.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol was designated under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 as a pollutant to be regulated. A test method has been developed for the measurement of methanol emissions from stationary sources. The methanol sampling train (MST) consists of a glass-lined heated probe, two condensate knockout traps, and three sorbent cartridges packed with Anasorb 747. The Anasorb samples were desorbed with a 1:1 mixture of carbon disulfide and N,N-dimethylformamide. All samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Following laboratory testing, field tests of the MST and the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI) sampling method for methanol were conducted at two pulp and paper mills. In accordance with EPA Methol 301, two pairs of trains were run in parallel for six runs, collecting a total of 24 samples by each method. During each run, half of the trains were spiked with a known amount of methanol. The sampling location at the first test was an inlet vent to a softwood bleach plant scrubber where the methanol concentration was about 30 ppm. A second field test was conducted at the vent of a black liquor oxidation tank where the methanol concentration was about 350 ppm. Samples were shown to be stable for at least 2 weeks after collection.

  2. Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benot Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho proponents (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benoît Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho the inventory of global thermal, chemical and associated biological fluxes. Drilling an ultra-deep hole, and into the uppermost mantle is a long-standing goal of scientific ocean drilling; it remains critical to answer many

  3. A 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASER SURVEY TOWARD GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xi; Shen Zhiqiang; Gan Conggui [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a systematic survey for 95 GHz class I methanol masers toward a new sample of 192 massive young stellar object candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects or EGOs) identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey. The observations were made with the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Mopra 22 m radio telescope and resulted in the detection of 105 new 95 GHz class I methanol masers. For 92 of the sources our observations provide the first identification of a class I maser transition associated with these objects (i.e., they are new class I methanol maser sources). Our survey proves that there is indeed a high detection rate (55%) of class I methanol masers toward EGOs. Comparison of the GLIMPSE point sources associated with EGOs with and without class I methanol maser detections shows that they have similar mid-IR colors, with the majority meeting the color selection criteria -0.6 < [5.8]-[8.0] < 1.4 and 0.5 < [3.6]-[4.5] < 4.0. Investigations of the Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 {mu}m colors and the associated millimeter dust clump properties (mass and density) of the EGOs for the sub-samples based on the class of methanol masers they are associated with suggest that the stellar mass range associated with class I methanol masers extends to lower masses than for class II methanol masers, or alternatively class I methanol masers may be associated with more than one evolutionary phase during the formation of a high-mass star.

  4. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transports from ocean to land and global energy ?ows inof Earth energy imbal- ance, ocean warming, and thermostericthe ther- mal energy of the ocean, it remains a challenging

  5. Alumina catalysts for reduction of NOx from methanol fueled diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Toshiro; Noda, Akira; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sato, Yoshio [Ministry of Transport of Japan, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOx selective reducing catalysts are expected to be used for lean-burn gasoline engines and diesel engines as an effective NOx reduction measure. The authors are interested in the combination of methanol, as a reducing agent, and alumina catalyst, and have considered the NOx reduction method using effectively much unburned methanol. In this report, in order to investigate the effect of NOx reduction by the alumina catalyst, the experiment was carried out by feeding the actual exhaust gas from the methanol engine into the alumina catalyst. As a result, it was confirmed that, without addition of any other reducing agents into the exhaust gas, the alumina catalyst has activity to reduce NOx.

  6. Catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight olefins in a fluidized bed reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza Tobias, Ricardo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the production of methane, CO, and CO, . Also methanol conversion to coke was increased with temperature. The space velocity was a significant variable in determining the final product distribution and also in the rate of coke formation. The olefins... in the feed and catalyst age on propane yields, T~430'C (Methanol-DME conversion was greater than 95% on all experiments except 313 where it was 73%) The effect of dilution in the feed and catalyst age on the methane yields, T 430'C (Methanol...

  7. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

  8. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  9. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  10. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  12. The environment of the strongest galactic methanol maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanna, A; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C; Reid, M J; Ellingsen, S P; Brunthaler, A; Moscadelli, L; Cesaroni, R; Krishnan, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-mass star-forming site G009.62-00.20E hosts the 6.7 GHz methanol maser source with the greatest flux density in the Galaxy which has been flaring periodically over the last ten years. We performed high-resolution astrometric measurements of the CH3OH, H2O, and OH maser emission and 7 mm continuum in the region. The radio continuum emission was resolved in two sources separated by 1300 AU. The CH3OH maser cloudlets are distributed along two north-south ridges of emission to the east and west of the strongest radio continuum component. This component likely pinpoints a massive young stellar object which heats up its dusty envelope, providing a constant IR pumping for the Class II CH3OH maser transitions. We suggest that the periodic maser activity may be accounted for by an independent, pulsating, IR radiation field provided by a bloated protostar in the vicinity of the brightest masers. We also report about the discovery of an elliptical distribution of CH3OH maser emission in the region of periodic v...

