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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Methane Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent; Estimated 2003 ... for about 8.7 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions when weighted by methanes global warming potential factor.

2

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

3

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

4

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

5

TRENDS: METHANE EMISSIONS - INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Wm-2), almost 20% is attributable to methane (CH4), according to the 1995 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 1995). Since the mid-1700s, the atmospheric concentration of methane has increased by about 145% (IPCC 1995). Thus, an understanding of the various sources of methane is important. Atmospheric methane is produced both from natural sources (e.g., wetlands) and from human activities (see global methane cycle, from Professor W.S. Reeburgh at the University of California Irvine). Total sources of methane to the atmosphere for the period 1980-1990 were about 535 (range of 410-660) Tg (1 Teragram = 1 million metric tons) CH4 per year, of which 160 (110-210) Tg CH4/yr were from natural sources and 375 (300-450) Tg CH4/yr

6

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California Title Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in...

7

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Methane emissions from natural wetlands  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Methane Emissions from Rice Fields - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Methane (Ch4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning.

Khalil, M. Aslam; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

Seasonal Production and Emission of Methane from Rice Fields, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

B 139 - Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning. The global emissions from these sources are still not well known. In the middle 1980s there were few available data on methane emissions from rice fields leading to estimates of a global source between 100-280 Tg/yr. Extensive worldwide research during the last decade has shown that the global emissions from rice fields are more likely to be in the range of 30-80Tg/yr. While this work has led to a substantial reduction in the estimated emissions, the uncertainty is still quite large, and seriously affects our ability to include methane in integrated assessments for future climate change and environmental management.China dominated estimates of methane emissions from rice fields because it was, and is, the largest producer of rice, and major increases in rice production had taken place in the country over the last several decades. This report summarizes the work in Sichuan Province, China, in each of the following areas: the design of the experiment; the main results on methane emissions from rice fields, delineating the factors controlling emissions; production of methane in the soil; a survey of water management practices in sample of counties in Sichuan province; and results of ambient measurements including data from the background continental site. B139

Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

SciTech Connect

Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

14

Formation and emission of methane in rice soils: Experimental determination and modeling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rice paddy soils have been identified as a major source of methane emissions contributing to the observed atmospheric increase in methane. This points to the need for a method of quantifying and predicting methane emissions for the widely varying conditions used in rice agriculture throughout the world. In the present work, a mathematical model for estimating the emission of methane from rice paddy soils is developed and refined. Kinetic parameters for methanogenesis in a Louisiana rice soil are determined from laboratory data on methane production from acetic acid substrate. Use of a stirred reactor allows simultaneous measurement of acetate consumption and methane production while minimizing mass transfer limitations. An existing model for rice plant growth is utilized to provide data on the availability of root exudates as a carbon source for the methanogens. The final methane model includes the kinetic parameters, plant data, and estimated transport parameters. With adjustments in these parameters, it provides an acceptable match to field data.

Law, V.J.; Bhattacharya, S.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

16

The Extraction of the Thermal Emission Band of Methane from the Longwave Spectrum of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal emission band at 1306 cm?1 of atmospheric methane, an important greenhouse gas, is presented for a cold, clear day in January 1994. A spectrum of the nonmethane emission features has been simulated using the FASCD3P radiation code and ...

W. F. J. Evans; E. Puckrin

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER SOURCES An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM of natural gas, which is mostly CH4, occurs through natural gas production, oil production, and coal mining

Delucchi, Mark

18

Diel Variation of Methane Emission from a Subtropical Paddy Field of South China in the Second Crop Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rice paddy has been identified as one of the important sources of the atmospheric methane and has large variability in emission estimates. This study was conducted to evaluate CH4 emission from a subtropical paddy field of south China with closed static ... Keywords: Diel variation, paddy field, methane, greenhouse gas

Hui Liu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Emission Factors from Brazilian Deforestation Fires Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of emission factors from 19 deforestation fires in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil. LBA-ECO TG-10 Fire Emission Factors in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil: 2004...

20

Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landfills, we developed reference projections of waste generation, recycling and landfill-gas captureSardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium 1 Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

22

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-01-0474 -01-0474 The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions Thomas Wallner and Henry K. Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert W. Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham Copyright © 2007 SAE International ABSTRACT Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising future energy carriers and transportation fuels. Because of the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations, widespread introduction of vehicles powered by pure hydrogen is not likely in the near future. Blending hydrogen with methane could be one solution. Such blends take advantage of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and, at the same time, reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. In this paper, the authors analyze the combustion properties of hydrogen/methane

24

OpenEI - electricity emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4650 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

25

OpenEI - hourly emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4640 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

26

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

27

UNDERSTANDING METHANE EMISSIONS SOURCES AND VIABLE MITIGATION MEASURES IN THE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS: RUSSIAN AND U.S. EXPERIENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article will compare the natural gas transmission systems in the U.S. and Russia and review experience with methane mitigation technologies in the two countries. Russia and the United States (U.S.) are the world's largest consumers and producers of natural gas, and consequently, have some of the largest natural gas infrastructure. This paper compares the natural gas transmission systems in Russia and the U.S., their methane emissions and experiences in implementing methane mitigation technologies. Given the scale of the two systems, many international oil and natural gas companies have expressed interest in better understanding the methane emission volumes and trends as well as the methane mitigation options. This paper compares the two transmission systems and documents experiences in Russia and the U.S. in implementing technologies and programs for methane mitigation. The systems are inherently different. For instance, while the U.S. natural gas transmission system is represented by many companies, which operate pipelines with various characteristics, in Russia predominately one company, Gazprom, operates the gas transmission system. However, companies in both countries found that reducing methane emissions can be feasible and profitable. Examples of technologies in use include replacing wet seals with dry seals, implementing Directed Inspection and Maintenance (DI&M) programs, performing pipeline pump-down, applying composite wrap for non-leaking pipeline defects and installing low-bleed pneumatics. The research methodology for this paper involved a review of information on methane emissions trends and mitigation measures, analytical and statistical data collection; accumulation and analysis of operational data on compressor seals and other emission sources; and analysis of technologies used in both countries to mitigate methane emissions in the transmission sector. Operators of natural gas transmission systems have many options to reduce natural gas losses. Depending on the value of gas, simple, low-cost measures, such as adjusting leaking equipment components, or larger-scale measures, such as installing dry seals on compressors, can be applied.

Ishkov, A.; Akopova, Gretta; Evans, Meredydd; Yulkin, Grigory; Roshchanka, Volha; Waltzer, Suzie; Romanov, K.; Picard, David; Stepanenko, O.; Neretin, D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reduction of Non-CO2 Gas Emissions Through The In Situ Bioconversion of Methane  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this research were to seek previously unidentified anaerobic methanotrophs and other microorganisms to be collected from methane seeps associated with coal outcrops. Subsurface application of these microbes into anaerobic environments has the potential to reduce methane seepage along coal outcrop belts and in coal mines, thereby preventing hazardous explosions. Depending upon the types and characteristics of the methanotrophs identified, it may be possible to apply the microbes to other sources of methane emissions, which include landfills, rice cultivation, and industrial sources where methane can accumulate under buildings. Finally, the microbes collected and identified during this research also had the potential for useful applications in the chemical industry, as well as in a variety of microbial processes. Sample collection focused on the South Fork of Texas Creek located approximately 15 miles east of Durango, Colorado. The creek is located near the subsurface contact between the coal-bearing Fruitland Formation and the underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The methane seeps occur within the creek and in areas adjacent to the creek where faulting may allow fluids and gases to migrate to the surface. These seeps appear to have been there prior to coalbed methane development as extensive microbial soils have developed. Our investigations screened more than 500 enrichments but were unable to convince us that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was occurring and that anaerobic methanotrophs may not have been present in the samples collected. In all cases, visual and microscopic observations noted that the early stage enrichments contained viable microbial cells. However, as the levels of the readily substrates that were present in the environmental samples were progressively lowered through serial transfers, the numbers of cells in the enrichments sharply dropped and were eliminated. While the results were disappointing we acknowledge that anaerobic methane oxidizing (AOM) microorganisms are predominantly found in marine habitats and grow poorly under most laboratory conditions. One path for future research would be to use a small rotary rig to collect samples from deeper soil horizons, possibly adjacent to the coal-bearing horizons that may be more anaerobic.

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

31

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

33

Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called 'biocovers') to enhance biological oxidation of CH{sub 4}. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH{sub 4} oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m{sup 2} were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH{sub 4} load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH{sub 4} was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH{sub 4} emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH{sub 4} emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH{sub 4} mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers.

Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Fredenslund, Anders M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Chanton, Jeffrey, E-mail: jchanton@fsu.edu [Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, 117 N. Woodward Avenue, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fl 32306-4320 (United States); Pedersen, Gitte Bukh, E-mail: gbp@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, Peter, E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region  

SciTech Connect

The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units ...

36

Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Precise and reliable measurements of emissions from landfills are needed. > A tracer technique involving simultaneous release of two tracers was proven successful. > Measurements to be performed at times with low changing trends in barometric pressure. - Abstract: A double tracer technique was used successfully to quantify whole-site methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions from Fakse Landfill. Emissions from different sections of the landfill were quantified by using two different tracers. A scaled-down version of the tracer technique measuring close-by to localized sources having limited areal extent was also used to quantify emissions from on-site sources at the landfill facility, including a composting area and a sewage sludge storage pit. Three field campaigns were performed. At all three field campaigns an overall leak search showed that the CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were localized to the leachate collection wells and slope areas. The average CH{sub 4} emissions from the old landfill section were quantified to be 32.6 {+-} 7.4 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the source at the new section was quantified to be 10.3 {+-} 5.3 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}. The CH{sub 4} emission from the compost area was 0.5 {+-} 0.25 kg CH{sub 4} h{sup -1}, whereas the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux was quantified to be in the order of 332 {+-} 166 kg CO{sub 2} h{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.03 kg N{sub 2}O h{sup -1}, respectively. The sludge pit located west of the compost material was quantified to have an emission of 2.4 {+-} 0.63 kg h{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, and 0.03 {+-} 0.01 kg h{sup -1} N{sub 2}O.

Scheutz, C., E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Samuelsson, J., E-mail: jerker.samuelsson@fluxsense.se [Chalmers University of Technology/FluxSense AB, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Fredenslund, A.M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, P., E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

GRI methane chemistry program review meeting  

SciTech Connect

Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The landfill methane balance: Model and practical applications  

SciTech Connect

A rational mass-balance framework is described for improved quantification of landfill methane processes at a given site. The methane balance model examines the partitioning of methane generated into methane recovered (via extraction systems), methane emitted, methane oxidized, methane migrated, and methane storage. This model encourages use of field-based data to better quantify rates of methane recovery and emissions.

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Emission Factors Handbook: Guidelines for Estimating Trace Substance Emissions from Fossil Fuel Steam Electric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Emission Factors Handbook" provides a tool for estimating trace substances emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants. The suggested emission factors are based on EPRI and Department of Energy (DOE) field measurements conducted at over 50 power plants using generally consistent sampling and analytical protocols. This information will help utility personnel estimate air toxic emissions for permitting purposes.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

53

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States

Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual...

54

Assessment of emissions prediction capability of RANS based PDF models for lean premixed combustion of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high computational cost of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) makes Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods the current standard for turbulent combustion modeling. Empirical models for turbulence, turbulence-combustion interaction and chemical kinetics are, however, a major source of uncertainty in RANS based combustion simulation. While Probability Density Function (PDF) based models overcome some of these issues, most commercial codes do not take full advantage of these models. In this study, lean premixed combustion of methane in a bluff-body combustor is simulated using two different reduced chemical mechanisms (ARM9 and ARM19) combined with the composition PDF transport combustion model in the commercial code FLUENT. Two different turbulence models, namely the RNG k-? model and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are used and the results of the simulations are compared to experimental data. For all the models tested, the prediction of temperature and major species (CH4, O2, CO2, CO, H2, and H2O) was good when compared to experiments. While all of the model predictions for the intermediate species OH showed an order magnitude difference (compared to the experiments) close to the bluff body surface; downstream axial locations showed good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the experiments. In a trend similar to the previous study (Nanduri et al., 2007) using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) model, predicted values for NO emission radial profiles showed an average difference of 5 ppm when compared to experimental values. The results were also compared to the results of a velocity-composition joint PDF model developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. In terms of emissions (NO and CO) predictions the relatively expensive composition PDF model in FLUENT did not give significant improvement when compared to the computationally cheaper EDC models. However, the velocity-composition joint PFD model used by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh did show significant improvement over EDC models in the prediction of NO. Both of the PDF models resulted in better qualitative and quantitative agreement in H2 prediction, thus showing the promise of PDF based models in simulating lean premixed combustion of fuel blends like hydrogen enriched natural gas.

Parsons, D.R.; Nanduri, J.R.; Celik, Ismail; Strakey, P.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Russia Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia[1] References ↑ "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_of_the_Electricity_Carbon_Emission_Factors_for_Russia&oldid=383164" Category: Programs What links here Related changes Special pages

56

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

57

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003 Title Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel...

58

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ... ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHENOL; PLASTICIZERS; ... of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl . ...

59

Indirect global warming effects of ozone and stratospheric water vapor induced by surface methane emission  

SciTech Connect

Methane has indirect effects on climate due to chemical interactions as well as direct radiative forcing effects as a greenhouse gas. We have calculated the indirect, time-varying tropospheric radiative forcing and GWP of O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O due to an impulse of CH{sub 4}. This impulse, applied to the lowest layer of the atmosphere, is the increase of the atmospheric mass of CH{sub 4} resulting from a 25 percent steady state increase in the current emissions as a function of latitude. The direct CH{sub 4} radiative forcing and GWP are also calculated. The LLNL 2-D radiative-chemistry-transport model is used to evaluate the resulting changes in the O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} atmospheric profiles as a function of time. A correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model is used to calculate the radiative forcing at the tropopause of the globally-averaged atmosphere profiles. The O{sub 3} indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}27 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}4 after 500 years, agreeing with the previous estimates to within about 10 percent. The H{sub 2}O indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}2 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}0.3 after 500 years, and are in close agreement with other estimates. The CH{sub 4} GWPs vary from {approximately}53 at 20 yrs to {approximately}7 at 500 yrs. The 20 year CH{sub 4} GWP is {approximately}20% larger than previous estimates of the direct CH{sub 4} GWP due to a CH{sub 4} response time ({approximately}17 yrs) that is much longer than the overall lifetime (10 yrs). The increased CH{sub 4} response time results from changes in the OH abundances caused by the CH{sub 4} impulse. The CH{sub 4} radiative forcing results are consistent with IPCC values. Estimates are made of latitude effects in the radiative forcing calculations, and UV effects on the O{sub 3} radiative forcing calculations (10%).

Wuebbles, D.J.; Grossman, A.S.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Jain, A.; Grant, K.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Methane de-NOx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

METHANE de-NOx® METHANE de-NOx® The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is teaming with the All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute and DB Riley to develop a pulverized-coal (PC)-combustion system that is an extension of IGT's METHANE de-NOx® technology. The technology is composed of a novel PC burner design using natural gas fired coal preheating developed and demonstrated in Russia, LNBs with internal combustion staging, and additional natural gas injection with overfire air. The coal is preheated at elevated temperatures (up to 1500oF) in oxygen deficient conditions prior to combustion. Coal preheat releases fuel-bound nitrogen together with volatiles present in the coal. These conditions promote the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen rather than to NOx.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Emission Factors For Formaldehyde - Home | Energy Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3.

