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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

5, 94059445, 2005 Methane emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 9405­9445, 2005 Methane emissions from SCIAMACHY observations J. F. Meirink et al. Title and Physics Discussions Sensitivity analysis of methane emissions derived from SCIAMACHY observations through, 9405­9445, 2005 Methane emissions from SCIAMACHY observations J. F. Meirink et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

5, 243270, 2008 Methane emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 5, 243­270, 2008 Methane emissions from plant biomass I. Vigano et al. Title Page Abstract and temperature on the emission of methane from plant biomass and structural components I. Vigano 1 , H. van.roeckmann@phys.uu.nl) 243 #12;BGD 5, 243­270, 2008 Methane emissions from plant biomass I. Vigano et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

3

6, 68416852, 2006 Methane emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 6841­6852, 2006 Methane emission from savanna grasses E. Sanhueza and L. Donoso Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Methane emission from tropical savanna Trachypogon sp. grasses E. Sanhueza;ACPD 6, 6841­6852, 2006 Methane emission from savanna grasses E. Sanhueza and L. Donoso Title Page

Boyer, Edmond

4

Methane emissions from rice fields: The effects of climatic and agricultural factors. Final report, March 1, 1994--April 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported was performed for the purpose of refining estimates of methane emissions from rice fields. Research performed included methane flux measurements, evaluation of variables affecting emissions, compilation of a data base, and continental background measurements in China. The key findings are briefly described in this report. Total methane emissions, seasonal patterns, and spatial variability were measured for a 7-year periods. Temperature was found to be the most important variable studies affecting methane emissions. The data archives for the research are included in the report. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Khalil, M.A.K. [Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Physics] [Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering] [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites in the United States #12;Why = 21 #12;Need for Study · Estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production , from academic in assumptions in estimating emissions · Measured data for some sources of methane emissions during natural gas

Lightsey, Glenn

7

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop November 12, 2014 11:00AM EST to...

8

Diurnal variations in methane emission from rice plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A greenhouse study was conducted to investigate the mechanisms causing diurnal variations in methane emission from rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). Methane emission was measured using a closed chamber system on individual rice plants at five stages...

Laskowski, Nicholas Aaron

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Methane oxidation associated with submerged brown mosses reduces methane emissions from Siberian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane oxidation associated with submerged brown mosses reduces methane emissions from Siberian, University of Hamburg, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg, Germany Summary 1. Methane (CH4) oxidation to Sphagnum species and low-pH peatlands. 2. Moss-associated methane oxidation (MAMO) can be an effective

Wehrli, Bernhard

10

Extreme Methane Emissions from a Swiss Hydropower Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme Methane Emissions from a Swiss Hydropower Reservoir: Contribution from Bubbling Sediments manuscript received February 3, 2010. Accepted February 15, 2010. Methane emission pathways.Methanediffusionfromthesediment was generally low and seasonally stable and did not account for the high concentration of dissolved methane

Wehrli, Bernhard

11

ESTIMATING METHANE EMISSION AND OXIDATION FROM TWO TEMPORARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATING METHANE EMISSION AND OXIDATION FROM TWO TEMPORARY COVERS ON LANDFILLED MBT TREATED WASTE to oxidize the methane flux coming from the residual organic fraction. The first plant was operated without recovery of organic fraction and with concentration of the fine fraction in a cell. The methane fluxes were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Tropical methane emissions: A revised view from SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical methane emissions: A revised view from SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT Christian Frankenberg,1; accepted 26 June 2008; published 12 August 2008. [1] Methane retrievals from near-infrared spectra recorded spectroscopic parameters, causing a substantial overestimation of methane correlated with high water vapor

Haak, Hein

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic methane emissions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

regional assessments... and global lake methane emissions, contributing to the greenhouse effect, are poorly known. We developed... predictions of methane emissions from easily...

14

Future methane, hydroxyl, and their uncertainties: key climate and emission parameters for future predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in tropospheric ozone and methane; global 3-D model studies,hydroxyl radical and methane life- time from the Atmosphericof meteorology and emissions on methane trends, 19902004,

Holmes, C. D; Prather, M. J; Sovde, O. A; Myhre, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions September 2007; revised 3 February 2008; accepted 28 February 2008; published 24 May 2008. [1] Methane (CH4 clear. We quantified internal cycling and methane emissions in three lakes during summer stratification

Pace, Michael L.

19

Methane emissions from lakes: Dependence of lake characteristics, two regional assessments, and a global estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane emissions from lakes: Dependence of lake characteristics, two regional assessments 2004. [1] Lake sediments are ``hot spots'' of methane production in the landscape. However, regional and global lake methane emissions, contributing to the greenhouse effect, are poorly known. We developed

20

Modeling ruminant methane emissions from the U.S. beef cattle industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer models were constructed to estimate methane emissions from cow/calf, replacement heifers, burs, stockers and feedlot sectors of the U.S. beef cattle industry. Methane (CH4) yields were calculated based on net energy values and forage...

Turk, Danny Carroll

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

Locatelli, R.

22

Methane Emissions from a Small Wind Shielded Lake Determined by Eddy Covariance, Flux Chambers, Anchored Funnels, and Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Emissions from a Small Wind Shielded Lake Determined by Eddy Covariance, Flux Chambers of methane, held to be responsible for 18% of the radiative forcing, to the atmosphere. Periods of lake but potentially one of the most important periods for methane emissions. We studied methane emissions using four

Wehrli, Bernhard

23

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

24

Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard methane (CH4 )annually to the world's total CH4 emission of ~550 Tg/yr. Recycling and thermal treatment destined for landfills and to mitigating CH4 emission. Waste generation is estimated to more than double

Columbia University

25

Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory of methane from flooded unexploited coal seams Field experience from the flooding operations of the abandoned sorption capacity of coal in the dry-air state through determining the isotherm of methane sorption

Boyer, Edmond

26

Mapping of North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution by inversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2 Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, 3 and biofuel burning. Wetlands are the largest natural source. The magnitude of global methane emissions

Jacob, Daniel J.

27

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Optimal(Estimation(of(North(American(Methane( Emissions(using(GOSAT(data:(  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal(Estimation(of(North(American(Methane( Emissions(using(GOSAT(data:( A&Sciences&Division,&Lawrence&Berkeley&National&Laboratory,&Berkeley,&CA,&USA.! *aturner@fas.harvard.edu& Harvard(University( #12;Prior Methane Emissions from EDGARv4.2/Kaplan Major/Gas Waste Coal 0 5 10 15 20 Wetlands Livestock Oil/Gas Landfills Coal North America Global #12;Satellites

Jacob, Daniel J.

29

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 FACTORS REGULATING NET METHANE FLUX IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 FACTORS REGULATING NET METHANE FLUX IN URBAN FORESTS Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545 USA Abstract. Methane is a potent greenhouse investigated four factors that could be causing this inhibition; reduced diffusion of methane into soils

Lovett, Gary M.

30

Reduced methane emissions from large-scale changes in water management of China's rice paddies during 19802000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced methane emissions from large-scale changes in water management of China's rice paddies; accepted 1 July 2002; published 24 October 2002. [1] Decreased methane emissions from paddy rice may have contributed to the decline in the rate of increase of global atmospheric methane (CH4) concentration over

31

Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 19862005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 1986­2005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model and a process-based methane model Xiaoliang Lu1 and Qianlai Zhuang1,2 Received 25 August has been made in methane modeling for the Arctic. However, there is still large uncertainty

32

Earth'sFuture Remote sensing of fugitive methane emissions from oil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth'sFuture Remote sensing of fugitive methane emissions from oil and gas production in North and tight oil reservoirs to exploit formerly inaccessible or unprofitable energy resources in rock and oil provide an opportunity to achieve energy self-sufficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Dickerson, Russell R.

33

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 49214929 Qualitative assessment of methane emission inventory from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and uncertainty estimation in national GHG emission inventories haveAtmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 4921­4929 Qualitative assessment of methane emission inventory May 2004 Abstract In developing countries like India, urban solid waste (SW) generation is increasing

Columbia University

34

Methane emission by termites: Impacts on the self-cleansing mechanisms of the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Termites are reported to emit large quantities of methane, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and dimethyl sulfide. The emission of other trace gases, namely C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} hydrocarbons, is also documented. We have carried out, both in the field and in the laboratory, measurements of methane emissions by Macrotermes subhyalinus (Macrotermitinae), Trinervitermes bettonianus (Termitinae), and unidentified Cubitermes and Microcerotermes species. Measured CH{sub 4} field flux rates ranged from 3.66 to 98.25g per m{sup 2} of termite mound per year. Laboratory measurements gave emission rates that ranged from 14.61 to 165.05 mg CH{sub 4} per termite per year. Gaseous production in all species sampled varied both within species and from species to species. Recalculated global emission of methane from termites was found to be 14.0 x 10{sup 12} g CH{sub 4}, per year. From our study, termites contribution to atmospheric methane content is between 1.11% and 4.25% per year. This study discusses the greenhouse effects as well as photochemical disposal of methane in the lower atmosphere in the tropics and the impacts on the chemistry of HO{sub x} systems and CL{sub x} cycles.

Mugedo, J.Z.A. [Maseno Univ. College (Kenya)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted wildland fire greenhouse gas and aerosol (organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) emission inventories

36

Methane Oxidation to Methanol without CO2 Emission: Catalysis by Atomic Negative Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The catalytic activities of the atomic Y-, Ru-, At-, In-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Os- ions have been investigated theoretically using the atomic Au- ion as the benchmark for the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol without CO2 emission. Dispersion-corrected density-functional theory has been used for the investigation. From the energy barrier calculations and the thermodynamics of the reactions, we conclude that the catalytic effect of the atomic Ag-, At-, Ru-, and Os- ions is higher than that of the atomic Au- ion catalysis of CH4 conversion to methanol. By controlling the temperature around 290K (Os-), 300K (Ag-), 310K (At-), 320K (Ru-) and 325K (Au-) methane can be completely oxidized to methanol without the emission of CO2. We conclude by recommending the investigation of the catalytic activities of combinations of the above negative ions for significant enhancement of the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol.

Tesfamichael, Aron; Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Methane and carbon monoxide emissions from asphalt pavement: Measurements and estimates of their important to global budgets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors measured emissions of methane from asphalt surfaces used in pavement for roadways. Maximum emissions were 22 mg/m{sup 2}/hr for 1- to 4-week-old pavement during maximum sunlight intensity. Emissions were much smaller at low sunlight intensity and dropped off to negligible amounts at night. Smaller emissions were observed for asphalt pavement of 2.5 to 3 years approximate age under similar conditions. Comparison measurements of carbon monoxide emissions resulted in maximum emissions of about 2.6 mg/m{sup 2}hr for 1-week-old pavement. These findings indicate that emissions of CH{sub 4} and CO are a function of both sunlight and temperature. Based on these results, methane emissions from asphalt pavement cannot be a significant source of atmospheric methane as compared to other identified methane sources. Therefore, although asphalt methane emissions are a form of fossil fuel methane, they cannot explain the relatively high fraction of {sup 14}C-depleted methane in the atmosphere.