  13. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  15. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: minho@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  16. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4In2O3 Model Catalyst: A...

  17. Conversion of methanol to light olefins on SAPO-34: kinetic modeling and reactor design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Wahabi, Saeed M. H.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    design of an MTO reactor, accounting for the strong exothermicity of the process. Multi-bed adiabatic and fluidized bed technologies show good potential for the industrial process for the conversion of methanol into olefins....

  18. A KINETIC S'FUDY OF METHANOL SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY REACTOR USING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. Akgerrnan A kinetic model that describes the methanol production rate over a CuOZnOA120 3 catalyst (United Catalyst L-951) at typical industrial...

  19. First VLBI observations of methanol maser polarisation, in G339.88-1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Dodson

    2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate class II methanol masers and the environment in which they form with the Long Baseline Array (LBA). Using full polarisation VLBI, we're able to measure the magnetic field directions so as to distinguish between the two main models of the environment in which methanol masers form: disks or shocks. We present polarised images of the methanol maser source G339.88-1.2, made with the LBA at 6.7-GHz. With these first polarisation maps made with the LBA, which successfully reproduce observations with the ATCA confirming the new AIPS code, a new technique for Southern VLBI is opened. The magnetic field directions found are inconstant with methanol masers arising in disks for the majority of the emission.

  20. The molecular environment of massive star forming cores associated with Class II methanol maser emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Longmore; M. G. Burton; P. J. Barnes; T. Wong; C. R. Purcell; J. Ott

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol maser emission has proven to be an excellent signpost of regions undergoing massive star formation (MSF). To investigate their role as an evolutionary tracer, we have recently completed a large observing program with the ATCA to derive the dynamical and physical properties of molecular/ionised gas towards a sample of MSF regions traced by 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission. We find that the molecular gas in many of these regions breaks up into multiple sub-clumps which we separate into groups based on their association with/without methanol maser and cm continuum emission. The temperature and dynamic state of the molecular gas is markedly different between the groups. Based on these differences, we attempt to assess the evolutionary state of the cores in the groups and thus investigate the role of class II methanol masers as a tracer of MSF.

  1. Design of high-ionic conductivity electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrauth, Anthony J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-supported porous electrodes are used in low-temperature fuel cells to provide maximum catalyst surface area, while taking up little volume and using minimum catalyst material. In Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs), ...

  2. Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 9 Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells G. Lu & C, including two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport. We explain how the better understanding

  3. Electrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 52665271 Effect of methanol crossover on the cathode behavior of a DMFC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of methanol crossover on the cathode behavior. Open circuit potentials, cyclic voltammetry profiles, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), resulting from the oxygen reduction measurements indicated that both current and open circuit potential of the electrode exhibited significant

  4. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  5. Methane Oxidation to Methanol without CO2 Emission: Catalysis by Atomic Negative Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfamichael, Aron; Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The catalytic activities of the atomic Y-, Ru-, At-, In-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Os- ions have been investigated theoretically using the atomic Au- ion as the benchmark for the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol without CO2 emission. Dispersion-corrected density-functional theory has been used for the investigation. From the energy barrier calculations and the thermodynamics of the reactions, we conclude that the catalytic effect of the atomic Ag-, At-, Ru-, and Os- ions is higher than that of the atomic Au- ion catalysis of CH4 conversion to methanol. By controlling the temperature around 290K (Os-), 300K (Ag-), 310K (At-), 320K (Ru-) and 325K (Au-) methane can be completely oxidized to methanol without the emission of CO2. We conclude by recommending the investigation of the catalytic activities of combinations of the above negative ions for significant enhancement of the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol.