62

Factors facilitating or limiting the use of AVO for coal-bed methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are similarities and differences in employing amplitude variation with offset (AVO) to explore for gas-sand reservoirs, as opposed to coal-bed methane (CBM) reservoirs. The main similarity is that large Poisson's ratio contrasts, resulting in AVO gradient anomalies, are expected for both kinds of reservoirs. The main difference is that cleating and fracturing raise the Poisson's ratio of a coal seam as it improves its reservoir potential for CBM, while gas always lowers the Poisson's ratio of a sandstone reservoir. The top of gas sands usually has a negative AVO gradient, leading to a class one, two, or three anomaly depending on the impedance contrast with the overlying caprock. On the other hand, the top of a CBM reservoir has a positive AVO gradient, leading to a class four anomaly. Three environmental factors may limit the usage of AVO for CBM reservoirs: the smaller contrast in Poisson's ratio between a CBM reservoir and its surrounding rock, variations in the caprock of a specific CBM reservoir, and the fact that CBM is not always free to collect at structurally high points in the reservoir. However, other factors work in favor of using AVO. The strikingly high reflection amplitude of coal improves signal/noise ratio and hence the reliability of AVO measurements. The relatively simple characteristics of AVO anomalies make them easy to interpret. Because faults are known to improve the quality of CBM reservoirs, faults accompanied by AVO anomalies would be especially convincing. A 3D-AVO example offered in this paper shows that AVO might be helpful to delineate methane-rich sweet spots within coal seams.

Peng, S.P.; Chen, H.J.; Yang, R.Z.; Gao, Y.F.; Chen, X.P. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000 Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Executive Summary on the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

65

Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earths atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Title Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Melissa M. Lunden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel-fueled trucks driving through a 1 km-long California highway tunnel in August 2006. Emission factors were based on concurrent increases in BC, PN, and COB2B concentrations (measured at 1 Hz) that corresponded to the passage of individual HD trucks. The distributions of BC and PN emission factors from individual HD trucks are skewed, meaning that a large fraction of pollution comes from a small fraction of the in-use vehicle fleet. The highest-emitting 10% of trucks were

68

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands in the United States: Satellite-Derived Estimation Based on Ecosystem Carbon Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wetlands are an important natural source of methane to the atmosphere. The amounts of methane emitted from inundated ecosystems in the United States can vary greatly from area to area. Seasonal temperature, water table dynamics, and carbon ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Seth Hiatt; Matthew Fladeland; Vanessa Genovese; Peggy Gross

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Title Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Klepeis, Neil E., Michael G. Apte, Lara A. Gundel, Richard G. Sextro, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Aerosol Science & Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 780-790 Date Published October 2003 Abstract Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides -- in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors -- estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange rate 20m^3 chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained by integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes

71

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

72

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ukraine Ukraine Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Ukraine UN Region Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine[1] "The study project "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine" was assigned by the European Bank for Development and Reconstruction (EBRD) to the consultant Lahmeyer International with Perspective as subcontractor on 16 July 2009. It is a baseline study with the overall goal to calculate reliable carbon

73

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations, ammonia (NH?) concentrations, and ventilation rates were measured in four commercial, tunnel ventilated broiler houses in June through December of 2000 in Brazos County, Texas. Particle size distributions were developed from TSP samplers collected and used to determine the mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples collected. Concentrations of TSP and ammonia measured were multiplied by the ventilation rates measured to obtain emission factors for PM?? and ammonia from tunnel ventilated commercial broiler houses. TSP and NH? concentrations ranged from 7,387 to 11,387 []g/m and 2.02 to 45 ppm, respectively. Ammonia concentration exhibited a correlation with the age of the birds. Mass median diameters (MMD) found using particle size analysis with a Coulter Counter Multisizer were between 24.0 and 26.7 mm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. MMD increased with bird age. The mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples was between 2.72% and 8.40% with a mean of 5.94%. Ventilation rates were measured between 0.58 and 89 m/s. Ammonia emission rates varied from 38 to 2105 g/hr. TSP emission rates and PM?? emission rates ranged from 7.0 to 1673 g/hr 0.58 to 99 g/hr respectively. Emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter increased with the age of the birds. Error and sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of emission rates. Error for ammonia emission rates was 99 g/hr during tunnel ventilation and 6 g/hr during sidewall ventilation. Error for TSP emission rates was 79 g/hr and 11 g/hr for tunnel and sidewall ventilation respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that ventilation rate measurements and measurement of ammonia concentration had the most effect on the emission rates. Emission factors of NH? and PM?? estimated for these buildings were 1.32 0.472 g/bird and 22.8 9.28 g/bird, respectively. These emission factors take into account the variation of PM?? and NH? concentrations and ventilation rates with the age of the birds.

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Methane Main  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee on Methane Hydrate Issues and Opportunities Including Assessment of Uncertainty of the Impact of Methane Hydrate on Global Climate Change December 2002 Report of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee on Methane Hydrate Issues and Opportunities Including Assessment of Uncertainty of the Impact of Methane Hydrate on Global Climate Change December 2002 i CONTENTS What is Methane Hydrate? ............................................................................................. 1 Why Methane Hydrate Matters for the United States? ..................................................... 4 Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate .......................................................................... 5 Implications of Methane Hydrate on Safety and Seafloor Stability

75

I N V I T E D R E V I E W Methane emissions from wetlands: biogeochemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Methane is responsible for about 18% of human- induced radiative forcing, making it the second most) with their large areal extent and high CH4 fluxes per area. However, the dominant research effort has focused on CH- tries at northern latitudes with their greater research (a) (b) Fig. 2 Global methane sources in (a

76

Determination of the electron temperature by optical emission spectroscopy in a 13.56 MHz dusty methane plasma: Influence of the power  

SciTech Connect

Optical emission spectroscopy is applied to the study of a radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) discharge in methane used to obtain hydrogenated carbon films and particles. The methane dissociation allows the creation of species in the plasma bulk as H{sub 2}, H, and CH. The emission lines of these species are studied as a function of time and of incident rf power. The electron temperature is determined from the two line radiance ratio method and the corona balance model using the Balmer lines (H{sub alpha}, H{sub beta}, and H{sub gamma}). The incident rf power enhancement in the range 40-120 W leads to the increase in the emission line intensities as the electron temperature decreases. The temporal variations of CH and hydrogen emission lines, of the dc self-bias voltage, and of the electron temperature are correlated both with the particle behavior and growth in the plasma, and with the coating that grows onto the powered electrode.

Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre [Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises (GREMI), UMR 6606 CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of an ammonia emission protocol and preliminary emission factor for a central Texas dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A protocol was developed to measure ammonia emission concentrations from dairies using an isolation flux chamber. A hybrid dairy in Comanche county, Texas, was measured for one week each during August 2002 and January 2003. Sixty total ammonia samples were taken from the free stall barn, open lot, mixing tank, separated solids, compost, and two lagoons using the developed protocol. The ammonia concentration measurements were made using a chemiluminescence analyzer located inside a mobile laboratory. From the emission concentrations recorded, it was estimated that 9.68 metric tons of ammonia were produced from this dairy per year. An emission factor of 13.34 28.80 kilograms per day per thousand head of cattle (kg/day/1000 head) was estimated for this dairy (95% confidence intervals) during summer conditions. For winter conditions the emission factor was 12.05 12.89 kg/day/1000 head. The 11% difference of the emission factors from summer to winter conditions was predominantly from the change in ambient and control volume temperatures (a mean difference of approximately 25 degrees Celsius), differences in source temperatures, and seasonal variability in husbandry. The adsorption of ammonia onto different polymer tubing used in pollutant stream conveyance was researched for possible systematic losses. Teflon and low density polyethylene (LDPE) were tested for ammonia losses with treatments of: temperature, length, and inlet concentration. Inlet concentration and temperature were significant factors used to describe ammonia adsorption for Teflon, whereas LDPE was also affected by tubing length. These factors were used to create a model to correct the summer dairy measurements for ammonia losses, resulting in an emission factor increase of 8.3% over the original value obtained from the flux chamber. A nitrogen mass balance was performed to estimate the amount of nitrogen available for ammonia formation as excreted - 177.5 kilograms per year per animal (wet basis). The amount of ammonia excreted per year was also estimated to be 26.63 kilograms per year. The measured ammonia emitted from the dairy was five times less than the ammonia excreted and thirty-six times less than the total nitrogen excreted.

Rose, Adam Joseph

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Emission Factors Handbook Addendum 2: Guidelines for Estimating Trace Substance Emissions from Fossil Fuel Steam Electric Power Plan ts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook provides a tool for estimating trace substances emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants. The suggested emission factors are based on EPRI and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) field measurements conducted at 51 power plants using generally consistent sampling and analytical protocols. This information will help utility personnel estimate air toxic emissions for permitting purposes.

2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

The basics of coalbed methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is an overview of coalbed methane (CBM), also known as coal seam gas. It provides an overview of what coalbed methane is and the current status of global coalbed methane exploration and production. Topics covered in the report include: An analysis of the natural gas industry, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; A detailed description of coalbed methane, its characteristics, and future potential; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coalbed methane; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of coalbed methane; An overview of the technologies used for coalbed methane production and water treatment; and Profiles of key coalbed methane producing countries. 25 figs., 5 tabs., 1 app.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SMALL CHAMBER MEASUREMENT OF CHEMICAL SPECIFIC EMISSION FACTORS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at...

82

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hippelein 4 . Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found informaldehyde, phenol, and TMPB-DIB. As reported by Maddalenamay have contributed to high TMPB-DIB emission factors. The

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A science based emission factor for particulate matter emitted from cotton harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poor regional air quality in some states across the US cotton belt has resulted in increased pressure on agricultural sources of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution regulators. Moreover, inaccurate emission factors used in the calculation of annual emissions inventories led to the identification of cotton harvesting as a significant source of PM10 in California and Arizona. As a result, cotton growers in these states are now required to obtain air quality permits and submit management practice plans detailing the actions taken by the producer to reduce fugitive PM emissions from field operations. The objective of this work was to develop accurate PM emission factors for cotton harvesting in terms of total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5. Two protocols were developed and used to develop PM emission factors from cotton harvesting operations on three farms in Texas during 2006 and 2007. Protocol one utilized TSP concentrations measured downwind of harvesting operations with meteorological data measured onsite in a dispersion model to back-calculate TSP emission flux values. Flux values, determined with the regulatory dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, were converted to emission factors and corrected with results from particle size distribution (PSD) analyses to report emission factors in terms of PM10 and PM2.5. Emission factors were developed for two-row (John Deere 9910) and sixrow (John Deere 9996) cotton pickers with protocol one. The uncertainty associated with the emission factors developed through protocol one resulted in no significant difference between the emission factors for the two machines. Under the second protocol, emission concentrations were measured onboard the six-row cotton picker as the machine harvested cotton. PM10 and PM2.5 emission factors were developed from TSP emission concentration measurements converted to emission rates using the results of PSD analysis. The total TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emission factors resulting from the source measurement protocol are 1.64 0.37, 0.55 0.12, and 1.58E- 03 4.5E-04 kg/ha, respectively. These emission factors contain the lowest uncertainty and highest level of precision of any cotton harvesting PM emission factors ever developed. Thus, the emission factors developed through the source sampling protocol are recommended for regulatory use.

Wanjura, John David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provideend-use energy efficiency, or avoid methane emissions...

85

"1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Emission Factors" Fuel Emission Factors" "(From Appendix H of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1" "Fuel ",,"Emission Factor ",,"Units" "Coal2" "Anthracite",,103.69,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Bituminous",,93.28,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Sub-bituminous",,97.17,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Lignite",,97.72,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Electric Power Sector",,95.52,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Industrial Coking",,93.71,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Other Industrial",,93.98,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Residential/Commercial",,95.35,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Natural Gas3"

86

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

87

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3.

88

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Title On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Dallmann, Timothy R., Steven J. DeMartini, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Scott C. Herndon, Timothy B. Onasch, Ezra C. Wood, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 46 Issue 15 Pagination 8511-8518 Abstract Pollutant concentrations in the exhaust plumes of individual diesel trucks were measured at high time resolution in a highway tunnel in Oakland, CA, during July 2010. Emission factors for individual trucks were calculated using a carbon balance method, in which pollutants measured in each exhaust plume were normalized to measured concentrations of carbon dioxide. Pollutants considered here include nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, ethene, and black carbon (BC), as well as optical properties of emitted particles. Fleet-average emission factors for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and BC respectively decreased 30 ± 6 and 37 ± 10% relative to levels measured at the same location in 2006, whereas a 34 ± 18% increase in the average NO2 emission factor was observed. Emissions distributions for all species were skewed with a small fraction of trucks contributing disproportionately to total emissions. For example, the dirtiest 10% of trucks emitted half of total NO2 and BC emissions. Emission rates for NO2 were found to be anticorrelated with all other species considered here, likely due to the use of catalyzed diesel particle filters to help control exhaust emissions. Absorption and scattering cross-section emission factors were used to calculate the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, at 532 nm) for individual truck exhaust plumes, which averaged 0.14 ± 0.03.

89

Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This document supports the other measurement procedures and all building energy-monitoring projects by providing methods to calculate the source energy and emissions from the energy measured at the building. Energy and emission factors typically account for the conversion inefficiencies at the power plant and the transmission and distribution losses from the power plant to the building. The energy and emission factors provided here also include the precombustion effects, which are the energy and emissions associated with extracting, processing, and delivering the primary fuels to the point of conversion in the electrical power plants or directly in the buildings.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Coal mine methane global review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

92

Evaporative Testing Requirements for Dual-Fuel Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)/Gasoline and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)/Gasoline Vehicles Revision of MAC #99-01 To Allow Subtraction of Methane Emissions from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The attached MAC clarifies the Air Resources Board's procedures regarding evaporative emission testing of dual-fuel CNG/gasoline vehicles. This MAC revises and supersedes MAC #99-01 by allowing manufacturers to determine, report, and subtract methane emissions when a dual-fuel CNG/gasoline vehicle is tested for evaporative emissions. A related revision clarifies that for dual-fuel CNG/gasoline medium-duty vehicles, the applicable LEV I evaporative emission standards, which are dependent on the fuel tank capacity of the medium-duty vehicles, are determined solely on the fuel tank capacity of the gasoline fuel system. If you have any questions or comments, please contact Mr. Steven Hada, Air

Alan C. Lloyd, Ph.D.; Arnold Schwarzenegger; All Heavy-duty Vehicle Manufacturers

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Title Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Marion L. Russell, Moya Melody, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations

94

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation-Air Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and use of Coal Mine Capture and use of Coal Mine Ventilation - air Methane Background Methane emissions from coal mines represent about 10 percent of the U.S. anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Methane-the second most important non-water greenhouse gas-is 21 times as powerful as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in its global warming potential. Ventilation-air methane (VAM)-the exhaust air from underground coal mines-is the largest source of coal mine methane, accounting for about half of the methane emitted from coal mines in the United States. Unfortunately, because of the low methane concentration (0.3-1.5 percent) in ventilation air, its beneficial use is difficult. However, oxidizing the methane to CO 2 and water reduces its global warming potential by 87 percent. A thermal

95

Coalbed Methane  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Coalbed methane is natural gas found in coal deposits. It was once considered a nuisance and mine safety hazard, but today has become a valuable part of the U.S. energy portfolio. A major reason for this is resource characterization and the establishment of efficient recovery methods pioneered by Office of Fossil Energy R&D.