Tyler, S.C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Cicerone, R.J. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA)); Lowe, D.C. (Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Lower Hutt (New Zealand))

1990-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) greenhouse gas inventory emission rate of 2.7 ? 1010 g CH4/yr is not accounted for in the CARB inventory. Citation: Peischl, J., et al. (2012), Airborne observations of methane California, which include livestock, landfills, wastewater treatment, oil and gas drilling and distribution

Cohen, Ronald C.

39

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

NREL: News - JISEA News: Study on Methane Emissions from Natural...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rates are unlikely to be representative of typical natural gas system leakage rates. * Hydraulic fracturing is not likely to be a substantial emissions source, relative to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global Methane Emissions from Pit Latrines Matthew C. Reid,*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information ABSTRACT: Pit latrines are an important form of decentral- ized wastewater management, providing focused on centralized treatment plants,4,5 it has become increasingly clear that on-site wastewater emissions from decentralized wastewater sources and reassess the appropriate actions for emissions

Mauzerall, Denise

42

Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland J O H N T . C R A W F O R D 1 , 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams J O H N T . C R A W F O R D 1 , 2 , E are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emis- sions from streams could also contribute methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble

Stanley, Emily

43

UNDERSTANDING METHANE EMISSIONS SOURCES AND VIABLE MITIGATION MEASURES IN THE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS: RUSSIAN AND U.S. EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article will compare the natural gas transmission systems in the U.S. and Russia and review experience with methane mitigation technologies in the two countries. Russia and the United States (U.S.) are the world's largest consumers and producers of natural gas, and consequently, have some of the largest natural gas infrastructure. This paper compares the natural gas transmission systems in Russia and the U.S., their methane emissions and experiences in implementing methane mitigation technologies. Given the scale of the two systems, many international oil and natural gas companies have expressed interest in better understanding the methane emission volumes and trends as well as the methane mitigation options. This paper compares the two transmission systems and documents experiences in Russia and the U.S. in implementing technologies and programs for methane mitigation. The systems are inherently different. For instance, while the U.S. natural gas transmission system is represented by many companies, which operate pipelines with various characteristics, in Russia predominately one company, Gazprom, operates the gas transmission system. However, companies in both countries found that reducing methane emissions can be feasible and profitable. Examples of technologies in use include replacing wet seals with dry seals, implementing Directed Inspection and Maintenance (DI&M) programs, performing pipeline pump-down, applying composite wrap for non-leaking pipeline defects and installing low-bleed pneumatics. The research methodology for this paper involved a review of information on methane emissions trends and mitigation measures, analytical and statistical data collection; accumulation and analysis of operational data on compressor seals and other emission sources; and analysis of technologies used in both countries to mitigate methane emissions in the transmission sector. Operators of natural gas transmission systems have many options to reduce natural gas losses. Depending on the value of gas, simple, low-cost measures, such as adjusting leaking equipment components, or larger-scale measures, such as installing dry seals on compressors, can be applied.

Ishkov, A.; Akopova, Gretta; Evans, Meredydd; Yulkin, Grigory; Roshchanka, Volha; Waltzer, Suzie; Romanov, K.; Picard, David; Stepanenko, O.; Neretin, D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reduction of Non-CO2 Gas Emissions Through The In Situ Bioconversion of Methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this research were to seek previously unidentified anaerobic methanotrophs and other microorganisms to be collected from methane seeps associated with coal outcrops. Subsurface application of these microbes into anaerobic environments has the potential to reduce methane seepage along coal outcrop belts and in coal mines, thereby preventing hazardous explosions. Depending upon the types and characteristics of the methanotrophs identified, it may be possible to apply the microbes to other sources of methane emissions, which include landfills, rice cultivation, and industrial sources where methane can accumulate under buildings. Finally, the microbes collected and identified during this research also had the potential for useful applications in the chemical industry, as well as in a variety of microbial processes. Sample collection focused on the South Fork of Texas Creek located approximately 15 miles east of Durango, Colorado. The creek is located near the subsurface contact between the coal-bearing Fruitland Formation and the underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The methane seeps occur within the creek and in areas adjacent to the creek where faulting may allow fluids and gases to migrate to the surface. These seeps appear to have been there prior to coalbed methane development as extensive microbial soils have developed. Our investigations screened more than 500 enrichments but were unable to convince us that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was occurring and that anaerobic methanotrophs may not have been present in the samples collected. In all cases, visual and microscopic observations noted that the early stage enrichments contained viable microbial cells. However, as the levels of the readily substrates that were present in the environmental samples were progressively lowered through serial transfers, the numbers of cells in the enrichments sharply dropped and were eliminated. While the results were disappointing we acknowledge that anaerobic methane oxidizing (AOM) microorganisms are predominantly found in marine habitats and grow poorly under most laboratory conditions. One path for future research would be to use a small rotary rig to collect samples from deeper soil horizons, possibly adjacent to the coal-bearing horizons that may be more anaerobic.

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goldberg, E.D. , 1976. Methane production and consumption inanaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature, 407 , 623-626.profiles indicate in situ methane flux from underlying gas

Berg, Richard D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Multi-tower Measurement Network Estimate of California's Methane Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions using atmospheric observations from five sites in Californias Central Valley across different seasons (September 2010 to June 2011). CH{sub 4} emissions for spatial regions and source sectors are estimated by comparing measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios with transport model (WRF-STILT) predictions based on two 0.1 degree CH{sub 4} (seasonally varying California-specific (CALGEM) and a static global (EDGAR42)) prior emission models. Region-specific Bayesian analyses indicate that for Californias Central Valley the CALGEM- and EDGAR42-based inversions provide consistent annual total CH{sub 4} emissions (32.872.09 vs. 31.602.17 Tg CO{sub 2}eq yr{sup -1}; 68% C.I., assuming uncorrelated errors between regions). Summing across all regions of California, optimized CH{sub 4} emissions are only marginally consistent between CALGEM- and EDGAR42-based inversions (48.356.47 vs. 64.9711.85 Tg CO{sub 2}eq), because emissions from coastal urban regions (where landfill and natural gas emissions are much higher in EDGAR than CALGEM) are not strongly constrained by the measurements. Combining our results with those from a recent study of the South Coast air basin narrows the range of estimates to 43 57 Tg CO{sub 2}eq yr{sup -1} (1.3 - 1.8 times higher than the current state inventory). These results suggest that the combination of rural and urban measurements will be necessary to verify future changes in Californias total CH{sub 4} emissions.

Jeong, Seongeun; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Vaca, Patrick; Wilczak, James M.; Fischer, Marc L.

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Department of Earth Sciences www.rhul.ac.uk/earthsciences Page 1 of 2 Fugitive Methane Emissions in the UK and their Impacts on the Urban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Earth Sciences www.rhul.ac.uk/earthsciences Page 1 of 2 Fugitive Methane Emissions James France, Prof Euan Nisbet Project Description: Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas amounts from vehicles, with emissions from landfills, ruminants and in some areas, coal mines

Sheldon, Nathan D.

49

Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The analysis of the factors effect on coalbed methane pool concentration and high-production -- The North China coalbed methane districts as an example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factors which affect coalbed methane (CBM) pool concentration and high-production based upon the exploration and research of the North China CBM districts are coal facies, coal rank and metamorphic types, structural features, the surrounding rocks and their thickness, and hydrogeological conditions. Coal facies, coal rank and their metamorphic types mainly affect the CBM forming characteristic, while the other factors effect the trap of CBM pool. The interaction of the above factors determines the petrophysics of coal reservoirs and extractability of CBM. The high-production areas where CBM pools develop well in North China CBM districts are sites which have a favorable coordination of the five factors. The poor-production areas where CBM pools are undeveloped in North China are caused by action of one or more unfavorable factors. Therefore the favorable factors coordination is the prerequisite in selecting sites for coalbed methane recovery.

Wang Shengwei; Zhang Ming; Zhuang Xiaoli

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solid waste Sudhakar Yedla*, Jyoti K. Parikh Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Vaidya (PBLF) has been proposed for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW Generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) increases with socio-economic development. In developing coun

Columbia University

52

Comparison of propane and methane performance and emissions in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Magnitude and spatio-temporal variability of methane emissions from a eutrophic freshwater lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and it can significantly impact global climate change. Considerable amounts of methane can be released to the atmosphere from freshwater lakes, ...

Varadharajan, Charuleka, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Rising methane emissions in response to climate change in Northern Eurasia during the 21st This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising methane emissions in response to climate change in Northern Eurasia during the 21st century) 045211 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/4/045211 Rising methane emissions in response to climate change the methane (CH4) exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere in Northern Eurasia from 1971

55

U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

Heath, G.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Russian Policy on Methane Emissions in the Oil and Gas Sector: A Case Study in Opportunities and Challenges in Reducing Short-Lived Forcers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper uses Russian policy in the oil and gas sector as a case study in assessing options and challenges for scaling-up emission reductions. We examine the challenges to achieving large-scale emission reductions, successes that companies have achieved to date, how Russia has sought to influence methane emissions through its environmental fine system, and options for helping companies achieve large-scale emission reductions in the future through simpler and clearer incentives.

Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Factors facilitating or limiting the use of AVO for coal-bed methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are similarities and differences in employing amplitude variation with offset (AVO) to explore for gas-sand reservoirs, as opposed to coal-bed methane (CBM) reservoirs. The main similarity is that large Poisson's ratio contrasts, resulting in AVO gradient anomalies, are expected for both kinds of reservoirs. The main difference is that cleating and fracturing raise the Poisson's ratio of a coal seam as it improves its reservoir potential for CBM, while gas always lowers the Poisson's ratio of a sandstone reservoir. The top of gas sands usually has a negative AVO gradient, leading to a class one, two, or three anomaly depending on the impedance contrast with the overlying caprock. On the other hand, the top of a CBM reservoir has a positive AVO gradient, leading to a class four anomaly. Three environmental factors may limit the usage of AVO for CBM reservoirs: the smaller contrast in Poisson's ratio between a CBM reservoir and its surrounding rock, variations in the caprock of a specific CBM reservoir, and the fact that CBM is not always free to collect at structurally high points in the reservoir. However, other factors work in favor of using AVO. The strikingly high reflection amplitude of coal improves signal/noise ratio and hence the reliability of AVO measurements. The relatively simple characteristics of AVO anomalies make them easy to interpret. Because faults are known to improve the quality of CBM reservoirs, faults accompanied by AVO anomalies would be especially convincing. A 3D-AVO example offered in this paper shows that AVO might be helpful to delineate methane-rich sweet spots within coal seams.