  6. Methanol Dehydrogenation and Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Jacob S. Spendelow, Jason D. Goodpaster, Paul J. A. Kenis, and Andrzej Wieckowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Methanol Dehydrogenation and Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Solutions Jacob S. Spendelow, Jason D, and oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions has been examined from a fundamental mechanistic.COhasbeenconfirmedasthemainpoisoningspecies,affectingtherateofmethanoldehydrogenation primarily through repulsive interactions with methanol dehydrogenation intermediates. At direct methanol

  7. Computational study of ion distributions at the air/liquid methanol interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiuquan; Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamic simulations with polarizable potentials were performed to systematically investigate the distribution of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, and SrCl2 at the air/liquid methanol interface. The density profiles indicated that there is no substantial enhancement of anions at the interface for the NaX systems in contrast to what was observed at the air/aqueous interface. The surfactant-like shape of the larger more polarizable halide anions is compensated by the surfactant nature of methanol itself. As a result, methanol hydroxy groups strongly interacted with one side of polarizable anions, in which their induced dipole points, and methanol methyl groups were more likely to be found near the positive pole of anion induced dipoles. Furthermore, salts were found to disrupt the surface structure of methanol, reducing the observed enhancement of methyl groups at the outer edge of the air/liquid methanol interface. With the additional of salts to methanol, the computed surface potentials increased, which is in contrast to what is observed in corresponding aqueous systems, where the surface potential decreases with the addition of salts. Both of these trends have been indirectly observed with experiments. This was found to be due to the propensity of anions for the air/water interface that is not present at the air/liquid methanol interface. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  8. A SEARCH FOR 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Cong-Gui; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China); Xu, Ye; Ju, Bing-Gang, E-mail: cggan@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)] [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed a sample of 288 molecular outflow sources including 123 high-mass and 165 low-mass sources in order to search for class I methanol masers at the 95 GHz transition and to investigate the relationship between outflow characteristics and class I methanol maser emission with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Our survey detected 62 sources with 95 GHz methanol masers above a 3{sigma} detection limit, which includes 47 high-mass sources and 15 low-mass sources. Therefore, the detection rate is 38% for high-mass outflow sources and 9% for low-mass outflow sources, suggesting that class I methanol masers are relatively easily excited in high-mass sources. There are 37 newly detected 95 GHz methanol masers (including 27 high-mass and 10 low-mass sources), 19 of which are newly identified (i.e., first identification) class I methanol masers (including 13 high-mass and 6 low-mass sources). A statistical analysis of the distributions of maser detections with the outflow parameters reveals that the maser detection efficiency increases with the outflow properties (e.g., mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity of outflows, etc.). Systematic investigations of the relationships between the intrinsic luminosity of methanol masers and the outflow properties (including mass, momentum, kinetic energy, bolometric luminosity, and mass-loss rate of the central stellar sources) indicate a positive correlation. This further supports the theory that class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and associated with shocks when outflows interact with the surrounding ambient medium.

  9. Development of microprocessor control for a V-6 engine fueled by prevaporized methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Donald F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL FOR A V 6 ENGINE FUELED BY PREVAPORIZED METHANOL A Thesis by DONALD F. SCHNEIDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19SS Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL FOR A V 6 ENGINE FUELED BY PREVAPORIZED METHANOL A Thesis by DONALD F. SCHNEIDER Approved as to style and content by: JP& r~ R. R. Davison...

  10. Conversion of synthesis gas and methanol to hydrocarbons using zeolite catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Michael Anthony

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and dimethyl ether to hydrocarbons on ZSM-5. Kikuchu et al. (1984) report that the activity of ZSM-5 for methanol conversion decreased, but olefin selectivity increased, with decreasing alumina content. Relatively little information has been published... and oxygenates (methanol and dimethyl ether). Relatively little gaseous olefins were formed. The effect of the ZSM-5 support was to greatly reduce methane formation and to completely eliminate oxygenates. Table 1 Conversion of Synthesis Gas Over ZSM-5...

  11. Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25°C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

  12. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  13. How do methanol masers manage to appear in the youngest star vicinities and isolated molecular clumps?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Sobolev; D. M. Cragg; S. P. Ellingsen; M. J. Gaylard; S. Goedhart; C. Henkel; M. S. Kirsanova; A. B. Ostrovskii; N. V. Pankratova; O. V. Shelemei; D. J. van der Walt; T. S. Vasyunina; M. A. Voronkov