96

Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

Abichou, Tarek, E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane [Unite de Recherche M.A.C.S., Ecole Nationale d'Ingenieurs de Gabes, Route de Medenine, 6029 Gabes (Tunisia)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Novel strategies for the synthesis of methane adsorbents with controlled porosity and high surface area. Final report, October 1991-October 1992  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is an attractive alternative to gasoline as fuel for cars because of its desirable emission characteristics, good cold starting characteristics, and high octane number. A major factor that limits widespread use of NGVs is the low energy density of natural gas. The energy density can be increased by adsorption of the natural gas on high surface area sorbents. Present carbon adsorbents do not adsorb enough methane on a volume per volume basis to be commercially attractive for storage of methane on natural gas fueled vehicles. The report has begun exploring the use of organic gels for the adsorption of methane. Preliminary results are promising enough to warrant further research.

Ventura, S.C.; Hum, G.P.; Narang, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles Title Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Melissa M. Lunden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Robert A. Harley Journal Journal of Aerosol Science Keywords emission, motor vehicle, particle number, size distribution, tunnel Abstract Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from ~61 000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and ~2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter Dp > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 ± 1.4) x 1014 and (3.3 ± 1.3) x 1015 # kg-1 fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < Dp < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as Dp decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting

99

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sources of methane in China: A program to estimate emissions from rice paddy fields, bio-gas pits, and urban areas: Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are measuring methane from rice paddy fields and bio-gas pits. The project has produced new results that we are using to sharply focus the present study. We measured ambient concentrations at Minqin, Beijing, and Chendu. We obtained flux measurements from bio-gas pits, and flux measurements from rice paddy fields. Minqin is a background site with no large local sources of methane such as rice fields or urban areas. It serves as control for the experiment. Beijing is representative of a large industrialized Chinese city not affected by rice agriculture but heavily dependent on burning coal for cooking and heating. Chendu is in the heart of the rice producing areas of China where rice paddies cover millions of acres and methane from bio-gas pits is an important source of energy. Further progress was impeded by a lack of a formal agreement between the US and PRC, which was not signed until August 1987. 9 figs.

Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factors Applicable to Wastewater Wet Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transport of wastewater in sewer networks causes potential problems associated with gases which include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and methane, in regard (more)

Mudragaddam, Madhuri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Methane (CH4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) Gateway Pages to Methane Data Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of...

104

Analysis on Coalbed Methane Development Mode and Utilization Technology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM), as a new energy, has become an important supplement to natural gas in China. Development and utilization of CBM can also reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect of ecological environment. Very different forms of the Chinese ... Keywords: coalbed methane, virtual reservoir, low concentration CBM, ventilation air methane, energy-saving and emission reduction

Yuandong Qiao; Daping Xia; Hongyu Guo

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Effects of Dissolved Methane upon Liquid Argon Scintillation Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report on measurements of the effects of dissolved methane upon argon scintillation light. We monitor the light yield from an alpha source held 20 cm from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (PMT) assembly as methane is injected into a high-purity liquid argon volume. We observe significant suppression of the scintillation light yield by dissolved methane at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. By examining the late scintillation light time constant, we determine that this loss is caused by an absorption process and also see some evidence of methane-induced scintillation quenching at higher concentrations (50-100 ppb). Using a second PMT assembly we look for visible re-emission features from the dissolved methane which have been reported in gas-phase argon methane mixtures, and we find no evidence of visible re-emission from liquid-phase argon methane mixtures at concentrations between 10 ppb and 0.1%.

B. J. P. Jones; T. Alexander; H. O. Back; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; A. Greene; T. Katori; S. Pordes; M. Toups

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

106

Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Version History Methane Symmetry Operations. JT Hougen Optical Technology Division Gloria Wiersma ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

Investigation of feasibility of injecting power plant waste gases for enhanced coalbed methane recovery from low rank coals in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) may be to blame for a gradual rise in the average global temperature. The state of Texas emits more CO2 than any other state in the U.S., and a large fraction of emissions are from point sources such as power plants. CO2 emissions can be offset by sequestration of produced CO2 in natural reservoirs such as coal seams, which may initially contain methane. Production of coalbed methane can be enhanced through CO2 injection, providing an opportunity to offset the rather high cost of sequestration. Texas has large coal resources. Although they have been studied there is not enough information available on these coals to reliably predict coalbed methane production and CO2 sequestration potential. The goal of the work was to determine if sequestration of CO2 in low rank coals is an economically feasible option for CO2 emissions reduction. Additionally, reasonable CO2 injection and methane production rates were to be estimated, and the importance of different reservoir parameters investigated. A data set was compiled for use in simulating the injection of CO2 for enhanced coalbed methane production from Texas coals. Simulation showed that Texas coals could potentially produce commercial volumes of methane if production is enhanced by CO2 injection. The efficiency of the CO2 in sweeping the methane from the reservoir is very high, resulting in high recovery factors and CO2 storage. The simulation work also showed that certain reservoir parameters, such as Langmuir volumes for CO2 and methane, coal seam permeability, and Langmuir pressure, need to be determined more accurately. An economic model of Texas coalbed methane operations was built. Production and injection activities were consistent with simulation results. The economic model showed that CO2 sequestration for enhanced coalbed methane recovery is not commercially feasible at this time because of the extremely high cost of separating, capturing, and compressing the CO2. However, should government mandated carbon sequestration credits or a CO2 emissions tax on the order of $10/ton become a reality, CO2 sequestration projects could become economic at gas prices of $4/Mscf.

Saugier, Luke Duncan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (N O), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Environmental Regulations Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide...

112

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Supplement D to compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1: Stationary point and area sources (fifth edition)  

SciTech Connect

This document contains emission factors and process information for more than 200 air pollution source categories. These emission factors have been compiled from source test data, material balance studies, and they can be used judiciously in making emission estimations for various purposes. This supplement to AP-42 addresses pollutant-generating activity from natural gas combustion, wood waste combustion in boilers; municipal solid waste landfills; waste water collection, treatment and storage; organic liquid storage tanks; nitric acid; grain elevators and processes; plywood manufacturing; lime manufacturing; primary aluminum production; paved roads; abrasive blasting; enteric fermentation -- greenhouse gases.

NONE

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Heat pipe methanator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

Ranken, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf The Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf was created to provide a repository for information collected from projects funded as part of the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. As output from the projects is received, it will be reviewed and then placed onto the reference shelf to be available to other methane hydrate researchers. Projects: DOE/NETL Projects : These pages contain detailed information on methane hydrate projects funded through the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Publications: Newsletter | Bibliography | Software | Reports | Program Publications | Photo Gallery Newsletter: Fire in the Ice: A publication highlighting the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program Bibliography: "Project Reports Bibliography"[PDF]: The bibliography lists publications resulting from DOE/NETL-sponsored

116

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Coal bed methane global market potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide increases in energy prices, as well as the increased potential for project financing derived from emissions credits, have renewed focus on coal bed methane (CBM) and coal mine methane (CMM) projects in coal-producing countries around the world. Globally, CBM utilization projects (in the operational, development, or planning stages) capture and utilize methane from gassy underground coal mines in at least 13 countries. The total methane emission reductions that could be achieved by these projects are approximately 135 billion cubic feet per year (equal to 14.8 million tons of carbon equivalent per year). This global activity level reflects a growing awareness of the technological practicality and the economic attractiveness of coal mine methane recovery and use. This report outlines the potential of the global CBM market. Contents: An overview of CBM; Challenges and issues; Technologies to generate power from CAM; Global CBM/CMM utilization; Country highlights; Ranking of countries with the largest CMM development potential (Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, USA, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Africa); Planning CBM/CMM projects; Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies; Demonstration projects; Development plan and application process; Equity and debt; Carbon financing; Government sponsors; Private sponsors; Project risk reduction support; Examples of integrated project financing; Glossary.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ridge region Ongoing areas of study in the Hydrate Ridge region Map showing where gas hydrates occur off the Cascadia Margin Locations of methane hydrate off the Cascadia Margin...

120

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrates Primer provides background and general information about the history of hydrate R&D, the science of methane hydrates, their occurrences, and R&D related issues. Photo...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Why not methane--5. Delivering methane  

SciTech Connect

A discussion showed that the methane delivery system in the U.S. consists of 350,000 mi of underground high-pressure pipelines, 650,000 mi of distribution mains and connections to 45 million energy users. This delivery system now carries much less natural gas than it could carry because of the regulation-caused shortages of recent years. The delivery system is also connected to an efficient storage system of exhausted underground gas wells into which methane from any source (e.g., gasification of coal or vegetation) could be pumped and then recovered as needed. This storage system could be readily expanded and could thus be used for strategic storage of methane. Enough methane could be stored to replace foreign oil if the foreign supply should be interrupted; and methane can be quickly delivered nation-wide, whereas strategic oil storage requires unusual and expensive provisions for delivery. Natural gas usage could be increased by 20Vertical Bar3< in two years and would reduce payments for imported oil by about $10 billion. Doubling the amount of methane used in the U.S. would eliminate the need for foreign oil entirely.

Luntey, E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Methane to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a novel process by which natural gas or methane from coal gasification products can be converted to a transportable liquid fuel. It is proposed that methanol can be produced by the direct, partial oxidation of methane utilizing air or oxygen. It is anticipated that, compared to present technologies, the new process might offer significant economic advantages with respect to capital investment and methane feedstock purity requirements. Results to date are discussed. 6 refs.

Finch, F.T.; Danen, W.C.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Rofer, C.K.; Ferris, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coalbed Methane Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2006 2007 2008 2009...

124

PlasmaMethane Reformation  

INL thermal plasma methane reformation process produces hydrogen and elemental carbon from natural gas and other hydrocarbons, such as natural gas or ...

125

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

127

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a primary source of greenhouse gases. Injection of CO2 from power plants near coalbed reservoirs is a win-win method to reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. Limited studies have investigated CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production in San Juan and Alberta basins, but reservoir modeling is needed to assess the potential of the Black Warrior basin. Alabama ranks 9th nationally in CO2 emissions from power plants; two electricity generation plants are adjacent to the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway. This research project was a reservoir simulation study designed to evaluate the potential for CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery in the Blue Creek Field of Black Warrior basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector and producer. The simulation study was based on a 5-spot well pattern 40-ac well spacing. Injection of 100 percent CO2 in coal seams resulted in average volumes of 0.57 Bcf of sequestered CO2 and average volumes of 0.2 Bcf of enhance methane production for the Mary Lee coal zone only, from an 80-acre 5-spot well pattern. For the entire Blue Creek field of the Black Warrior basin, if 100 percent CO2 is injected in the Pratt, Mary Lee and Black Creek coal zones, enhance methane resources recovered are estimated to be 0.3 Tcf, with a potential CO2sequestration capacity of 0.88 Tcf. The methane recovery factor is estimated to be 68.8 percent, if the three coal zones are completed but produced one by one. Approximately 700 wells may be needed in the field. For multi-layers completed wells, the permeability and pressure are important in determining the breakthrough time, methane produced and CO2 injected. Dewatering and soaking do not benefit the CO2 sequestration process but allow higher injection rates. Permeability anisotropy affects CO2 injection and enhanced methane recovery volumes of the field. I recommend a 5-spot pilot project with the maximum well BHP of 1,000 psi at the injector, minimum well BHP of 500 psi at the producer, maximum injection rate of 70 Mscf/D, and production rate of 35 Mscf/D. These technical results, with further economic evaluation, could generate significant projects for CO2 sequestration and enhance coalbed methane production in Blue Creek field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama.

He, Ting

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter...

130

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane Symmetry Operations. ... At least three T d symmetry classification systems are widely used at present in the methane literature [5-13]. ...

131

Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Data Report; emissions from imports calculated using U.S.source of energy in the Southwest U.S. Thus, imports from

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ng/J) distributions from residential natural gas appliances.ng/J) distribution from residential natural gas appliances.Pollutant Emissions from Residential Heating Systems, EPA-

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Extracting value from coal mine methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging US policy to regulate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a cap-and-trade program presents mine managers with a new opportunity to explore and develop methane utilization or abatement projects that generate value from the anodization of carbon offset credits. In addition, the rising focus on US energy security and domestic energy supply is promoting mine managers and engineers to give further consideration to the importance of their methane gas by-products. The market through which coal mine methane offset projects can be developed and carbon offset credits monetized is quickly maturing. While many methane utilization projects have previously been uneconomical, the carbon offset credit market provides a new set of financing tools for mine engineers to capitalize these projects today. Currently , there are two certification programs that have approved project protocols for CMM projects. The Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) offers a methodology approved under the Clean Development Mechanism, the international compliance based offset market under the Kyoto Protocol. The VCS protocol is applicable to projects that combust ventilation air methane (VAM) and methane extracted from pre-and post-mine drainage systems. The Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX), which operates a voluntary yet binding cap-and-trade market, also has an approved protocol for CMM projects. CCX's protocol can be applied to projects combusting VAM, and methane extracted from pre-and-post-mine drainage systems, as well as abandoned mines. The article describes two case studies - Developing a gob gas utilization project financed by carbon offset credits and First VAM oxidation system to be commissioned at an operating mine in the US. 1 tab., 4 photos.

Liebert, B. [Verdao Group (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Prescribed Fire Emission Factors Database for Land Management and Air Quality Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act, its amendments, and air quality regulations require that prescribed fire managers estimate the quantity of emissions that a prescribed fire will produce. Information on emissions is available for these calculations; however, it is often incomplete or difficult to find. Tables and computer models can also provide some of this information, but the quality and applicability of the data to a specific site are unknown. In conjunction with three research projects developing new emissions data and meteorological tools to assist prescribed fire managers, the Resource Conservation and Climate Change Program Area of the Department of Defense's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program is supporting development of a database that contains emissions information related to prescribed burning. Ultimately the vetted database will be available on the Internet and will contain emissions information that has been developed from laboratory and field-scale measurements and has been published.

Lincoln, Emily; Hao, WeiMin; Baker, S.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Urbanski, Shawn; Miller, J. Wayne; Weise, David; Johnson, Timothy J.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Supply and Emerging Resources Future Supply and Emerging Resources The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship Program Jeffrey James Marlow, a graduate student in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology, was recently selected as the 2012 recipient of the NETL-National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship. Please see page 15 of the March 2013 issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1) of Fire in the Ice for more information on the recipient. The Department of Energy has a long history of building synergistic relationships with research universities. Funding academic research is a "win-win-win" situation. The U.S. government is able to tap into some of the best minds available for solving national energy problems, the universities get the support they need to maintain cutting edge faculty and laboratories, and the students involved are provided with opportunities that help them along their chosen path of study, strengthening the national pool of scientists and engineers. According to Samuel Bodman, speaking about graduate research in methane hydrates, "Students are the foundation of our energy future, bringing new ideas and fresh perspectives to the energy industry. What better way to assure technology innovation than to encourage students working on the development of a resource that has the potential to tip our energy balance toward clean-burning, domestic fuels."

136

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes June 6th - 7th, 2013...

138

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2011 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress July 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | July 2012 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report entitled U.S. Department of Energy FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area of research. Pursuant to statutory requirements, this report is being provided to the following

139

Methane Hydrate Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of Methane Hydrate research. Listed are the Annual Reports per...

