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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Demonstration projects for coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas: Final report. [None  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, the US Department of Energy provided the American Public Gas Association (APGA) with a grant to demonstrate the feasibility of bringing unconventional gas such as methane produced from coalbeds or Devonian Shale directly into publicly owned utility system distribution lines. In conjunction with this grant, a seven-year program was initiated where a total of sixteen wells were drilled for the purpose of providing this untapped resource to communities who distribute natural gas. While coalbed degasification ahead of coal mining was already a reality in several parts of the country, the APGA demonstration program was aimed at actual consumer use of the gas. Emphasis was therefore placed on degasification of coals with high methane gas content and on utilization of conventional oil field techniques. 13 figs.

Verrips, A.M.; Gustavson, J.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Engineering Methane is a major component of shale gas. Recent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-added chemicals, (ii) efficient electricity generation through fuel cells, and (iii) methane storage for vehicles), and electrochemical oxidation of CH4 in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In situ IR studies revealed that adsorbed of solid oxide fuel cells. In 2009, he established FirstEnergyAdvanced Energy Research Center, focusing

4

Investigation of methane adsorption and its effect on gas transport in shale matrix through microscale and mesoscale simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane adsorption and its effect on fluid flow in shale matrix are investigated through multi-scale simulation scheme by using molecular dynamics (MD) and lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods. Equilibrium MD simulations are conducted to study methane adsorption on the organic and inorganic walls of nanopores in shale matrix with different pore sizes and pressures. Density and pressure distributions within the adsorbed layer and the free gas region are discussed. The illumination of the MD results on larger scale LB simulations is presented. Pressure-dependent thickness of adsorbed layer should be adopted and the transport of adsorbed layer should be properly considered in LB simulations. LB simulations, which are based on a generalized Navier-Stokes equation for flow through low-permeability porous media with slippage, are conducted by taking into consideration the effects of adsorbed layer. It is found that competitive effects of slippage and adsorbed layer exist on the permeability of shale matrix, leading to di...

Li, ZhongZhen; Chen, Li; Kangd, Qinjun; He, Ya-Ling; Tao, Wen-Quan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Methane adsorption on Devonian shales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHANE ADSORPTION ON DEVONIAN SHALES A Thesis by FAN-CHANG LI Submitted to thc Office of Graclua4e Sturiics of texas AgiM Ulllvel'sliy in pari, ial fulfilhuent of t, hc requirements I'or t, hc degree of ii IAS'I'Elf OF SCIL'NCE December... 1992 Major Subject, : Chemical Engineering METHANE ADSORPTION ON DEVONIAN SHALES A Thesis l&y I'AN-CHANC LI Approved as to style and contcut by: A. T. 'vtratson (Chair of Commitl. ee) John C. Slattery (Member) Bruce . Hcrhcrt (Memhcr...

Li, Fan-Chang

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

FreezeFrac Improves the Productivity of Gas Shales S. Enayatpour, E. Van Oort, T. Patzek, University of Texas At Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to unconventional hydrocarbon reservers such as oil shales, gas shales, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and gas

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

7

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2035 2040 Associated with oil Coalbed methane Tight gas Shale gas Alaska Non-associated offshore Non-associated onshore Projections History 2012 Adam Sieminski, IAEEAEA January...

8

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee Unconventional Gas Research Group, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Curtin University, Australia Shale gas is becoming an important source feet (Tcf) of technically recoverable shale gas resources. Western Australia (WA) alone

12

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane contamination is usually due to natural causes; however, it can also be the result of drilling activities, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases

Wang, Z. Jane

13

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

Khan, Waqar A.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

I. Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment I. CANADA SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by this resource study. Figure I-1 illustrates certain of the major shale gas and shale oil basins in

unknown authors

16

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

17

Shale Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San JuanGas Production

18

Challenges and strategies of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this paper is to help new investors and project developers identify the challenges of shale gas E&P and to enlighten them of… (more)

Lee, Sunje

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas, desorbtion, tracing, migration Overview The discovery of shale gas in UK Shales demonstrates how important and no doubt will vary from shale to shale. An improved understanding of the controls on gas production from

Henderson, Gideon

20

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:43:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

22

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

23

What is shale gas and why is it important?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy,...

25

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

26

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

27

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaskan gas hydrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and finally the prospects for methane hydrates. NATURAL GAS AND THE RECOVERY PROCESS The primary... Coal Bed Methane Shale Gas Methane Hydrates Volume...

31

ARM - Methane Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background Information Outreach Home Room

32

Reservoir and stimulation analysis of a Devonian Shale gas field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Gas Research Institute (GRI) which sponsored this work under GRI Contract No. 5084-213-0980, "Analysis of Eastern Devonian Gas Shales Production Data;" 2. Doug Terry and Joe Petty with Union Drilling, Inc. who showed great interest in this study... and enhance productivity. ~St h The Devonian Shales in the Mason County Field study area can be subdivided using gamma ray logs as follows (in descending order): Upper Devonian Undivided, Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, Java Formation, Angola Shale...

Shaw, James Stanley

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

Ge, Zigang

34

General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of… (more)

Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke University Presentation:...

36

Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P o l i c y m a k e r G u i d e #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

McGaughey, Alan

37

Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P O L I C Y M A K E R G U I D E #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

McGaughey, Alan

38

Development of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia for informational purposes only and does not support or oppose development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas information regarding shale gas well development, ancillary facilities asso- ciated with that development

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

39

Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

Jackson, Robert B.

40

,"Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed Methane ProvedShale Gas Proved

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Review of Emerging Resources: U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

To gain a better understanding of the potential U.S. domestic shale gas and shale oil resources, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) commissioned INTEK, Inc. to develop an assessment of onshore lower 48 states technically recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources. This paper briefly describes the scope, methodology, and key results of the report and discusses the key assumptions that underlie the results.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Economics and Politics of Shale Gas in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Asia Pacific – JKM) Source: Henry Hub and NBP – Bloomberg; JKM - Platts Overall, the US shale gas revolution produced improvements along several key dimensions: 1. Climate change mitigation – U.S. CO2 emissions fell by 5.3% between 2010- 2012... entry). 18 References AMION Consulting (2014). Potential Economic Impacts of Shale Gas in the Ocean Gateway. Available at: http://www.igasplc.com/media/10851/ocean- gateway-shale-gas-impact-study.pdf Barteau, M. and S. Kota (2014). Shale...

Chyong, Chi Kong; Reiner, David M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Shale Gas Glossary | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOE Former Worker/EnergyFracture Fluids Shale GasShale

44

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Process Design and Integration of Shale Gas to Methanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent breakthroughs in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technology have made huge reservoirs of previously untapped shale gas and shale oil formations available for use. These new resources have already made a significant impact...

Ehlinger, Victoria M.

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

Economic viability of shale gas production in the Marcellus Shale; indicated by production rates, costs and current natural gas prices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The U.S. natural gas industry has changed because of the recent ability to produce natural gas from unconventional shale deposits. One of the largest… (more)

Duman, Ryan J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O

51

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

The U.S. Natural Gas and Shale Production Outlook  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Shale Production Outlook for North American Gas Forum September 29, 2014 by Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas...

53

Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind #12;1 Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind November 15, 2010 Author.....................................................................................................................3 Marcellus Shale Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

55

Oil and Gas CDT Structural and depositional controls on shale gas resources in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Structural and depositional controls on shale gas resources in the UK), http://www.bgs.ac.uk/staff/profiles/0688.html · Laura Banfield (BP) Key Words Shale gas, Bowland of structural and depositional controls on shale gas potential in the UK with a synthesis of a series

Henderson, Gideon

56

90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Novemeber 18,...

57

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas. This publication fo- cuses mostly on Pennsylvania because it has the most Marcellus drilling activity of any state

Lee, Dongwon

59

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

60

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information 1. GHG Emissions Estimation for Production of Marcellus Shale Gas 1.1 Preparation of Well Pad estimate from Columbia University shows the size of a multi-well pad of Marcellus Shale averages 20

Jaramillo, Paulina

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas production. Natural gas is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, providing a quarter of the country's total...

62

La Revolucin del Shale Gas Profesor: Hugh Rudnick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................ 36 Impacto / PreocupaciĂłn Ambiental...................................................................................... 38 Impacto Ambiental en los Procesos de ExtracciĂłn del Shale Gas.................................................................................................................. 11 Impacto en las Reservas Mundiales de Gas y Proyecciones Relevantes

Rudnick, Hugh

63

Economic analysis of shale gas wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas produced from shale formations has increased dramatically in the past decade and has altered the oil and gas industry greatly. The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has enabled the production ...

Hammond, Christopher D. (Christopher Daniel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Forecasting long-term gas production from shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and natural gas from deep shale formations are transforming the United States economy and its energy outlook. Back in 2005, the US Energy Information Administration published projections of United States natural gas ...

Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

65

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

Manilla, R.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Shale-Gas Experience as an Analog for Potential Wellbore Integrity Issues in CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shale-gas development in Pennsylvania since 2003 has resulted in about 19 documented cases of methane migration from the deep subsurface (7,0000) to drinking water aquifers, soils, domestic water wells, and buildings, including one explosion. In all documented cases, the methane leakage was due to inadequate wellbore integrity, possibly aggravated by hydrofracking. The leakage of methane is instructive on the potential for CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration operations. Although there are important differences between the two systems, both involve migrating, buoyant gas with wells being a primary leakage pathway. The shale-gas experience demonstrates that gas migration from faulty wells can be rapid and can have significant impacts on water quality and human health and safety. Approximately 1.4% of the 2,200 wells drilled into Pennsylvania's Marcellus Formation for shale gas have been implicated in methane leakage. These have resulted in damage to over 30 domestic water supplies and have required significant remediation via well repair and homeowner compensation. The majority of the wellbore integrity problems are a result of over-pressurization of the wells, meaning that high-pressure gas has migrated into an improperly protected wellbore annulus. The pressurized gas leaks from the wellbore into the shallow subsurface, contaminating drinking water or entering structures. The effects are localized to a few thousands of feet to perhaps two-three miles. The degree of mixing between the drinking water and methane is sufficient that significant chemical impacts are created in terms of elevated Fe and Mn and the formation of black precipitates (metal sulfides) as well as effervescing in tap water. Thus it appears likely that leaking CO{sub 2} could also result in deteriorated water quality by a similar mixing process. The problems in Pennsylvania highlight the critical importance of obtaining background data on water quality as well as on problems associated with previous (legacy) oil and gas operations. The great majority of the leakage issues in Pennsylvania are due to improperly abandoned wells, however in the media there is no clear distinction between past and present problems. In any case, significant analytical work is required to attribute differing sources of methane (or CO{sub 2} in the case of sequestration). In Pennsylvania, a relatively lax regulatory environment appears to have contributed to the problem with inadequate oversight of well design and testing to ensure well integrity. New rules were adopted at the end of 2010, and it will be interesting to observe whether methane leakage problems are significantly reduced.

Carey, James W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simpson, Wendy S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ziock, Hans-Joachim [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of gas production type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists on methane production from the coal seams. The unique coal characteristic results in a dual-porosity system.… (more)

Garcia Arenas, Anangela.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Occurrence of Multiple Fluid Phases Across a Basin, in the Same Shale Gas Formation – Eagle Ford Shale Example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas and oil are playing a significant role in US energy independence by reversing declining production trends. Successful exploration and development of the Eagle Ford Shale Play requires reservoir characterization, recognition of fluid...

Tian, Yao

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient of PVC, LLDPE, and HDPE geomembranes by performing the standard gas transport test (ASTM D1434). The measured methane gas permeability coefficient through a PVC geomembrane is 7.55 3 104 ml(STP).mil/m2.day thicknesses is proposed using the measured permeability coefficients for PVC, LLDPE, and HDPE geomembranes

75

Assessment of Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and to assess Eagle Ford shale oil and gas reserves, contingent resources, and prospective resources. I first developed a Bayesian methodology to generate probabilistic decline curves using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) that can quantify the reserves...

Gong, Xinglai

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

3D multi-scale imaging of experimental fracture generation in shale gas reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in research and shale unconventional reservoirs that will provide you with the skills to enter the oil and gas3D multi-scale imaging of experimental fracture generation in shale gas reservoirs. Supervisory-grained organic carbon-rich rocks (shales) are increasingly being targeted as shale gas "reservoirs". Due

Henderson, Gideon

77

General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help...

Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop November 12, 2014 11:00AM EST to...

79

Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions quantities of CH4 are stored in marine sediment in the form of methane hydrate, bubbles, and dissolved CH4 in pore water. Here I discuss the various pathways for methane to enter the ocean and atmosphere

Zhang, Youxue

80

Shale Gas and Climate Targets: Can They Be Reconciled?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas and Climate Targets: Can They Be Reconciled? Mark Jaccard and Brad Griffin School greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 33% below their 2007 level by 2020. By 2050, it has committed to emissions to promote the exploitation of highly valuable provincial natural gas resources in spite of the challenges

Pedersen, Tom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites in the United States #12;Why = 21 #12;Need for Study · Estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production , from academic in assumptions in estimating emissions · Measured data for some sources of methane emissions during natural gas

Lightsey, Glenn

82

Review article Oil and gas wells and their integrity: Implications for shale and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article Oil and gas wells and their integrity: Implications for shale and unconventional by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction The rapid expansion of shale gas and shale oil exploration and exploitation xxx Keywords: Shale Fracking Integrity Barrier Integrity Wells a b s t r a c t Data from around

Jackson, Robert B.

83

Numerical Simulation and Multiple Realizations for Sensitivity Study of Shale Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 141058 Numerical Simulation and Multiple Realizations for Sensitivity Study of Shale Gas. The abstract must contain conspicuous acknowledgment of SPE copyright. Abstract Shale gas in the United States the largest conventional gas accumulations in the world. Shale gas success is directly the result

Mohaghegh, Shahab

84

Eastern gas shales bibliography selected annotations: gas, oil, uranium, etc. Citations in bituminous shales worldwide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains 2702 citations, most of which are annotated. They are arranged by author in numerical order with a geographical index following the listing. The work is international in scope and covers the early geological literature, continuing through 1979 with a few 1980 citations in Addendum II. Addendum I contains a listing of the reports, well logs and symposiums of the Unconventional Gas Recovery Program (UGR) through August 1979. There is an author-subject index for these publications following the listing. The second part of Addendum I is a listing of the UGR maps which also has a subject-author index following the map listing. Addendum II includes several important new titles on the Devonian shale as well as a few older citations which were not found until after the bibliography had been numbered and essentially completed. A geographic index for these citations follows this listing.

Hall, V.S. (comp.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and approaches special for estimating rate decline and recovery of shale gas wells were developed. As the strategy of the horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures (MTFHW) was discovered and its significance to economic shale gas production...

Song, Bo

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Forecasting Gas Production in Organic Shale with the Combined Numerical Simulation of Gas Diffusion in Kerogen, Langmuir Desorption from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 159250 Forecasting Gas Production in Organic Shale with the Combined Numerical Simulation algorithm to forecast gas production in organic shale that simultaneously takes into account gas diffusion-than-expected permeability in shale-gas formations, while Langmuir desorption maintains pore pressure. Simulations confirm

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

87

Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various models featuring horizontal wells with multiple induced fractures have been proposed to characterize flow behavior over time in tight gas and shale gas systems. Currently, there is little consensus regarding the effects of non...

Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular review of shale gas drilling in New York State, as well as the most comprehensive collection of data

Manning, Sturt

89

NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES THE HOUSING MARKET IMPACTS OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES THE HOUSING MARKET IMPACTS OF SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT Lucija Muehlenbachs © notice, is given to the source. #12;The Housing Market Impacts of Shale Gas Development Lucija to control for confounding factors, we recover hedonic estimates of property value impacts from shale gas

Habib, Ayman

90

Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network Diego C. Cafaro1-term planning of the shale gas supply chain is a relevant problem that has not been addressed before Shale gas, supply chain, strategic planning, MINLP, solution algorithm * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

91

Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine Shoemaker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Working Together in Shale Gas Policy Hosts: Todd Cowen, Teresa Jordan and Christine and environmental groups. The Shale Gas Roundtable of the Institute of Politics at the University of Pittsburgh produced a report with several recommendations dealing especially with shale gas research, water use

Angenent, Lars T.

92

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

93

www.tyndall.ac.uk Shale gas: an updated assessment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as oil derived from tar sands. Nevertheless, there are several routes by which shale gas extraction maywww.tyndall.ac.uk Shale gas: an updated assessment of environmental and climate change impacts Summary This report, commissioned by The Co-operative, is an update on our January report, Shale gas

Matthews, Adrian

94

Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1 , P.E., M: Railway transportation is playing a key role in the development of many new shale oil and gas reserves in North America. In the rush to develop new shale oil and gas plays, sites for railway transload terminals

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

95

Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

CONSIDERING SHALE GAS EXTRACTION IN NORTH CAROLINA: LESSONS FROM OTHER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hearings on the issues of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing for shale gas extraction. 3 Unlike viable in recent years due to advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques, which prohibits both horizontal drilling and the injection of waste (including hydraulic fracturing fluids

Jackson, Robert B.

97

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources is also reflected in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) energy projectionsWorld Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States APRIL 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 #12;The information presented

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

98

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

Walter, M.Todd

99

Shale Gas Opportunities It's no secret that petroleum and natural gas engineers are currently in great  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Opportunities It's no secret that petroleum and natural gas engineers are currently and natural gas engineers design and develop methods for getting oil and gas from underground deposits's Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering is competitive, with qualified applicants receiving

Mohaghegh, Shahab

100

Modern Devonian shale gas search starting in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of southwestern Indiana is a worthwhile exploration and exploitation objective. The technical ability to enhance natural fractures is available, the drilling depths are shallow, long term gas reserves are attractive, markets are available, drilling costs are reasonable, risks are very low, multiple drilling objectives are available, and the return on investment is good. Indiana Geological Survey records are well organized, accessible, and easy to use. The paper describes the New Albany shale play, play size, early exploration, geologic setting, completion techniques, and locating prime areas.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. (Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Firm, Fort Worth, TX (United States))

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Natural Gas from Shale | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNational ScienceEnergy - Third QuarterNaturalShale

102

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32Department ofMoving AwayAvailability ofMyChallengesis shale

103

New Albany shale gas flow starts in western Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes the stratigraphy and lithology of the New Albany shale and how this affects the placement of gas recovery wells in the Greene County, Indiana area. It reviews the project planning aspects including salt water reinjection and well spacing for optimum gas recovery. It also briefly touches on how the wells were completed and brought on-line for production and distribution.

NONE

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R.E.; McIver, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lagrangian Relaxation Based Decompositon for Well Scheduling in Shale-gas Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian Relaxation Based Decompositon for Well Scheduling in Shale-gas Systems Brage Rugstad of mid and late-life wells in shale-gas systems. This state of the wells can be prevented by performing. In this paper, we present a Lagrangian relaxation based scheme for shut-in scheduling of distributed shale multi

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

106

ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING SCALING METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING P. Marder University of Texas at Austin ABSTRACT The Haynesville Shale is one of the largest. The reservoir temperature is also high, up to 3000 F. These pressures are uniquely high among shale gas

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

107

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

108

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

109

Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability...

Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID (flame ionization)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID to equilibrate the methane between the air and water. · With the syringe pointing down, eject all the water fromL of gas in the syringe · We will now move to the GC lab in Starr 332 to measure methane. · Repeat

Vallino, Joseph J.

111

Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOE Former Worker/EnergyFracture Fluids Shale Gas

114

Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration targets? The University Hesselbo, University of Exeter http://emps.exeter.ac.uk/csm/staff/sph216 Key Words Shales, depositional environments, diagenesis, sedimentology, geochemistry Overview Shales are of increasing interest not only

Henderson, Gideon

115

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................ 41 xii FIGURE Page 3.15 Matching the linear flow interval to evaluate Acm using the Shale Gas VBA... .................................................................................................... 42 3.16 After resetting the time to zero and matching the interval with gas lift effect, the same calculations were cared to evaluate Acm using the Shale Gas VBA...

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Influence of Shale gas on U.S. Energy and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of U.S. shale gas resources to economic viability affects the nation’s energy outlook and the expected role of natural gas in climate policy. Even in the face of the current shale gas boom, however, questions ...

Jacoby, H.D.

117

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R. In Pennsylvania, oil and gas wastewater is sometimes treated at brine treatment facilities and discharged to local bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal. INTRODUCTION The safe disposal of large

Jackson, Robert B.

118

TOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nation's energy landscape. However, the environmental impacts associated with ``fracking'' for shale gas: November 20th , 12:00 -1:00pm, 300 Rice Hall Atmospheric Impacts of Expanded Natural Gas Use HydraulicTOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen DATE

Angenent, Lars T.

119

Natural gas potential of the New Albany shale group (Devonian-Mississippian) in southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany shale group indicate that a 19-country area of southeastern Illinois is a favorable area to explore for gas in Devonian shale. Although gas shows in the shales have been encountered in several wells drilled in this area, no attempts were made to complete or evaluate a shale gas well until 1979. It is found that conventional rotary drilling with mud base drilling fluids likely causes extensive formation damage and may account for the paucity of gas shows and completion attempts in the Devonian shales; therefore, commercial production of shale gas in Illinois probably will require novel drilling completion techniques not commonly used by local operators. 16 refs.

Cluff, R.M.; Dickerson, D.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Shale Gas 101 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartment of EnergyAprilAShale Gas 101 This

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas This article has been downloaded from.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034014 Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas Mohan Jiang1 , W Michael Griffin2,3 , Chris greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the production of Marcellus shale natural gas and compares its emissions

Jaramillo, Paulina

122

Synthesis Gas Production from Partial Oxidation of Methane with Air in AC Electric Gas Discharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis Gas Production from Partial Oxidation of Methane with Air in AC Electric Gas Discharge K 73019 Received October 11, 2002 In this study, synthesis gas production in an AC electric gas discharge of methane and air mixtures at room temperature and ambient pressure was investigated. The objective

Mallinson, Richard

123

Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressures )( p by conventional well tests due to very low permeabilities. Decline curves for conventional gas, when applied on shale gas reservoirs, can not be validated by material balance due to unavailability of average reservoir pressure. However...* variable rate gas BDF including adsorbed gas exhibiting exponential decline (b = 1)................. 25 4.6 Plot of [m(pi )? m(pwf )] / qg(t) vs material balance pseudo time tca*, xii FIGURE...

Mengal, Salman Akram

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and kerogen surfaces, very similar to the way methane is stored within coal beds. It has been demonstrated in gassy coals that on average; CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two for one or more. Black shale reservoirs may react similarly and desorb methane in the presence

Mohaghegh, Shahab

125

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Commodity chemicals from natural gas by methane chlorination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethylene and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) can be produced from natural gas through methane chlorination by reacting methane and chlorine at 900/sup 0/C or higher. Experimental results indicate total ethylene equivalent yield from methane of 45%(wt) and marginal process economics. Fundamental kinetic modeling predicts improved C/sub 2/ yields of up to 70%(wt) at optimum reaction conditions. This optimum condition established the basis for the process design study to evaluate the potential for producing ethylene and VCM from natural gas. HCl by-product is recycled for economic viability. Using the Kel-Chlor process for recycling HCl, the proposed plant produces 27,200 TPA of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 383,800 TPA of VCM. The Midwest is an ethylene consumption area requiring imports of ethylene derivatives from other regions. A methane chlorination plant located on a Midwestern natural gas pipeline network has a good commercial potential.

Che, S.C.; Minet, R.G.; Giacobbe, F.; Mullick, S.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas reservoirs with multistage hydraulic fractures are commonly characterized by analyzing long-term gas production data, but water flowback data is usually not included in the analysis. However, this work shows there can be benefits...

Alkouh, Ahmad

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

129

A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basin, and of late the Eagle Ford shale located in southwest Texas. Figure A1 illustrates the growth reservoir pressure, total organic content, thermal maturity, porosity, the presence of natural fractures Eagle Ford Marcellus Haynesville Woodford Fayetteville Barnett Figure A1. Growth in natural gas

130

Fractured gas reservoirs in the Devonian shale of the Illinois and Appalachian basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Devonian and Lower Mississippian black shale sequence of Kentucky includes the New Albany Shale of Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale of the Appalachian basin. Fractured reservoirs in the Ohio Shale contain a major gas resource, but have not been so prolific in the New Albany Shale. The authors propose two models of fractured shale reservoirs in both the Illinois and the Appalachian basins, to be tested with gas production data. (1) Where reactivated basement faults have propagated to the surface, the lack of an effective seal has prevented the development of overpressure. The resulting fracture system is entirely tectonic is origin, and served mainly as a conduit for gas migration from the basin to the surface. Gas accumulations in such reservoirs typically are small and underpressured. (2) Where basement faults have been reactivated but have not reached the surface, a seal on the fractured reservoir is preserved. In areas where thermal maturity has been adequate, overpressuring due to gas generation resulted in a major extension of the fracture system, as well as enhanced gas compression and adsorption. Such gas accumulations are relatively large. Original overpressuring has been largely lost, due both to natural depletion and to uncontrolled production. The relative thermal immaturity of the Illinois basin accounts for the scarcity of the second type of fractured reservoir and the small magnitude of the New Albany Shale gas resource.

Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, D.; Nuttall, B. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Shale Oil and Gas, Frac Sand, and Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Bakken Oil Shale scope · Light, Sweet crude ­ ideal for automotive fuels and mid-size refineries (Midwest

Minnesota, University of

132

Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

2012 by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences Is Shale Gas Good for Climate Change?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ence and Engineering at Harvard University, where he is also Direc- tor of the Center for the Environ fracturing ("fracking") techniques that greatly increase the permeability of the shale, vast reserves emissions overall. I argue that the main impact of shale gas on climate change is neither the reduced

Schrag, Daniel

135

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas Health, GSPH. Background Natural gas drilling in shale formations worldwide employs relatively new drilling in the Marcellus Shale (See Figure 1.) of the northeastern United States necessitates better

Sibille, Etienne

136

Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

Yan, Bicheng

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Application of the Stretched Exponential Production Decline Model to Forecast Production in Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Production forecasting in shale (ultra-low permeability) gas reservoirs is of great interest due to the advent of multi-stage fracturing and horizontal drilling. The well renowned… (more)

Statton, James Cody

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Comparison of Various Deterministic Forecasting Techniques in Shale Gas Reservoirs with Emphasis on the Duong Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a huge demand in the industry to forecast production in shale gas reservoirs accurately. There are many methods including volumetric, Decline Curve Analysis (DCA), analytical simulation and numerical simulation. Each one of these methods...

Joshi, Krunal Jaykant

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

Precise inversion of logged slownesses for elastic parameters in a gas shale formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dipole sonic log data recorded in a vertical pilot well and the associated production well are analyzed over a 200×1100-ft section of a North American gas shale formation. The combination of these two wells enables angular ...

Miller, Douglas E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Regulation of shale gas development : an argument for state preeminence with federal support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas development has become big business in the United States during the past decade, introducing drilling to parts of the country that have not seen it in decades and provoking an accelerating shift in the country's ...

Kansal, Tushar, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb Mar AprFeet) Year

143

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb Mar AprFeet)

144

Gas potential of new Albany shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to update and evaluate publicly available data relating to present and potential gas production from New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin was conducted cooperatively by the Indiana. Illinois, and Kentucky geological surveys (Illinois Basin Consortium), and was partially funded by the Gas Research Institute. Deliverables included a plate of stratigraphic cross sections and six basin-wide maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The New Albany Shale is an organic-rich brownish black shale present throughout the Illinois basin. Gas potential of the New Albany Shale may be great because it contains an estimated 86 tcf of natural gas and has produced modest volumes since 1858 from more than 60 fields, mostly in the southeastern part of the basin. Reservoir beds include organic-rich shales of the Grassy Creek (Shale), Clegg Creek, and Blocher (Shale) members. Limited geologic and carbon isotope data indicate that the gas is indigenous and thermogenic. T[sub max] data suggest that the gas generation begins at R[sub o] values of 0.53% and may begin at R[sub 0] values as low as 0.41% in some beds. New Albany Shale reservoirs contain both free gas in open-pore space and gas adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. Natural fracturing is essential for effective reservoir permeability. Fractures are most common near structures such as faults, flexures, and buried carbonate banks. Based on limited data, fractures and joints have preferred orientations of 45-225[degrees] and 135-315[degrees]. Commercial production requires well stimulation to connect the well bore with the natural fracture system and to prop open pressure-sensitive near-borehole fractures. Current stimulations employ hydraulic fracture treatments using nitrogen and foam, with sand as a propping agent.

Comer, J.B.; Hasenmueller, N.R. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Frankie, W.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was not quantified. In November 2011, Petr?leos Mexicanos (PEMEX) estimated prospective gas resources in the different plays. For the Upper Cretaceous (which includes the Eagle Ford shale) the estimates were 54-106-171 TCF (P90-P50-P10). For the Eagle Ford... and Agua Nueva shales combined resources were estimated to be 27-87 TCF (P90-P10) (PEMEX 2011). An assessment of the Eagle Ford shale oil and gas resources in the US is being done by the Crisman Institute for Petroleum Research at Texas A&M University...

Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interdisciplinary Investigation of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project investigates the feasibility of geologic sequestration of CO2 in depleted shale gas reservoirs from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. It is anticipated that over the next two decades, tens of thousands of wells will be drilled in the 23 states in which organic-rich shale gas deposits are found. This research investigates the feasibility of using these formations for sequestration. If feasible, the number of sites where CO2 can be sequestered increases dramatically. The research embraces a broad array of length scales ranging from the ~10 nanometer scale of the pores in the shale formations to reservoir scale through a series of integrated laboratory and theoretical studies.

Zoback, Mark; Kovscek, Anthony; Wilcox, Jennifer

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Catalytic Methane Reduction in the Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalytic Methane Reduction in the Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engines Peter Mauermann1,* , Michael Dornseiffer6 , Frank Amkreutz6 1 Institute for Combustion Engines , RWTH Aachen University, Schinkelstr. 8, D of the hydrocarbon exhaust of internal combustion engines. In contrast to other gaseous hydrocarbons, significant

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

149

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small...

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0Decade (MillionSep-14AlaskaShale Gas

151

Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

Song Jin

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Generating Methane Gas From Manure Charles D. Fulhage, Dennis Sievers and James R. Fischer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Methane Gas From Manure Charles D. Fulhage, Dennis Sievers and James R. Fischer Department of Agricultural Engineering At first glance, the idea of generating methane gas has considerable -- the environmental crisis and the energy shortage. Unfortunately, present-day large-scale methane generation requires

Laughlin, Robert B.