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    General characteristics of methanol (CH3OH) maser emission are summarized. It is shown that methanol maser sources are concentrated in the spiral arms. Most of the methanol maser sources from the Perseus arm are associated with embedded stellar clusters and a considerable portion is situated close to compact HII regions. Almost 1/3 of the Perseus Arm sources lie at the edges of optically identified HII regions which means that massive star formation in the Perseus Arm is to a great extent triggered by local phenomena. A multiline analysis of the methanol masers allows us to determine the physical parameters in the regions of maser formation. Maser modelling shows that class II methanol masers can be pumped by the radiation of the warm dust as well as by free-free emission of a hypercompact region hcHII with a turnover frequency exceeding 100 GHz. Methanol masers of both classes can reside in the vicinity of hcHIIs. Modelling shows that periodic changes of maser fluxes can be reproduced by variations of the dust temperature by a few percent which may be caused by variations in the brightness of the central young stellar object reflecting the character of the accretion process. Sensitive observations have shown that the masers with low flux densities can still have considerable amplification factors. The analysis of class I maser surveys allows us to identify four distinct regimes that differ by the series of their brightest lines.

  14. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

  15. Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    -on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

  16. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMFAlaskaNews from theOceanic

  17. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale ElectricOcean Flow

  18. Changes in the ocean mixed layer following extraordinary atmospheric forcing. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mettlach, T.R.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional ocean planetary boundary-layer model is used to predict the evolution of the thermal structure of the ocean mixed layer at six locations in the ocean following the hypothetical effects on the atmosphere of a major nuclear war. The inputs to the ocean model are the heat and momentum fluxes computed from a 3D climate model designed to simulate nuclear winter effects in the atmosphere. The experiment gives evidence that the summertime mixed layer can cool 5 C within 30 days and that the effect of increased wind along coastal regions due to sudden ocean-land temperture differences will deepen the mixed layer 20 to 30 meters. The scientific literature on the subject of nuclear winter is reviewed and interpreted to trace the evolution of the nuclear winter hypothesis and to assess the quality of the results of the mixed layer experiment.

  19. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    generates an upwelling internal wave at 30N with a positive deviation in interface height of size 30m. What long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? c) At the same time that the wave passesOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves Due: Thursday, March 1 1. A two layer

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

  1. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  2. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near-inertial energy in an eddying ocean channel model. Geo-maximum integrated kinetic energy when the ocean was forcedto the the transfer of energy in the ocean from large scales

  3. Mechanism of Methanol Synthesis on Cu through CO2 and CO Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabow, Lars C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model for the methanol synthesis and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions that includes novel reaction intermediates, such as formic acid (HCOOH) and hydroxymethoxy (CH?O?) and allows for the formation of formic acid (HCOOH), formaldehyde (CH?O), and methyl formate (HCOOCH?) as byproducts. All input model parameters were initially derived from periodic, self-consistent, GGA-PW91 density functional theory calculations on the Cu(111) surface and subsequently fitted to published experimentalmethanol synthesis rate data, which were collected under realistic conditions on a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al?O? catalyst. We find that the WGS reaction follows the carboxyl (COOH)-mediated path and that both CO and CO? hydrogenation pathways are active for methanol synthesis. Under typical industrial methanol synthesis conditions, CO? hydrogenation is responsible for ?2/3 of the methanol produced. The intermediates of the CO? pathway for methanol synthesis include HCOO*, HCOOH*, CH?O?*, CH?O*, and CH?O*. The formation of formate (HCOO*) from CO?* and H* on Cu(111) does not involve an intermediate carbonate (CO?*) species, and hydrogenation of HCOO* leads to HCOOH* instead of dioxymethylene (H?CO?*). The effect of CO is not only promotional; CO* is also hydrogenated in significant amounts to HCO*, CH?O *, CH?O*, and CH?OH*. We considered two possibilities for CO promotion: (a) removal of OH* via COOH* to form CO? and hydrogen (WGS), and (b) CO-assisted hydrogenation of various surface intermediates, with HCO* being the H-donor. Only the former mechanism contributes to methanol formation, but its effect is small compared with that of direct CO hydrogenation to methanol. Overall, methanol synthesis rates are limited by methoxy (CH?O*) formation at low CO?/(CO+CO?) ratios and by CH?O* hydrogenation in CO?-rich feeds. CH?O* hydrogenation is the common slow step for both the CO and the CO? methanol synthesis routes; the relative contribution of each route is determined by their respective slow steps HCO*+H*?CH?O*+* and HCOOH*+H*?CH?O?*+* as well as by feed composition and reaction conditions. An analysis of the fitted parameters for a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al?O? catalyst suggests that a more open Cu surface, for example, Cu(110), Cu(100), and Cu(211) partially covered by oxygen, may provide a better model for the active site of methanol synthesis, but our studies cannot exclude a synergistic effect with the ZnO support.