140

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fiscal Year 2012 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress August 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | August 2013 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the actions taken to carry out methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report, entitled U.S. Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electrochemical methane sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

1984-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Methane Hydrate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Methane hydrate is a cage-like lattice of ice inside of which are trapped molecules of methane, the chief constituent of natural gas. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will revert back to water and natural gas. When brought to the earth's surface, one cubic meter of gas hydrate releases 164 cubic meters of natural gas. Hydrate deposits may be several hundred meters thick and generally occur in two types of settings: under Arctic permafrost, and beneath the ocean floor. Methane that forms hydrate can be both biogenic, created by biological activity in sediments, and thermogenic, created by geological processes deeper within the earth.

143

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methane, and nitrous oxide) from on-site fuel combustion and purchased electricity and district heating and cooling. Portfolio Manager also enables tracking of avoided emissions...

145

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., in conjunction with MEGTEC Systems, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, designed, built, and operated a commercial-size thermal flow reversal reactor (TFRR) to evaluate its suitability to oxidize coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM). Coal mining, and particularly coal mine ventilation air, is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions, a greenhouse gas. Ventilation air volumes are large and the concentration of methane in the ventilation air is low; thus making it difficult to use or abate these emissions. This test program was conducted with simulated coal mine VAM in advance of deploying the technology on active coal mine ventilation fans. The demonstration project team installed and operated a 30,000 cfm MEGTEC VOCSIDIZER oxidation system on an inactive coal mine in West Liberty, WV. The performance of the unit was monitored and evaluated during months of unmanned operation at mostly constant conditions. The operating and maintenance history and how it impacts the implementation of the technology on mine fans were investigated. Emission tests showed very low levels of all criteria pollutants at the stack. Parametric studies showed that the equipment can successfully operate at the design specification limits. The results verified the ability of the TFRR to oxidize {ge}95% of the low and variable concentration of methane in the ventilation air. This technology provides new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the reduction of methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air. A large commercial-size installation (180,000 cfm) on a single typical mine ventilation bleeder fan would reduce methane emissions by 11,000 to 22,100 short tons per year (the equivalent of 183,000 to 366,000 metric tonnes carbon dioxide).

Deborah Kosmack

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

NETL: News Release - World's First Coal Mine Methane Fuel Cell Powers Up in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2003 22, 2003 World's First Coal Mine Methane Fuel Cell Powers Up in Ohio New Technology Mitigates Coal Mine Methane Emissions, Produces Electricity HOPEDALE, OH - In a novel pairing of old and new, FuelCell Energy of Danbury, Conn., has begun operating the world's first fuel cell powered by coal mine methane. Funded by the Department of Energy, the demonstration harnesses the power of a pollutant - methane emissions from coal mines - to produce electricity in a new, 21st Century fuel cell. MORE INFO Remarks by DOE's James Slutz FuelCell Energy Web Site "We believe this technology can reduce coal mine methane emissions significantly while producing clean, efficient, and reliable high-quality power," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "This has the dual

147

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 6142013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate...

148

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Short-Term Carbon Dioxide Exchange and Environmental Factors in a Boreal Fen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Northern peatlands are important contributors to the global carbon cycle. In cold and moist climatic conditions, boreal peatlands have sequestered large amounts of atmospheric carbon during the past few thousand years (GORHAM 1991). The carbon balance in mires depends on the rates of photosynthesis and respiration which are affected by both the long-term and the short-term variations in environmental factors. So far, more emphasis has been put on the annual carbon balance of mires, and short-term dynamics have received less attention. However, a relationship between the carbon dioxide and methane cycling has been proposed as newly photosynthesized carbon provides substrates for methanogenesis substrates and promotes methane emissions (WHITING & CHANTON 1993). To analyze the connection between green plant photosynthesis and methane emissions, we need to analyze the short-term dynamics of carbon dioxide exchange. Consequently, we use earlier data (ALM et al. 1997) to study

Anu Kettunen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Supplement E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42 Volume I, new or revised emissions data are presented for Anthracite Coal Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Liquified Petroleum Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion In Boilers; Bagasse Combustion In Sugar Mills; Residential Fireplaces; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Automobile Body Incineration; Conical Burners; Open Burning; Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy Duty Natural Gas Fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Gasoline and Diesel Industrial Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and All Stationary Dual Fuel Engines; Soap and Detergents; and Storage of Organic Liquids.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy conservation: The main factor for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect

The energy intensity of the former Soviet Union is more than twice that of other market economics in similar stages of economic development. Low energy efficiency in the Soviet Union has contributed significantly to global carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions. The technological potential for energy conservation in the former Soviet Union is the largest in the world. The inefficiencies of the previously command-system economy, however, have provided little incentive for conserving energy. The present transition to a market-based economy should encourage the incorporation of energy-efficiency improvements in order for the former Soviet Union to successfully lower its energy intensity. There are several obstacles that limit implementing energy conservation: for example, energy prices and discount rates influence the volume of investment in energy efficiency. Nevertheless, cost-effective measures for energy conservative do exist even in the most energy-intensive sectors of the Soviet economy and should form the core of any energy conservation program. The overall cost-effective potential for carbon savings in the former Soviet Union is estimated to be 280 to 367 million tons of carbon per year by the year 2005, or 23 to 29 percent of 1988 energy-related emissions.

Bashmakov, I.A.; Chupyatov, V.P.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

NREL: News - NREL to Help Convert Methane to Liquid Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

113 113 NREL to Help Convert Methane to Liquid Diesel Advanced research project could lead to lower greenhouse emissions, new life for spent gas and oil wells January 3, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will help develop microbes that convert methane found in natural gas into liquid diesel fuel, a novel approach that if successful could reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower dependence on foreign oil. The amount of natural gas simply flared or vented from oil wells globally is enormous - equal to one-third of the amount of petroleum used in the United States each year. And every molecule of methane vented to the atmosphere in that process has the global-warming capacity of 12 molecules of carbon dioxide.

155

Predicting methane fermentation biodegradability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimation of the feedstock digestibility in cows by procedures developed by Van Soest was performed. By feeding cows feedstuff of different lignin content, cell wall digestibility can be estimated. In this article a digestibility model has been employed and tested along with other models for the rapid prediction of substrate methane fermentation biodegradability.

Chandler, J.A.; Jewell, W.J.; Gossett, J.M.; Van Soest, P.J.; Robertson, J.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fluxes of methane between landfills and the atmosphere: Natural and engineered controls  

SciTech Connect

Field measurement of landfill methane emissions indicates natural variability spanning more than 2 seven orders of magnitude, from approximately 0.0004 to more than 4000 g m{sub -2} day{sup -1}. This wide range reflects net emissions resulting from production (methanogenesis), consumption (methanotrophic oxidation), and gaseous transport processes. The determination of an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} emission rate for a given field site requires sampling designs and statistical techniques which consider spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, particularly at sites with pumped gas recovery systems, it is possible for methanotrophic microorganisms in aerated cover soils to oxidize all of the methane from landfill sources below and, additionally, to oxidize methane diffusing into cover soils from atmospheric sources above. In such cases, a reversed soil gas concentration gradient is observed in shallow cover soils, indicating bidirectional diffusional transport to the depth of optimum methane oxidation. Rates of landfill methane oxidation from field and laboratory incubation studies range up to 166 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} among the highest for any natural setting, providing an effective natural control on net emissions. Estimates of worldwide landfill methane emissions to the atmosphere have ranged from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup -1}, differing mainly in assumed methane yields from estimated quantities of landfilled refuse. At highly controlled landfill sites in developed countries, landfill methane is often collected via vertical wells or horizontal collectors. Recovery of landfill methane through engineered systems can provide both environmental and energy benefits by mitigating subsurface migration, reducing surface emissions, and providing an alternative energy resource for industrial boiler use, on-site electrical generation, or upgrading to a substitute natural gas.

Bogner, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, M. [ETSU, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Czepiel, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Review of Coal Mine Methane Recovery for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of methane from coal mines might be a cost-effective offset method for some utilities looking for ways to reduce or offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides an evaluation of potential recovery amounts and costs for U.S. mines along with a discussion of technical and legal issues.

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Calculating Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions --A New Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculating Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions -- A New Approach Larry Hughes, Kathleen Bohan to submit an annual national greenhouse gas inventory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate different sectors and their associated greenhouse gas emissions (principally carbon dioxide, methane

Hughes, Larry

160

Methane conversion to methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor for the partial oxidation of methane. The specific goals are to demonstrate that we can improve product yield, demonstrate the optimal conditions for membrane reactor operation, determine the transport properties of the membrane, and provide demonstration of the process at the pilot plant scale. The last goal will be performed by Unocal, Inc., our industrial partner, upon successful completion of this study.

Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Coal Bed Methane Primer  

SciTech Connect

During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radiative Forcing Due to Reactive Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive gas emissions (CO, NOx, VOC) have indirect radiative forcing effects through their influences on tropospheric ozone and on the lifetimes of methane and hydrogenated halocarbons. These effects are quantified here for the full set of ...

T. M. L. Wigley; S. J. Smith; M. J. Prather

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Interagency Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links to interagency pdf. The multi-faceted issues associated with naturally occurring methane hydrates demand a coordinated approach to studying (1) the potential of this resource...

167

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

168

Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

None

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas hydrate systems from three perspectives: as an energy resource, as a geohazard, and as a long-term influence on global climate. Performers Rice University, Houston, TX University of Texas, Austin, TX Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Background Heterogeneity in the distribution of gas hydrate accumulations impacts all aspects of research into gas hydrate natural systems. The challenge is to delineate, understand, and appreciate these differences at the regional and local scales, where differences in in situ concentrations are relevant to the importance of gas hydrate as a resource, a geohazard, and a factor in

170

Regulation of methane genes and genome expression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the methane genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ?H (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein, designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences and alternative initiation codons in translation initiation, established that polarity e

John N. Reeve

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

New Materials Make Methane Capture Possible  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2013... SBN, captured enough medium source methane to turn it to high purity methane, which in turn could be used to generate efficient electricity.

172

Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System Technology available for licensing: Enhanced renewable methane production system provides a low-cost process that accelerates...

173

Florida Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Florida Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

174

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with sampling and observation from the surface ship. Activities included collection of methane hydrate, sediment, water, and other materials from methane hydrate and seep sites...

175

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Td Symmetry Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents Methane Symmetry Operations. 11. ... Magnetic-dipole transitions are observed in molecular-beam studies of methane [42]. ...

176

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

represent components of dynamic biogeochemical environments with inputs and outputs of methane, accurate rates of biological methane production are poorly understood. Recent...

177

Michigan Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Michigan Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

178

Kentucky Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

179

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety...

180

Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2013 0, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. WASHINGTON - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced nearly $5 million in funding across seven research projects nationwide designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates - a large, completely untapped natural gas resource-and what it could mean for the environment, as well as American economic competiveness and energy security. "The recent boom in natural gas production - in part due to long-term Energy Department investments beginning in the 70's and 80's - has had a transformative impact on our energy landscape, helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support thousands of American jobs," said Secretary Moniz. "While our research into methane hydrates is still in its early stages, these investments will increase our understanding of this domestic resource and the potential to safely and sustainably unlock the natural gas held within."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland. Progress report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The role of freshwater peatlands in the global methane cycle remains uncertain. Field measurements of methane emissions tend to be highly variable across a peatland and exhibit sharp seasonal fluctuations. The process of extrapolating these variable measurements to regional estimates is further complicated by rudimentary knowledge of the environmental controls can the production and emissions of methane from peat. The distribution of methanogenesis within the peat profile will strongly influence the response of methane emissions to potential climatic changes. During the summers of 1990 and 1991 we conducted a study on the mechanisms for the production, transport, and storage of methane within the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatland region as the regional climate shifted from extreme drought to a period of normal rainfall. This natural experiment provided unexpected insights on the linkages among climate, hydrology, and the methane cycle in large peat basins. This report presents project progress for period July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

Siegel, D.I.

1993-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Development of Risk Assessment System for Coal-Bed Methane Underbalanced Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As there are a lot of factors with complexity and uncertainty, the process of coal-bed methane under balanced drilling has great risk. In order to overcome the one-sidedness and limitation caused by single evaluation method, the combined evaluation model ... Keywords: coal-bed methane, underbalanced drilling, combined evaluation model, risk assessment system

Xiujuan Yang; Qingyang Wen; Xiangzhen Yan; Yan Xia

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Assessing the methane hazard of gassy coals in storage silos. Report of investigations  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines investigated coal storage silos to determine how gassy coal must be for methane accumulations in a silo to become hazardous and where such accumulations are likely to occur. Methane concentrations were measured in the open space above the stored coal pile, in the pile, and in the reclaiming area. No methane layering was found in closed-top silos. Reclaiming areas were as gassy as the top part of the silos. Coal samples were collected from the conveyors entering the silos in order to assess the gassiness of the coal. No simple correlation was found between the gassiness of the coal stored and the measured methane concentrations. However, at mines where the average 24-hour gas emissions from the conveyor belt samples was 14 cubic feet/ton of more, fans or open tops were used. It appears that a large fraction of the methane released during storage remains in the void space between the coal particles.

LaScola, J.C.; Matta, J.E.; Kissell, F.N.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Extension-Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective technology for upgrading coal mine methane to natural gas pipeline quality. Nitrogen rejection is the most costly step with conventional technology and emerging competitive technology. Significant cost reductions to this step will allow for the cost effective capture and utilization of this otherwise potent greenhouse gas. The proposed approach is based on the microchannel technology platform that Velocys is developing to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this application, ultra fast thermal swing adsorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat transfer enabled by microchannels. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. Initial performance results for the Velocys TSA technology were promising. Velocys has also completed initial discussions with several prospective users of the technology and received positive market feedback. Some of the factors that create an attractive opportunity for the technology include the sustained high prices for natural gas, the emerging system of carbon credits, and continued focus on reducing coal mine emissions. While market interest has been confirmed, improvements and optimization are necessary to move the technology to a point that will enable commercial investment in the technology scale-up. In particular, prospective industry collaborators are interested in seeing validation that the technology can meet real-world conditions, including handling impurities, meeting purity and recovery targets (which requires low dead volume), and meeting cost and manufacturability goals. In this quarter, the system adsorbent has been selected--a granular mesoporous carbon. An overall change to the system to move to a phase change fluid for heating and cooling has been projected to significantly reduce the thermal lag of adsorption and desorption unit. Modeling work using the properties of powder carbon has shown that the overall system performance can be achieved, thus negating the need for structured adsorbents. A revised testing protocol for powder adsorbents has been initiated.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Extension-Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective technology for upgrading coal mine methane to natural gas pipeline quality. Nitrogen rejection is the most costly step with conventional technology and emerging competitive technology. Significant cost reductions to this step will allow for the cost effective capture and utilization of this otherwise potent greenhouse gas. The proposed approach is based on the microchannel technology platform that Velocys is developing to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this application, ultra fast thermal swing adsorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat transfer enabled by microchannels. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. Initial performance results for the Velocys TSA technology were promising. Velocys has also completed initial discussions with several prospective users of the technology and received positive market feedback. Some of the factors that create an attractive opportunity for the technology include the sustained high prices for natural gas, the emerging system of carbon credits, and continued focus on reducing coal mine emissions. While market interest has been confirmed, improvements and optimization are necessary to move the technology to a point that will enable commercial investment in the technology scale-up. In particular, prospective industry collaborators are interested in seeing validation that the technology can meet real-world conditions, including handling impurities, meeting purity and recovery targets (which requires low dead volume), and meeting cost and manufacturability goals.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

TITAN'S TRANSPORT-DRIVEN METHANE CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The mechanisms behind the occurrence of large cloud outbursts and precipitation on Titan have been disputed. A global- and annual-mean estimate of surface fluxes indicated only 1% of the insolation, or {approx}0.04 W m{sup -2}, is exchanged as sensible and/or latent fluxes. Since these fluxes are responsible for driving atmospheric convection, it has been argued that moist convection should be quite rare and precipitation even rarer, even if evaporation globally dominates the surface-atmosphere energy exchange. In contrast, climate simulations indicate substantial cloud formation and/or precipitation. We argue that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance is diagnostic of horizontal heat transport by Titan's atmosphere, and thus constrains the strength of the methane cycle. Simple calculations show the TOA radiative imbalance is {approx}0.5-1 W m{sup -2} in Titan's equatorial region, which implies 2-3 MW of latitudinal heat transport by the atmosphere. Our simulation of Titan's climate suggests this transport may occur primarily as latent heat, with net evaporation at the equator and net accumulation at higher latitudes. Thus, the methane cycle could be 10-20 times previous estimates. Opposing seasonal transport at solstices, compensation by sensible heat transport, and focusing of precipitation by large-scale dynamics could further enhance the local, instantaneous strength of Titan's methane cycle by a factor of several. A limited supply of surface liquids in regions of large surface radiative imbalance may throttle the methane cycle, and if so, we predict more frequent large storms over the lakes district during Titan's northern summer.