Peng, S.P.; Chen, H.J.; Yang, R.Z.; Gao, Y.F.; Chen, X.P. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Exploiting coalbed methane and protecting the global environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global climate change caused by greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission has received wide attention from all countries in the world. Global environmental protection as a common problem has confronted the human being. As a main component of coalbed methane, methane is an important factor influencing the production safety of coal mine and threatens the lives of miners. The recent research on environment science shows that methane is a very harmful GHG. Although methane gas has very little proportion in the GHGs emission and its stayed period is also very short, it has very obvious impact on the climate change. From the estimation, methane emission in the coal-mining process is only 10% of the total emission from human`s activities. As a clean energy, Methane has mature recovery technique before, during and after the process of mining. Thus, coalbed methane is the sole GHG generated in the human`s activities and being possible to be reclaimed and utilized. Compared with the global greenhouse effect of other GHGs emission abatement, coalbed methane emission abatement can be done in very low cost with many other benefits: (1) to protect global environment; (2) to improve obviously the safety of coal mine; and (3) to obtain a new kind of clean energy. Coal is the main energy in China, and coalbed contains very rich methane. According to the exploration result in recent years, about 30000{approximately}35000 billion m{sup 2} methane is contained in the coalbed below 2000 m in depth. China has formed a good development base in the field of reclamation and utilization of coalbed methane. The author hopes that wider international technical exchange and cooperation in the field will be carried out.

Yuheng, Gao

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subsurface life in deep-sea sediments. Science , 295 , 2067-consumption in anoxic marine sediments. Geology , 4 , 297-oxidation in methane-rich sediments overlying the Blake

Berg, Richard D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evaluation of factors that influence microbial communities and methane production in coal microcosms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Vast reserves of coal represent a largely untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to burning oil (more)

Gallagher, Lisa K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane flux from underlying gas hydrate. Geology , 24 (7),overlying the Blake Ridge gas hydrates. In Proceedings ofgas transport in shallow sediments of an accretionary complex, Southern Hydrate

Berg, Richard D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-produced electricity for battery electric vehicles. Already, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas, propane. LIPMAN AND MARK A. DELUCCHI example, promising strategies for powering motor vehicles with reduced GHGEMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES

Kammen, Daniel M.

63

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earths atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Supplementary material to:1 Global anthropogenic methane emissions 2005-2030:2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Crude oil and natural gas production19 Extraction of crude oil and natural gas gives rise to CH4 and unintended leakage. Total emissions from oil and gas4 production are the sum of venting, flaring and leakage emissions:5 6 Venting emissions from production of oil and gas, respectively, are calculated as:7 8 9 10

Meskhidze, Nicholas

66

AUTHOR: Mitchell A. Pavao-Zuckerman, John C. Waller, Teri Ingle, and Henry A. TITLE: Methane Emissions of Beef Cattle Grazing Tall Fescue Pastures at Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Methane Emissions of Beef Cattle Grazing Tall Fescue Pastures at Three Levels of Endophyte Infestation.) is an important forage in the eastern United States. The toxic syndrome associated with the endophytic fungus taurus) on two pastures each of E+ tall fescue, of endophyte free (E-) tall fescue, of E+/E- (1:1 ratio

Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

67

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THEEVEN BEYOND MANURE-ASSOCIATED METHANE EMISSIONS, INDUSTRIAL

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A PM10 emission factor for free stall dairies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was determined using the Coulter Counter Multisizer. The results of this process was a representative dairy PM PSD with 28% of TSP emissions being PM10. The reported PM10 24-hour emission factors were 4.7 kg/1000hd/day for the free-stall areas of the facility...

Goodrich, Lee Barry

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

methane that actually preceded recent concerns about potential emissions from fracking," Dubey said. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over...

71

Review article Methane production by ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article Methane production by ruminants: its contribution to global warming Angela R. MOSSa of methane in the global warming scenario and to examine the contribution to atmospheric methane made by enteric fermentation, mainly by rumi- nants. Agricultural emissions of methane in the EU-15 have recently

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

72

Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter per hour [{micro}g/m{sup 2}/h]. The dominant sulfur containing compounds in the RSG emission stream were hydrogen sulfide with emission factors between 17-201 {micro}g/m{sup 2}/h, and sulfur dioxide with emission factors between 8-64 {micro}g/m{sup 2}/h. The four highest emitting samples also had a unique signature of VSC emissions including > 40 higher molecular weight sulfur-containing compounds although the emission rate for the VSCs was several orders of magnitude lower than that of the RSGs. All of the high emitting drywall samples were manufactured in China in 2005-2006. Results from Phase 1 provided baseline emission factors for drywall samples manufactured in China and in North America but the results exclude variations in environmental conditions that may exist in homes or other built structures, including various combinations of temperature, RH, ventilation rate and the influence of coatings such as texture and paints. The objective of Phase 2 was to quantify the effect of temperature and RH on the RSG emission factors for uncoated drywall, and to measure the effect of plaster and paint coatings on RSG emission factors from drywall. Additional experiments were also performed to assess the influence of ventilation rate on measured emission factors for drywall.

Maddalena, Randy

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Mller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Mller Danish Institute This thesis, entitled "Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure" is presented in partial of digested and separated products.................... 13 3. Methane productivity and greenhouse gas emissions

74

POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE CYCLE UNDER FUTURE the available scientific literature on how natural sources and the atmospheric fate of methane may be affected by future climate change. We discuss how processes governing methane wetland emissions, per- mafrost thawing

Chappellaz, Jérôme

75

Performance and Emissions Characteristics of Bio-Diesel (B100)-Ignited Methane and Propane Combustion in a Four Cylinder Turbocharged Compression Ignition Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different combustion strategies and fuel sources are needed to deal with increasing fuel efficiency demands and emission restrictions. One possible strategy is dual fueling using readily available resources. Propane and natural gas are readily available with the current infrastructure and biodiesel is growing in popularity as a renewable fuel. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel combustion of methane (as a surrogate for natural gas) and propane as primary fuels with biodiesel pilots in a 1.9 liter, turbocharged, 4 cylinder diesel engine at 1800 rev/min. Experiments were performed with different percentage energy substitutions (PES) of propane and methane and at different brake mean effective pressures (BMEP/bmep). Brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions (NOx, HC, CO, CO2, O2 and smoke) were also measured. Maximum PES levels for B100-methane dual fuelling were limited to 70% at 2.5 bar bmep and 48% at 10 bar bmep, and corresponding values for B100-propane dual fuelling were 64% and 43%, respectively. Maximum PES was limited by misfire at 2.5 bar bmep and the onset of engine knock at 10 bar bmep. Dual fuel BTEs approached straight B100 values at 10 bar bmep while they were significantly lower than B100 values at 2.5 bar bmep. In general dual fuelling was beneficial in reducing NOx and smoke emissions by 33% and 50%, respectively from baseline B100 levels; however, both CO and THC emissions were significantly higher than baseline B100 levels at all PES and loads.

Shoemaker, N. T.; Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Krishnan, S. R.; Srinivasan, K. K.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

The basics of coalbed methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is an overview of coalbed methane (CBM), also known as coal seam gas. It provides an overview of what coalbed methane is and the current status of global coalbed methane exploration and production. Topics covered in the report include: An analysis of the natural gas industry, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; A detailed description of coalbed methane, its characteristics, and future potential; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coalbed methane; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of coalbed methane; An overview of the technologies used for coalbed methane production and water treatment; and Profiles of key coalbed methane producing countries. 25 figs., 5 tabs., 1 app.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the atmosphere. o Accounts for 20% of methane emissions from human sources. Globally cattle produce about 80 million metric tons of methane annually. o Accounts for 28% of global methane emissions

Toohey, Darin W.

78

Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extraction (including coalbed methane release), processing,extraction (including coalbed methane release), processing,

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

TEMPORAL VARIATION OF LFG EMISSION FROM DIFFERENT TYPES OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This reduction of the landfill gas (LFG) emissions requires the ability to measure low methane emissions methane emissions were observed only near the landfill gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

GHG emission factors developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South African municipalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? An average GHG emission factor for the collection and transport of municipal solid waste in South Africa is calculated. ? A range of GHG emission factors for different types of landfills (including dumps) in South Africa are calculated. ? These factors are compared internationally and their implications for South Africa and developing countries are discussed . ? Areas for new research are highlighted. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors are used with increased frequency for the accounting and reporting of GHG from waste management. However, these factors have been calculated for developed countries of the Northern Hemisphere and are lacking for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the collection, transport and landfilling of municipal waste in South Africa. As such it presents a model on how international results and methodology can be adapted and used to calculate country-specific GHG emission factors from waste. For the collection and transport of municipal waste in South Africa, the average diesel consumption is around 5 dm{sup 3} (litres) per tonne of wet waste and the associated GHG emissions are about 15 kg CO{sub 2} equivalents (CO{sub 2} e). Depending on the type of landfill, the GHG emissions from the landfilling of waste have been calculated to range from ?145 to 1016 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when taking into account carbon storage, and from 441 to 2532 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet waste, when carbon storage is left out. The highest emission factor per unit of wet waste is for landfill sites without landfill gas collection and these are the dominant waste disposal facilities in South Africa. However, cash strapped municipalities in Africa and the developing world will not be able to significantly upgrade these sites and reduce their GHG burdens if there is no equivalent replacement of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) resulting from the Kyoto agreement. Other low cost avenues need to be investigated to suit local conditions, in particular landfill covers which enhance methane oxidation.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

2, 11971241, 2005 Control of methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 2, 1197­1241, 2005 Control of methane efflux at the Tommeliten seep area H. Niemann et al Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Methane emission;BGD 2, 1197­1241, 2005 Control of methane efflux at the Tommeliten seep area H. Niemann et al. Title

Boyer, Edmond

83

Development of an ammonia emission protocol and preliminary emission factor for a central Texas dairy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dairies. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), the Texas SAPRA, does not currently use an emission factor to permit or regulate emitted ammonia for the dairy industry. ________________________ This thesis follows the style..., and is subject to gas-phase reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl (-OH) radicals, reaction with gaseous nitric acid (to form particulate ammonium nitrate), and with aerosols to form ammonium salts (Singh et al., 2001). Ammonia that does not react...

Rose, Adam Joseph

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spontaneous emission factor for semiconductor superluminescent diodes Yongsheng Zhao, Weihua Han, Junfeng Song, Xuemei Li, Yang Liu, Dingsan Gao,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spontaneous emission factor for semiconductor superluminescent diodes Yongsheng Zhao, Weihua Han emission factor is an important parameter for the characterization of semiconductor light emitting devices difference involved in each device. In this article, the spontaneous emission factor for superluminescent

Cao, Hui

85

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

Boyer, Edmond

86

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane...

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Methane in lakes and wetlands -Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methane in lakes and wetlands - Microbiological production, ecosystem Zürcher, Fortunat Joos Global methane emissions from wet ecosystems 9:50 - 10 Were tropical wetlands C4-dominated during the glacial? A view from methane

Mühlemann, Oliver

88

Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane, ethylene, methane, and two isotopically substituted methanes, CH2D2 and CD4, at a momentum constituent. For example, Fig. 1 of Ref. 2 shows that, for gaseous methane, above a certain momentum transfer

Hitchcock, Adam P.