  4. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  5. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  6. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  7. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  8. The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

  9. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland) Institut National des Sciences de l States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University

  10. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  11. Research Module: Scheme 2A. N-Benzylation Using Benzyl Bromide 63 Scheme 2 Part A: Redissolve in Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    in Methanol 1. Turn hot plate to 5. 2. To the flask with your product 3 from Scheme 1, attach a condener with gentle water flow. 3. Add 15 mL of methanol. · For 4-methoxy compoud 3c, you may need to add 20 mL of methanol, since the 4-methoxy substrates is probably less soluble. 4. Heat the mixture on the hot plate

  12. Thermal Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

  13. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCENARIO . . . . . . . . . . OTEC RESOURCE REGIONALC-1 ILLUSTRATIONS Number Title OTEC Systems Development Gulfof Mexico Moored OTEC Resource Area . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Assessment OTEC Pilot Plant. Prepared forDraft Environmental Assessment Mini-OTEC Second Deployment.matic EA are within the OTEC technology and include the

  16. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringthermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants by mid-1980 1 s.distributiion at potential OTEC sites. p. 7D-4/1-4/5. In

  17. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by liquifaction and fractional distillation of air (EPA, Thefractional elements nitrogen pure form. Nitrogen \\'lill be extracted from the atmosphere by means of liquefaction and distillation,

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

  19. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds. During E weather small craft anchor 0.5 mile offshorewinds, and 100-cm sec surface currents. Living quarters will be provided in offshore

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds. During E weather small craft anchor 0.5 mile offshoreOffshore of Bahia de Tallaboa a current of 0.5 knot has been observed setting :\\E across and against the E wind.winds, and 100 em sec (2 knot) surface currents. Living quarters will be provided in offshore

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial users. Costs and per kWh increased from to 2.7rf-30, 1978, the average cost per kWh was 6.09i for residential

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KILOMETERS () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTKaupo o () = FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT NUMBER WITHIN PLANTSea o = o FOSSIL GENERATING PLANT HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working Fluid Process Product Process Requirement FuelNo fuel in a conventional sense 1S used. working fluid is

  4. Wave-Turbulence Mixing for Upper Ocean Multifractal Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    ) width ~ 0.8 km #12;Data Observation · Coastal Monitoring Buoy (CMB) - U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office) Frequency is around 4 CPH #12;Isopycnal Displacement turbulence-Dominated (00-05 GMT Aug 1) #12;Power depth #12;Structure Function (Power Law) IW-T type #12;Structure Function (Power Law) T type #12

  5. Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mass of water produced from the gravel pack (M W ).Wellbore designs with gravel packs that allow gas ventingattributed to a sand or gravel pack emplaced during drilling

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical- generating Thus, the population affected by an facility offshore may expose the plant to power outages

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical conditions of the site must be determined. An engineering test plan for evaluation of plant design

  8. The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Fisheries; Edward P. Myers; Donald E. Hoss; Walter M. Matsumoto; David S. Peters; Michael P. Seki; Richard N. Uchida; John D. Ditmars; Robert A. Paddock

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major responsibilities of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) are to monitor and assess the abundance and geographic distribution of fishery resources, to understand and predict fluctuations in the quantity and distribution of these resources, and to establish levels for their optimum use. NMFS is also charged with the development and implementation of policies for managing national fishing grounds, development and enforcemeJlt of domestic fisheries regulations, surveillance of foreign fishing off United States coastal waters, and the development and enforcement of international fishery agreements and policies. NMFS also assists the fishing industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel cunstruction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry.

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    skipjack tuna, Katsuwonnus pelamis, in an offshore area oflittle tuna), Katsuwonus pelamis (skipj ack), spp. ,

  10. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM Policy AcquisitionWeatherizationDepartment of Energy

  11. Response of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments to thermal stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c) aqueous, gas and hydrate phase saturations, (d) waterIntrinsic Rate of Methane Gas Hydrate Decomposition”, Chem.Western Nankai Trough”, in Gas Hydrates: Challenges for the

  12. List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea

  13. Case Files of the California Poison Control System, San Francisco Division: Blue Thunder Ingestion: Methanol, Nitromethane, and Elevated Creatinine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin; Rowley, Freda; Olson, Kent R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    San Francisco Division: Blue Thunder Ingestion: Methanol,by consuming vodka and “ Blue Thunder”, a fuel for radio-controlled car fuels such as “Blue Thunder”, the primary