Mitchell, Jonathan L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of uncertainty in SAPRC90 rate constants and selected product yields on reactivity adjustment factors for alternative fuel vehicle emissions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tropospheric ozone is formed in the atmosphere by a series of reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). While NOx emissions are primarily composed of only two compounds, nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), there are hundreds of different VOCs being emitted. In general, VOCs promote ozone formation, however, the rate and extent of ozone produced by the individual VOCs varies considerably. For example, it is widely acknowledged that formaldehyde (HCHO) is a very reactive VOC, and produces ozone rapidly and efficiently under most conditions. On the other hand, VOCs such as methane, ethane, propane, and methanol do not react as quickly, and are likely to form less urban ozone than a comparable mass of HCHO. The difference in ozone forming potential is one of the bases for the use of alternative fuels. The fuels considered in this study included compressed natural gas, LPG, mixtures of methanol and gasoline, ethanol and gasoline, and a reformulated gasoline.

Bergin, M.S.; Russell, A.G.; Yang, Y.J.; Milford, J.B.; Kirchner, F.; Stockwell, W.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Utilization of fuel cells to beneficially use coal mine methane. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has been given the responsibility to encourage industry to recover and use methane that is currently being released to the atmosphere. At this time the only method being employed at the Left Fork Mine to remove methane is the mine ventilation system. The methane content was measured at one one-hundredth of a percent. To prevent this methane from being vented to the atmosphere, degasification wells are proposed. To use the coal mine methane, it is proposed to use phosphoric-acid fuel cells to convert methane to electric power. These fuel cells contain (1) a steam reformer to convert the methane to hydrogen (and carbon dioxide), (2) the fuel cell stack, and (3) a power conditioner that provides 200 kW of 60 Hz alternating current output. The environmental impacts and benefits of using this technology ware summarized in the report. The study indicates the methane emission reduction that could be achieved on a national and Global level. The important point being that this technology is economically viable as is demonstrated in the report.

Brown, J.T.; O`Brien, D.G.; Miller, A.R.; Atkins, R.; Sanders, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Controls On Methane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems Last Reviewed 6242013 DE-FE0010406 Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced...

191

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

192

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th-7th, 2013 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th-7th, 2013 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee...

193

Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and...

194

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes January, 2010 Atlanta, GA Methane Hydrate Advisory...

195

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Descriptions for Energy Department Methane...

196

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes March 2010 Washington, DC Methane Hydrate Advisory...

197

Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials  

SciTech Connect

The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

Rachor, Ingke, E-mail: i.rachor@ifb.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter An image of a hydrate burning overlayed with the Newsletter Title: Fire in the Ice The methane hydrate newsletter, Fire in the Ice, is a bi-annual publication highlighting the latest developments in international gas hydrates R&D. Fire in the Ice promotes the exchange of information amoung those involved in gas hydrates research and development, and also recognizes the efforts of a hydrate researcher in each issue. The newsletter now reaches nearly 1300 scientists and other interested individuals in sixteen countries. To subscribe electronically to Fire in the Ice please send an email to karl.lang@contr.netl.doe.gov Please click on the links below to access issues of "Fire in the Ice". More on Methane Hydrates

199

Methane Credit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Credit Methane Credit Jump to: navigation, search Name Methane Credit Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28273 Product Specialises in utilising methane produced on municipal landfill sites. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002. Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for thein Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History U.S. 18,743 18,390 19,892 19,620 21,874 20,798 1989-2008 Alabama 1,665 1,900 1,773 2,068 2,126 1,727 1989-2008 Alaska 0 0 2007-2008 Arkansas 31 31 2007-2008 California 0 0 2007-2008 Colorado 6,473 5,787 6,772 6,344 7,869 8,238 1989-2008 Florida 0 0 2007-2008 Kansas 340 301 2007-2008 Kentucky 0 0 2007-2008 Louisiana 7 9 2007-2008 North 7 9 2007-2008 South Onshore 0 0 2007-2008 South Offshore 0 0 2007-2008 Michigan 0 0 2007-2008 Mississippi 0 0 2007-2008 Montana 66 75 2007-2008 New Mexico 4,396 5,166 5,249 4,894 4,169 3,991 1989-2008

203

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.into carbon dioxide emissions, we continue to use a factorappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (1) Fuel Type Petroleum 0.5 Natural Gas 26.8 Coal 0.3 Wood 0.4 Electricity (2) 50.5 Total 78.5 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

205

Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water  

SciTech Connect

The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (??Methane in the Arctic Shelf? or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (??metagenomes?). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

David Kirchman

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Microbial oxidation of methane from old landfills in biofilters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfill gas emissions are among the largest sources of the greenhouse gas methane. For this reason, the possibilities of microbial methane degradation in biofilters were investigated. Different filter materials were tested in two experimental plants, a bench-scale plant (total filter volume 51 l) and a pilot plant (total filter volume 4 m{sup 3}). Three months after the beginning of the experiment, very high degradation rates of up to 63 g CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 3}h) were observed in the bench-scale plant at mean methane concentrations of 2.5% v/v and with fine-grained compost as biofilter material. However, the degradation rates of the compost biofilter decreased in the fifth month of the experiment, probably due to the accumulation of exopolymeric substances formed by the microorganisms. A mixture of compost, peat, and wood fibers showed stable and satisfactory degradation rates around 20 g/(m{sup 3}h) at mean concentrations of 3% v/v over a period of one year. In this material, the wood fibers served as a structural material and prevented clogging of the biofilter. Extrapolation of the experimental data indicates that biofilters for methane oxidation have to be at least 100 times the volume of biofilters for odor control to obtain the same cleaning efficiency per unit volume flow of feed gas.

Streese, J.; Stegmann, R

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

208

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane production from landfills if organic waste is composted prior to. The quantities and rates of methane production were measured from simulated landfill cells containing composted and raw simulated refuse. The refuse was composted in an open pile and characterized by temperature, pH, ash content and C02 evolved during aerobic respiration. Assuming a 1 0% lignin content, the labile carbon fraction was reduced by an estimated 71 % during composting. Over a of six month period, simulated landfill cells filled with raw waste generated 66 M3 methane per Mg of dry refuse, while cells containing compost produced 31 M3 methane per Mg of dry compost. Per unit weight of dry raw material, composted waste placed in a landfill produced only 23% of the methane that was generated from raw refuse.

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

210

Why Sequence a Methane-Oxidizing Archaean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Methane-Oxidizing Archaeon? a Methane-Oxidizing Archaeon? Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose atmospheric concentration has increased significantly because of anthropogenic activities and fluctuated naturally over glacial and interglacial cycles. While the importance of methane in Earth's climate dynamics has been well established, the global processes regulating its oceanic cycling remain poorly understood. Although there are high rates of methane production in many marine sedimentary environments (including a number that have been targeted as petroleum reserves), net methane sources from the ocean to the atmosphere appear to be small. This is due in large part to a biogeochemical process known as the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Microbially mediated AOM reduces methane flux from ocean to atmosphere, stimulates subsurface microbial

211

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 DE-NT0005667 Goal The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of aerobic methanotrophy in preventing the escape of methane from marine, hydrate-bearing reservoirs to the atmosphere and ultimately to better define the role of aerobic methanotrophy in the global carbon cycle. Graph overlayed on photo - Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume, Geophysical Research Letters, November 2007 Performers University of California – Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara (UCSB), CA 93106 Background The global methane reservoir in the form of gas hydrate is estimated at 500–10,000 Gt (KVENVOLDEN, 1995; MILKOV, 2004). This pool of carbon

212

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as described by Dillon, et al. (1998). Failure would be accompanied by the release of methane gas, but a portion of the methane is likely to be oxidized unless the gas release is...

213

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

214

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Waters Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005666 Goal The goal of this project is gain a better understanding of...

215

NETL: News Release - Methane Hydrate Production Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of CO2 molecules for methane molecules in the solid-water hydrate lattice, the release of methane gas, and the permanent storage of CO2 in the formation. This field experiment will...

216

coalbed methane | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coalbed methane coalbed methane Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations Source NREL Date Released April 30th, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 07th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords coalbed methane GEF Kenya NREL SWERA TMY UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Data (zip, 5.4 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

217

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields under relatively mild reaction conditions. Results in this document are reported under the headings: methane oxidation over silica, methane oxidation over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, and oxidative coupling of methane over sulfate-doped Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. 24 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time.

Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA); D' Este, Joseph R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time. 3 figs.

Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D`Este, J.R.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

QUEST FOR NEW MATERIALS FOR METHANE STORAGE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quest for New Materials for Methane Storage: Gas Adsorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements. Yang Peng, 1,2 Vaiva ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Nuclear spin functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane Symmetry Operations. 9. Symmetry Properties of Laboratory-Fixed Nuclear Spin Functions, Nuclear Spin Statistics, and Parities. ...

222

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane Dariusz Strapo´c,1, Maria Mastalerz,2 Katherine, biodegradation Abstract Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal- bearing basins low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older

Macalady, Jenn

223

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

224

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methane production by attached film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

Jewell, William J. (202 Eastwood Ave., Ithaca, NY 14850)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Feasibility Production Feasibility Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. Methane, the predominant component of natural gas, forms hydrate in the presence of water, low temperatures and high pressures. Alternatively, when the temperature is increased or the pressure decreased so that hydrates are outside their stability field, they dissociate into methane and water.

231

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee The Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee was created in response to provisions of the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 and reauthorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The Committee is to advise the Secretary of Energy on potential applications of methane hydrate; assist in developing recommendations and priorities for the methane hydrate research and development program; and submit to Congress one or more reports on an assessment of the research program and an assessment of the DOE 5-year research plan. The Committee's charter stipulates that up to 15 members can be appointed by the Secretary of Energy, representing institutions of higher education, industrial enterprises and oceanographic institutions and state agencies.

232

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.conversion factor of pounds of carbon dioxide emitted perappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Compilation of air-pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources, Fourth Edition. Supplement B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42, new or revised emissions data are presented for Bituminous And Subbituminous Coal Combustion; Anthracite Coal Combustion; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Refuse Combustion; Sewage Sludge Incineration; Surface Coating; Polyester Resin Plastics Product Fabrication; Soap and Detergents; Grain Elevators and Processing Plants; Lime Manufacturing; Crushed Stone Processing; Western Surface Coal Mining; Wildfires and Prescribed Burning; Unpaved Roads; Aggregate Handling And Storage Piles; Industrial Paved Roads; Industrial Wind Erosion; and Appendix C.3, Silt Analysis Procedures.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E STIMATES OF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTIONOF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTION PLANTS A.

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

237

Methane and carbon dioxide production from simulated anaerobic degradation of cattle carcasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates methane and carbon dioxide production after land burial of cattle carcasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disposal of animal mortalities is often overlooked in evaluating the environmental impacts of animal production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer we quantify annual emissions from cattle carcass disposal in the United States as 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. - Abstract: Approximately 2.2 million cattle carcasses require disposal annually in the United States. Land burial is a convenient disposal method that has been widely used in animal production for disposal of both daily mortalities as well as during catastrophic mortality events. To date, greenhouse gas production after mortality burial has not been quantified, and this study represents the first attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from land burial of animal carcasses. In this study, anaerobic decomposition of both homogenized and unhomogenized cattle carcass material was investigated using bench-scale reactors. Maximum yields of methane and carbon dioxide were 0.33 and 0.09 m{sup 3}/kg dry material, respectively, a higher methane yield than that previously reported for municipal solid waste. Variability in methane production rates were observed over time and between reactors. Based on our laboratory data, annual methane emissions from burial of cattle mortalities in the United States could total 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. Although this represents less than 1% of total emissions produced by the agricultural sector in 2009, greenhouse gas emissions from animal carcass burial may be significant if disposal of swine and poultry carcasses is also considered.

Yuan Qi; Saunders, Samuel E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States); Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L., E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dairy methane generator. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

Williams, T.B.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 EST-380-NEDA Goal The purpose of this study is to establish sediment lithology and quantification of methane in hydrates hosted in fine-grained sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), a marine site of methane hydrate occurrence. The results will help establish a correlation between laboratory data and hydrate accumulation field data on dispersed hydrates in the natural environment. Performer Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York 11973 Background Gas hydrates are located in permafrost and marine environments and show potential as a vast methane source worldwide. However, methane is about 17 times more potent a greenhouse gas than CO2 and the inherent instability of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

Methane Hydrates R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates R&D Program Methane Hydrates R&D Program Gas hydrates are a naturally-occurring combination of methane gas and water that form under specific conditions of low temperature and high pressure. Once thought to be rare in nature, gas hydrates are now known to occur in great abundance in association with arctic permafrost and in the shallow sediments of the deep-water continental shelves. The most recent estimates of gas hydrate abundance suggest that they contain

242

Table 16. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

aIncludes Illinois and Indiana. Note: The above table is based on coalbed methane proved reserves and production volumes as reported to the EIA on ...

243

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seol, Y. and T. J. Kneafsey, Methane hydrate induced permeability modification for multiphase flow in unsaturated porous media, Journal of Geophysical Research, 2011, In...

244

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL ORD Methane Hydrate Research - Thermal Properties of Hydrate Tool Development Last Reviewed 3182013 Project Goal The goal of this project is increased understanding of...

245

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Model Code Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study An International Effort to Compare Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulators Code Comparison Logo The National Energy Technology Laboratory...

246

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of gas hydrates. The effort aims to quantify the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and hydrate cemented sediments for use in models of the dynamic behavior of...

247

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5102012 ESD05-048 Goal The project is bringing new laboratory measurements and...

248

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Projects If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. Search Hydrates Projects Active Projects | Completed...