89

Coal mine methane global review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

RESEARCH ARTICLE -BASED ON MIR INVESTIGATIONS IN LAKE GENEVA Spatial heterogeneity of benthic methane dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane dynamics in the subaquatic canyons of the Rhone River Delta (Lake Geneva) S. Sollberger · J. P methane (CH4) dynam- ics from river deltas with important organic matter accumulation have been recently Methane emission Á Methane production Introduction Atmospheric methane (CH4) concentration has dramati

Wehrli, Bernhard

91

RESEARCH ARTICLE -BASED ON MIR INVESTIGATIONS IN LAKE GENEVA Spatial heterogeneity of benthic methane dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane dynamics in the subaquatic canyons of the Rhone River Delta (Lake Geneva) S. Sollberger · J. P Abstract Heterogeneous benthic methane (CH4) dynam- ics from river deltas with important organic matter Particle size Á Methane emission Á Methane production Introduction Atmospheric methane (CH4) concentration

Wehrli, Bernhard

92

Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Deru, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sulfur pollution suppression of the wetland methane source in the 20th and 21st centuries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Emission of this powerful greenhouse gas from wet- lands is known to depend on climate, with increasing are likely due to factors other than the global warming of wetlands. Atmospheric methane (CH4) is a powerful greenhouse gas (GHG) that is responsible for an estimated 22% of the present anthropogenically enhanced

94

The Methane to Markets Coal Mine Methane Subcommittee meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) include: a report from the Administrative Support Group; strategy updates from Australia, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Poland and the USA; coal mine methane update and IEA's strategy and activities; the power of VAM - technology application update; the emissions trading market; the voluntary emissions reduction market - creating profitable CMM projects in the USA; an Italian perspective towards a zero emission strategies; and the wrap-up and summary.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks of California, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Berkeley, CA 94720-1710 Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel

96

I N V I T E D R E V I E W Methane emissions from wetlands: biogeochemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is about a third of total global emissions. We provide a perspective on important new frontiers­72% of the total global flux (Fig. 1, Table S1), with livestock, biomass burning, landfills and other waste manage perspectives from local to global scales S C O T T D . B R I D G H A M * , H I N S B Y C A D I L L O - Q U I R

97

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ammonia will probably result in the emission of other odorants (e. g. volatile fatty acids. volatile amines, indole, phenol, sulfur-containing compounds). Ammonia is produced from the microbial breakdown of uric acid in poultry manure. The decomposition... sulfate (Barthelmie and Pryor, 1998). Additionally, ammonia is an odorant and conditions conducive to the production of ammonia will probably result in the emission of other odorants (e. g. volatile fatty acids, volatile amines, indole, phenol, sulfur...

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

GHG emission factors developed for the recycling and composting of municipal waste in South African municipalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: GHG emission factors for local recycling of municipal waste are presented. GHG emission factors for two composting technologies for garden waste are included. Local GHG emission factors were compared to international ones and discussed. Uncertainties and limitations are presented and areas for new research highlighted. - Abstract: GHG (greenhouse gas) emission factors for waste management are increasingly used, but such factors are very scarce for developing countries. This paper shows how such factors have been developed for the recycling of glass, metals (Al and Fe), plastics and paper from municipal solid waste, as well as for the composting of garden refuse in South Africa. The emission factors developed for the different recyclables in the country show savings varying from ?290 kg CO{sub 2} e (glass) to ?19 111 kg CO{sub 2} e (metals Al) per tonne of recyclable. They also show that there is variability, with energy intensive materials like metals having higher GHG savings in South Africa as compared to other countries. This underlines the interrelation of the waste management system of a country/region with other systems, in particular with energy generation, which in South Africa, is heavily reliant on coal. This study also shows that composting of garden waste is a net GHG emitter, releasing 172 and 186 kg CO{sub 2} e per tonne of wet garden waste for aerated dome composting and turned windrow composting, respectively. The paper concludes that these emission factors are facilitating GHG emissions modelling for waste management in South Africa and enabling local municipalities to identify best practice in this regard.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za; Trois, Cristina

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump to:Information of Emission

100

Emission Factor for Antimony in Brake Abrasion Dusts as One of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

originating from automobiles. Abrasion dusts from commercially available brake pads (nonasbestos organic type factors originating from automobiles were approximately 32 µg Sb/braking/car for PM10 and 22 µg Sb of automobiles to the atmospheric Sb concen- tration. The emission factors of pollutants from automobiles have

Short, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Rapid communication Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid communication Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston Nathan G. Phillips a of methane (CH4) in the United States. To assess pipeline emissions across a major city, we mapped CH4 leaks extraction and pipeline transmission are the largest human-derived source of emissions (EPA, 2012). However

Jackson, Robert B.

102

Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

2002-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

Fischlin, Andreas

106

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. EIA

107

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based on Real-World Data H and Zhai 1 ABSTRACT Heavy-duty diesel vehicles contribute a substantial fraction of nitrogen oxides unloaded trucks. Replacing diesel fuel with biodiesel fuel for heavy-duty trucks may reduce tailpipe

Frey, H. Christopher

109

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4 dynamics (3309); 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: methane emissions, methane oxidation, permafrost

McGuire, A. David

110

Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

Kota, Sri H

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Photofragment imaging of methane Albert J. R. Heck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on CH4. © 1996 American Institute of Physics. S0021-9606 96 03810-3 INTRODUCTION Knowledge about the photo dissociation pathways of the methane molecule is of fundamental importance as it is of central, the photochemistry of methane in the atmosphere is mostly driven by intense solar atomic emission lines

Zare, Richard N.

113

Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for smoldering compounds emitted by burning the semi-arid SW fuels should likely be increased by about a factor of 2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present a table with emission factors for 365 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species) for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semi-arid shrublands, evergreen canopy, and duff. To our knowledge this is the most complete measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke in atmospheric models. The results provide important insights into the nature of smoke. For example, ~35% (range from 16-71%) of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to the species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are likely not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged ~2.6 for the main fire types with a range from ~1.8-8.8. About 36-63% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of organic aerosol. For the one fire in organic soil (Alaskan duff) about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC in contrast to the other fuels for which NMOC accounted for only ~1-3% of emitted carbon. 71% of the mass of NMOC emitted by the smoldering duff was un-identified. The duff results highlight the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The ?NMOC/NOx-as-NO ratio was consistently about ten for the main fire types when accounting for all NMOC, indicating strongly NOx-limited O3 production conditions. Finally, the fuel consumption per unit area was measured on 6 of the 14 prescribed fires and averaged 7.08 2.09 (1?) Mg ha-1.

Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surface to mineralization. 1. Introduction Understanding the source of methane (CH4) emissions is important for assessing

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

115

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Methane Hydrate Field Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report Methane Hydrate Workshop Report Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan Final Scientific/Technical Report

None

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Methane Digester Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by...

118

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Methanation assembly using multiple reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mechanistic Studies on the Hydroxylation of Methane by Methane Monooxygenase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanistic Studies on the Hydroxylation of Methane by Methane Monooxygenase Mu-Hyun Baik, Martin 2393 3.1. KIE in Methane Oxidations 2394 3.2. Primary and Secondary KIEs 2396 3.3. Other KIEs 2396 3 are bacteria that live on methane as their only source of carbon.1 The first step in their utilization

Baik, Mu-Hyun

122

Constraints on Asian and European sources of methane from CH4 -C2H6-CO correlations in Asian outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of emissions from coal mining and landfills. 2 #12;1. Introduction Atmospheric methane (CH4) is an importantConstraints on Asian and European sources of methane from CH4 - C2H6-CO correlations in Asian and European methane sources Submitted to J. Geophys. Res.: 22 December 2003 Revised: 9 April 2004 1 #12

Jacob, Daniel J.

123

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quantitative analysis of factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions at institutions of higher education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, emissions from buildings comprise 40% of energy consumption and carbon emissions, not including to have 10 times more effect on emissions per square meter than space such as classroom and office, while to the institution's own greenhouse gas emission reductions, energy and water conservation, and other sustainability

Illinois at Chicago, University of

125

Electrochemical methane sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

1984-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas engines are predominately unburned fuel, therefore, the non-methane hydrocarbon fraction of THC exhaust emissions typically trends

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 155 (2007) 2834 Electron Compton scattering from methane and methane-d4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from methane and methane-d4 G. Coopera, A.P. Hitchcocka,, C.A. Chatzidimitriou-Dreismannb, M. Vosc]. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Quasi-elastic electron scattering; Methane; CD4

Hitchcock, Adam P.

128

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., in conjunction with MEGTEC Systems, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, designed, built, and operated a commercial-size thermal flow reversal reactor (TFRR) to evaluate its suitability to oxidize coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM). Coal mining, and particularly coal mine ventilation air, is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions, a greenhouse gas. Ventilation air volumes are large and the concentration of methane in the ventilation air is low; thus making it difficult to use or abate these emissions. This test program was conducted with simulated coal mine VAM in advance of deploying the technology on active coal mine ventilation fans. The demonstration project team installed and operated a 30,000 cfm MEGTEC VOCSIDIZER oxidation system on an inactive coal mine in West Liberty, WV. The performance of the unit was monitored and evaluated during months of unmanned operation at mostly constant conditions. The operating and maintenance history and how it impacts the implementation of the technology on mine fans were investigated. Emission tests showed very low levels of all criteria pollutants at the stack. Parametric studies showed that the equipment can successfully operate at the design specification limits. The results verified the ability of the TFRR to oxidize {ge}95% of the low and variable concentration of methane in the ventilation air. This technology provides new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the reduction of methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air. A large commercial-size installation (180,000 cfm) on a single typical mine ventilation bleeder fan would reduce methane emissions by 11,000 to 22,100 short tons per year (the equivalent of 183,000 to 366,000 metric tonnes carbon dioxide).