153

Reduction of titania by methane-hydrogen-argon gas mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of titania using methane-containing gas was investigated in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range 1,373 to 1,773 K. The reduction production product is titanium oxycarbide, which is a solid solution of TiC and TiO. At 1,373 K, the formation rate of TiC is very slow. The rate and extent of reaction increase with increasing temperature to 1,723 K. A further increase in temperature to 1,773 K does not affect the reaction rate and extent. An increase in methane concentration to 8 vol pct favors the reduction process. A further increase in methane concentration above 8 vol pct causes excessive carbon deposition, which has a negative effect on the reaction rate. Hydrogen partial pressure should be maintained above 35 vol pct to depress the cracking of methane. Addition of water vapor to the reducing gas strongly retards the reduction reaction, even at low concentrations of 1 to 2 vol pct. Carbon monoxide also depresses the reduction process, but its effect is significant only at higher concentrations, above 10 vol pct.

Zhang, G.; Ostrovski, O.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650?°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110?°C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

Cárdenas, Rosa Elia, E-mail: recarde1@uiwtx.edu [Department of Physics, The University of the Incarnate Word, 4301 Broadway, San Antonio, Texas 78209 (United States); Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F., E-mail: dfcowgi@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Hydrogen and Metallurgical Sciences, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in unconventional reservoirs such as coalbed methane, shale gas and tight gas reservoirs. Developing these types of unconventional gas reservoirs improves our energy security, and benefits the overall economy. Also, natural gas is one of the cleanest and most...

Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Barnett Shale Municipal Oil and Gas Ordinance Dynamics: A Spatial Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

criticisms of shale gas wells is the environmental impact, not the least of which is watershed and aquifer degradation due to the usage of fracking fluids (Mantell 2011) that contain known carcinogens including benzene, toluene, and formaldehyde (Rahm 2011... residents concerned that drilling — or more precisely, the injection of spent fracking fluids deep underground — is jeopardizing the underlying geologic stability of the Barnett Shale (Malewitz 2014a). Municipal responses to impacts In an effort to allay...

Murphy, Trey Daniel-Aaron

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2012-13  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary:Principal shale gas plays:

160

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford Cartwright Project description: Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale) formations has triggered

Henderson, Gideon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Back to previous page Shale gas: Can we safely tap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and associated hydrocarbon liquids are produced by hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." One million to 5 million gallons of fracking fluid -- a mixture of water, sand and chemical additives -- is injected along that fracking fluid can contaminate shallow underground drinking-water supplies, the distance between deep shale

Deutch, John

162

A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States Avner Vengosh,*, Robert B. Jackson,, Nathaniel Warner,§ Thomas H: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has hydraulic fracturing. This paper provides a critical review of the potential risks that shale gas operations

Jackson, Robert B.

163

Catalyst for the methanation of carbon monoxide in sour gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention involves the synergistic effect of the specific catalytic constituents on a specific series of carriers for the methanation of carbon monoxide in the presence of sulfur at relatively high temperatures and at low steam to gas ratios in the range of 0.2:1 or less. This effect was obtained with catalysts comprising the mixed sulfides and oxides of nickel and chromium supported on carriers comprising magnesium aluminate and magnesium silicate. Conversion of carbon monoxide to methane was in the range of from 40 to 80%. Tests of this combination of metal oxides and sulfides on other carriers and tests of other metal oxides and sulfides on the same carrier produced a much lower level of conversion.

Kustes, William A. (Louisville, KY); Hausberger, Arthur L. (Louisville, KY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare. Proc.W.S. A review of methane and gas hydrates in the dynamic,Geology of Natural Gas Hydrates, M. Max, A.H. Johnson, W.P.

Reagan, Matthew T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

Angenent, Lars T.

166

Gasification kinetics of six eastern shales in steam and synthesis gas atmospheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification reactivities have been determined for six Eastern shales with conversions described by a model incorporating fast and slow gasification reactions. A simple model, based on Indiana New Albany shale, was developed to describe the fast and slow weight loss as well as the slow sulfur and organic carbon gasification rates. The slow sulfur and organic carbon reactions are described by rate equations that are first order in sulfur and organic carbon and include the steam pressure. Terms in the organic carbon rate expression account for hydrogen and carbon monoxide inhibition of the steam-carbon reaction. The fraction of shale species lost by fast and slow gasification and the rate of slow sulfur gasification are similar (and assumed to be equal) for the six Eastern shales studied. Eastern shale organic carbon reactivities are different and have been described with different kinetic parameters in the slow organic carbon gasification rate equation. The kinetic expressions developed for Eastern shale gasification are valid in steam and steam; synthesis gas mixtures and for residence times of more than 3 minutes. Gasification is described for temperature and pressure ranges of 1144 to 1311 K and 0.20 to 3.55 MPa, respectively.

Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick, P.E., M.ASCE and Lynn E. Brown2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick, P.E., M: Railway transportation is playing a key role in the development of many new shale oil and gas reserves in North America. In the rush to develop new shale oil and gas plays, sites for railway transload terminals

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

168

Gas sales starting from Indiana`s fractured New Albany shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas issued 138 drilling permits from Dec. 1, 1994, through July 31, 1996, in 17 counties in a growing play for gas in Devonian New Albany shale in southern Indiana. The permits are active in the form of locations, drilling wells, wells in the completion process, and wells producing gas in the dewatering stage. Geologically in southwestern Indiana the New Albany shale exploration play is found in three provinces. These are the Wabash platform, the Terre Haute reef bank, and the Vincennes basin. Exploration permits issued on each of these geologic provinces are as follows: Wabash platform 103, Terra Haute reef bank 33, and Vincennes basin two. The authors feel that the quantity and effectiveness of communication of fracturing in the shale will control gas production and water production. A rule of thumb in a desorption reservoir is that the more water a shale well makes in the beginning the more gas it will make when dewatered.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. [Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Geologists, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Application of the Stretched Exponential Production Decline Model to Forecast Production in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is widely used in industry to forecast shale gas wells. Left unconstrained, the model often overestimates reserves by a great deal. A minimum decline rate is imposed to prevent overestimation of reserves but with less than ten years of production history...

Statton, James Cody

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Shale Gas Spreads to the South | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluatingconstructionSessioneight NewShadesWaterShale

172

EIA responds to Nature article on shale gas projections  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and...

173

Partitioning and chemical speciation of mercury, arsenic, and selenium during inert gas oil shale retorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Green River shale from Colorado and a New Albany shale from Kentucky were retorted in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory 6-kg bench-scale retort at 1 to 2C/min and at 10C/min to maximum temperatures of 500 and 750C under a nitrogen sweep gas. The product streams were analyzed using a variety of methods including Zeeman atomic aabsortion spectroscopy, microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, instrumental neutron activation analysis, high-pressure liquid and silica gel column chromatography, and mercury cold vapor atomic absorption. The results obtained using these analytical methods indicate the the distribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product stream is a function of oil shale type, heating rates, and maximum retorting temperatures. 23 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Sanders, R.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Rupp, John A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgSector Effects of the Shale Gas Revolution in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the impact of the shale gas revolution on the sectors of electricity generation, transportation, and manufacturing in the United States. Natural gas is being substituted for other fuels, particularly coal, in electricity generation, resulting in lower greenhouse gas emissions from this sector. The use of natural gas in the transportation sector is currently negligible but is projected to increase with investments in refueling infrastructure and natural gas vehicle technologies. Petrochemical and other manufacturing industries have responded to lower natural gas prices by investing in domestically located manufacturing projects. This paper also speculates on the impact of a possible shale gas boom in China. Key Words: shale gas, electricity, transportation, and manufacturing JEL Classification Numbers: L71, L9, Q4 © 2013 Resources for the Future. All rights reserved. No portion of this paper may be reproduced without permission of the authors. Discussion papers are research materials circulated by their authors for purposes of information and discussion.

176

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for a Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that...

177

Experimentation and application of directional solvent extraction for desalination of seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recently demonstrated directional solvent technique for desalination of water has been tested for desalting seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water. The premise behind directional solvent extraction is that when ...

Kleinguetl, Kevin (Kevin G.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A New Type Curve Analysis for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual Porosity Linear System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With increase of interest in exploiting shale gas/oil reservoirs with multiple stage fractured horizontal wells, complexity of production analysis and reservoir description have also increased. Different methods and models were used throughout...

Abdulal, Haider Jaffar

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin-level characterizations for the CO{sub 2} storage capacity and injectivity potential of the targeted eastern shales. In total, these Eastern gas shales cover an area of over 116 million acres, may contain an estimated 6,000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas in place, and have a maximum theoretical storage capacity of over 600 million metric tons. Not all of this gas in-place will be recoverable, and economics will further limit how much will be economic to produce using EGR techniques with CO{sub 2} injection. Reservoir models were developed and simulations were conducted to characterize the potential for both CO{sub 2} storage and EGR for the target gas shale formations. Based on that, engineering costing and cash flow analyses were used to estimate economic potential based on future natural gas prices and possible financial incentives. The objective was to assume that EGR and CO{sub 2} storage activities would commence consistent with the historical development practices. Alternative CO{sub 2} injection/EGR scenarios were considered and compared to well production without CO{sub 2} injection. These simulations were conducted for specific, defined model areas in each shale gas play. The resulting outputs were estimated recovery per typical well (per 80 acres), and the estimated CO{sub 2} that would be injected and remain in the reservoir (i.e., not produced), and thus ultimately assumed to be stored. The application of this approach aggregated to the entire area of the four shale gas plays concluded that they contain nearly 1,300 Tcf of both primary production and EGR potential, of which an estimated 460 Tcf could be economic to produce with reasonable gas prices and/or modest incentives. This could facilitate the storage of nearly 50 Gt of CO{sub 2} in the Marcellus, Utica, Antrim, and Devonian Ohio shales.

Godec, Michael

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Stimulation rationale for shale gas wells: a state-of-the-art report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the large quantities of gas contained in the Devonian Shales, only a small percentage can be produced commercially by current production methods. This limited production derives both from the unique reservoir properties of the Devonian Shales and the lack of stimulation technologies specifically designed for a shale reservoir. Since October 1978 Science Applications, Inc. has been conducting a review and evaluation of various shale well stimulation techniques with the objective of defining a rationale for selecting certain treatments given certain reservoir conditions. Although this review and evaluation is ongoing and much more data will be required before a definitive rationale can be presented, the studies to date do allow for many preliminary observations and recommendations. For the hydraulic type treatments the use of low-residual-fluid treatments is highly recommended. The excellent shale well production which is frequently observed with only moderate wellbore enlargement treatments indicates that attempts to extend fractures to greater distances with massive hydraulic treatments are not warranted. Immediate research efforts should be concentrated upon limiting production damage by fracturing fluids retained in the formation, and upon improving proppant transport and placement so as to maximize fracture conductivity. Recent laboratory, numerical modeling and field studies all indicate that the gas fracturing effects of explosive/propellant type treatments are the predominate production enhancement mechanism and that these effects can be controlled and optimized with properly designed charges. Future research efforts should be focused upon the understanding, prediction and control of wellbore fracturing with tailored-pulse-loading charges. 36 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Young, C.; Barbour, T.; Blanton, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Shale Gas and Climate Targets: Can They Be Reconciled?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives. Second, because industry must incur the cost of CO2 separation as part of the production process this strategy creates for its GHG objectives. In recent years, natural gas exploration and development have is normally vented to the atmosphere as the gas is processed to market standards. While the expansion of B

183

A study of the effects of stimulation on Devonian Shale gas well performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of actual production data from producing Devonian Shale gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. These comparisons are of limited use, however, because they fail to take into account recently developed stimulation technologies and because compari... by analysis of these data. Unfortunately, too little data are available for wells stimulated using current technologies. This study included no production data from wells stimulated by radial (tailored-pulse) fracturing methods. These data are vital...

Zuber, Michael Dean

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in the United States is natural gas. However, with the increased use of natural ...

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argus Americas Crude Summit January 22, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Six key plays account for nearly all recent growth in oil and natural gas production...

186

Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Lin, Haiqing (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Scott (Brecksville, OH); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Combined Steam Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas under Electrical Discharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Steam Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas under Electrical production from simultaneous steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane using an ac corona discharge production has been steam reforming, shown in reaction 4. It is very useful to use low-cost materials

Mallinson, Richard

188

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein Natural gas is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless fuel that is used by households, manufacturers

Mohaghegh, Shahab

189

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery Vent gas '\\Raw shale oil Recycled gas compressorThis process produces shale oil, a low BTU gas, and char,Oil Shale Process" in Oil Shale and Tar Sands, J. W. Smith

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Study of Multi-scale Transport Phenomena in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the rate and pressure data. Integration of the compositional shift analysis of this work with modern production analysis is used to infer reservoir properties. This work extends the current understanding of flow behavior and well performance for shale...

Freeman, Craig Matthew

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Data Bias in Rate Transient Analysis of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ......................................................................................................... 10 6 Rate and time relationship developed by Gentry (1972) ............................ 11 7 Fetkovich type-curves ................................................................................ 13 8 Gas type-curves developed by Carter (1985... the production data analyst to the proper use of superposition diagnostic plots ? To program a VBA program that performs proper use of superposition time functions according to the proposed work flow. 5 1.4 Organization of the thesis This report...

Agnia, Ammar Khalifa Mohammed

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

Kansas Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0Month Previous YearThousand1 3 2 4 6

193

Kentucky Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15IndustrialVehicleThousand Cubic20 55 10

194

LA, South Onshore Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396

195

Louisiana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084 889,5705,02044 149858

196

Michigan Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3YearDecade Year-0per9 6 0 0

197

Miscellaneous Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15Thousand CubicYear46 4722 35 42724

198

Mississippi Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic Feet)(Million

199

Montana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384FuelYear125 137 186 192 216 229

200

How is shale gas produced? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistory History On7,How GasHow YouHow is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Colorado Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180 208 283 607 1996-20132008

202

Shale Gas R&D | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartment of EnergyAprilAShale Gas 101

203

File:EIA-shale-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jump to:Decembercbmusa1.pdf Jump to:offshore-gas.pdf

204

California Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 (Million0,515,162180,648(Million Cubic

205

Expectations for Oil Shale Production (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that contain relatively large amounts of kerogen, which can be converted into liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons (petroleum liquids, natural gas liquids, and methane) by heating the rock, usually in the absence of oxygen, to 650 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit (in situ retorting) or 900 to 950 degrees Fahrenheit (surface retorting). (Oil shale is, strictly speaking, a misnomer in that the rock is not necessarily a shale and contains no crude oil.) The richest U.S. oil shale deposits are located in Northwest Colorado, Northeast Utah, and Southwest Wyoming. Currently, those deposits are the focus of petroleum industry research and potential future production. Among the three states, the richest oil shale deposits are on federal lands in northwest Colorado.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported in research on methane recovery from coalbeds, eastern gas shales, western gas sands, and geopressured aquifers. In the methane from coalbeds project, data on information evaluation and management, resource and site assessment and characterization, model development, instrumentation, basic research, and production technology development are reported. In the methane from eastern gas shales project, data on resource characterization and inventory, extraction technology, and technology testing and verification are presented. In the western gas sands project, data on resource assessments, field tests and demonstrations and project management are reported. In the methane from geopressured aquifers project, data on resource assessment, supporting research, field tests and demonstrations, and technology transfer are reported.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

,"U.S. Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (DollarsLiquidsAnnual",2014,"6/30/1993"Refinery,Gas

210

US-China_Fact_Sheet_Shale_Gas.pdf | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy,UCORRenewable_Energy.pdfShale_Gas.pdf

211

Workshop on gas potential of New Albany shale held in conjunction with the 1995 Ioga meeting in Evansville, Indiana on March 1, 1995. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This workshop is intended to provide an overview of the organic lithofacies, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, and gas potential of the Devonian and Mississippian New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin. In addition, the reservoir characteristics and completion technology for productive organic-rich Devonian shales in the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are also reviewed. Emphasis is being placed on how proven technologies together with appropriate geologic and geochemical information can be used to explore for gas in the New Albany Shale.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory Ricardo B. Metz Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 USA Abstract Gas such as methanol has attracted great experimental and theoretical interest due to its importance as an industrial

Metz, Ricardo B.