249

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characterization and temporal variation of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes on the Alaska North Slope in response to Arctic climate change Last Reviewed 632013 DE-NT0005665...

250

,"California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","...

251

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Gulf of Mexico and 2) NRL's Advanced Research Initiative on shallow sediment methane seeps. Geochemical data coupled with heat flow probe data were used to estimate...

252

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2013 Washington, DC July 16, 2013 Meeting Minutes More Documents & Publications Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Electricity Advisory Committee Notice of Open...

253

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

late Quaternary. An investigation of the nature of deposition and alteration of the methane hydrate in cores from the Umnak Plateau in the southeastern Bering Sea was conducted...

254

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

establishing high-priority geographical regions of prospective interest, in terms of methane volume estimates; c). Prediction of environmental effects and geologic risks at the...

255

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goal was to develop new methodologies to characterize the physical properties of methane hydrate and hydrate sediment systems. Performers Westport Technology Center...

256

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

during NGHP Expedition 01 Background Gas hydrate distribution in sediments depends on methane supply, which in turn depends on fluid flow. When drilling data are available to...

257

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3182013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOENETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies...

258

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(RUS) technique to examine hydrate formationdissociation processes. For determining methane abundance and location on a grain-to-grain scale, a completely new method of...

259

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

natural and simulated sediment samples, and to use these sediments as hosts to form methane hydrate and to investigate the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation...

260

,"Federal Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for this sample, but Raman bands from both samples were essentially identical: methane and ethane along with trace amounts of isobutene and trans-butane. Small angle...

262

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the behavior of gas hydrates in their natural environment under either production (methane gas extraction) or climate change scenarios. This research is closely linked with...

263

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determine the potential impacts of gas hydrate instability in terms of the release of methane into seafloor sediments, the ocean and the atmosphere. Performers University of...

264

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02172010 EST-380-NEDA Goal The purpose of this study is to...

265

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and presentations as well as a listing of funded students can be found in the Methane Hydrate Program Bibliography PDF. A final report is available by request. Contact...

266

,"Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

267

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and presentations as well as a listing of funded students can be found in the Methane Hydrate Program Bibliography PDF. Final Project Report PDF-23MB - October, 2009...

268

,"Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

269

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization project has resulted in a characterization of two large prospective methane hydrate accumulations (or trends); the Eileen Trend, which underlies but extends well...

270

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Physical Properties of Methane Hydrate Deposit at Blake Ridge Last Reviewed 02052010 Bathymetric location map of the Blake Ridge study area Bathymetric location map...

271

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizon spill approximately 10 miles from the observatory showed increased levels of methane at two depths where detectable levels had not been seen in the past. The evidence...

272

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slope represents an important milestone in an ongoing evaluation of Alaskan Arctic methane hydrate potential. This evaluation, a joint effort of DOE, USGS, BP Exploration...

273

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey, Woods Hole Field Center Location Woods Hole Massachusetts Background Oceanic methane hydrates are a major emerging research topic spanning energy resource issues, global...

274

New Materials Make Methane Capture Possible  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2013... and FER, were able to concentrate dilute methane streams into moderate concentrations that could be used to treat coal-mine ventilation air.

275

Coal bed methane reservoir simulation studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to perform simulation studies for a specific coal bed methane reservoir. First, the theory and reservoir engineering aspects of (more)

Karimi, Kaveh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

methane hydrate science plan-final.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Revolu on. Methane in the atmosphere comes from many sources, including wetlands, rice cul va on, termites, cows and other ruminants, forest fi res, and fossil fuel...

277

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for converting methane and water to methanol and hydrogen using visible light and a catalyst.

Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D' Este, J.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Use of Positive Matrix Factorization with Conditional Probability Functions in Air Quality Studies: An Application to Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study to identify groups of compounds (source categories) associated with different processing facilities, a multivariate receptor model called Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to hourly average concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured at five Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) located near the Ship Channel in Houston, Texas. The observations were made between June and October, 2003, and limited to nighttime measurements (21:00 pm 6:00 am) in order to remove the complexity of photochemical processing and associated changes in the concentrations of primary and secondary VOCs. Six to eight volatile organic compounds source categories were identified for the five Ship Channel sites. The dominant source categories were found to be those associated with petrochemical, chemical industries and fuel evaporation. In contrast, source categories associated with on-road vehicles were found to be relatively insignificant. Although evidence of biogenic emissions was found at almost all the sites, this broad category was significant only at the Wallisville site, which was also the site furthest away from the Ship Channels area and closest to the northeast forest of Texas. Natural gas, accumulation and fuel evaporation sources were found to contribute most to the ambient VOCs, followed by the petrochemical emission of highly reactive ethene and propylene. Solvent / paint industry and fuel evaporation and emission from refineries were next in importance while the on-road vehicle exhaust generally contributed less than 10% of the total ambient VOCs. Specific geographic areas associated with each source category were identified through the use of a Conditional Probability Function (CPF) analysis that related elevated concentrations of key VOCs in each category to a network of grids superimposed on the source inventories of the VOCs.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the ...

Ruppel, Carolyn

280

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane New Field Discoveries Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production...

283

Changes related to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)" Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)...

284

Pages that link to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)" Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)...

285

Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production LA, South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

286

California (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

287

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production (Billion Cubic Feet)...

288

Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

289

Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

290

Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

291

Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...

292

Texas--RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

293

Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

294

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Federal Offshore U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

295

Texas--RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

296

Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 LA, South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

297

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Alaska Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

298

Texas--RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

299

Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

300

Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

302

Texas--RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

303

Texas--RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

304

Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...

305

Texas--RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

306

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, October 2011...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2011 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, October 2011 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes October 2011 Washington, DC Advisory Committee...

307

New York Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production New York Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

308

Texas--RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

309

North Dakota Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

310

Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production LA, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

311

Texas--RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

312

Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

313

Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

314

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Alaska Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

315

Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

316

Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

317

Why sequence functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen cycles in freshwater lakes? Methane is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, but it is also a potential source of...

318

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Advisory Committee Charter 1. Committee's Official Designation. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (MHAC) 2. Authority....

319

Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

320

Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Mississippi Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

322

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

323

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Application of Crunch...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

multi-dimensional reactive transport simulation code to constrain modern day methane fluxes and to reconstruct past episodes of methane flux that can be correlated with...

324

Utilization of ventilation air methane as a supplementary fuel at a circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation air methane (VAM) accounts for 60-80% of the total emissions from underground coal mining activities in China, which is of serious greenhouse gas concerns as well as a waste of valuable fuel sources. This contribution evaluates the use of the VAM utilization methods as a supplementary fuel at a circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler. The paper describes the system design and discusses some potential technical challenges such as methane oxidation rate, corrosion, and efficiency. Laboratory experimentation has shown that the VAM can be burnt completely in circulated fluidized bed furnaces, and the VAM oxidation does not obviously affect the boiler operation when the methane concentration is less than 0.6%. The VAM decreased the incomplete combustion loss for the circulating fluidized bed combustion furnace. The economic benefit from the coal saving insures that the proposed system is more economically feasible. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Changfu You; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

326

Manifold methods for methane combustion  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to develop a new method for studying realistic chemistry in turbulent methane combustion with NO{sub x} mechanism. The realistic chemistry is a simplification to a more detailed chemistry based on the manifold method; accuracy is determined by interaction between the transport process and the chemical reaction. In this new (tree) method, probability density function or partially stirred reactor calculations are performed. Compared with the reduced mechanism, manifold, and tabulation methods, the new method overcomes drawbacks of the reduced mechanism method and preserves the advantages of the manifold method. Accuracy is achieved by specifying the size of the cell.

Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to modelmade at 91 and 483 m on a tall-tower near Walnut Grove, CA (

Zhao, Chuanfeng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

TRENDS: ANNUAL ESTIMATES OF GLOBAL ANTHROPOGENIC METHANE EMISSIONS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flaring and Venting of Natural Gas Oil and Gas Supply Systems, Excluding Flaring Coal Mining Biomass Burning Livestock Farming Rice Farming and Related Activities Landfills...

329

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

330

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 11/30/2011 Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 11/30/2011 DE-FC26-06NT42963 Goal The goal of this project is to develop observational and experimental data that can provide a better understanding of the basic mechanisms at work in a methane hydrate reservoir that is under production. To this end, a thorough physical understanding of underlying phenomena associated with methane hydrate production will be acquired through unique, multi-scale experiments and associated analyses. In addition, one or more mathematical models that account for the observed phenomena and provide insights that may help to optimize methane hydrate production methods will be developed. Performers Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

331

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide Table 2-4 Overall Weighted Average Emission FactorsCarbon dioxide .. 18 Figure 2-4 PM 2.5 Mass Emission Factors

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers  

SciTech Connect

Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thin cover and 330 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH{sub 4} mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area.

Abichou, Tarek [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)]. E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu; Chanton, Jeffery [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Powelson, David [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Fleiger, Jill [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Escoriaza, Sharon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Lei, Yuan [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Stern, Jennifer [Department of Geology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and Japan are outspending the United States on hydrate science and engineering R&D by a factor of 10, and may bring this resource to market as much as a decade before the United States.

Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

335

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Remote sensor improves methane leakage surveys  

SciTech Connect

The remote sensing methane detector (RSMD) described in this paper is the result of a twelve year cooperative research program sponsored by the Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Environmental Research and Technology, Inc. and the Gas Research Institute. It is a hand-held, rechargeable battery-powered sensor that operates eight hours on one charge with a sensitivity very specific to methane. It can be scanned along the right of way to detect any methane in its path, up to at least 50 feet away. The RSMD is methane specific in that it only sense methane with minor sensitivity to ethane. This makes it particularly useful in industrial areas where present instruments are confused by solvents. It cannot be poisoned by silicones or leaded gasoline, since it is an optical system. When a cloud of methane has been detected by the RSMD, a sample cell attachment can be used to determine methane concentration in parts per million. A low power microcomputer is used in the RSMD to control its operation.

Eberle, A.C.; Kebabian, P.L.; Kruse, J.R.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

338

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future August 31, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Jenny Hakun What Are Methane Hydrates? Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. The substance looks remarkably like white ice, but it does not behave like ice. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas.

339

Methane Hydrates and Climate Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrates and Climate Change Hydrates and Climate Change Methane Hydrates and Climate Change Methane hydrates store huge volumes of methane formed by the bacterial decay of organic matter or leaked from underlying oil and natural gas deposits. The active formation of methane hydrates in the shallow crust prevents methane, a greenhouse gas, from entering the atmosphere. On the other hand, warming of arctic sediments or ocean waters has the potential to cause methane hydrate to dissociate, releasing methane into the deepwater sediments, the ocean or atmosphere. DOE is conducting research to understand the mechanisms and volumes involved in these little-studied processes. DOE environmental and climate change research projects related to Arctic methane hydrate deposits include: Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading

340

Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of three catalysts formulated for methane oxidation on a cng-fueled pickup truck. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the exhaust emission results obtained from the evaluation of three specialized methane catalytic converters supplied by three different catalysts manufacturers. The catalytic converters were evaluated using a compressed natural gas-fueled Dodge Dakota pickup truck. The report includes a description of the catalytic converters, the test vehicle, test facilities and test procedures.

Piotrowski, G.K.; Schaefer, R.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

Frazer, J.W.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks: Thermal, Electrical and Stress Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a parametric analysis performed to determine the effect of varying the percent on-cell reformation (OCR) of methane on the thermal and electrical performance for a generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack design. OCR of methane can be beneficial to an SOFC stack because the reaction (steam-methane reformation) is endothermic and can remove excess heat generated by the electrochemical reactions directly from the cell. The heat removed is proportional to the amount of methane reformed on the cell. Methane can be partially pre-reformed externally, then supplied to the stack, where rapid reaction kinetics on the anode ensures complete conversion. Thus, the thermal load varies with methane concentration entering the stack, as does the coupled scalar distributions, including the temperature and electrical current density. The endotherm due to the reformation reaction can cause a temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet, resulting in large thermal gradients. This effect depends on factors that include methane concentration, local temperature, and stack geometry.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

"Blue Sky" Approaches to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: An Initial Assessment of Potential New Types of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an initial assessment of potential new approaches to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that might be capable of generating large-scale GHG emissions offsets at relatively low cost compared to other GHG mitigation options. The nine potential blue sky approaches assessed in this report include biochar, destruction of ozone depleting substances, control of natural fugitive methane seeps from coal seams, control of fugitive natural gas emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Production and Ebullition of Methane in a Shallow Eutrophic Lake (Lake Elsinore, CA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide and total gaseous mercuryFluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from a small productiveebullition of methane and carbon dioxide from a eutrophied

Martinez, Denise Nicole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

Green, Michael A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Methane Digester Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate RFA can provide up to $250,000 of loan principal Program Info Funding Source Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) State Minnesota Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount RFA participation limited to 45% of loan principal Provider Minnesota Department of Agriculture Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by providing zero-interest loans to eligible borrowers. The loan program is part of the Rural Finance Authority (RFA) revolving loan fund, through which farmers can receive financial aid

348

Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2010 FY 2010 Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress September 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | September 2011 FY 2010 Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress | Page 2 Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report entitled, U.S. Department of Energy FY 2010 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area of

349

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Studies in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5/10/2012 Laboratory Studies in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5/10/2012 ESD05-048 Goal The project is bringing new laboratory measurements and evaluation techniques to bear on the difficult problems of characterization and gas recovery from methane hydrate deposits. Performer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Background LBNL is performing laboratory tests to provide data to support the characterization and development of methane hydrate deposits. Major areas of research underway include hydrologic measurements, combined geomechanical/geophysical measurements, and synthetic hydrate formation studies. Hydrologic Measurements Relatively little research has been done to experimentally determine

350

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection and Microbiological Analysis of Gas Hydrate Cores Collection and Microbiological Analysis of Gas Hydrate Cores FWP-4340-60 and FWP-42C1-01 Goal Determine the presence and activity of methanogens in methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Background The project was set up to determine a fundamental modeling parameter - the amount of methane generated in deep sediments by methanogenic microorganisms. This would allow methane distribution models of gas hydrate reservoirs to accurately reflect an unknown volume and the distribution of biogenic methane within in a reservoir. The personnel at INEL have experience in similar biologic research and are considered to be experts by their global peers. Performer Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) - sample collection and analysis Location

351

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate DE-FC26-05NT42663 Goal The goal of this project was to establish rock physics models for use in generating synthetic seismic signatures of methane hydrate reservoirs. Ultimately, the intent was to improve seismic detection and quantification of offshore and onshore methane hydrate accumulations. Performer Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Background Gas hydrate reservoir characterization is, in principle, no different from traditional hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The seismic response of the subsurface is determined by the spatial distribution of the elastic properties (properties of the subsurface that deform as seismic waves pass through it) and attenuation. By mapping changes in the elastic properties, scientists can identify geologic features, including hydrocarbon reservoirs.

352

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 3 3 3...

353

Alabama Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 23...

354

Kansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 17 25 38...

355

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the DV JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02052010 DE-FC26-01NT41329 photo of a man showing the pressure...

356

Virginia Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 56 81...

357

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that the hydrate in this region occurs in patchy deposits and may require a high methane flux from the subsurface in order to form more continuous drilling prospects. Project...

358

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-AF26-01NT00370 Goal The goal of the project is to better characterize potential methane hydrate drilling sites in the Gulf of Mexico for the Ocean Drilling Program....

359

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 133 278...