Deborah Kosmack

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM COMPOSTING An Issue Paper for the: Climate Action Reserve...........................................................................................................39 6.2. Standard Methods for Quantifying Methane from Organic Waste in Landfills...40 6.3. GHG

Brown, Sally

132

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Constraints on Asian and European sources of methane from CH4-C2H6-CO correlations in Asian outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints on Asian and European sources of methane from CH4-C2H6-CO correlations in Asian outflow of European sources could result in part from recent mitigation of emissions from coal mining and landfills: Troposphere--constituent transport and chemistry; KEYWORDS: methane, emissions, correlations Citation: Xiao, Y

Palmer, Paul

134

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

4, 9931057, 2007 Methane hydrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 993­1057, 2007 Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change D. Archer Title Discussions Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Methane 2007 Correspondence to: D. Archer (d-archer@uchicago.edu) 993 #12;BGD 4, 993­1057, 2007 Methane hydrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Cirkva, Vladimir; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

Cirkva, Vladimir

137

METHANE OXIDATION (AEROBIC) Helmut Brgmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHANE OXIDATION (AEROBIC) Helmut Bürgmann Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Kastanienbaum, Switzerland Synonyms Methanotrophy Definition Methane oxidation is a microbial metabolic process for energy generation and carbon assimilation from methane that is carried out by specific

Wehrli, Bernhard

138

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Církva, Vladimír; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

Cirkva, Vladimir

139

5, 23052341, 2008 Anaerobic methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 5, 2305­2341, 2008 Anaerobic methane oxidation in Black Sea sediments N. J. Knab et al. Title of Biogeosciences Regulation of anaerobic methane oxidation in sediments of the Black Sea N. J. Knab1 , B. A. Cragg2­2341, 2008 Anaerobic methane oxidation in Black Sea sediments N. J. Knab et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia emission factors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FROM WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITIES WITH OPERATIONAL CONTROLS... program for the theory that combustion controls can be utilized to minimize NOx emissions. ... Source: Columbia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gas Emissions FLOODING THE LAND,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

signif- icant sources of emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and, in particular, methane to bacteria breaking down organic matter in the water. Methane, a much more powerful greenhouse gas than coal plants generating the same amounts of power. Dams and their associated reservoirs are globally

Batiste, Oriol

142

Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel-and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City D. A. Thornhill, A. E. Williams, T. B be low. The second figure shows the background versus diesel factors. There may be a slight horizontal factors. In this case, even when the diesel factor's contributions are very high, the background factor

Meskhidze, Nicholas

143

Economic investigation of discount factors for agricultural greenhouse gas emission offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches to discount factors, estimation and incorporation of discount factors procedures are developed. Discount factors would be imposed by credit purchasers due to noncompliance with regulatory program of the credits with GHG program including...

Kim, Man-Keun

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Dust covering factor, silicate emission and star formation in luminous QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Spitzer IRS low resolution, mid-IR spectra of a sample of 25 high luminosity QSOs at 2silicate emission feature in the average spectrum, but also in four individual objects. These are the Silicate emission in the most luminous objects obtained so far. When combined with the silicate emission observed in local, low luminosity type-I AGNs, we find that the silicate emission strength is correlated with luminosity. The silicate strength of all type-I AGNs also follows a positive correlation with the black hole mass and with the accretion rate. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, expected from starburst activity, are not detected in the average spectrum of luminous, high-z QSOs. The upper limit inferred from the average spectrum points to a ratio between PAH luminosity and QSO optical luminosity significantly lower than observed in lower luminosity AGNs, implying that the correlation between star formation rate and AGN power saturates at high luminosities.

R. Maiolino; O. Shemmer; M. Imanishi; H. Netzer; E. Oliva; D. Lutz; E. Sturm

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Carbon Dioxide Storage in Coal Seams with Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery: Geologic Evaluation, Capacity Assessment and Field Validation of the Central Appalachian Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane are benefits to sequestering carbon dioxide in coal seams. This is possible because (more)

Ripepi, Nino Samuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from {approx}61,000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and {approx}2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter D{sub p} > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 14} and (3.3 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < D{sub p} < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as D{sub p} decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting showed that diesel trucks emitted 28 {+-} 11 times more particles by volume than LD vehicles, consistent with the diesel/gasoline emission factor ratio for PM{sub 2.5} mass measured using gravimetric analysis of Teflon filters, reported in a companion paper.

Ban-Weiss, George A.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

148

Permafrost degradation and methane: low risk of biogeochemical climate-warming feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and permafrost thaw have been suggested to increase high latitude methane emissions that could potentially represent a strong feedback to the climate system. Using an integrated earth-system model framework, ...

Gao, Xiang

149

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Bromly, Reduction of Nitrogen Dioxide Emissions from Gasthan 10 ! lm), and nitrogen dioxide ( N0 2) standards areare nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (N0 2); although,

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fluxes of methane between landfills and the atmosphere: Natural and engineered controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field measurement of landfill methane emissions indicates natural variability spanning more than 2 seven orders of magnitude, from approximately 0.0004 to more than 4000 g m{sub -2} day{sup -1}. This wide range reflects net emissions resulting from production (methanogenesis), consumption (methanotrophic oxidation), and gaseous transport processes. The determination of an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} emission rate for a given field site requires sampling designs and statistical techniques which consider spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, particularly at sites with pumped gas recovery systems, it is possible for methanotrophic microorganisms in aerated cover soils to oxidize all of the methane from landfill sources below and, additionally, to oxidize methane diffusing into cover soils from atmospheric sources above. In such cases, a reversed soil gas concentration gradient is observed in shallow cover soils, indicating bidirectional diffusional transport to the depth of optimum methane oxidation. Rates of landfill methane oxidation from field and laboratory incubation studies range up to 166 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} among the highest for any natural setting, providing an effective natural control on net emissions. Estimates of worldwide landfill methane emissions to the atmosphere have ranged from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup -1}, differing mainly in assumed methane yields from estimated quantities of landfilled refuse. At highly controlled landfill sites in developed countries, landfill methane is often collected via vertical wells or horizontal collectors. Recovery of landfill methane through engineered systems can provide both environmental and energy benefits by mitigating subsurface migration, reducing surface emissions, and providing an alternative energy resource for industrial boiler use, on-site electrical generation, or upgrading to a substitute natural gas.

Bogner, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, M. [ETSU, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Czepiel, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide end-use energy efficiency, or avoid...

152

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Municipal Solid Waste-Sewage Sludge. b 4.15 SCF CH 4 / cu ftUP I j methane 31.5 scf sludge 18.61b water 161b Btu/scfsewer 65.3 lb ( 7.9 gal) sludge ash 1.74 lb stack emissions

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARM - Methane Background Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background Information Outreach Home Room News

155

ARM - Methane Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background Information Outreach Home Room

156

Coal Bed Methane Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Closing the Gaps in the Budgets of Methane and Nitrous Oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Together methane and nitrous oxide contribute almost 40% of the estimated increase in radiative forcing caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases during the last 250 years (IPCC, 2007). These increases are attributed to human activities. Since the emissions of these gases are from biogenic sources and closely associated with living things in the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world, climate change is expected to cause feedbacks that may further increase emissions even from systems normally classified as natural. Our results support the idea that while past increases of methane were driven by direct emissions from human activities, some of these have reached their limits and that the future of methane changes may be determined by feedbacks from warming temperatures. The greatly increased current focus on the arctic and the fate of the carbon frozen in its permafrost is an example of such a feedback that could exceed the direct increases caused by future human activities (Zimov et al. 2006). Our research was aimed at three broad areas to address open questions about the global budgets of methane and nitrous oxide. These areas of inquiry were: The processes by which methane and nitrous oxide are emitted, new sources such as trees and plants, and integration of results to refine the global budgets both at present and of the past decades. For the process studies the main research was to quantify the effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from rice agriculture. Additionally, the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide under present conditions were estimated using the experimental data on how fertilizer applications and water management affect emissions. Rice was chosen for detailed study because it is a prototype system of the wider terrestrial source, its role in methane emissions is well established, it is easy to cultivate and it represents a major anthropogenic source. Here we will discuss the highlights of the results that were obtained.

Khalil, Aslam; Rice, Andrew; Rasmussen, Reinhold

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bioconversion of biomass to methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of biomass to methane is described. The biomethane potentials of various biomass feedstocks from our laboratory and literature is summarized.

Hashimoto, A.G. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Form factor in K+ --> pi+ pi0 gamma: interference versus direct emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the effect of a form factor in the magnetic contribution to K+ --> pi+ pi0 gamma. We emphasize how this can show up experimentally: in particular we try to explore the difference between a possible interference contribution and a form factor in the magnetic part. The form factor used for K+ --> pi+ pi0 gamma is analogous to the one for KL --> pi+ pi- gamma, experimentally well established.

Luigi Cappiello; Giancarlo D'Ambrosio

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

VIBRATION->VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE Peter Hess, A. H. Kung,Rotation Spectra of Methane, U.S. Nat'L Tech. Inform.tret t tllll. I. INTRODUCTION Methane is a relatively simple

Hess, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and...

165

Incentives for Methane Mitigation and Energy-Efficiency Improvements in Case of Ukraines Natural Gas Transmission System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing methane losses is a concern for climate change policy and energy policy. The energy sector is the major source of methane emissions into the atmosphere. Reducing methane emissions and avoiding combustion can be very cost-effective, but various barriers prevent such energy-efficiency measures from taking place. To date, few examples of industry-wide improvements exist. One example of substantial investments into upgrading natural gas transmission system comes from Ukraine. The Ukrainian transmission company, Ukrtransgaz, reduced its own systems natural gas consumption by 68 percent in 2011 compared to the level in 2005. Evaluating reductions in methane emissions is challenging because of lack of accurate data and gaps in accounting methodologies. At the same time, Ukraines transmission system has undergone improvements that, at the very least, have contained methane emissions, if not substantially reduced them. In this paper, we describe recent developments in Ukraines natural gas transmission system and analyze the incentives that forced the sector to pay close attention to its methane losses. Ukraine is one of most energy-intensive countries, among the largest natural gas consumers in the world, and a significant emitter of methane. The country is also dependent on imports of natural gas. A combination of steep increases in the price of imported natural gas, and comprehensive domestic environmental and energy policies, regional integration policy, and international environmental agreements has created conditions for successful methane emission and combustion reductions. Learning about such case studies can help us design better policies elsewhere.

Roshchanka, Volha; Evans, Meredydd

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

methane hydrate science plan-final.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2013 Principal Authors: Consor um for Ocean Leadership and the Methane Hydrate Project Science Team December 2013 DOE Award Number: DE-FE0010195 Project Title: Methane Hydrate...

167

Coalbed Methane Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil andMCKEESPORTfor the 2012Methane

168

Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

None

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers November 2006; published 4 May 2007. [1] Understanding factors that control methane exchange between soils-based technique to investigate the relative importance of three mechanisms for explaining landscape

171

Integrated process for coalbed brine and methane disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a technology and project to demonstrate and commercialize a brine disposal process for converting the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process also utilizes coalbed methane (CBM) released from coal mining for the combustion process thereby substantially reducing the potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere. The technology is ideally suited for the treatment and disposal of produced brines generated from the development of coal mines and coalbed methane resources worldwide. Over the next 10 to 15 years, market potential for brine elimination equipment and services is estimated to be in the range of $1 billion.

Byam, J.W. Jr.; Tait, J.H.; Brandt, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Investigation of feasibility of injecting power plant waste gases for enhanced coalbed methane recovery from low rank coals in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as power plants. CO2 emissions can be offset by sequestration of produced CO2 in natural reservoirs such as coal seams, which may initially contain methane. Production of coalbed methane can be enhanced through CO2 injection, providing an opportunity...

Saugier, Luke Duncan

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Sulfonation of Methane Direct Liquid-Phase Sulfonation of Methane to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sulfonation of Methane Direct Liquid-Phase Sulfonation of Methane to Methanesulfonic Acid by SO3 of methane to value-added prod- ucts is a significant contemporary challenge.[1] Methane is a very unreactive, consider- able effort has been devoted to the oxidation and oxidative carbonylation of methane.[2

Bell, Alexis T.