213

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate simulating reflectors (BSRs) imply the potential existence of gas hydrates offshore southwestern Taiwan that the fluxes are very high in offshore southwestern Taiwan. The depths of the SMI are different at sites GH6

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

214

FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About Gas Hydrates? What Role Do Gas Hydrates Play in Nature? Theme 2 Gas Hydrates as a Potential Energy Resource Are Gas Hydrates a Potential Energy Source? How Big Is the...

215

Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Applied Earth Science, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Target-rate Tracking for Shale-gas Multi-well Pads by Scheduled Shut-ins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

horizontal wells and stimulation with multistage hydraulic fracturing. This practice normally leads with hydraulic fracturing (HF) is therefore crucial for draining reasonable amounts of gas from the low permeable shale. Horizontal wells together with multistage hydraulic fracturing is by far the most common

Foss, Bjarne A.

220

CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injection into saline aquifer, CO2-EOR, CO2-ECBM, and so forth, have been studied to minimize the CO22-EOR, CO2-ECBM, and so forth, have been studied to minimize the CO2 release into the atmosphere1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

222

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Napersville, IL); Kobylinski, Thadeus P. (Lisle, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Focus on the Marcellus Shale By Lisa Sumi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas: Focus on the Marcellus Shale By Lisa Sumi FOR THE OIL & GAS ACCOUNTABILITY PROJECT on potential oil and gas development in the Marcellus Shale formation in northeastern Pennsylvania · www.ogap.org #12;Shale Gas: Focus on the Marcellus Shale A REPORT COMPILED FOR THE OIL AND GAS

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

225

,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars perReservesAnnual",2013 ,"Release

226

Process for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

Jones, John B. (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501); Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501)

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

Christopher Orme

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion CubicTotal Offshore

229

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion CubicTotal

230

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (BillionShareAnnual",2013

231

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves

232

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPrice (DollarsAnnual",2013

233

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPrice

234

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

Jerry Myers

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration targets?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration targets? (EARTH-15-SR2) Host institution: University of Oxford Supervisor 1: Stuart Robinson Supervisor 2: Steve Hesselbo (University of Exeter) Project description: Shales

Henderson, Gideon

236

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded natural

237

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra of energy use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded

Jackson, Robert B.

238

GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Incentives for Methane Mitigation and Energy-Efficiency Improvements in Case of Ukraine’s Natural Gas Transmission System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing methane losses is a concern for climate change policy and energy policy. The energy sector is the major source of methane emissions into the atmosphere. Reducing methane emissions and avoiding combustion can be very cost-effective, but various barriers prevent such energy-efficiency measures from taking place. To date, few examples of industry-wide improvements exist. One example of substantial investments into upgrading natural gas transmission system comes from Ukraine. The Ukrainian transmission company, Ukrtransgaz, reduced its own system’s natural gas consumption by 68 percent in 2011 compared to the level in 2005. Evaluating reductions in methane emissions is challenging because of lack of accurate data and gaps in accounting methodologies. At the same time, Ukraine’s transmission system has undergone improvements that, at the very least, have contained methane emissions, if not substantially reduced them. In this paper, we describe recent developments in Ukraine’s natural gas transmission system and analyze the incentives that forced the sector to pay close attention to its methane losses. Ukraine is one of most energy-intensive countries, among the largest natural gas consumers in the world, and a significant emitter of methane. The country is also dependent on imports of natural gas. A combination of steep increases in the price of imported natural gas, and comprehensive domestic environmental and energy policies, regional integration policy, and international environmental agreements has created conditions for successful methane emission and combustion reductions. Learning about such case studies can help us design better policies elsewhere.

Roshchanka, Volha; Evans, Meredydd

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoirs 19. Cheng et al. (2007) Decline Curve Analysis for Multilayered Tight Gas Reservoirs 20. Blasingame and Rushing Method for Gas-in-Place and Reserves Estimation (2005) 21. Clarkson et al. (2007) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane... Wells 22. Clarkson et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 23. Rushing et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 24. Lewis and Hughes (2008) Production Data Analysis for Shale Gas Wells 25. Mattar et al...

Currie, Stephanie M.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sulfur resistance of Group VIII transition metal promoted nickel catalysts for synthesis gas methanation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SULFUR RESISTANCE OF GROUP VIII TRANSITION METAL PROMOTED NICKEL CATALYSTS FOR SYNTHESIS GAS METHANATION A Thesis by KELLEE HALL HAMLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AgrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...: Aydin Akger n (Chairman of Co 'ttee) Ahme M. Gadalla (Member) Michael . Rosynek (Member) aries D. Holland . ( ead of Department) May 1986 ABSTRACT Sulfur Resistance of Group VIII Transition Metal Promoted Nickel Catalysts For Synthesis Gas...

Hamlin, Kellee Hall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

UNDERSTANDING METHANE EMISSIONS SOURCES AND VIABLE MITIGATION MEASURES IN THE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS: RUSSIAN AND U.S. EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article will compare the natural gas transmission systems in the U.S. and Russia and review experience with methane mitigation technologies in the two countries. Russia and the United States (U.S.) are the world's largest consumers and producers of natural gas, and consequently, have some of the largest natural gas infrastructure. This paper compares the natural gas transmission systems in Russia and the U.S., their methane emissions and experiences in implementing methane mitigation technologies. Given the scale of the two systems, many international oil and natural gas companies have expressed interest in better understanding the methane emission volumes and trends as well as the methane mitigation options. This paper compares the two transmission systems and documents experiences in Russia and the U.S. in implementing technologies and programs for methane mitigation. The systems are inherently different. For instance, while the U.S. natural gas transmission system is represented by many companies, which operate pipelines with various characteristics, in Russia predominately one company, Gazprom, operates the gas transmission system. However, companies in both countries found that reducing methane emissions can be feasible and profitable. Examples of technologies in use include replacing wet seals with dry seals, implementing Directed Inspection and Maintenance (DI&M) programs, performing pipeline pump-down, applying composite wrap for non-leaking pipeline defects and installing low-bleed pneumatics. The research methodology for this paper involved a review of information on methane emissions trends and mitigation measures, analytical and statistical data collection; accumulation and analysis of operational data on compressor seals and other emission sources; and analysis of technologies used in both countries to mitigate methane emissions in the transmission sector. Operators of natural gas transmission systems have many options to reduce natural gas losses. Depending on the value of gas, simple, low-cost measures, such as adjusting leaking equipment components, or larger-scale measures, such as installing dry seals on compressors, can be applied.

Ishkov, A.; Akopova, Gretta; Evans, Meredydd; Yulkin, Grigory; Roshchanka, Volha; Waltzer, Suzie; Romanov, K.; Picard, David; Stepanenko, O.; Neretin, D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs...

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluation of the EOR potential in shale oil reservoirs by cyclic gas injection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract The current available technique to produce shale oil is through primary depletion using horizontal wells with multiple transverse fractures. The oil recovery factor is… (more)

Wan, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evaluation of the EOR Potential in Shale Oil Reservoirs by Cyclic Gas Injection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract The current available technique to produce shale oil is through primary depletion using horizontal wells with multiple transverse fractures. The oil recovery factor is… (more)

Wan, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Parameter sensitivity analysis of tailored-pulse loading stimulation of Devonian gas shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of three tailored-pulse loading parameters has been undertaken to access their importance in gas well stimulation technology. This numerical evaluation was performed using STEALTH finite-difference codes and was intended to provide a measure of the effects of various tailored-pulse load configurations on fracture development in Devonian gas shale. The three parameters considered in the sensitivity analysis were: loading rate; decay rate; and sustained peak pressures. By varying these parameters in six computations and comparing the relative differences in fracture initiation and propagation the following conclusions were drawn: (1) Fracture initiation is directly related to the loading rate aplied to the wellbore wall. Loading rates of 10, 100 and 1000 GPa/sec were modeled. (2) If yielding of the rock can be prevented or minimized, by maintaining low peak pressures in the wellbore, increasing the pulse loading rate, to say 10,000 GPa/sec or more, should initiate additional multiple fractures. (3) Fracture initiation does not appear to be related to the tailored-pulse decay rate. Fracture extension may be influenced by the rate of decay. The slower the decay rate, the longer the crack extension. (4) Fracture initiation does not appear to be improved by a high pressure plateau in the tailored-pulse. Fracture propagation may be enhanced if the maintained wellbore pressure plateau is of sufficient magnitude to extent the range of the tangential tensile stresses to greater radial distances. 26 figures, 2 tables.

Barbour, T.G.; Mihalik, G.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Implementation of the Ensemble Kalman Filter in the Characterization of Hydraulic Fractures in Shale Gas Reservoirs by Integrating Downhole Temperature Sensing Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are needed in order to accurately characterize hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs. In this study, a stochastic inverse problem is set up with the objective of inferring hydraulic fracture characteristics, such as fracture half...

Moreno, Jose A

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Stretched Exponential Decline Model as a Probabilistic and Deterministic Tool for Production Forecasting and Reserve Estimation in Oil and Gas Shales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this work suggests a physics-based regularization approach, based on critical velocity concept. Applied to selected Barnett Shale gas wells, the suggested method leads to reliable and consistent EURs. To further understand the interaction of the different...

Akbarnejad Nesheli, Babak

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

A New Method for History Matching and Forecasting Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual and Triple Porosity Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different methods have been proposed for history matching production of shale gas/oil wells which are drilled horizontally and usually hydraulically fractured with multiple stages. These methods are simulation, analytical models, and empirical...

Samandarli, Orkhan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

253

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fingerprinting | fracking | hydrology and ecology Unconventional sources of gas and oil are transforming energy and horizontal drilling are also growing (4, 5). These concerns include changes in air quality (6), human health the greenhouse gas balance (8, 9). Perhaps the biggest health concern remains the potential for drinking water

Jackson, Robert B.

254

The presence of natural gas-primarily methane-in the shale layers of sedimen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceTheofThe

255

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale Gas Draft Report Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale Gas Draft Report November 10,...

256

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

257

New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

Pantelis K. Panteli

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

POTENTIAL USES OF SPENT SHALE IN THE TREATMENT OF OIL SHALE RETORT WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pore-volume study of retorted oil shale," Lawrence Livermoreits contact with the oil and shale. The gas condensate, onkinetics between and oil-shale residual carbon. 1. co Effect

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frequently a discrepancy is found between the stimulated shale volume (SSV) estimated from production data and the SSV expected from injected water and proppant volume. One possible explanation is the presence of a fracture network, often termed...

Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

264

Stochastic Modeling of a Fracture Network in a Hydraulically Fractured Shale-Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fundamental behavior of fluid production from shale/ultra-low permeability reservoirs that are produced under a constant wellbore pressure remains difficult to quantify, which is believed to be (at least in part) due to the complexity...

Mhiri, Adnene

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE-Sponsored Software Application Assists Exploration of Gas-Rich Fayetteville Shale  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy has resulted in the development of the Fayetteville Shale Infrastructure Placement Analysis System, or IPAS, which is now available online.

266

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0ExtensionsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

267

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0ExtensionsYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear

268

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0MonthIncreasesFeet) Year Jan

269

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0MonthIncreasesFeet) Year JanYear

270

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0Feet) Year JanYear

271

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0Feet) Year JanYearYear

272

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-140.0Feet)Decade Year-0

273

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-140.0Feet)Decade

274

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

275

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunYear

276

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0Decade

277

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0DecadeYear Jan

278

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388Feet) Year JanYear

279

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388Feet) Year JanYearYear

280

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47ExtensionsYear JanYear Jan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47ExtensionsYear JanYear JanYear Jan

282

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013 AdjustmentsYear Jan Feb

283

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013 AdjustmentsYear Jan FebYear

284

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005.Feet) Year Jan

285

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005.Feet) Year JanYear

286

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794 2011-2013 TotalYear

287

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: FWP 49462  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have produce enough natural gas from shale formations to make the wells economically viable. Because

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

288

The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?, including tight gas, gas/oil shale, oil sands, and coal-bed methane. North America has a substantial growth in its unconventional oil and gas market over the last two decades. The primary reason for that growth is because North America, being a mature...

Lin, Jiajing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10{degree}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500{degree}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degree}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO{sub x} remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH[sub 3] as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10[degree]C/min in an Ar/O[sub 2]/NO/NH[sub 3] mixture ([approximately]93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of [approximately]0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500[degree]C, with maximum removal of 70% at [approximately]400[degree]C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was [approximately]64%. When CO[sub 2] was added to the gas mixture at [approximately]8%, the NO removal dropped to [approximately]50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to [approximately]1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO[sub x] remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

291

Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Numerical-model developments for stimulation technologies in the Eastern Gas Shales Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These efforts were directed towards the development of a numerical tensile failure model that could be used to make a parameter sensitivity study of the EGSP wellbore stimulation methods for gas recovery in Devonain shales, calculations were performed using the NTS Multi-Frac Mineback Experiments as the geometry, boundary conditions and material properties of the models. Several major accomplishments were achieved during this task. These include: development of a Crack and Void Strain (CAVS) tensile failure model for one-dimensional fracture analysis using the one-dimensional geometries available in SAI's STEALTH 1-D finite-difference code; modification of the original CAVS tensile failure criteria to improve its representation of multiple fracture development by introducing a logic that adjusts the material's tensile strength (both for crack initiation and crack propagation) according to the degree of cracking that has occurred; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for cracking propping when a crack is reclosed and to require energy to be expanded during this process; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for crack pressurization when a crack void strain is in communication with the fluid pressure of the borehole; and performing a parameter sensitivity analysis to determine the effect that the material properties of the rock has on crack development, to include the effects of yielding and compaction. Using the CAVS model and its submodels, a series of STEALTH calculations were then performed to estimate the response of the NTS unaugmented Dynafrac experiment. Pressure, acceleration and stress time histories and snapshot data were obtained and should aid in the evaluation of these experiments. Crack patterns around the borehole were also calculated and should be valuable in a comparison with the fracture patterns observed during mineback.

Barbour, T.G.; Maxwell, D.E.; Young, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Marcellus Shale Litigation and Legislation December 17, 2009 7 . Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Law1 Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar Series October 2009 - March 2010 Penn State Cooperative Extension #12;2 Marcellus Shale Webinar Series Planning Committee · Members ­ Mark Douglass, Jefferson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

294

Shale Play Industry Transportation Challenges,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ High volume commodi-es flows in and out of shale plays · Sand In....Oil in excess of 50 MMT/Yr. · Life of current Shale Oil & Gas explora-on trend ­ 2012) #12;Shale Play Oil Industry A Look at the Baaken · 2-3 Unit Trains

Minnesota, University of

295

Methanation assembly using multiple reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR�¢����s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument�¢����s robustness in a real-world situation.

Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Multi-scale Detection of Organic and Inorganic Signatures Provides Insights into Gas Shale Properties and Evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic geochemical analyses, including solvent extraction or pyrolysis, followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, are generally conducted on bulk gas shale samples to evaluate their source and reservoir properties. While organic petrology has been directed at unravelling the matrix composition and textures of these economically important unconventional resources, their spatial variability in chemistry and structure is still poorly documented at the sub-micrometre scale. Here, a combination of techniques including transmission electron microscopy and a synchrotron-based microscopy tool, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, have been used to characterize at a multiple length scale an overmature organic-rich calcareous mudstone from northern Germany. We document multi-scale chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities within the sample, from the millimetre down to the nanometre-scale. From the detection of different types of bitumen and authigenic minerals associated with the organic matter, we show that the multi-scale approach used in this study may provide new insights into gaseous hydrocarbon generation/retention processes occurring within gas shales and may shed new light on their thermal history.

Bernard, S.; Horsfield, B; Schultz, H; Schreiber, A; Wirth, R; Thi AnhVu, T; Perssen, F; Konitzer, S; Volk, H; et. al.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential distribution of methane hydrate in the world'sisotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability duringHendy, L.L. , and R.J. Behl, Methane hydrates in quaternary

Reagan, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

Jerry Myers

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

Jerry Myers

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale… (more)

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL hot recycle solids oil shale retorting process has been studied as a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as areductant. Combusted Green River oil shale heated at 10{degrees}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppm/4000 ppm) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec exhibited NO removal between 250 and 500{degrees}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was found to be {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. These results are not based on optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized (combusted) oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Unconventional gas recovery program. Semi-annual report for the period ending September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the third semi-annual report describing the technical progress of the US DOE projects directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources. Currently the program includes Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, Eastern Gas Shales Project, Western Gas Sands Project, and Geopressured Aquifers Project.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

Jerry Myers

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650 to 700/sup 0/C for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, R.; Walton, O.; Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.

1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650.degree.-700.degree. C. for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

4-102 Methane is heated in a rigid container. The final pressure of the methane is to be determined using the ideal gas equation and the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-54 4-102 Methane is heated in a rigid container. The final pressure of the methane the ideal gas equation of state, Methane 100 kPa 20qC Q kPa229.7 K293 K673 kPa)100( 1 2 12 T T PP The specific molar volume of the methane is /kmolm36.24 kPa100 K)K)(293/kmolmkPa(8.314 3 3 1 1 21 P TRu vv (b

Bahrami, Majid

309

Using Decline Curve Analysis, Volumetric Analysis, and Bayesian Methodology to Quantify Uncertainty in Shale Gas Reserve Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. [ ( ) ] .................................................................................. (4) In Eq. (4), ? is a dimensionless exponent parameter and ? is the characteristic time parameter, months. Can and Kabir (2012) analyzed production data from 820 wells from three different shale formations (220 wells in the Bakken oil shale...

Gonzalez Jimenez, Raul 1988-

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

GEOLOGIC ASSESSMENT OF DRILLING, COMPLETION, AND STIMULATION METHODS IN SELECTED GAS SHALE PLAYS WORLDWIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United States regularly imports majority of the transportation oil, and several TCF of natural gas annually. Nevertheless, there is very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of natural gas in just...

Patel, Harsh Jay

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Proposed natural gas protection program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of US Department of Energy (DOE) monitoring activities, it was determined in 1983 that the potential existed for natural gas resources underlying the Naval Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSrs-1 3) to be drained by privately-owned gas wells that were being drilled along the Reserves borders. In 1985, DOE initiated a limited number of projects to protect the Government's interest in the gas resources by drilling its own offset production'' wells just inside the boundaries, and by formally sharing in the production, revenues and costs of private wells that are drilled near the boundaries ( communitize'' the privately-drilled wells). The scope of these protection efforts must be expanded. DOE is therefore proposing a Natural Gas Protection Program for NOSRs-1 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells (including the wells drilled and/or communitized since 1985). Of these, 111 would be offset wells drilled by DOE on Government land inside the NOSRs' boundaries and would be owned either entirely by the Government or communitized with adjacent private land owners or lessees. The remainder would be wells drilled by private operators in an area one half-mile wide extending around the NOSRs boundaries and communitized with the Government. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Oil shale retorting method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method and apparatus for the retorting of oil shale and the formation of spent oil shale having improved cementation properties. The improved method comprises passing feed comprising oil shale to a contacting zone wherein the feed oil shale is contacted with heat transfer medium to heat said shale to retorting temperature. The feed oil shale is substantially retorted to form fluid material having heating value and forming partially spent oil shale containing carbonaceous material. At least a portion of the partially spent oil shale is passed to a combustion zone wherein the partially spent oil shale is contacted with oxidizing gas comprising oxygen and steam to substantially combust carbonaceous material forming spent oil shale having improved cementation properties.

York, E.D.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

Glenn, R.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

Glenn, R.K.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet

318

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,Price

319

Oil shale retort apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

Reeves, Adam A. (Grand Junction, CO); Mast, Earl L. (Norman, OK); Greaves, Melvin J. (Littleton, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Unconventional resources ................................................................................. 1 1.2 Oil shale and shale oil ....................................................................................... 6 1.3 Production from unconventional..., heavy oil, shale gas and shale oil. On the other hand, conventional reservoirs can be produced at economic flow rates and produce economic volumes of oil and gas without large stimulation treatments or any special recovery process. Conventional...

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700şC) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

Heath, G.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low levels of 14C-labeled methane and accelerator mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Environ. Microbiol. 10(Field observations of methane concentra- tions and oxidationAnaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

“Multi-temperature” method for high-pressure sorption measurements on moist shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple and effective experimental approach has been developed and tested to study the temperature dependence of high-pressure methane sorption in moist organic-rich shales. This method, denoted as “multi-temperature” (short “multi-T”) method, enables measuring multiple isotherms at varying temperatures in a single run. The measurement of individual sorption isotherms at different temperatures takes place in a closed system ensuring that the moisture content remains constant. The multi-T method was successfully tested for methane sorption on an organic-rich shale sample. Excess sorption isotherms for methane were measured at pressures of up to 25 MPa and at temperatures of 318.1 K, 338.1 K, and 348.1 K on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples. The measured isotherms were parameterized with a 3-parameter Langmuir-based excess sorption function, from which thermodynamic sorption parameters (enthalpy and entropy of adsorption) were obtained. Using these, we show that by taking explicitly into account water vapor as molecular species in the gas phase with temperature-dependent water vapor pressure during the experiment, more meaningful results are obtained with respect to thermodynamical considerations. The proposed method can be applied to any adsorbent system (coals, shales, industrial adsorbents) and any supercritical gas (e.g., CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}) and is particularly suitable for sorption measurements using the manometric (volumetric) method.

Gasparik, Matus; Ghanizadeh, Amin; Gensterblum, Yves; Krooss, Bernhard M. [Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR), Institute of Geology and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal, Lochnerstr. 4-20, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)] [Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR), Institute of Geology and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal, Lochnerstr. 4-20, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

,"Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNetWellheadCoalbed

328

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974- Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in agricultural and forest reserve areas.

329

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee (SEAB) on Shale...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(SEAB) on Shale Gas Production Posts Draft Report Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee (SEAB) on Shale Gas Production Posts Draft Report November 10, 2011 - 1:12pm...

330

Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2013 00:00 Over 20 trillion cubic meters of natural gas are trapped in shale, but many shale oil and gas producers still use models of underground fluid flow that date back to...

331

Subsurface definition of the Allegheny Group coalbed methane prospect interval in Southwestern Pennsylvania and new gas content results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary reconnaissance of coalbed methane gas content data from exploratory coal cores and pre-existing data implies that the greater the depth and rank, the greater the total and cumulative gas content. The coal seams studied, ranging in age from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Dunkard Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group, are from the Main Bituminous Field and two of the anthracite fields. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey conducted a mapping investigation to evaluate the regional geology of the coal-bearing intervals and its influence on coalbed methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval; Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny coalbeds and associated sandstones. A variety of cross sections and isopach maps show several prospective coalbeds and facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. This suggests that some of these sandstones may be traps for coalbed methane. Often overlooked in reservoir characterization is the quality of a coal seam. Coal rank, grade, and type influence the reserves and production of coalbed methane; the higher the rank, the greater adsorptive capacity of the coal. The integration of coal quality with other critical tools of exploration may increase the success rate of finding {open_quotes}sweet spots.{close_quotes} Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling occurred in Beaver, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington counties. Gas contents were graphically displayed against depth, thickness, and time for a variety of samples from 21 coal seams; average gas composition and Btu values were determined for selected samples.

Markowski, A.K. [Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Tool to predict the production performance of vertical wells in a coalbed methane reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed Methane (CBM) is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams. Coalbed Methane gas production is controlled be interactions of… (more)

Enoh, Michael E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

,"Montana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,

334

SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Control Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters,~~ inpyrolysized to produce shale oil, gas, a solid referred towaters are co-produced with shale oil and separated from it

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Decline Curve Analysis of Shale Oil Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Production of oil and gas from shale is often described as a revolution to energyproduction in North America. Since the beginning of this century… (more)

Lund, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Location and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Quebec, is organic-rich black shale and hosting oil and gas. It is equivalent to the Ithaca shaleLocation and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale in the Anticosti Island in the Gulf of St. d13C for calcite disseminated in the black shale range from 2.6o to 2.8 / The values are lower

337

Commercialization of waste gob gas and methane produced in conjunction with coal mining operations. Final report, August 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of the project were to identify and evaluate existing processes for (1) using gas as a feedstock for production of marketable, value-added commodities, and (2) enriching contaminated gas to pipeline quality. The following gas conversion technologies were evaluated: (1) transformation to liquid fuels, (2) manufacture of methanol, (3) synthesis of mixed alcohols, and (4) conversion to ammonia and urea. All of these involved synthesis gas production prior to conversion to the desired end products. Most of the conversion technologies evaluated were found to be mature processes operating at a large scale. A drawback in all of the processes was the need to have a relatively pure feedstock, thereby requiring gas clean-up prior to conversion. Despite this requirement, the conversion technologies were preliminarily found to be marginally economic. However, the prohibitively high investment for a combined gas clean-up/conversion facility required that REI refocus the project to investigation of gas enrichment alternatives. Enrichment of a gas stream with only one contaminant is a relatively straightforward process (depending on the contaminant) using available technology. However, gob gas has a unique nature, being typically composed of from constituents. These components are: methane, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor. Each of the four contaminants may be separated from the methane using existing technologies that have varying degrees of complexity and compatibility. However, the operating and cost effectiveness of the combined system is dependent on careful integration of the clean-up processes. REI is pursuing Phase 2 of this project for demonstration of a waste gas enrichment facility using the approach described above. This is expected to result in the validation of the commercial and technical viability of the facility, and the refinement of design parameters.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec. 31 705 740 725WellsGas

339

Optimal use of Hybrid feedstock, Switchgrass and Shale gas, for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal of the sour gases, and its composition is adjusted (using either water gas shift reaction or pressure swift adsoprtion) and the liquid fuels are obtained in an FT reactor. The heavy liquids are the most promising due to their compatibility with the current supply chain and automobiles. However

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

340

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Colorado Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketedCoalbedNetGas, Wet AfterShale

342

Effects of scale-up on oil and gas yields in a solid-recycle bed oil shale retorting process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized bed pyrolysis of oil shale in a non-hydrogen atmosphere has been shown to significantly increase oil yield in laboratory-scale reactors compared to the Fischer assay by many workers. The enhancement in oil yield by this relatively simple and efficient thermal technique has led to the development of several oil shale retorting processes based on fluidized bed and related technologies over the past fifteen years. Since 1986, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has been developing one such process, KENTORT II, which is mainly tailored for the Devonian oil shales that occur in the eastern U.S. The process contains three main fluidized bed zones to pyrolyze, gasify, and combust the oil shale. A fourth fluidized bed zone serves to cool the spent shale prior to exiting the system. The autothermal process utilizes processed shale recirculation to transfer heat from the combustion to the gasification and pyrolysis zones. The CAER is currently testing the KENTORT II process in a 22.7-kg/hr process-development unit (PDU).

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Vego, A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Modeling, History Matching, Forecasting and Analysis of Shale Reservoirs Performance Using Artificial Intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matching, forecasting and analyzing oil and gas production in shale reservoirs. In this new approach and analysis of oil and gas production from shale formations. Examples of three case studies in Lower Huron and New Albany shale formations (gas producing) and Bakken Shale (oil producing) is presented

Mohaghegh, Shahab

344

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enggeo.2013.05.021. CNX/GTI (2008). New Albany ShaleRVSP, New Albany Shale Gas Project, RVSP Seismic Projectisopach maps of the New Albany Shale, Illinois Basin. Figure

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Lower 48 States Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342Cubic Feet) Decade4,871 5,382

346

Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

BC Technologies

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?ť), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

J. Daniel Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee Releases Shale...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

environmental management of shale gas, which has rapidly grown to nearly 30 percent of natural gas production in the United States. Increased transparency and a focus on best...

349

Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J.; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Creation and Impairment of Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing is the key to the success of many shale gas and shale oil reservoirs. The main objectives of hydraulic fracturing in shale are to create artificial fracture networks that are conductive for oil and gas flow...

Zhang, Junjing

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reduction of Non-CO2 Gas Emissions Through The In Situ Bioconversion of Methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this research were to seek previously unidentified anaerobic methanotrophs and other microorganisms to be collected from methane seeps associated with coal outcrops. Subsurface application of these microbes into anaerobic environments has the potential to reduce methane seepage along coal outcrop belts and in coal mines, thereby preventing hazardous explosions. Depending upon the types and characteristics of the methanotrophs identified, it may be possible to apply the microbes to other sources of methane emissions, which include landfills, rice cultivation, and industrial sources where methane can accumulate under buildings. Finally, the microbes collected and identified during this research also had the potential for useful applications in the chemical industry, as well as in a variety of microbial processes. Sample collection focused on the South Fork of Texas Creek located approximately 15 miles east of Durango, Colorado. The creek is located near the subsurface contact between the coal-bearing Fruitland Formation and the underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The methane seeps occur within the creek and in areas adjacent to the creek where faulting may allow fluids and gases to migrate to the surface. These seeps appear to have been there prior to coalbed methane development as extensive microbial soils have developed. Our investigations screened more than 500 enrichments but were unable to convince us that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was occurring and that anaerobic methanotrophs may not have been present in the samples collected. In all cases, visual and microscopic observations noted that the early stage enrichments contained viable microbial cells. However, as the levels of the readily substrates that were present in the environmental samples were progressively lowered through serial transfers, the numbers of cells in the enrichments sharply dropped and were eliminated. While the results were disappointing we acknowledge that anaerobic methane oxidizing (AOM) microorganisms are predominantly found in marine habitats and grow poorly under most laboratory conditions. One path for future research would be to use a small rotary rig to collect samples from deeper soil horizons, possibly adjacent to the coal-bearing horizons that may be more anaerobic.