360

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area, known as Mississippi Canyon lease block 118, is well-known for the occurrence of methane hydrate and is the location of the University of Mississippis gas hydrate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 58 68...

362

Methane Hydrates - Mt. Elbert Well Log Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more. Project background information - Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization - DE-FC26-01NT41332 More information on the National Methane Hydrates R&D Program...

363

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FWP-4340-60 and FWP-42C1-01 Goal Determine the presence and activity of methanogens in methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Background The project was set up to determine a...

364

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of high chloride concentration and no sulfate reduction zone, indicating areas of high methane flux. The February 2005 RV Pelican cruise was a follow-up to the May 2004 cruise....

365

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 182013 DE-NT0005667 Goal The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of...

366

Montana Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 12 12 13...

367

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3 5...

368

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to develop a two-dimensional, basin-scale model for the deep sediment biosphere with methane dynamics to provide a better picture of the distribution of hydrates on the sea floor...

369

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal The overall objective of this project is to develop a new method to assess methane hydrate distribution using 3-D seismic data calibrated to wellbore data. The method...

370

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas...

371

The role of methane in tropospheric chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While methane is chemically quite inert to reactions with atmospheric molecular species, it does react with atomic species and molecular radicals. Because of its relatively large abundance in the global troposphere and ...

Golomb, D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for theemissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Upgrading drained coal mine methane to pipeline quality: a report on the commercial status of system suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's scenario of growing energy demand worldwide and rising natural gas prices, any methane emitted into the atmosphere is an untapped resource of energy and potentially a lost opportunity for additional revenue. In 2005, 9.7% of the total US anthropogenic emissions of methane were attributed to coal production. In recent years, many gassy coal mines have seized the opportunity to recover coal mine methane (CMM) and supply it to natural gas pipeline systems. With natural gas prices in the US exceeding $7.00 per million Btu, CMM pipeline sales brought in an annual revenue topping $97 million in 2005. However, significant opportunity still exists for tapping into this resource as 22% of the drained CMM remains unutilized as of 2005, primarily because its quality does not meet the requirements of natural gas pipeline systems. Recent advances in technologies now offer off-the-shelf options in the US that can upgrade the drained CMM to pipeline quality. These gas upgrading technologies are not only opening up the market to lower-quality methane resources but also providing significant means for reducing emissions, since methane is over 20 times a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. This report reviews current gas upgrading technologies available in the market for removal of typical CMM contaminants, provides examples of their successful commercial implementation and compiles a list of vendors specific to nitrogen rejection systems, since nitrogen exposes the biggest challenge to upgrading CMM. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 9 apps.

Carothers, F.P.; Schultz, M.L.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Methane level rise blamed in greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

As scientists continue to probe effects of global warming trends and the greenhouse effect, increasing attention is being placed on the impact of methane. Last year, scientists at the University of California in Irvine found there were almost 1.7 parts per million of methane in the troposphere- 11% higher that a decade ago and climbing at 1% annually. European scientists came up with similar analyses, and the belief is that methane is currently 2.4 times higher than it has ever been in the last 160,000 years. The big challenge now is to identify the sources of the methane. About 15 to 20% can be traced to oil and gas wells, coal mining and other tapping of the gas trapped in the planet's crust. Other sources are bacteria working in tropical rain forests, burned-off clearings, etc. Cattle figure high on the list of methane generators. When domesticated herds of sheep, goats, pigs, etc. are figured, the total rises to 73 million metric tons per year- a 435% increase since 1890. Rice paddies are also rated a major source of methane. It's estimated that 115 million metric tons rise from rice paddies a year, as much as is coming from natural swamps and wetlands. When scientists added up all the published estimates of methane production, the total ranged from 400 million to 640 million metric tons a year. Estimates of how much methane the atmosphere can handle are similarly uncertain, ranging from 300 million to 650 million metric tons a year.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Explosive photodissociation of methane induced by ultrafast intense laser  

SciTech Connect

A new type of molecular fragmentation induced by femtosecond intense laser at the intensity of 2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is reported. For the parent molecule of methane, ethylene, n-butane, and 1-butene, fluorescence from H (n=3{yields}2), CH (A {sup 2}{delta}, B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup -}, and C {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 2}{pi}), or C{sub 2} (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) is observed in the spectrum. It shows that the fragmentation is a universal property of neutral molecule in the intense laser field. Unlike breaking only one or two chemical bonds in conventional UV photodissociation, the fragmentation caused by the intense laser undergoes vigorous changes, breaking most of the bonds in the molecule, like an explosion. The fragments are neutral species and cannot be produced through Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ion. The laser power dependence of CH (A{yields}X) emission of methane on a log-log scale has a slope of 10{+-}1. The fragmentation is thus explained as multiple channel dissociation of the superexcited state of parent molecule, which is created by multiphoton excitation.

Kong Fanao; Luo Qi; Xu Huailiang; Sharifi, Mehdi; Song Di; Chin, See Leang [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Center for Optics, Photonics, and Laser, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Center for Optics, Photonics, and Laser, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Methane cracking over a bituminous coal char  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane cracking over a bed of Chinese bituminous coal char was studied using a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 1073 and 1223 K. Methane conversion over the fresh char increased with increasing temperature to 90% at 1223 K. Hydrogen was the only gas-phase product that was detected during the experimentation. The char was shown to exert a significant catalytic effect on methane cracking by comparing results from experiments with the raw char and demineralised char as well as from blank experiments using quartz. It was further shown that the ash was not the source of the catalytic effect of the char. However, both methane conversion and hydrogen yield decreased with increasing reaction time, irrespective of other experimental conditions, indicating that the char rapidly became deactivated following the exposure to methane. It was speculated that the deposition of carbon from methane cracking was responsible for this deactivation, which is supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image analysis. It was demonstrated that the catalytic activity of the deactivated char can be partially recovered by burning off the carbon deposits with an oxidizing gas mixture containing 0.46% oxygen. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Zhi-qiang Sun; Jin-hu Wu; Mohammad Haghighi; John Bromly; Esther Ng; Hui Ling Wee; Yang Wang; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

COMPILATION AND ANALYSES OF EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE NOAA ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY PROJECT. PROGRESS REPORT, AUGUST 1997.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for circa 1985 and 1990 and Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) for circa 1990 have been compiled by this project. Work on the inventories has been carried out under the umbrella of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program. The 1985 NO{sub x} inventory was compiled using default data sets of global emissions that were refined via the use of more detailed regional data sets; this inventory is being distributed to the scientific community at large as the GEIA Version 1A inventory. Global emissions of NO{sub x} for 1985 are estimated to be 21 Tg N y{sup -1}, with approximately 84% originating in the Northern Hemisphere. The 1990 inventories of NO{sub x} and NMVOCs were compiled using unified methodologies and data sets in collaboration with the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Rijksinstituut Voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene, RIVM) and the Division of Technology for Society of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, (IMW-TNO); these emissions will be used as the default estimates to be updated with more accurate regional data. The NMVOC inventory was gridded and speciated into 23 chemical categories. The resulting global emissions for 1990 are 31 Tg N yr{sup -1} for NO{sub x} and 173 Gg NMVOC yr{sup -1}. Emissions of NO{sub x} are highest in the populated and industrialized areas of eastern North America and across Europe, and in biomass burning areas of South America, Africa, and Asia. Emissions of NMVOCs are highest in biomass burning areas of South America, Africa, and Asia. The 1990 NO{sub x} emissions were gridded to 1{sup o} resolution using surrogate data, and were given seasonal, two-vertical-level resolution and speciated into NO and NO{sub 2} based on proportions derived from the 1985 GEIA Version 1B inventory. Global NMVOC emissions were given additional species resolution by allocating the 23 chemical categories to individual chemical species based on factors derived from the speciated emissions of NMVOCs in the U.S. from the U.S. EPA's 1990 Interim Inventory. Ongoing research activities for this project continue to address emissions of both NO{sub x} and NMVOCs. Future tasks include: (a) evaluation of more detailed regional emissions estimates and update of the default 1990 inventories with the appropriate estimates, (b) derivation of quantitative uncertainty estimates for the emission values, and (c) development of emissions estimates for 1995.

BENKOVITZ,C.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Separation and Purification of Methane from coal-Bed Methane via the Hydrate Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation of methane from coal-bed methane (CBM) via hydrate process using tetrahydrofuran (THF) + sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as additives was investigated in this work. The effect of additives, the concentration of the additives and hydrate memory ... Keywords: CBM, hydrate, separation, THF, SDS

Cai Jing; Chen Zhaoyang; Li Xiaosen; Xu Chungang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NETL: News Release - Converting Emissions into Energy - Three Companies to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 14, 2000 September 14, 2000 Converting Emissions into Energy - Three Companies To Develop Technologies for Tapping Coal Mine Methane Methane, the chief constituent of natural gas, is a potent greenhouse gas, and millions of cubic feet of it escape daily from active coal mines. Now, three projects selected the U.S. Department of Energy propose new ways to capture the gas and convert it to useful energy -- reducing an environmental threat while adding to the nation's supplies of clean natural gas and electric power. The National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Energy Department's chief field site for its fossil energy research program, has selected: Appalachian-Pacific Coal Mine Methane Power Co., LLC, Arlington, VA, to work with West Virginia University Research Corp., Morgantown, WV, and Invitation Energy, Mannington, WV, to convert coal mine methane from mines in Marion County, WV, and surrounding areas into liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel heavy trucks.

380

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ground-to-Air Gas Emission Rate Inferred from Measured Concentration Rise within a Disturbed Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In reference to previously observed concentrations of methane released from a source enclosed by a windbreak, this paper examines a refined inverse dispersion approach for estimating the rate of emission Q from a small ground-level source, when ...

J. D. Wilson; T. K. Flesch; P. Bourdin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Methane Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Power Inc Methane Power Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Methane Power Inc. Name Methane Power Inc. Address 121 Edinburgh South Drive Place Cary, NC Zip 27511 Sector Renewable Energy Product Methane Power is a renewable energy project developer that focuses on landfill gas-to-energy projects. Currently, they are a supplier of landfill gas generated energy to Duke Energy in North Carolina. Phone number 919-297-7206 Website http://www.methanepower.net Coordinates 35.7395875°, -78.8029226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7395875,"lon":-78.8029226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

Thornhill, D. A.

385

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel use, CO 2 emissions, and CO 2 emission factors of ten largest California electricity generatingFuel use, CO 2 emissions, and CO 2 emission factors of ten largest California electricity generating

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart.........................................................................................8 Coal and Metabolite Enrichment Studies ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16

Maxwell, Bruce D.

388

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic energy conversion system being considered in thisEnergy Fixation and Conversion with Algal Bacterial Systems/energy producer based on current methane prices. bility of a kelp to methane conversion system

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Title On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012...

390

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

391

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

392

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

393

New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

394

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

395

Western States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Western States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Western States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

396

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

397

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

398

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

399

Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

400

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama Jack C. Pashin (jpashin@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Richard H. Groshong, Jr. (rgroshon@wgs.geo.ua.edu; 205-348-1882) Deparment of Geology University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Richard E. Carroll (rcarroll@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Abstract Sequestration of CO 2 in coal is a market-based environmental solution with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while increasing coalbed methane recovery. Producing coalbed methane through injection of CO 2 is also more efficient than current techniques requiring

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed DE-NT0006553 Goal The goal of this project is to define, plan, conduct and evaluate the results of a field trial of a methane hydrate production methodology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules are exchanged in situ for methane (CH4) molecules within a hydrate structure, releasing the methane for production. The objective is to evaluate the viability of this hydrate production technique and to understand the implications of the process at a field scale. image showing Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the production of natural gas from hydrates Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the

403

SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

Sundaram, Muthu S. (Shoreham, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

gas is an important energy gas is an important energy resource for the United States, providing nearly one-quarter of total energy use. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has played a major role in developing technologies to help tap new, unconventional sources of natural gas. FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH BENEFITS Methane Hydrate R&D "The (DOE) Program has supported and managed a high-quality research portf olio that has enabled signifi cant progress toward the (DOE) Program's long-term goals." The Nati onal Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety of forms in sediments within and below thick permafrost in Arctic regions, and in the

407

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

408

CFD Modeling of Methane Production from Hydrate-Bearing Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane hydrate is being examined as a next-generation energy resource to replace oil and natural gas. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that methane hydrate may contain more organic carbon the the world's coal, oil, and natural gas combined. To assist in developing this unfamiliar resource, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has undertaken intensive research in understanding the fate of methane hydrate in geological reservoirs. This presentation reports preliminary computational fluid dynamics predictions of methane production from a subsurface reservoir.

Gamwo, I.K.; Myshakin, E.M.; Warzinski, R.P.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Multivariate statistical evaluation of equilibrium methane adsorption isotherms of coal  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of methane by coals varies over a broad range of values and appears to depend on a complex function related to coal rank. In order to evaluate these variations in methane adsorption 100 coal samples were analyzed. The paper presents some preliminary results of this study based on multivariate statistical evaluation of equilibrium methane adsorption isotherm data, coal petrology, and vitrinite reflectance.

Schwarzer, R.S.; Bayliss, G.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Abstract Methane gas is a by-product of landfilling municipal solid wastes (MSW). Most tonnes of methane annually, 70% of which is used to generate heat and/or electricity. The landfill gas. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

413

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July-September 2007 July-September 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Rice University University of Houston George J. Hirasaki Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Table of Contents DOE Methane Hydrate Program Peer Review.................................................. 3 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ........................... 3 Task 6: Numerical Models for Quantification of Hydrate and Free Gas Accumulations....................................................................................................

414

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep report direct measurements of methane concentrations made in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool located

Girguis, Peter R.

416

Methane Recovery from Animal Manures The Current Opportunities Casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry create opportunities for the proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. Pollutants from unmanaged livestock wastes can degrade the environment, and methane emitted from decomposing manure may contribute to global climate change. One management system not only provides pollution prevention but also can convert a manure problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion (AD) of livestock manures is a commercially available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable coproducts, including a cost-effective renewable fuel for livestock production operations. This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the AD animal manures. U.S. livestock operations currently employ four types of anaerobic digester technology: slurry, plug-flow, complete-mix, and covered lagoon. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, and possible end-use applications for the methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Case studies of operating digesters, with project and maintenance histories and the operators ''lessons learned,'' are included as reality checks. Factors necessary for successful projects, as well as a list of reasons explaining why some AD projects fail, are provided. The role of farm management is key; not only must digesters be well engineered and built with high-quality components, they must also be sited at farms willing to incorporate the uncertainties of a new technology. More than two decades of research has provided much information about how manure can be converted to an energy source; however, the American farmer has not been motivated to adopt new practices. More cost-effective and easily managed manure management techniques are still needed to encourage farmers to use animal manure for conversion into energy and nutrients, especially for smaller farms. AD benefits farmers monetarily and mitigates possible manure pollution problems, thereby sustaining development while maintaining environmental quality. Moreover, rural economic development will benefit from the implicit multiplier effect resulting from jobs created by implementing digester systems. Promising future waste-to-profit activities may add to the economic performance of AD. New end-use applications, which provide added value to coproducts, are discussed.

Lusk, P.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

US vehicle emissions: Creating a common currency to avoid model comparison problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III Computer programme to calculate emissions from roadtransport: methodology and emission factors (version 2.1).to compare air pollution emission estimates produced by di?