175

Method of coalbed methane production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing coalbed methane from a coal seam containing coalbed methane and penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one producing well. It comprises: injecting an inert gas through the injection well and into the coal seam. The inert gas being a gas that does not react with the coal under conditions of use and that does not significantly adsorb to the coal; and producing a gas from the production well which consists essentially of the inert gas, coalbed methane, or mixtures thereof.

Puri, R.; Stein, M.H.

1989-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. land use water use CO2 emissions radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Utilization of fuel cells to beneficially use coal mine methane. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has been given the responsibility to encourage industry to recover and use methane that is currently being released to the atmosphere. At this time the only method being employed at the Left Fork Mine to remove methane is the mine ventilation system. The methane content was measured at one one-hundredth of a percent. To prevent this methane from being vented to the atmosphere, degasification wells are proposed. To use the coal mine methane, it is proposed to use phosphoric-acid fuel cells to convert methane to electric power. These fuel cells contain (1) a steam reformer to convert the methane to hydrogen (and carbon dioxide), (2) the fuel cell stack, and (3) a power conditioner that provides 200 kW of 60 Hz alternating current output. The environmental impacts and benefits of using this technology ware summarized in the report. The study indicates the methane emission reduction that could be achieved on a national and Global level. The important point being that this technology is economically viable as is demonstrated in the report.

Brown, J.T.; O`Brien, D.G.; Miller, A.R.; Atkins, R.; Sanders, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B) and those present within methane seep Euryarchaea ( PMI,margin: the influence of methane seeps and oxygen minimumisotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep

Thurber, Andrew R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryDIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE Kendall F. Haven MarkArrangement Kelp to Methane Processing Plant Schematic.

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B) and those present within methane seep Euryarchaea ( PMI,margin: the influence of methane seeps and oxygen minimumisotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep

Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses involving coal. Greenhouse gas emissions from fuel use and methane releases at coal mines, fuel.5 million metric tons of methane emissions. Close to 95% of domestic coal was consumed by the electricityUncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal Aranya Venkatesh

Jaramillo, Paulina

183

A method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low levels of 14C-labeled methane and accelerator mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Environ. Microbiol. 10(Field observations of methane concentra- tions and oxidationAnaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (??Methane in the Arctic Shelf? or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (??metagenomes?). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

David Kirchman

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions quantities of CH4 are stored in marine sediment in the form of methane hydrate, bubbles, and dissolved CH4 in pore water. Here I discuss the various pathways for methane to enter the ocean and atmosphere

Zhang, Youxue

186

Activation of the C-H Bond of Methane by Intermediate Q of Methane Monooxygenase: A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activation of the C-H Bond of Methane by Intermediate Q of Methane Monooxygenase: A Theoretical component (MMOH) of the multicomponent soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) system catalyzes the oxidation of methane by dioxygen to form methanol and water at non-heme, dinuclear iron active sites. The catalytic

Gherman, Benjamin F.

187

Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its ...

Wang, David T.

188

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time. 3 figs.

Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D`Este, J.R.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time.

Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA); D'Este, Joseph R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coalbed methane production case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Methane adsorption on Devonian shales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHANE ADSORPTION ON DEVONIAN SHALES A Thesis by FAN-CHANG LI Submitted to thc Office of Graclua4e Sturiics of texas AgiM Ulllvel'sliy in pari, ial fulfilhuent of t, hc requirements I'or t, hc degree of ii IAS'I'Elf OF SCIL'NCE December... 1992 Major Subject, : Chemical Engineering METHANE ADSORPTION ON DEVONIAN SHALES A Thesis l&y I'AN-CHANC LI Approved as to style and contcut by: A. T. 'vtratson (Chair of Commitl. ee) John C. Slattery (Member) Bruce . Hcrhcrt (Memhcr...

Li, Fan-Chang

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane Dariusz Strapo´c,1, Maria Mastalerz,2 Katherine, biodegradation Abstract Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal- bearing basins low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older

Macalady, Jenn

193

6, 36113626, 2006 Effects of methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 3611­3626, 2006 Effects of methane outgassing on the Black Sea atmosphere K. Kourtidis et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Effects of methane outgassing Effects of methane outgassing on the Black Sea atmosphere K. Kourtidis et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to characterize carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from hydropower reservoirs in the US SoutheastGHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly understood, but recent studies have indicated that GHG emissions

195

Methane production by attached film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

Jewell, William J. (202 Eastwood Ave., Ithaca, NY 14850)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Partial oxidation of methane to syngas in different reactor types  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of Rh/ZnO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for partial oxidation of methane to syngas was compared in fixed and fluidised bed reactors. Catalyst activity was found not to be a limiting factor under any experimental conditions and complete oxygen conversions were observed in all tests. In the fixed bed reactor both methane conversion and syngas selectivity were increasing with space velocity as the result of an autothermal effect. Satisfactory control of the catalyst temperature at high space velocities could only be achieved with addition of inert diluent or steam to the feed. Different conversion and selectivity patterns were observed in fluidised bed reactor. Methane conversion and carbon monoxide selectivity were decreasing with increasing gas flow. By contrast, hydrogen selectivity showed distinct maximum at medium space velocities. These results are interpreted in terms of catalyst backmixing and its effect on primary and secondary reactions. Improved temperature control was also achieved in fluidised bed reactor. Several experiments using fluidised bed reactor were carried out at elevated pressures. To eliminate the occurrence of non-catalytic gas phase reactions between methane and oxygen very short feed mixing times (< 1 ms) were employed. Despite these measures the reactor could not be successfully operated at pressures above 0.7 MPa. The implications of these findings for process development are discussed.

Lapszewicz, J.A.; Campbell, I.; Charlton, B.G.; Foulds, G.A. [CSIRO Division of Coal and Energy Technology, Menai (Australia)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

202

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory for Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions. J. Air &T. A. Cackette (2001), Diesel engines: Environmental impact2003), http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/diesel.htm BAAQMD, Bay

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nickel crystallite thermometry during methanation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magnetic method to measure the average temperature of superparamagnetic nickel crystallites has been applied during CO methanation. The method takes advantage of the temperature dependence of the low field magnetization of such catalysts; however, the adsorption of carbon monoxide and the formation of surface carbon species complicate the interpretation of results. Calibrations to account for temperature change and the adsorption of reactants are described. The calibration for the effects of CO is based on the assumption that the interaction of CO with nickel is the same for methanation and disproportionation. Interphase heat transfer calculations based on the thermometric data compare favorably with previous results from ethane hyrogenolysis, and give no indication of microscopic temperature differences between the nickel crystallites and support.

Ludlow, D.K.; Cale, T.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hydrogen, Methane and Nitrous oxide Trend variability, budgets, and interactions with the biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission regulations on CH4 and N2 O, and future impacts of a transition to a `hydrogen economy', taking transition to a `hydrogen economy' in the coming de- cades is likely to cause a significant increaseCH4 H2 N2O ............ ........ Hymn Hydrogen, Methane and Nitrous oxide Trend variability

Haak, Hein

205

Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and carbon dioxide. Introduction Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide per capita are released annually into the atmosphere.1a,b CarbonStorage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks

Yaghi, Omar M.

206

The Role of the Ocean in the Atmospheric Budgets of Methyl Bromide, Methyl Chloride and Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which was 700 (490 to 920) Gg yr^-1 and -370 (-440 to -280) Gg yr^-1, respectively. The ocean accounts for 10 - 19 % in the global CH3Cl emission and 6 - 9 % in its global sinks. Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which has a warming potential...

Hu, Lei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October, 2012 - 08:20EmissionLandfill Methane

208

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

209

,"Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

210

,"Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

211

,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

212

A guide to coalbed methane operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A guide to coalbed methane production is presented. The guide provides practical information on siting, drilling, completing, and producing coalbed methane wells. Information is presented for experienced coalbed methane producers and coalbed methane operations. The information will assist in making informed decisions about producing this resource. The information is presented in nine chapters on selecting and preparing of field site, drilling and casing the wellbore, wireline logging, completing the well, fracturing coal seams, selecting production equipment and facilities, operating wells and production equipment, treating and disposing of produced water, and testing the well.

Hollub, V.A.; Schafer, P.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

,"Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

214

,"Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

215

,"Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

216

CO2 Sequestration Enhances Coalbed Methane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since 1980s, petroleum engineers and geologists have conducted researches on Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery (ECBM). During this period, many methods are introduced to enhance the (more)

Pang, Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

,"Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

218

,"Miscellaneous Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

219

,"Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

220

A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the ...

Ruppel, Carolyn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16.............................................................................................21 Coal and Methane Production

Maxwell, Bruce D.

222

Three-dimensional model synthesis of the global methane cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

39, Ehhalt, D. H. , The atmoheric cycle of methane, Tellugworld-wide increase in theric methane, 1978-1987, Science,

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Prediction of coalbed methane reservoir performance with type curves.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoirs are dual-porosity systems that are characterized by (more)

Bhavsar, Amol Bhaskar.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The (more)

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Diffusion Characterization of Coal for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explores the concept of displacement of sorbed methane and enhancement of methane recovery by injection of CO2 into coal, while sequestering CO2. The (more)

Chhajed, Pawan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of gas production type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists on methane production from the coal seams. The unique coal characteristic results in a dual-porosity system. (more)

Garcia Arenas, Anangela.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Direct Observation of the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatizati...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using an Ultrahigh Field 95Mo NMR Spectroscopy. Direct Observation of the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using an...

228

Studies of the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using Ultrahigh-Field Solid-State Mo95 NMR Spectroscopy. Studies of the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using...

229

Coalbed Methane (CBM) is natural  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartmentPolicyClean,Coalbed Methane (CBM)

230

The 1991 coalbed methane symposium proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the 1991 coalbed methane symposium are presented. The proceedings contains 50 papers on environmental aspects of recovering methane from coal seams, reservoir characterization and testing mine safety and productivity, coalbed stimulation, geology and resource assessment, well completion and production technologies, reservoir modeling and case histories, and resources and technology.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

onward. Table A-4: Carbon Emission Factors of ElectricityAdjustment factor Carbon Emission Factor (kg C/kWh)L ABORATORY Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effect of silane concentration on the supersonic combustion of a silane/methane mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of direct connect combustor tests was conducted to determine the effect of silane concentration on the supersonic combustion characteristics of silane/methane mixtures. Shock tube ignition delay data indicated more than an order of magnitude reduction in ignition delay times for both 10 and 20 percent silane/methane mixtures as compared to methane. The ignition delay time of the 10 percent mixture was only a factor of 2.3 greater than that of the 20 percent mixture. Supersonic combustion tests were conducted with the fuel injected into a model scramjet combustor. The combustor was mounted at the exit of a Mach 2 nozzle and a hydrogen fired heater was used to provide a variation in test gas total temperature. Tests using the 20 percent silane/methane mixture indicated considerable combustion enhancement when compared to methane alone. This mixture had an autoignition total temperature of 1650 R. The addition of 20 percent silane to methane resulted in a pyrophoric fuel with good supersonic combustion performance. Reducing the silane concentration below this level, however, yielded a less pyrophoric fuel that exhibited poor supersonic combustion performance.