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

352

Volumetric strain associated with methane desorption and its impact on coalbed gas production from deep coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For deep coal seams, significant reservoir pressure drawdown is required to promote gas desorption because of the Langmuir-type isotherm that typifies coals. Hence, a large permeability decline may occur because of pressure drawdown and the resulting increase in effective stress, depending on coal properties and the stress field during production. However, the permeability decline can potentially be offset by the permeability enhancement caused by the matrix shrinkage associated with methane desorption. The predictability of varying permeability is critical for coalbed gas exploration and production-well management. We have investigated quantitatively the effects of reservoir pressure and sorption-induced volumetric strain on coal-seam permeability with constraints from the adsorption isotherm and associated volumetric strain measured on a Cretaceous Mesaverde Group coal (Piceance basin) and derived a stress-dependent permeability model. Our results suggest that the favorable coal properties that can result in less permeability reduction during earlier production and an earlier strong permeability rebound (increase in permeability caused by coal shrinkage) with methane desorption include (1) large bulk or Young's modulus; (2) large adsorption or Langmuir volume; (3) high Langmuir pressure; (4) high initial permeability and dense cleat spacing; and (5) low initial reservoir pressure and high in-situ gas content. Permeability variation with gas production is further dependent on the orientation of the coal seam, the reservoir stress field, and the cleat structure. Well completion with injection of N2 and displacement of CH{sub 4} only results in short-term enhancement of permeability and does not promote the overall gas production for the coal studied.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth & Ocean Science

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development of water production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. The key parameters for the evaluation of coalbed methane… (more)

Burka Narayana, Praveen Kumar.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goldberg, E.D. , 1976. Methane production and consumption inanaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature, 407 , 623-626.profiles indicate in situ methane flux from underlying gas

Berg, Richard D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed Methane ProvedShale Gas

356

,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed Methane ProvedShale GasPlant

357

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V.A. Soloviev, Submarine Gas Hydrates. St. Petersburg, 1998.and stability of gas hydrate-related bottom-simulatingPotential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare, Proc.

Reagan, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

,"Arkansas Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePrice (Dollars perNetGas, WetShale

359

The basics of coalbed methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is an overview of coalbed methane (CBM), also known as coal seam gas. It provides an overview of what coalbed methane is and the current status of global coalbed methane exploration and production. Topics covered in the report include: An analysis of the natural gas industry, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; A detailed description of coalbed methane, its characteristics, and future potential; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coalbed methane; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of coalbed methane; An overview of the technologies used for coalbed methane production and water treatment; and Profiles of key coalbed methane producing countries. 25 figs., 5 tabs., 1 app.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale M. O. Eshkalak, SPE, S. D of hydrocarbons from the reservoirs, notably shale, is attributed to realizing the key fundamentals of reservoir and mineralogy is crucial in order to identify the "right" pay-zone intervals for shale gas production. Also

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCIDENT #12;#12;#12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - EnvironmentalThe Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities Bernard D. Goldstein, MD Department using Data.FracTracker.org. #12;Drilling Rig in Rural Upshur County, WV Source: WVSORO, Modern Shale Gas

Jiang, Huiqiang

362

Conversion characteristics of 10 selected oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion behavior of 10 oil shale from seven foreign and three domestic deposits has been studied by combining solid- and liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements with material balance Fischer assay conversion data. The extent of aromatization of aliphatic carbons was determined. Between zero and 42% of the raw shale aliphatic carbon formed aromatic carbon during Fischer assay. For three of the shales, there was more aromatic carbon in the residue after Fisher assay than in the raw shale. Between 10 and 20% of the raw shale aliphatic carbons ended up as aliphatic carbons on the spent shale. Good correlations were found between the raw shale aliphatic carbon and carbon in the oil and between the raw shale aromatic carbon and aromatic carbon on the spent shale. Simulated distillations and molecular weight determinations were performed on the shale oils. Greater than 50% of the oil consisted of the atmospheric and vacuum gas oil boiling fractions. 14 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Miknis, F.P.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Production of hydrogen from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for production of hydrogen from oil shale fines by direct introduction of the oil shale fines into a fluidized bed at temperatures about 1200/sup 0/ to about 2000/sup 0/ F. to obtain rapid heating of the oil shale. The bed is fluidized by upward passage of steam and oxygen, the steam introduced in the weight ratio of about 0.1 to about 10 on the basis of the organic carbon content of the oil shale and the oxygen introduced in less than the stoichiometric quantity for complete combustion of the organic carbonaceous kerogen content of the oil shale. Embodiments are disclosed for heat recovery from the spent shale and heat recovery from the spent shale and product gas wherein the complete process and heat recovery is carried out in a single reaction vessel. The process of this invention provides high conversion of organic carbon component of oil shale and high production of hydrogen from shale fines which when used in combination with a conventional oil shale hydroconversion process results in increased overall process efficiency of greater than 15 percent.

Schora, F. C.; Feldkirchner, H. L.; Janka, J. C.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

365

A method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low levels of 14C-labeled methane and accelerator mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NEsediment from a marine gas hydrate area. Environ. Microbiol.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Critical View of Current State of Reservoir Modeling of Shale Assets Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Intelligent Solutions, Inc. & West Virginia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and diffusion as a transport phenomenon in reservoirs that came to be known as CBM (Coalbed Methane). Today in shale, more attention has been focused on their characteristics in the recent years. Studies of methane

Mohaghegh, Shahab

367

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Prediction of coalbed methane reservoir performance with type curves.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoirs are dual-porosity systems that are characterized by… (more)

Bhavsar, Amol Bhaskar.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The… (more)

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group Analysis from Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has significant potential to affect in the Barnett Shale region of north Texas. The Barnett Shale play is very similar in geology to the Marcellus

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

371

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Multiscale strength homogenization : application to shale nanoindentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shales are one of the most encountered materials in sedimentary basins. Because of their highly heterogeneous nature, their strength prediction for oil and gas exploitation engineering has long time been an enigma. In this ...

Gathier, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the ...

Ruppel, Carolyn

375

Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Mller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Mřller Danish Institute This thesis, entitled "Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure" is presented in partial of digested and separated products.................... 13 3. Methane productivity and greenhouse gas emissions

376

Method of coalbed methane production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing coalbed methane from a coal seam containing coalbed methane and penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one producing well. It comprises: injecting an inert gas through the injection well and into the coal seam. The inert gas being a gas that does not react with the coal under conditions of use and that does not significantly adsorb to the coal; and producing a gas from the production well which consists essentially of the inert gas, coalbed methane, or mixtures thereof.

Puri, R.; Stein, M.H.

1989-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

New York Marcellus Shale: Industry boom put on hold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key catalysts for Marcellus Shale drilling in New York were identified. New York remains the only state in the nation with a legislative moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, as regulators and state lawmakers work to balance the advantages of potential economic benefits while protecting public drinking water resources and the environment. New York is being particularly careful to work on implementing sufficiently strict regulations to mitigate the environmental impacts Pennsylvania has already seen, such as methane gas releases, fracturing fluid releases, flowback water and brine controls, and total dissolved solids discharges. In addition to economic and environmental lessons learned, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) also acknowledges impacts to housing markets, security, and other local issues, and may impose stringent measures to mitigate potential risks to local communities. Despite the moratorium, New York has the opportunity to take advantage of increased capital investment, tax revenue generation, and job creation opportunities by increasing shale gas activity. The combination of economic benefits, industry pressure, and recent technological advances will drive the pursuit of natural gas drilling in New York. We identify four principal catalysts as follows: Catalyst 1: Pressure from Within the State. Although high-volume hydraulic fracturing has become a nationally controversial technology, shale fracturing activity is common in every U.S. state except New York. The regulatory process has delayed potential economic opportunities for state and local economies, as well as many industry stakeholders. In 2010, shale gas production accounted for $18.6 billion in federal royalty and local, state, and federal tax revenues. (1) This is expected to continue to grow substantially. The DEC is under increased pressure to open the state to the same opportunities that Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming are pursuing. Positive labor market impacts are another major economic draw. According to the Revised Draft SGEIS on the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory Program (September 2011), hydraulic fracturing would create between 4,408 and 17,634 full-time equivalent (FTE) direct construction jobs in New York State. Indirect employment in other sectors would add an additional 29,174 FTE jobs. Furthermore, the SGEIS analysis suggests that drilling activities could add an estimated $621.9 million to $2.5 billion in employee earnings (direct and indirect) per year, depending upon how much of the shale is developed. The state would also receive direct tax receipts from leasing land, and has the potential to see an increase in generated indirect revenue. Estimates range from $31 million to $125 million per year in personal income tax receipts, and local governments would benefit from revenue sharing. Some landowner groups say the continued delay in drilling is costing tens of thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in growth for New York, especially in the economically stunted upstate. A number of New York counties near Pennsylvania, such as Chemung, NY, have experienced economic uptick from Pennsylvania drilling activity just across the border. Chemung officials reported that approximately 1,300 county residents are currently employed by the drilling industry in Pennsylvania. The Marcellus shale boom is expected to continue over the next decade and beyond. By 2015, gas drilling activity could bring 20,000 jobs to New York State alone. Other states, such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia, are also expected to see a significant increase in the number of jobs. Catalyst 2: Political Reality of the Moratorium. Oil and gas drilling has taken place in New York since the 19th century, and it remains an important industry with more than 13,000 currently active wells. The use of hydraulic fracturing in particular has been employed for decades. Yet, as technological

Mercurio, Angelique

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Perform research in process development for hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales: Volume 2, Expansion of the Moving-Bed Hydroretorting Data Base for Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive data base was developed for six Eastern oil shales: Alabama Chattanooga, Indiana New Albany, Kentucky Sunbury, Michigan Antrim, Ohio Cleveland, and Tennessee Chattanooga shales. The data base included the hydroretorting characteristics of the six shales, as well as the retorting characteristics in the presence of synthesis gas and ionized gas. Shale gasification was also successfully demonstrated. Shale fines (20%) can produce enough hydrogen for the hydroretorting of the remaining 80% of the shale. The amount of fines tolerable in a moving bed was also determined. 16 refs., 59 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report 2014 Natural Gas Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Russian Policy on Methane Emissions in the Oil and Gas Sector: A Case Study in Opportunities and Challenges in Reducing Short-Lived Forcers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper uses Russian policy in the oil and gas sector as a case study in assessing options and challenges for scaling-up emission reductions. We examine the challenges to achieving large-scale emission reductions, successes that companies have achieved to date, how Russia has sought to influence methane emissions through its environmental fine system, and options for helping companies achieve large-scale emission reductions in the future through simpler and clearer incentives.

Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gasification characteristics of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is evaluating the gasification characteristics of Eastern oil shales as a part of a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and HYCRUDE Corporation to expand the data base on moving-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification of shale fines will improve the overall resource utilization by producing synthesis gas or hydrogen needed for the hydroretorting of oil shale and the upgrading of shale oil. Gasification characteristics of an Indiana New Albany oil shale have been determined over temperature and pressure ranges of 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Carbon conversion of over 95% was achieved within 30 minutes at gasification conditions of 1800/sup 0/F and 15 psig in a hydrogen/steam gas mixture for the Indiana New Albany oil shale. This paper presents the results of the tests conducted in a laboratory-scale batch reactor to obtain reaction rate data and in a continuous mini-bench-scale unit to obtain product yield data. 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Deformation of shale: mechanical properties and indicators of mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basins, shales of Devonian age are commonly considered reservoir rocks I' or natural gas [Woodward, 1958; Lockett, 1968; Long, 1979; Gonzales and Johnson, 1985], Economic gas production from the Devonian shales of these basins is associated...] and slates [Donath, 1961], may be expected to be weak. Finally, Microstructural studies of deformed shales have been restricted by optical resolution, and the role of crystal plasticity in clays may have been overlooked. Results for the brittle and semi...

Ibanez, William Dayan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coalbed methane potential assessed in Forest City basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Forest City basin is a shallow cratonic depression located in northeastern Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, southern Iowa and northern Missouri. Historically, the Forest City basin in northeastern Kansas has been a shallow oil and gas province with minor coal production. The Iowa and Missouri portion has had minor oil production and moderate coal mining. In recent years there has been little coal mining in the Forest City in Iowa and Kansas and only minor production in Missouri. Before 1940, gas was produced from coal beds and shales in the Kansas portion of the Forest City basin. The Cherokee group (Altokan and Desmoinesian age) includes section containing the largest number of actively mined coals and has the greatest available data for coalbed methane evaluation.

Tedesco, S.A. (CST Oil and Gas Corp., Denver, CO (US))

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

,"New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice Sold toResidential ConsumptionNetGas,Coalbed Methane

387

Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Suresh Babu, Senior Program Manager, Biomass Program Development, Brookhaven National Laboratory

388

Electrochemical methane sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

1984-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Pennsylvania Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-MonthCoalbed Methane(Dollars per ThousandShale

390

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas, Coal Bed Methane, Oil Shale, and Oil Sand, StrategicGas, Coal Bed Methane, Oil Shale, and Oil Sand, Strategicof coal bed methane gas, oil shale, oil sands, as well as

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report 2014 Natural Gas

392

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report 2014 Natural Gas

393

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report 2014 Natural Gas

394

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Mitigation Woekshop Nov. 12-13, 2014  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report 2014 Natural Gas

395

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bureau of Mines (USBM) gas combustion retorting process; (2)th or without recycle gas), combustion conditions exist durTvoe Combustion Inert gas Combustion Inert gas Air gas shale

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2010 Geothermal Pressure Reduction Marcellus Shale Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Production Overview (problem and challenges) During the preliminary production stage, Marcellus Shale natural gas wells have a wellhead pressure that exceeds the material limits of typical above understanding of Marcellus Shale natural gas wells and drilling was gathered on-site. Evaluation of (5

Demirel, Melik C.

397

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holes from the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 R. D. Giauque,all of the known oil and gas reserves in the United States.cores from the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 were sectioned

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of predicted and measured methane gas production data within the heterogeneous porous methane hydrate sample.Global Distribution of Methane Hydrate in Ocean Hydrate.

Gupta, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bed Methane, Oil Shale, and Oil Sand, Strategic ResearchBed Methane, Oil Shale, and Oil Sand, Strategic Researchbed methane gas, oil shale, oil sands, as well as methane

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

,"Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet After Lease

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

,"Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet AfterPrice (Dollars

402

,"Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet AfterPrice

403

,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNet Withdrawals

404

,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNet

405

,"Missouri Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNetWellhead Price

406

,"Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,Price (Dollars per

407

,"Montana Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,Price (Dollars

408

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,Price (DollarsPlant

409

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,PriceNet Withdrawals

410

,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,PriceNet

411

,"Montana Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,PriceNetWellhead Price

412

,"Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,PriceNetWellhead

413

Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of a bench-scale, inert-gas, oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heating rates and maximum temperatures on the redistribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium into the shale oil, retort water, and offgas of a 6-kg bench-scale retort. A Green River shale (western) from Colorado and a New Albany shale (eastern) from Kentucky were heated at 1-2{degree}C/min to a maximum temperature of 500{degree}C. The eastern and western shales were also heated at 2{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C and at 10{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C. Real-time monitoring of the offgas stream for mercury was accomplished with Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy or a microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy. Microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy was also used to monitor for arsenic in the offgas during retorting; little or no arsenic was observed in the offgas. Mass balance calculations for arsenic and selenium accounted for essentially 100% of those elements in the spent shale, shale oil, and retort water. The mass balance calculations suggest little offgas component for arsenic and selenium. This agrees with the results of the MPD monitoring of the offgas. These results indicate the potential pathway for mercury to enter the environment is from the offgas. Arsenic and selenium preferential redistribution into the shale oil may present problems during the upgrading process.

Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Fruchter, J.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New Albany Shale A. Kalantari Dahaghi, S. D. Mohaghegh, West and the orientation of horizontal wells on gas production in New Albany Shale. The study was conducted using as fracture bedding of the New Albany Shale are modeled using information found in the literature and outcrops

Mohaghegh, Shahab

415

Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well Logs Haryanto Adiguna, SPE, Anadarko Petroleum, and mineral composition is an integral part of unconventional shale reservoir formation evaluation. Porosity requirement for economically viable flow of gas in very-low permeability shales. Brittle shales are favorable

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

416

TOP-DOWN MODELING; PRACTICAL, FAST TRACK, RESERVOIR SIMULATION & MODELING FOR SHALE FORMATIONS Shahab D. Mohaghegh1 & Grant Bromhal2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development in the oil and gas industry and is being used on some shale formations. BAKKEN SHALE MuchTOP-DOWN MODELING; PRACTICAL, FAST TRACK, RESERVOIR SIMULATION & MODELING FOR SHALE FORMATIONS based on measure data, called Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling for the shale formations

Mohaghegh, Shahab

417

Synthesis gas formation by catalytic oxidation of methane in fluidized bed reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of synthesis gas (CO + H[sub 2]) by the catalytic partial oxidation of CH[sub 4] in air or O[sub 2] in static fluidized beds at atmospheric pressure has been examined over Pt, Rh, and Ni catalysts coated on 100-[mu]m [alpha]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] beads. With CH[sub 4]/air feeds, CO and H[sub 2] selectivities as high as 95% with >90% CH[sub 4] conversion were obtained on Rh and Ni catalysts at contact times of 0.1-0.5 sec. Pt catalysts were found to have significantly lower selectivities for all the three catalysts were improved by heating the reaction mixture above the autothermal reactor temperature and using O[sub 2] instead of air. The selectivities and conversions were fairly constant over the range of contact time s used. Probable reaction pathways for CH[sub 4] oxidation in fluidized beds are discussed. 31 refs., 6 figs.

Bharadwaj, S.S.; Schmidt, L.D. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Natural gas cleanup: Evaluation of a molecular sieve carbon as a pressure swing adsorbent for the separation of methane/nitrogen mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the technical feasibility of using a molecular sieve carbon manufactured by the Takeda Chemical Company of Japan in a pressure owing adsorption cycle for upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Adsorption tests were conducted using this adsorbent in two, four, and five-step adsorption cycles. Separation performance was evaluated in terms of product purity, product recovery, and sorbent productivity for all tests. The tests were conducted in a small, single-column adsorption apparatus that held 120 grams of the adsorbent. Test variables included adsorption pressure, pressurization rate, purge rate and volume, feed rate, and flow direction in the steps from which the product was collected. Sorbent regeneration was accomplished by purging the column with the feed gas mixture for all but one test series where a pure methane purge was used. The ratio between the volumes of the pressurization gas and the purge gas streams was found to be an important factor in determining separation performance. Flow rates in the various cycle steps had no significant effect. Countercurrent flow in the blow-down and purge steps improved separation performance. Separation performance appears to improve with increasing adsorption pressure, but because there are a number of interrelated variables that are also effected by pressure, further testing will be needed to verify this. The work demonstrates that a molecular sieve carbon can be used to separate a mixture of methane and nitrogen when used in a pressure swing cycle with regeneration by purge. Further work is needed to increase product purity and product recovery.

Grimes, R.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature, type of shale and oil content of shale iscontent of the shale, and shale oil content of the rock cantemperatures. Lean and Rich Shale Oil shales vary in their

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substantial progress in developing the technologies required to bring these unconventional reserves to the market. A common misconception is that there are not enough domestic oil and gas reserves to fuel our economy. The United States imports most of the oil...

Agrawal, Archna

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale The University of Oxford http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/people/profiles/academic/joec Key Words Shale gas, hydraulic fracture, groundwater contamination, transport in porous media Overview Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale

Henderson, Gideon

422

Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane Dariusz Strapo´c,1, Maria Mastalerz,2 Katherine, biodegradation Abstract Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal- bearing basins low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older

Macalady, Jenn

424

Nitrogen chemistry during oil shale pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real time evolution of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), two major nitrogen-containing volatiles evolved during oil shale pyrolysis, was measured by means of a mass spectrometer using chemical ionization and by infrared spectroscopy. While the on-line monitoring of NH{sub 3} in oil shale pyrolysis games was possible by both techniques, HCN measurements were only possible by IR. We studied one Green River Formation oil shale and one New Albany oil shale. The ammonia from the Green River oil shale showed one broad NH{sub 3} peak maximizing at a high temperature. For both oil shales, most NH{sub 3} evolves at temperatures above oil-evolving temperature. The important factors governing ammonia salts such as Buddingtonite in Green River oil shales, the distribution of nitrogen functional groups in kerogen, and the retorting conditions. The gas phase reactions, such as NH{sub 3} decomposition and HCN conversion reactions, also play an important role in the distribution of nitrogen volatiles, especially at high temperatures. Although pyrolysis studies of model compounds suggests the primary nitrogen product from kerogen pyrolysis to be HCN at high temperatures, we found only a trace amount of HCN at oil-evolving temperatures and none at high temperatures (T {gt} 600{degree}C). 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Oh, Myongsook S.; Crawford, R.W.; Foster, K.G.; Alcaraz, A.

1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Isothermal kinetics of new Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the development of technologies for the utilization of eastern U.S. oil shales, fluidized bed pyrolysis technology is emerging as one of the most promising in terms of oil yield, operating cost, and capital investment. Bench-scale testing of eastern shales has reached a level where scale-up represents the next logical step in the evolution of this technology. A major consideration in this development and an essential part of any fluidized bed reactor scale-up effort--isothermal kinetics-- has largely been ignored for eastern US shale with the exception of a recent study conducted by Richardson et al. with a Cleveland shale. The method of Richardson et al. was used previously by Wallman et al. with western shale and has been used most recently by Forgac, also with western shale. This method, adopted for the present study, entails injecting a charge of shale into a fluidized bed and monitoring the hydrocarbon products with a flame ionization detector (FID). Advantages of this procedure are that fluidized bed heat-up effects are simulated exactly and real-time kinetics are obtained due to the on-line FID. Other isothermal methods have suffered from heat-up and cool-down effects making it impossible to observe the kinetics at realistic operating temperatures. A major drawback of the FID approach, however, is that no differentiation between oil and gas is possible.

Carter, S.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

In situ retorting or oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved method of in situ retorting of oil shale wherein a cavern of crushed shale is created within an oil shale deposit, preferably by igniting a powerful explosion within the oil shale deposit, thereby creating a localized area or cavern of rubblized oil shale. Combustion gases are injected into the bottom of this cavern and particulate material, preferably a cracking catalyst, is deposited into a void at the top of the cavern and allowed to trickle down and fill the voids in the rubblized cavern. The oil shale is ignited at the bottom of the cavern and a combustion zone proceeds upwardly while the particulate material is caused by gas flow to percolate downwardly. A fluidized bed of particulate material is thereby formed at the combustion zone providing a controlled, evelny advancing combustion zone. This, in turn, efficiently retorts oil shale, provides increased recovery of hydrocarbon while ismultaneously producing a catalytically cracked volatile, high octane gasoline exiting from the top of the retort.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

Eastern shale hydroretorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Bench-Scale Unit (BSU) test program was to determine the effects of major process variables on conversion of organic carbon, yields and properties of oil and gas and consumption of hydrogen for hydroretorting of a specific Indiana New Albany shale. A preliminary error-propagation analysis was performed to identify possible improvements in BSU measurements that could lead to better overall material and elemental balances. A list of additional potential sources of uncertainty (primarily due to the operating procedures used) was compiled. Based on the identification of these possible sources of uncertainty, additional equipment was ordered and installed and existing operating procedures and calculation methods were modified. The result was excellent overall material balance closures (100% +/- 1%).

Roberts, M.J.; Feldkirchner, H.L.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Raw shale dissolution as an aid in determining oil shale mineralogy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an accurate oil shale mineralogy, one can begin to unravel the inorganic and organic aspects of retorting and combustion chemistry. We evaluated three modern elemental analysis procedures (ICP-AES, XRF, and PIXE) with the aim of improving our knowledge of the mineral matrix. A New Albany Shale (Clegg Creek Member) specimen (NA13) and a Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from Anvil Points (AP24) were the two materials analyzed. These were oil shales that we had used in our pilot retort. We set a modest goal: determination of those materials present at greater than a 1% level with a relative accuracy of {plus_minus}10%. Various total dissolution methods and pre-treatement procedures were examined. The routine ICP-AES method that we adopted had precision and accuracy that exceeded our initial goals. Partial dissolution of carbonate minerals in acetic acid was slow but highly selective. The clay mineral content of both shales was deduced from the time dependence of dissolution in 6N HCl. An Al:K ratio of 3 indicated selective HCl solubility of the clay, illite. Our eastern oil shale from Kentucky was remarkably similar in mineral composition to high-grade-zone New Albany Shale samples from Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois that others had subjected to careful mineral analysis. A Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from the Colony Mine had slightly different minor mineral components (relative to AP24) as shown by its gas evolution profile.

Duewer, T.I.; Foster, K.G.; Coburn, T.T.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

Raw shale dissolution as an aid in determining oil shale mineralogy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an accurate oil shale mineralogy, one can begin to unravel the inorganic and organic aspects of retorting and combustion chemistry. We evaluated three modern elemental analysis procedures (ICP-AES, XRF, and PIXE) with the aim of improving our knowledge of the mineral matrix. A New Albany Shale (Clegg Creek Member) specimen (NA13) and a Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from Anvil Points (AP24) were the two materials analyzed. These were oil shales that we had used in our pilot retort. We set a modest goal: determination of those materials present at greater than a 1% level with a relative accuracy of {plus minus}10%. Various total dissolution methods and pre-treatement procedures were examined. The routine ICP-AES method that we adopted had precision and accuracy that exceeded our initial goals. Partial dissolution of carbonate minerals in acetic acid was slow but highly selective. The clay mineral content of both shales was deduced from the time dependence of dissolution in 6N HCl. An Al:K ratio of 3 indicated selective HCl solubility of the clay, illite. Our eastern oil shale from Kentucky was remarkably similar in mineral composition to high-grade-zone New Albany Shale samples from Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois that others had subjected to careful mineral analysis. A Mahogany Zone Green River Formation oil shale from the Colony Mine had slightly different minor mineral components (relative to AP24) as shown by its gas evolution profile.

Duewer, T.I.; Foster, K.G.; Coburn, T.T.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Adsorption Mechanism and Uptake of Methane in Covalent Organic Frameworks: Theory and Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this disadvantage include · storing methane as liquefied natural gas (LNG, at 112 K) or compressed natural gas (CNG

Yaghi, Omar M.

432

,"Lower 48 States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"Shale Proved ReservesCoalbed MethanePlantNetGas,

433

,"Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed Methane Proved ReservesDryPlantGas,

434

,"Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet After

435

,"Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet AfterPricePrice

436

,"Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNetWellhead

437

,"Montana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas,Price (DollarsPlantPrice

438

Clay and SHale--2004 18.1 Clay and Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clay and SHale--2004 18.1 Clay and Shale By Robert l. Virta Domestic survey data and tables were). Common Clay and Shale.--In 2004, 162 companies produced common clay and shale from approximately 459 pits in 41 States and Puerto Rico. In States not reporting production, common clay and shale probably

439

Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting International Gas Hydrate...

440

Applied reaction dynamics: Efficient synthesis gas production via single collision partial oxidation of methane to CO on Rh,,111...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the incident beam's translational energy, and approaches unity for energies greater than 1.3 eV. Comparison for methanol synthesis. One method is the direct partial oxidation of methane, CH4 + 1/2 O2 CO + 2H2. 1 This process has been extensively studied using high surface area supported Rh catalysts in flow reactors

Sibener, Steven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Utilization of Estonian oil shale at power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estonian oil shale belongs to the carbonate class and is characterized as a solid fuel with very high mineral matter content (60--70% in dry mass), moderate moisture content (9--12%) and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg). Estonian oil shale deposits lie in layers interlacing mineral stratas. The main constituent in mineral stratas is limestone. Organic matter is joined with sandy-clay minerals in shale layers. Estonian oil shale at power plants with total capacity of 3060 MW{sub e} is utilized in pulverized form. Oil shale utilization as fuel, with high calcium oxide and alkali metal content, at power plants is connected with intensive fouling, high temperature corrosion and wear of steam boiler`s heat transfer surfaces. Utilization of Estonian oil shale is also associated with ash residue use in national economy and as absorbent for flue gas desulfurization system.

Ots, A. [Tallin Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Department

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coalbed methane production case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Group (Devonian Black Shale) in Illinois to evaluate its characteristics as a source of hydrocarbons. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a detailed analysis of the lithology, stratigraphy, and structure of the New Albany Group in Illinois to determine those characteristics of lithology, thickness, regional distribution, vertical and lateral variability, and deformation that are most relevant to the occurrence of hydrocarbons. The mineralogic and petrographic properties of the New Albany Shale in Illinois are characterized. This includes the quantitative and qualitative characterization, by optical and x-ray techniques, of the inorganic mineral constituents, the dispersed organic matter, and the fabric of the shale. Not less than 49 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in 300 to 500 shale samples, which are representative cross sections of the cores taken. Organic and mineral carbon are included; total hydrogen; total sulfur and when that exceeds 0.5%, pyritic and sulfate sulfur. Also, other elements observed during normal routine analysis are reported. The character of off-gases from approximately 10-foot intervals in cores collected in the Illinois Basin is determined. In addition, the relative distribution of hydrocarbons is determined in ten specially prepared core samples, which are the same as those in previous unit. The carbon isotopic composition of methane in off-gases is determined from core samples whenever sufficient methane can be collected. This data is compared to other pertinent data such as gas composition and vitrinite reflectance for the purpose of making interpretations as to the origin and maturity of the gas. Laboratory experiments are performed to study the relative effects and significance of chemical and isotopic fractionation that occurs as gas is released from core samples. Data accumulated can be evaluated to gain a better understanding of the origin, migration, and location of natural gas associated with the shales.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane, ethylene, methane, and two isotopically substituted methanes, CH2D2 and CD4, at a momentum constituent. For example, Fig. 1 of Ref. 2 shows that, for gaseous methane, above a certain momentum transfer

Hitchcock, Adam P.

445

Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

Mohaghegh, Shahab

447

RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery and Salt Production - Jim Silva, GE Oil & Gas 9:30 a.m. Appalachian Shale and Barnett Area Water Shale Coalition 8:30 a.m. Meeting Overview & Agenda - Kent Perry, Vice President, Onshore Programs Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale Production - Yongchun Tang, PEER Institute Shale Gas

Yener, Aylin

448

OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper history, current status and forecast of Chinese oil shale indus-try, as well as the characteristics of some typical Chinese oil shales are given.

J. Qian; J. Wang; S. Li

449

Oil shale as an energy source in Israel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reserves, characteristics, energetics, chemistry, and technology of Israeli oil shales are described. Oil shale is the only source of energy and the only organic natural resource in Israel. Its reserves of about 12 billion tons will be enough to meet Israel`s requirements for about 80 years. The heating value of the oil shale is 1,150 kcal/kg, oil yield is 6%, and sulfur content of the oil is 5--7%. A method of oil shale processing, providing exhaustive utilization of its energy and chemical potential, developed in the Technion, is described. The principal feature of the method is a two-stage pyrolysis of the oil shale. As a result, gas and aromatic liquids are obtained. The gas may be used for energy production in a high-efficiency power unit, or as a source for chemical synthesis. The liquid products can be an excellent source for production of chemicals.