Kear, Tom P.; Eisinger, Douglas; Niemeier, Debbie A.; Brady, Mike

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for theemissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

[Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

Zinder, S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

IMPROVEMENT OF METHANE STORAGE IN ACTIVATED CARBON USING METHANE HYDRATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differently based on the type and characteristics of the coal and where the coal bed is located. Equipment acre of each coal bed in the State. These ten factors include: · The present value per acre of a coal bed; · The coal price per million BTU; · The average royalty rate; · The BTU and sulfur adjustment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

DEVELOPMENT OF A CATALYST/SORBENT FOR METHANE REFORMING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has led to the initial development of a very promising material that has the potential to greatly simplify hydrocarbon reforming for the production of hydrogen and to improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. This material, which was derived from an advanced calcium-based sorbent, was composed of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consisted of a CaO core and an alumina-based shell. By incorporating a nickel catalyst in the shell, a combined catalyst and sorbent was prepared to facilitate the reaction of hydrocarbons with steam. It was shown that this material not only catalyzes the reactions of methane and propane with steam, it also absorbs CO{sub 2} simultaneously, and thereby separates the principal reaction products, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the absorption of CO{sub 2} permits the water gas shift reaction to proceed much further towards completion at temperatures where otherwise it would be limited severely by thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, an additional water gas shift reaction step would not be required to achieve low concentrations of CO. In a laboratory test of methane reforming at 600 C and 1 atm it was possible to produce a gaseous product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} (dry basis) while also achieving a H{sub 2} yield of 95%. Methane reforming under these conditions without CO{sub 2} absorption provided a H{sub 2} concentration of 75 mole% and yield of 82%. Similar results were achieved in a test of propane reforming at 560 C and 1 atm which produced a product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was being absorbed but which contained only 69 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was not being absorbed. These results were achieved with an improved catalyst support that was developed by replacing a portion of the {alpha}-alumina in the original shell material with {gamma}-alumina having a much greater surface area. This replacement had the unfortunate consequence of reducing the overall compressive strength of the core-in-shell pellets. Therefore, a preliminary study of the factors that control the surface area and compressive strength of the shell material was conducted. The important factors were identified as the relative concentrations and particle size distributions of the {alpha}-alumina, {gamma}-alumina, and limestone particles plus the calcination temperature and time used for sintering the shell material. An optimization of these factors in the future could lead to the development of a material that has both the necessary mechanical strength and catalytic activity.

B.H. Shanks; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus A. Satrio; Timothy Diehl; Brigitte Vollmer

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Emission...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for 1990 through 2001 and Reporting Year reports for 1991 through 2002. Use Emission Inventory factors to estimate indirect emissions from the consumption of purchased...

425

File:Methane.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane.pdf Methane.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Methane.pdf Size of this preview: 448 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,218 × 1,630 pixels, file size: 929 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 5 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:51, 9 February 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:51, 9 February 2012 1,218 × 1,630, 5 pages (929 KB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: Hydraulic Fracturing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=File:Methane.pdf&oldid=404017"

426

Methane Hydrates R&D U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Power of Working Together Interagency Coordination on Methane Hydrates R&D U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l...

427

California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - No...

428

Federal Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 -...

429

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

Song Jin

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and water right holders for damage to land and to water quality and availability that is attributable to the development of coal bed methane wells. The Act aims to provide for

432

Methane Hydrates - The National R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates R&D Program Methane Hydrates R&D Program The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program Welcome to the information portal for the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. Over the past eight years, research carried out under this program has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of methane hydrates, their role in nature, and their potential as a future energy resource. This success is largely due to an unprecedented level of cooperation between federal agencies, industry, national laboratories, and academic institutions. For a quick introduction to methane hydrate and its potential as a fuel source, please read the 2011 Methane Hydrates Primer. Information on other elements of the program can be found under the remaining Key Links. Read More.

433

Operation of an aircraft engine using liquefied methane fuel  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a reciprocating aircraft engine on methane fuel is demonstrated. Since storage of the methane fuel in the gaseous state would impractical for a flight fuel system, a liquid storage system was used. System valving was configured to deliver only liquid methane to the engine supply line. The equipment description includes photo and diagram illustrations of the liquid methane storage dewar, and photos of the methane heat exchanger, pressure regulator and air-fuel mixer. The engine test results are presented for gasoline and methane in terms of RPM, horsepower, fuel flow, specific energy consumption and standard conditions horsepower. Conclusions include the finding that conversion of an aircraft reciprocating engine to operate on liquified methane is possible with very satisfactory results.

Raymer, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

RECOVERY AND UTILIZATION OF COALMINE METHANE: PILOT-SCALE DEMONSTRATION PHASE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fuel cell demonstration was conducted on coalmine methane to demonstrate the utilization of methane emissions associated with underground coal mining operations in a carbonate Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) power plant. FuelCell Energy (FCE) conducted the demonstration with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and in cooperation with Northwest Fuel Development, the operator of the Rose Valley test site in Hopedale, Ohio. The fuel cell power plant, a first generation sub megawatt power plant, was operated on CMM between August 1, 2003 and December 13, 2003. The direct fuel cell operated on low-Btu CMM with 42% methane content and achieved performance levels comparable to natural gas on a Btu feed basis. During this period 1456 hours on-load operation was achieved. The total power generated using CMM was 134 megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity. The power generated was connected to the American Electric Power grid by a 69-kilovolt (kV) transformer. The maximum power level achieved was 140 kW. Efficiency of power generation was 40% based on the lower heating value (LHV) of the CMM. Compression and drying of the CMM resulted in additional parasitic load, which reduced the overall efficiency to 36 % LHV. In future applications, on-board compression and utilization of the saturated CMM without drying will be investigated in order to reduce the auxiliary power requirements. By comparison, the internal combustion engines operating on CMM at the Hopedale site operate at an over efficiency of 20%. The over-all efficiency for the fuel cell is therefore 80% higher than the internal combustion engine (36% vs. 20%). Future operation of a 250 kW Fuel Cell Power Plant on CMM will utilize 18,400,000 cubic feet of methane per year. This will be equivalent to: (a) avoiding 7428 metric tons of CO{sub 2} emissions, (b) avoiding 16.4 million pounds of CO{sub 2} emissions, (c) removing 1640 cars off the road for one year, (d) heating 267 households for 1 year, (e) planting 2234 acres of trees. Based on the results obtained in this demonstration it can be concluded that utilization of fuel cells to mitigate CMM emissions is an attractive option that can be utilized to generate power at high efficiencies and with very low emissions.

George Steinfeld; Jennifer Hunt

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate  

SciTech Connect

Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methanewater solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Catalyst for utilization of methane in selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}, Task 2.6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides(NO{sub x}) in flue gas or engine exhaust gas with hydrocarbons as the reductant has great potential for less expense, less pollution, and easier operation than SCR with ammonia. Methane is the preferred reducing gas because of its low cost and low toxicity. Stable, low-cost catalysts for SCR with methane are required to demonstrate this technology for controlling NO{sub x} emissions. Several cobalt and nickel catalysts on synthetic clay and uranium oxide supports were investigated for their activities in reducing NO{sub x} with methane in the presence of air. The efficiency of the synthetic clay-supported nickel and cobalt catalysts for nitric oxide (NO) reduction with methane as the reducing gas was poor. The nickel oxide-uranium oxide catalyst, which was chosen for its high stability, was also ineffective. Results from the two-step experiments conducted at two-temperatures produced some interesting information on the reactions of methane with the catalysts and the reactivity of the carbonaceous intermediate. The carbonaceous material formed from methane dissociation at 450{degrees}C not only reduces NO to N{sub 2}O at lower temperatures, but also prevents oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. Unfortunately, the carbonaceous forms that reduce the NO are not available for reactions at 400{degrees}C in the presence of oxygen. A two-step process employing this chemistry would be difficult because the catalyst would have to be cycled between the two temperatures. Also the desired reduction to nitrogen is not very efficient.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41331 photo of new Anadarko drilling rig in place at Hot Ice No.1 on Alaska's North Slope Hot Ice No. 1 Drilling Platform courtesy Anadarko Petroleum Corp. Goal The goal of the project was to develop technologies for drilling and recovering hydrates in arctic areas. The specific objectives were to drill, core, and test a well through the hydrate stability zone in northern Alaska Performers Maurer Technology, Inc.* - Project coordination with DOE Anadarko Petroleum Corporation - Overall project management for the design, construction, and operation of the Arctic Drilling Platform and mobile core lab, and field coring operations Noble Engineering and Development* - Real time data collection and

438

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Prepared by: George Hirasaki Rice University August 2007 CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-06NT42960 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; Fax: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu

439

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 In Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41329 photo of a man showing the pressure core sampler on the deck of JOIDES Resolution Pressure core sampler on deck courtesy Texas A&M University Goal The goal of the project was to characterize hydrate accumulation at Hydrate Ridge (offshore Oregon) and improve the ability to use geophysical and subsurface logging to identify hydrates. A follow-on goal was to characterize hydrate accumulation at offshore Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. Background This project focused on physically verifying the existence of hydrates at Hydrate Ridge through the collection of pressurized and non-pressurized core samples and logging data. This study developed and tested tools to

440

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 - Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOE/NETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies (NGHFS) project are: Conduct field-based studies that advance the ability to predict, detect, characterize, and understand distribution of and controls on natural gas hydrate occurrences. Analyze geologic, geochemical, and microbiologic data for indications of past and current changes to the stability of natural gas hydrate in marine settings. Develop links between the U.S. Gas Hydrate Program and international R&D efforts through direct participation in international field programs and workshops. Evaluate the potential role natural gas hydrates may play in the global carbon cycle through analysis of modern and paleo-natural gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 – Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 Project Objective Observe hydrate formation and dissociation phenomena in various porous media and characterize hydrate-bearing sediments by estimating physical properties (kinetic parameters for hydrate formation and dissociation, thermal conductivity, permeability, relative permeability, and mechanical strength) to enhance fundamental understanding on hydrate formation and accumulation and to support numerical simulations and potential gas hydrate production Project Performers Yongkoo Seol – NETL Office of Research & Development Jeong Choi – Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Jongho Cha-Virginia Polytech Institute Project Location National Energy Technology Laboratory - Morgantown, West Virginia

442

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 1 - Characterization and Qualification of the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Phase 1 - Characterization and Qualification of the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to characterize and quantify the postulated gas hydrate resource associated with the Barrow Gas Fields – three producing fields located in a permafrost region near Barrow, the North Slope's biggest population center and economic hub. Map of the North Slope Borough showing the location of its eight major communities, including Barrow, the site of this research project. Map of the North Slope Borough showing the location of its eight major communities, including Barrow, the site of this research project. Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska (North Slope Borough) 99723

443

Methane Hydrate Field Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Studies Field Studies Methane Hydrate Field Studies Arctic/Alaska North Slope Field Studies Since 2001, DOE has conducted field trials of exploration and production technology in the Alaska North Slope. Although Alaska methane hydrate resources are smaller than marine deposits and currently lack outlets to commercial markets, Alaska provides an excellent laboratory to study E&P technology. The research also has implications for various Alaska resources, including potential gas hydrate resources for local communities, conventional "stranded" gas, as well as Alaska's large unconventional oil resources. The hydrate deposits have been delineated in the process of developing underlying oil fields, and drilling costs are much lower than offshore. DOE-BP Project

444

Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the experimental demonstration of a process for the direct thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. The process utilizes a thermal plasma heat source to dissociation products react to form a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen. The use of a supersonic expansion of the hot gas is investigated as a method of rapidly cooling (quenching) the product stream to prevent further reaction or thermal decomposition of the acetylene which can lower the overall efficiency of the process.

Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

447

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of Sea Floor Monitoring Station Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of Sea Floor Monitoring Station DE-FC26-02NT41328 Goal Determine the potential impacts of gas hydrate instability in terms of the release of methane into seafloor sediments, the ocean and the atmosphere. Performers University of California, San Diego (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) - manage geochemical, hydrological and sedimentological investigations Texas A&M University - manage field monitoring program Location La Jolla, California 92093 Background This project will monitor, characterize, and quantify the rates of formation and dissociation of methane gas hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and determine linkages between formation/dissociation and physical/chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of a year. The stability and response of shallow gas hydrates to temperature and chemical perturbations will be monitored in situ, and localized seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation characterized. The following will be determined: 1) The equilibrium/steady state conditions for structure II methane gas hydrates at the field site,2) whether the system is in dynamic equilibrium and the local hydrology is characterized by steady state episodic fluid flow, and 3) how fluid fluxes and fluid composition work together to dynamically influence gas hydrate stability.

448

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. Department of Energy Advisory Committee Charter - - - - ---- ---- ------~ 1. Committee's Official Designation. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (MHAC) 2. Authority:. This charter establishes the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (Committee) pursuant to Title IX, Subtitle F, Section 968, Methane Hydrate Research of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), Public Law 109-58. This charter establishes the MHAC under the authority of the Department of Energy (DOE). The MHAC is being renewed in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), as amended, 5 U.S.C., App.2. 3. Objectives and Scope of Activities. The Committee provides advice to the Secretary of Energy by developing recommendations and broad programmatic priorities for the methane

449

International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Methane Hydrate » Oil & Gas » Methane Hydrate » International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates In 1982 the multi-national Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) recovered the first subsea substantial methane hydrate deposits, which spurred methane hydrate research in the US and other countries. The successor programs, the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampled hydrate deposits off Oregon (ODP 204, 2002) and in the Cascadia Margin off Vancouver Island, Canada (ODP 146, 1992 and IODP 311, 2005). In the Atlantic Ocean off the US, ODP Leg 146 sampled hydrate deposits on the Blake Ridge and Carolina Rise in 1995. International cooperation helps scientists in the US and other countries

450

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

452

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2011,"6...

453

Methane Hydrate Research and Modeling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Modeling Clean Coal Carbon Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Research is focused on understanding...

454

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies The USGS published a USGS Professional Paper in 2010 entitled

455

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies Dataset Summary...

456

Coalbed Methane Resources in the Powder River Basin: Lithologic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Wyoming and North Dakota. Specifically, the analysis looked at: total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data from 963 cored coal samples...

457

Hydrogen Production from Methane Using Oxygen-permeable Ceramic Membranes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest as membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons (more)

Faraji, Sedigheh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Effect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dynamic nature of coalbed methane reservoir permeability makes the continuous modeling of the flow process difficult. Knowledge of conventional reservoir modeling is of little (more)

Tandon, Rohit, 1966-

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to develop analytical techniques capable of quantitatively evaluating the nature of methane hydrate reservoir systems through modeling of their acoustic response using...

460

,"Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - GAS HYDRATE DYNAMICS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the first systematic geochemical and microbiological data to constrain subseafloor methane sinks and the spatio-temporal changes in the nature of microbial systems and pore...

462

,"Lower 48 Federal Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

463

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

464

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","812013"...

465

,"Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

466

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

467

,"Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

468

,"Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

469

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

470

,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

471

Table 16: Coalbed methane proved reserves and production, 2007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Coalbed methane proved reserves and production, 2007 - 2011" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Reserves",,,,,,"Production" "State and Subdivision",,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,,2007,2008,2009...

472

,"Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

473

NETL-ORD Methane Hydrate Project - Micro XCT Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the experimental systempressure vessel development and system parameter optimization, methane hydrate will be formed and dissociated in packed sediments. Micro-XCT scans will be...

474

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2011,"6301989"...

475

,"Texas--RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

476

,"Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...