  14. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Madden, Andrew [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  15. Comparative Density Functional Study of Methanol Decomposition on Cu4 and Co4 Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Zapol, Peter; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A density functional theory study of the decomposition of methanol on Cu4 and Co4 clusters is presented. The reaction intermediates and activation barriers have been determined for reaction steps to form H2 and CO. For both clusters, methanol decomposition initiated by C-H and O-H bond breaking was investigated. In the case of a Cu4 cluster, methanol dehydrogenation through hydroxymethyl (CH2OH), hydroxymethylene (CHOH), formyl (CHO), and carbon monoxide (CO) is found to be slightly more favorable. For a Co4 cluster, the dehydrogenation pathway through methoxy (CH3O) and formaldehyde (CH2O) is slightly more favorable. Each of these pathways results in formation of CO and H2. The Co cluster pathway is very favorable thermodynamically and kinetically for dehydrogenation. However, since CO binds strongly, it is likely to poison methanol decomposition to H2 and CO at low temperatures. In contrast, for the Cu cluster, CO poisoning is not likely to be a problem since it does not bind strongly, but the dehydrogenation steps are not energetically favorable. Pathways involving C-O bond cleavage are even less energetically favorable. The results are compared to our previous study of methanol decomposition on Pd4 and Pd8 clusters. Finally, all reaction energy changes and transition state energies, including those for the Pd clusters, are related in a linear, Broensted-Evans-Polanyi plot.

  16. 6.7GHz Methanol Maser Associated Outflows: An evolutionary sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, H M; Thompson, M A; Urquhart, J S; Breen, S L; Burton, M G; Ellingsen, S P; Fuller, G A; Pestalozzi, M; Voronkov, M A; Ward-Thompson, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a continuing study of a sample 44 molecular outflows, observed in 13CO lines, closely associated with 6.7GHz methanol masers, hence called Methanol Maser Associated Outflows (MMAOs). We compare MMAO properties with those of outflows from other surveys in the literature. In general, MMAOs follow similar trends, but show a deficit in number at low masses and momenta, with a corresponding higher fraction at the high end of the distributions. A similar trend is seen for the dynamical timescales of MMAOs. We argue that the lack of relatively low mass and young flows in MMAOs is due to the inherent selection-bias in the sample, i.e. its direct association with 6.7GHz methanol masers. This implies that methanol masers must switch on after the onset of outflows (hence accretion), and not before a sufficient abundance of methanol is liberated from icy dust mantles. Consequently the average dynamical age of MMAOs is older than for the general population of molecular outflows. We propose an adjusted evolution...

  17. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

  18. Application of the Kellogg reforming exchanger system to large scale methanol plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, G.; Schneider, R.V. III [M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a majority of existing methanol production facilities, synthesis gas is furnished typically by a tubular fired steam reformer which uses natural gas as a feedstock. When one considers all synthesis gas produced from both ammonia and methanol plants, well over 80% is produced in a conventional reforming furnace. Steam reforming in a conventional sense, however, requires a considerable investment in both capital equipment and on-going maintenance and further, the use of such a unit operation will require heat recovery in the form of steam which forces the hand of the designer with respect to machinery driver selection. The authors have investigated alternatives to the coinventional approach with a view towards developing a process for methanol production that would be hopefully less expensive to construct, easier to operate and more reliable over the course of long term operation. In this paper, the authors present an alternative methanol plant process based on Kellogg`s proprietary reforming exchanger system (KRES). The flowsheet presented herein is for a 1500 MTPD facility that will produce US Federal Grade AA + methanol and will be compared on an economic basis to a conventional plant with respect to investment requirements and expected energy efficiency.

  19. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  20. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS AROUND 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS. I. AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandian, J. D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K. M., E-mail: jagadheep@iist.ac.in [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers at 6.7 GHz are known to be tracers of high-mass star formation in our Galaxy. In this paper, we study the large-scale physical conditions in the star-forming clumps/cores associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers using observations of the (1, 1), (2, 2), and (3, 3) inversion transitions of ammonia with the Effelsberg telescope. The gas kinetic temperature is found to be higher than in infrared dark clouds, highlighting the relatively evolved nature of the maser sources. Other than a weak correlation between maser luminosity and the ammonia line width, we do not find any differences between low- and high-luminosity methanol masers.