Fainberg, V.; Hetsroni, G. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev.TechDepartment ofChallengesWater Key

451

Production patterns in Eagle Ford Shale (Decline Curve Analysis) Muoz Torres, J.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Eagle Ford Shale (EFS) play has had a remarkable development in natural gas and oil production. EFSEG39 Production patterns in Eagle Ford Shale (Decline Curve Analysis) Muñoz Torres, J.1 javier (bcf) of natural gas and 8,049 thousand barrels of oil. Up to 2020, it is expected that natural gas

Texas at Austin, University of

452

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-4-2014_CO2 Storage and Enhanced Gas...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, Feb 7-9, 2011; SPE, Gaffney, Cline & Associates: Bangkok, Thailand, 2011. Ghaith, A.; Chen, W.; Ortoleva, P. Oscillatory methane release from shale...

453

Comparison of Emperical Decline Curve Analysis for Shale Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compares four recently developed decline curve methods and the traditional Arps or Fetkovich approach. The four methods which are empirically formulated for shale and tight gas wells are: 1. Power Law Exponential Decline (PLE). 2...

Kanfar, Mohammed Sami

2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

454

Water mist injection in oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand

456

The Shale Gas Matt Ridley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental impacts ................................................................19 Fracking fluid

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

457

CLAY AND SHALE--2001 18.1 CLAY AND SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operated approximately 633 clay and shale pits or quarries. The largest 20 companies, many with multiple

458

CLAY AND SHALE--2002 18.1 CLAY AND SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLAY AND SHALE--2002 18.1 CLAY AND SHALE By Robert L. Virta Domestic survey data and tables were clay, bentonite, common clay and shale, fire clay, fuller's earth, and kaolin. Ball clays consist of feldspars, biotite, and quartz. Common clay and shale contain illite and chlorite as major components. Fire

459

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT & PRODUCTION TESTING FOR COAL BED METHANE IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky have completed the initial geologic assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. Cumulative thickness maps have been generated and target areas for drilling have been selected. The first well in the Illinois area of the Illinois Basin coal bed methane project was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. This well was cored in the major coal interval from the Danville to the Davis Coals and provided a broad spectrum of samples for further analyses. Sixteen coal samples and three black shale samples were taken from these cores for canister desorption tests and were the subject of analyses that were completed over the following months, including desorbed gas volume, gas chemical and isotope composition, coal proximate, calorific content and sulfur analyses. Drilling programs in Indiana and Kentucky are expected to begin shortly.

Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Organic petrography of coals from a coalbed methane test well, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Louisiana Geological Survey, and EnerVest Management Partners Ltd. participated in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to drill and core the Fairbanks Real Estate No. 359 (FRE No. 359) coalbed methane test well in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. This effort was in support of ongoing U.S. Geological Survey investigations into the coal gas potential of the Gulf Coastal Plain. To determine possible relationships between coalbed gas content and coal composition, maceral modes were determined for 17 subsurface coal and carbonaceous shale samples cored and desorbed from the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group. Similar determinations of maceral mode were made on cuttings collected from 5 non-cored coaly intervals in the overlying Eocene Sparta Sand. 22 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Paul C. Hackley; Peter D. Warwick [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Investing in Our Energy Future August 31, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed...

463

Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissociation heat of mixed-gas hydrate composed of methaneInternational Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), 2008,and specific heats of gas hydrates under submarine and

Kwon, T.H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Oil shale research in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Oil shale derived pollutant control materials and methods and apparatuses for producing and utilizing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Pollution control substances may be formed from the combustion of oil shale, which may produce a kerogen-based pyrolysis gas and shale sorbent, each of which may be used to reduce, absorb, or adsorb pollutants in pollution producing combustion processes, pyrolysis processes, or other reaction processes. Pyrolysis gases produced during the combustion or gasification of oil shale may also be used as a combustion gas or may be processed or otherwise refined to produce synthetic gases and fuels.

Boardman, Richard D.; Carrington, Robert A.

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

467

Characterization of interim reference shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as interim reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Anvil Points mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, kerogen concentrates, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. The measured properties of the interim reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western interim reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern interim reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the interim reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. The experimental determination of many of the shale oil properties was beyond the scope of this study. Therefore, direct comparison between calculated and measured values of many properties could not be made. However, molecular weights of the shale oils were measured. In this case, there was poor agreement between measured molecular weights and those calculated from API and other published correlations. 23 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Miknis, F.P.; Sullivan, S.; Mason, G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

Utah, University of

469

Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

covers coal bed methane, tight gas reservoirs, shale gas,coal bed methane (CBM). Tight gas refers to gas that is dispersed in sand or silt reservoirs

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Microporomechanical modeling of shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale, a common type of sedimentary rock of significance to petroleum and reservoir engineering, has recently emerged as a crucial component in the design of sustainable carbon and nuclear waste storage solutions and as a ...

Ortega, J. Alberto (Jose Alberta Ortega Andrade)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

DOE Oil Shale Reference Sample Bank. Quarterly reports, October-December 1985; January-March 1986. [Samples from eastern and western USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two FY-86 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The western shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the second quarter of FY 86. Partial distributions of both shales have been made to DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the reference shale locales, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in the following sections of this report. 26 tabs.

Owen, L.B.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Improved Detection of Bed Boundaries for Petrophysical Evaluation with Well Logs: Applications to Carbonate and Organic-Shale Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Applications to Carbonate and Organic-Shale Formations Zoya Heidari, SPE, Texas A&M University and Carlos of well logs acquired in organic shales and carbonates is challenging because of the presence of thin beds acquired in thinly bedded carbonates and in the Haynesville shale-gas formation. Estimates of petrophysical

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

476

Beneficiation and hydroretorting of low grade oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to oil recovery from low grade oil shales has been developed jointly by the Mineral Resources Institute (MRI) of The University of Alabama and the HYCRUDE Corporation. The approach is based on the HYTORT process, which utilized hydrogen gas during the retorting process to enhance oil yields from many types of oil shales. The performance of the HYTORT process is further improved by combining it with MRI's froth flotation process. Taking advantage of differences in the surface properties of the kerogen and the inorganic mineral constituents of the oil shales, the MRI process can reject up to three quarters by weight of relatively kerogen-free inorganic fractions of the oil shale before HYTORT processing. The HYTORT and MRI processes are discussed. Results of tests by each process on oil shales of low to moderate inherent kerogen content are presented. Also discussed are the results of the combined processes on an Indiana New Albany oil shale. By combining the two processes, the raw shale which yielded 12 gallons of oil per ton by Fischer Assay was upgraded by flotation to a product yielding 27 gallons of Fischer Assay oil per ton. HYTORT processing of the beneficiated product recovered 54 gallons of oil per ton, an improvement in oil yield by a factor of 4.5 over the raw shale Fischer Assay.

Tippin, R.B.; Hanna, J.; Janka, J.C.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Reactive gases evolved during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer modeling of oil shale pyrolysis is an important part of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Oil Shale Program. Models containing detailed chemistry have been derived from an investigation of Colorado oil shale. We are currently attempting to use models to treat more completely reactions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in the retort to better understand emissions. Batch retorting work on Devonian oil shale is proving particularly useful for this study of nitrogen/sulfur chemistry. Improved analytical methods have been developed to quantitatively determine reactive volatiles at the parts-per-million level. For example, the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS) is used in the chemical ionization (CI) mode to provide real-time analytical data on ammonia evolution as the shale is pyrolyzed. A heated transfer line and inlet ensure rapid and complete introduction of ammonia to the instrument by preventing water condensation. Ammonia and water release data suitable for calculating kinetic parameters have been obtained from a New Albany Shale sample. An MS/MS technique with the TQMS in the electron ionization (EI) mode allows hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and certain trace organic sulfur compounds to be monitored during oil shale pyrolysis. Sensitivity and selectivity for these compounds have been increased by applying artificial intelligence techniques to tuning of the spectrometer. Gas evolution profiles (100 to 900/sup 0/C) are reported for hydrogen sulfide, water, ammonia, and trace sulfur species formed during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale. Implications for retorting chemistry are discussed. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Gregg, H.R.; Oh, M.S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

DOE oil shale reference sample bank: Quarterly report, July-September 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Oil Shale Program was restructured in FY84 to implement a 5-year period of basic and applied research in the study of the phenomena involved in oil shale pyrolysis/retorting. The program calls for the study of two reference shales per year for a period of 5 years. Consequently, the program calls for the identification, acquisition, processing, characterization, storage, disbursement, and record keeping for ten reference shales in a period of 5 years. Two FY86 and one FY87 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The FY86 Western Shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the first quarter of FY86. The FY87 Western Shale was obtained from the Tipton Member of the Green River Formation near Rock Springs, Wyoming during the fourth quarter of FY87. Partial distributions of the FY86 shale have been made to DOE and non-DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the FY87 Western reference shale locale, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in this report. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Owen, L.B.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Department of Earth Sciences www.rhul.ac.uk/earthsciences Page 1 of 2 New methods for maximising shale permeability and minimising risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shale permeability and minimising risk during hydraulic fracturing Supervisor(s): Agust Gudmundsson-fracture mechanics, rock physics, and sedimentology there are three aspects of hydraulic fracturing of gas shales. More specifically, hydraulic fracturing of gas shales requires that fluid-driven fractures propagate

Sheldon, Nathan D.

480

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Ocean Field Test of Methane Hydrate Formation from aW.J. , and Mason, D.H. , Methane Hydrate Formation inNatural and Laboratory--Formed Methane Gas Hydrate. American

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane gas shales" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Fluidized-bed gasification of an eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current conceptual HYTORT process design for the hydroretorting of oil shales employs moving-bed retorts that utilize shale particles larger than 3 mm. Work at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is in progress to investigate the potential of high-temperature (1100 to 1300 K) fluidized-bed gasification of shale fines (<3 mm size) using steam and oxygen as a technique for more complete utilization of the resource. Synthesis gas produced from fines gasification can be used for making some of the hydrogen needed in the HYTORT process. After completing laboratory-scale batch and continuous gasification tests with several Eastern oil shales, two tests with Indiana New Albany shale were conducted in a 0.2 m diameter fluidized-bed gasification process development unit (PDU). A conceptual gasifier design for 95% carbon conversion was completed. Gasification of 20% of the mined shale can produce the hydrogen required by the HYTORT reactor to retort 80% of the remaining shale. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Results of rapid pyrolysis experiments using eastern US oil shale in the Livermore solid-recycle retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has operated a 2-ton/day pilot-scale solid-recycle system for the study of oil shale retorting under rapid-pyrolysis conditions. Results of processing eastern US New Albany oil shale are presented and compared with results obtained previously using two western US Green River oil shales. The retort consists of a cascading mixer and plug-flow soak-tank pyrolyzer with an air lift pipe and cascading-bed combustor. In the solid-recycle system, spent shale leaving the pyrolyzer is burned in the lift and cascading-bed combustor and then returned to the retort to heat the incoming raw shale. In laboratory experiments, when raw shale is rapidly heated in a fluidized bed of sand, oil yields above those of Fischer assay are obtained. In the present experiments, hot-recycled shale is used as the heat-carrying media, resulting in oil yields comparable to those obtained from Fischer assay. The distribution and composition of solid, oil, and gas throughout the recycle system is reported for the three shales studied. The distribution of sulfur and nitrogen during processing Green River oil shale has been the focus of environmental studies at LLNL. Eastern oil shale contains 5 to 10 times more sulfur and approximately the same amount of nitrogen as western oil shale. The high sulfur content coupled with low carbonate mineral concentrations results in significant sulfur releases in the combustor-gas, compared with trace releases for western shale. Iron oxide in the recycled solid was found to effectively scrub H/sub 2/S from the pyrolysis gas for both western and eastern shales. From 0.4 to 3% of the raw shale nitrogen is released as NO/sub x/ in the combustor-gas for western shale. Releases for New Albany shale are one-tenth these levels. 8 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Cena, R.J.; Taylor, R.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Preparation of environmental analyses for synfuel and unconventional gas technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Government agencies that offer financial incentives to stimulate the commercialization of synfuel and unconventional gas technologies usually require an analysis of environmental impacts resulting from proposed projects. This report reviews potentially significant environmental issues associated with a selection of these technologies and presents guidance for developing information and preparing analyses to address these issues. The technologies considered are western oil shale, tar sand, coal liquefaction and gasification, peat, unconventional gas (western tight gas sands, eastern Devonian gas shales, methane from coal seams, and methane from geopressured aquifers), and fuel ethanol. Potentially significant issues are discussed under the general categories of land use, air quality, water use, water quality, biota, solid waste disposal, socioeconomics, and health and safety. The guidance provided in this report can be applied to preparation and/or review of proposals, environmental reports, environmental assessments, environmental impact statements, and other types of environmental analyses. The amount of detail required for any issue discussed must, by necessity, be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Reed, R.M. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

Sundaram, Muthu S. (Shoreham, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

486

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S. DepartmentCommitment for aIn this update, readTo beSavings

487

January 20, 2011 Marcellus Shale 101  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Will oil shale be viable as well? Oil shale will not be economically viable anytime in the near future

Hardy, Christopher R.

488

Carcinogenicity Studies of Estonian Oil Shale Soots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determine the carcinogenicity of Estonian oil shale soot as well as the soot from oil shale fuel oil. All

A. Vosamae

489

Water Use in the Eagle Ford Shale: An Economic and Policy Analysis of Water Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inaccessible shale reserves to produce abundant amounts of oil and gas. The oil and gas proliferation in the Eagle Ford has seen exponential growth, and production is not anticipated to decline until 2025. In addition, a typical HF well in the Eagle Ford... Figures Figure 1: Map of the Eagle Ford Shale Oil, Gas and Condensate Play .......................................................... 4 Figure 2: Production Growth within the Eagle Ford Shale...

Arnett, Benton; Healy, Kevin; Jiang, Zhongnan; LeClere, David; McLaughlin, Leslie; Roberts, Joey; Steadman, Maxwell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Planetary and Space Science 54 (2006) 11771187 Titan's methane cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Methane is key to sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen atmosphere. However, methane is destroyed and the pressure induced opacity in the infrared, particularly by CH4­N2 and H2­N2 collisions in the troposphere), whose reaction with carbon grains or carbon dioxide in the crustal pores produces methane gas

Atreya, Sushil

491

Methane-assisted combustion synthesis of nanocomposite tin dioxide materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane-assisted combustion synthesis of nanocomposite tin dioxide materials S.D. Bakrania *, C and flow conditions using methane as a supplemental fuel. The experiments were carried out at atmospheric-phase precursor for metal additives. In the methane-assisted (MA) system, the inert carrier gas was replaced

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

492

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research A robotic sub samples the methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute A robotic sub samples the methane content of the seafloor.263 News Seafloor probe taps methane reservoir Greenhouse gas found in high abundance but risk of mass release uncertain. Nicola Jones A robotic submarine has been used to measure the amount of methane lurking

Tian, Weidong

493

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

MĂĽhlemann, Oliver

494

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

496

FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

government gives priority to the development of China's shale gas sector to help fight air pollution and reduce reliance on natural gas imports; and The U.S. government supports...