Northam, G.B.; Mc Lain, A.G.; Pellett, G.L.; Diskin, G.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Coal companies hope to receive carbon credits for methane reductions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, underground coal mining in the USA liberates 2.4 million tonnes of coal mine methane (CMM), of which less than 30% is recovered and used. One barrier to CMM recovery is cost. Drainage, collection, and utilization systems are complex and expensive to install. Two coal mines have improved the cost equation, however, by signing on to earn money for CMM emissions they are keeping out of the atmosphere. Jim Walter Resources and PinnOak Resources have joined a voluntary greenhouse gas reduction trading program called the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) to turn their avoided emissions into carbon credits. The example they set may encourage other coal mining companies to follow suit, and may bring new projects on the line that would otherwise have not gone forward. 2 refs., 1 fig.

NONE

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles.D.H. , Chase, R.E. , 1999b. Gasoline vehicle particle sizeFactors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

Ban-Weiss, George A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

238

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, School of Engineering, Ocean .. Engineel'ing-and nutrition, ocean engineering and methane generation. In

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS PART I: ALLENE Full-length article SHORTENED RUNNING TITLE : METHANE FLAMES DOPED BY ALLENE OR PROPYNE * E investigated: a pure methane flame and two methane flames doped by allene and propyne, respectively. The gases

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume E T H A N L . G R O S S M A N , * , L U I, and methane, and (2) negligible oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Methane concentrations and stable carbon isotope (13C) values suggest anaerobic methane oxidation was occurring within the plume and at its

Grossman, Ethan L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID (flame ionization)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID to equilibrate the methane between the air and water. · With the syringe pointing down, eject all the water fromL of gas in the syringe · We will now move to the GC lab in Starr 332 to measure methane. · Repeat

Vallino, Joseph J.

242

Formation of Liquid Methane-Water Mixture during Combustion of a Laminar Methane Jet at Supercritical Pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of Liquid Methane-Water Mixture during Combustion of a Laminar Methane Jet in laminar jet flames of methane at elevated pressures in a high-pressure combustion chamber, we have MPa, after the laminar methane jet flame had been stabilized on a co-flow circular nozzle-type burner

Gülder, ?mer L.

243

Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and Japan are outspending the United States on hydrate science and engineering R&D by a factor of 10, and may bring this resource to market as much as a decade before the United States.

Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

DOE/AMO NG Infrastructure R & D & Methane emissions Mitigation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

structural analysis and manufacturing processes Self-Healing Pipe Project * Develop plastic pipe that self-heals when damaged by cracking or mechanical impact * Deliverable:...

245

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Agenda Participant List Christopher Freitas, U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy Robert Smith, U.S. DOT, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Michael Whelan,...

246

Hydraulic fracturing accelerates coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane production from deep coal seams that never will be mined requires hydraulic fracturing for faster, optimal recovery. Since this can be a complex process, proper formation evaluation beforehand is essential, according to this paper.

Holditch, S.A. (Texas A and M Univ. (US)); Ely, J.W.; Semmelbeck, M.E.; Carter, R.H. (S.A. Holditch and Associates (US)); Hinkel, J.J.; Jeffrey, R.G. Jr. (Dowell Schlumberger (US))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The role of methane in tropospheric chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While methane is chemically quite inert to reactions with atmospheric molecular species, it does react with atomic species and molecular radicals. Because of its relatively large abundance in the global troposphere and ...

Golomb, D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

249

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

250

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

251

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

252

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

253

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

254

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

255

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

256

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

257

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

258

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

259

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

260

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

262

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

263

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

264

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

265

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

266

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

267

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

268

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

269

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

270

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

271

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

272

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

273

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

274

Transient Supersonic Methane-Air Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the thermochemical properties of a transient supersonic flame. Creation of the transient flame was controlled by pulsing air in 200 millisecond intervals into a combustor filled with flowing methane...

Richards, John L.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Development of water production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. The key parameters for the evaluation of coalbed methane (more)

Burka Narayana, Praveen Kumar.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tool to predict the production performance of vertical wells in a coalbed methane reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed Methane (CBM) is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams. Coalbed Methane gas production is controlled be interactions of (more)

Enoh, Michael E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects of atmospheric methane, Global Biogeochem. Cycles 2,Budeus, Fate of vent derived methane in seawater above theHanfland, Pathways of methane in seawater: Plume spreading

Elliott, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

Green, Michael A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides by Methane over Pd(110) S. M. Vesecky, J. Paul, and D. W. Goodman*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions.1 The subfield of environ- mental catalysis concerned with air quality control involves and stationary sources2 There are many stationary sources of environmental gas phase pollutants. Methane is perhaps the largest pollutant by volume, emitted from sources such as livestock, gas wells, and landfills

Goodman, Wayne

280

Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources. Part 1. San Juan Basin. Annual report, August 1988-July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the San Juan Basin, Fruitland Formation coal seams contain an estimated 43 to 49 Tcf of methane. With more than 500 producing coalbed methane wells and approximately 1,000 wells scheduled for drilling in 1990, the basin is one of the most active areas of coalbed methane exploration and production in the United States. Among the most important geologic factors affecting the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane are depositional setting, structural attitude and fracturing of the coal, and regional hydraulic setting. In the second year of the study, the Bureau of Economic Geology evaluated the depositional setting and structure of Fruitland coal seams, which are both source rocks and reservoirs for coalbed methane, throughout the basin. The report summarizes the regional tectonic setting of the San Juan Basin; describes the Cretaceous stratigraphy, structure, and basin evolution; relates these factors to Fruitland coal and coalbed methane occurrence; describes studies of lineaments, fractures, and cleats; presents hydrodynamic controls on the producibility of coalbed methane from the Fruitland Formation; summarizes production from the Fruitland Formation; and evaluates geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility.

Ayers, W.B.; Kaiser, W.R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Swartz, T.E.; Laubach, S.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Upgrading drained coal mine methane to pipeline quality: a report on the commercial status of system suppliers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In today's scenario of growing energy demand worldwide and rising natural gas prices, any methane emitted into the atmosphere is an untapped resource of energy and potentially a lost opportunity for additional revenue. In 2005, 9.7% of the total US anthropogenic emissions of methane were attributed to coal production. In recent years, many gassy coal mines have seized the opportunity to recover coal mine methane (CMM) and supply it to natural gas pipeline systems. With natural gas prices in the US exceeding $7.00 per million Btu, CMM pipeline sales brought in an annual revenue topping $97 million in 2005. However, significant opportunity still exists for tapping into this resource as 22% of the drained CMM remains unutilized as of 2005, primarily because its quality does not meet the requirements of natural gas pipeline systems. Recent advances in technologies now offer off-the-shelf options in the US that can upgrade the drained CMM to pipeline quality. These gas upgrading technologies are not only opening up the market to lower-quality methane resources but also providing significant means for reducing emissions, since methane is over 20 times a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. This report reviews current gas upgrading technologies available in the market for removal of typical CMM contaminants, provides examples of their successful commercial implementation and compiles a list of vendors specific to nitrogen rejection systems, since nitrogen exposes the biggest challenge to upgrading CMM. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 9 apps.

Carothers, F.P.; Schultz, M.L.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - active methane weather Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry 48 Universitt Stuttgart Auslandsorientierter Studiengang Summary: Potential of Coalbed Methane Recovery during Active Coalmin- ing... Methane Recovery from Active...

284

A study on coalbed methane reserve of Shanxi: Hedong coalfield reserve and its utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed gas, i.e. coalbed methane, is considered an unconventional gas, formed during coal accumulation and preserved in coal seams. In the past, coalbed gas was considered a major hazard factor to the safety of mining and caused countless explosive events and great losses to the enterprises and even to the country. Early in 1960s and 70s, it was recognized that coalbed gas could be utilized as an energy resource and collected through tunnels in China. In 1995, the output of tunnel gas reached 500Mm{sup 3}, however, surface pumping is still at its beginning stage, test and appraisal; so far, no commercial development is being carried out in China. Hedong coalfield, situated in the west of Shanxi province and bordered by the Yellow River in the northwest and outcrop seams in the southeast, is 540km long (N-S) and 10--40 km wide (E-W) and covers an area of 17,000 km{sup 2} across 13 counties of Xinzou, Luliang, Linfen and Yuncheng prefectures. It is the No. 2 coalfield in Shanxi province and the well-known base of excellent coking coal and power coal in China. Hedong coalfield is not only rich in coal resource, but also in coalbed methane. This paper describes the geology of the coalfield (including structure, magmatic activity, coal seams and coal grade); the regularity of coalbed methane occurrence in the Hedong coalfield; the calculation of coalbed methane resource; and the use of coalbed methane for motor fuels and chemicals production. The total resource is 1468.93Gm{sup 3}. The production of motor fuels can be realized by the following processes: (a) synthetic methanol as substitute of gasoline; (b) F-T synthesis for synthetic gasoline and diesel oil; (c) Compressed natural gas as motor fuel; and (d) Liquefied natural gas as motor fuel. The production of organic chemicals is suggested with the following technology: (a) Two-stage steam reforming to convert methane to synthetic gas various organic chemicals can be produced therefrom; (b) Partial oxidation of methane to produce synthesis gas and acetylene; (c) Coalbed methane to produce hydrogen cyanide and chloromethanes; and (d) Coalbed methane to produce acrylonitrile, acetylene, ethylene, propylene and butylenes.

Kong, X.; Fan, R.; Hu, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, Z.; Li, M.; Peng, S. [Taiyuan Ke-jin Technology Development Service (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensities and the carbon emission factor for each process.through fuel switching. Carbon emissions factors used infor reduction in carbon emissions was slightly larger than

Price, Lynn; Phylipsen, Dian; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Numerical modeling of methane venting from lake sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of methane transport in lake sediments control the release of methane into the water column above, and the portion that reaches the atmosphere may contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect. The observed ...

Scandella, Benjamin P. (Benjamin Paul)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Conversion of methane and acetylene into gasoline range hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion of methane and acetylene to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst (HZSM-5) was studied The reaction between methane and acetylene successfully produced high molecular weight hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, benzene...

Alkhawaldeh, Ammar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Methane Adsorption and Dissociation and Oxygen Adsorption and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methane Adsorption and Dissociation and Oxygen Adsorption and Reaction with CO on Pd Nanoparticles on MgO(100) and on Pd(111). Methane Adsorption and Dissociation and Oxygen...

289

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Investing in Our Energy Future August 31, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed...

290

SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

Sundaram, Muthu S. (Shoreham, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Julian Cleary, Nigel T. Roulet and Tim R. Moore Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) emissions from land use, fossil fuel combustion, and peat decomposition, contributes to Canada's net the rate of in situ decomposition through greater diffusion of oxygen, increasing CO2 emissions, manufacturing, use, and disposition (12, 13). GHG emissions, comprising carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4

Roulet, Nigel T.

294

Gravimetric study of adsorbed intermediates in methanation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to more fully elucidate the adsorbed intermediates and mechanism involved in catalytic methanation of CO on a typical nickel methanation catalyst. Rates of adsorption and desorption of surface species and of gasification of carbon were measured gravimetrically to determine their kinetics and possible roles in methanation. 19 refs.

Gardner, D.C.; Bartholomew, C.H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Planetary and Space Science 54 (2006) 11771187 Titan's methane cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Methane is key to sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen atmosphere. However, methane is destroyed and the pressure induced opacity in the infrared, particularly by CH4­N2 and H2­N2 collisions in the troposphere), whose reaction with carbon grains or carbon dioxide in the crustal pores produces methane gas

Atreya, Sushil

296

METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced models of adsorption occuring in coalbed methane recovery processes, and discuss the underlying methods, hysteresis, coalbed methane, mean-field equi- librium models AMS(MOS) subject classifications. 76 applications important for global climate and energy studies, namely Enhanced Coalbed Methane (ECBM) recovery

Peszynska, Malgorzata

297

An improved third order dipole moment surface for methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An improved third order dipole moment surface for methane P. Cassam-Chena¨i Laboratoire J and used to calculate the rotational spectrum of methane vibrational ground state, by means. Keywords: Dipole moment surface; methane; generalized mean field configuration interaction. Suggested

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

298

Methane-assisted combustion synthesis of nanocomposite tin dioxide materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane-assisted combustion synthesis of nanocomposite tin dioxide materials S.D. Bakrania *, C and flow conditions using methane as a supplemental fuel. The experiments were carried out at atmospheric-phase precursor for metal additives. In the methane-assisted (MA) system, the inert carrier gas was replaced

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

299

PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW F.K. Lu,* C.M. Roseberry, J.M. Meyers and D arc pyrolysis of methane at supersonic conditions, representative of conditions in the reformer- cate the feasibility of arc pyrolysis of methane. Introduction he high specific enthalpy of combustion

Texas at Arlington, University of

300

Methane Activation with Rhenium Catalysts. 1. Bidentate Oxygenated Ligands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Activation with Rhenium Catalysts. 1. Bidentate Oxygenated Ligands Jason M. Gonzales, Jonas, California 90089 ReceiVed July 31, 2006 Trends in methane activation have been explored for rhenium complexes proceeds with methane activation through a barrier of less than 35 kcal mol-1 . Study

Goddard III, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research A robotic sub samples the methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute A robotic sub samples the methane content of the seafloor.263 News Seafloor probe taps methane reservoir Greenhouse gas found in high abundance but risk of mass release uncertain. Nicola Jones A robotic submarine has been used to measure the amount of methane lurking

Tian, Weidong

302

Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Effects in Microbial Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Effects in Microbial Methane from Terrestrial Environments Jeffrey Chanton, Lia Chaser, Paul Glasser,Don Siegel Methane is the ultimate end-product of anaerobic respiration. Methane production via CO2 reduction does not consume CO2. Also, acetate can be written as 2CH20, so Eq. 6

Saleska, Scott

303

RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS PART III: CYCLOPENTENE-length article SHORTENED RUNNING TITLE : METHANE FLAMES DOPED BY CYCLOPENTENE * E-mail : pierre with the studies presented in the parts I and II of this paper, the structure of a laminar rich premixed methane

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

Mühlemann, Oliver

305

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic Photochemistry1 Howard E zimmerman@bert.chem.wisc.edu Received May 31, 2000 ABSTRACT The di--methane rearrangement is firmly established as a mode of synthesizing three-membered-ring compounds. We now report the tri-- methane

Cirkva, Vladimir

306

METHANE SOURCES AND SINKS IN UPPER OCEAN WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHANE SOURCES AND SINKS IN UPPER OCEAN WATERS A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE DIVISION the distribution of dissolved methane in ocean surface waters were investigated. Water column and sediment trap and Antarctic waters to the oliogotrophic ocean off Hawaii. The methane concentrations in most of the surface

Luther, Douglas S.

307

Dissociation of methane under high pressure Guoying Gao,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissociation of methane under high pressure Guoying Gao,1,a Artem R. Oganov,2,a Yanming Ma,1,b Hui Received 15 May 2010; accepted 18 August 2010; published online 12 October 2010 Methane is an extremely of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary

Oganov, Artem R.

308

RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS PART II: 1,3-BUTADIENE-length article SHORTENED RUNNING TITLE : METHANE FLAMES DOPED BY 1,3-BUTADIENE * E-mail : Pierre of this paper, the structure of a laminar rich premixed methane flame doped with 1,3-butadiene has been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Introduction In the past two centuries, atmospheric methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90 Introduction In the past two centuries, atmospheric methane (Ch4) concentrations have more than doubled. Despite the about 20o times smaller atmospheric burden of methane compared to carbon dioxide (CO2 ; IPCC 4th assessment report, 2007), because on a per molecule basis methane is a much more effective

Haak, Hein

310

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ModelInputs EmissionsFactors CO2EmissionfactorforgridtonneCO2/MWh) CO2Emissionfactorforfuel (tonneCO2/TJ)Improvements and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the

Morrow III, William R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep heterogeneity. In particular, biogeochemical fluxes of volatiles such as methane remain largely unconstrained

Girguis, Peter R.

313

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low levels of 14C-labeled methane and accelerator mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NEsediment from a marine gas hydrate area. Environ. Microbiol.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High Temperature Solar Splitting of Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term commercialization opportunities #12;Why Use Solar Energy?Why Use Solar Energy? · High concentrations possible (>1000High Temperature Solar Splitting of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon High Temperature Solar Splitting and worldwide) ­ Sufficient to power the world (if we choose to) · Advantages tradeoff against collection area

317

Methane production from ozonated pulp mill effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was made of the production of methane from desugared spent sulfite liquor (SSL) reacted with ozone. The ozonated SSL was fed continuously to three anaerobic fermenters for three months as the sole source of carbon and energy. The fermenters were inoculated with anaerobic bacteria obtained from sewage sludge and acclimated for 1 month in ozonated SSL prior to continuous fermentation. Chemical and biological parameters such as COD, BOD, total sulfur content, redox potential, pH, fatty acid composition, and methane bacteria populations were monitored to determine changes in the SSL during fermentation. Methane production from ozone-treated SSL averaged 1.7 liters/ liter or 17 ml of CH/sub 4/ produced/gram of volatile solids fed. Fatty acis analysis of fermenter effluent indicated a net production of 58 mM/ liter of acetate during ozonated SSL fermentation. This acetic acid production shows future potential for further fermentation by protein-producing yeast. Although the rate of conversion of volatile solids to CH/sub 4/ in this process was not competitive with domestic or agricultural waste digesters, this study did indicate the potential benefits of ozonating organic wastes for increased methane fermentation yields.

Bremmon, C.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient of PVC, LLDPE, and HDPE geomembranes by performing the standard gas transport test (ASTM D1434). The measured methane gas permeability coefficient through a PVC geomembrane is 7.55 3 104 ml(STP).mil/m2.day thicknesses is proposed using the measured permeability coefficients for PVC, LLDPE, and HDPE geomembranes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thus the detection of methane rather than carbon-monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanisms that leads to an enhancement of methane.

Mark R. Swain; Gautam Vasisht; Giovanna Tinetti

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Calculation of the compressibility factor and thermodynamic properties for methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Saturated Vapor Volumes Reported by Bloomer and Parent (5) and Those Calculated in This Work Thermodynamic Properties Calculated by Use of Berlin Equation Thermodynamic Properties Calculated by Use of Benedict-Webb-Rubin Equation 35 36 39 40 48..., and Smith (15), Gardoso (7), and Bloomer and Parent (5) have reported experimental vapor pressure data and values for the saturated liquid density. Cardoso (7) and Bloomer and Parent (5) have also reported values for saturated vapor densities. A critical...

Dowling, Dennis William

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

Song Jin

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic oxidation of methane to partial oxidation products, primarily formaldehyde and C[sub 2] hydrocarbons, was found to be directed by the catalyst used. In this project, it was discovered that a moderate oxidative coupling catalyst for C[sub 2] hydrocarbons, zinc oxide, is modified by addition of small amounts of Cu and Fe dopants to yield fair yields of formaldehyde. A similar effect was observed with Cu/Sn/ZnO catalysts, and the presence of a redox Lewis acid, Fe[sup III] or Sn[sup IV], was found to be essential for the selectivity switch from C[sub 2] coupling products to formaldehyde. The principle of double doping with an oxygen activator (Cu) and the redox Lewis acid (Fe, Sn) was pursued further by synthesizing and testing the CuFe-ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst. The Cu[sup II](ion exchanged) Fe[sup III](framework)-ZSM-5 also displayed activity for formaldehyde synthesis, with space time yields exceeding 100 g/h-kg catalyst. However, the selectivity was low and earlier claims in the literature of selective oxidation of methane to methanol over CuFe-ZSM-5 were not reproduced. A new active and selective catalytic system (M=Sb,Bi,Sn)/SrO/La[sub 2]O[sub 3] has been discovered for potentially commercially attractive process for the conversion of methane to C[sub 2] hydrocarbons, (ii) a new principle has been demonstrated for selectivity switching from C[sub 2] hydrocarbon products to formaldehyde in methane oxidations over Cu,Fe-doped zinc oxide and ZSM-5, and (iii) a new approach has been initiated for using ultrafine metal dispersions for low temperature activation of methane for selective conversions. Item (iii) continues being supported by AMOCO while further developments related to items (i) and (ii) are the objective of our continued effort under the METC-AMOCO proposed joint program.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sojka, Z.; DiCosimo, J.I.; DeTavernier, S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Asia-wide emissions of greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions of principal greenhouse gases (GHGs) from Asia are increasing faster than those from any other continent. This is a result of rapid economic growth, as well as the fact that almost half of the world`s population lives in Asian countries. In this paper, the author provides estimates of emissions of the two principal greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}), from individual countries and areas. Recent literature has been reviewed for emission estimates for individual sources, such as carbon dioxide from cement manufacture, and methane from rice fields. There are very large uncertainties in many of these estimates, so several estimates are provided, where available. The largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions is the use of fossil fuels. Energy consumption data from 1992 have been used to calculate estimated emissions of CO{sub 2} from this source. In view of the ongoing negotiations to limit future greenhouse gas emissions, estimates of projected CO{sub 2} emissions from the developing countries of Asia are also provided. These are likely to be 3 times their 1986 levels by 2010, under business as usual scenarios. Even with the implementation of energy efficiency measures and fuel switching where feasible, the emissions of CO{sub 2} are likely to double within the same time period.

Siddiqi, T.A. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Program on Environment

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Deep oxidation of methane on particles derived from YSZ-supported Pd-Pt-(O) coatings synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009) Deep oxidation of methane on particles derived fromAbstract Methane conversion tests were performed on Pd, PdOFigure captions Figure 1: Methane conversion a), methane

Horwat, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

RECOVERY AND UTILIZATION OF COALMINE METHANE: PILOT-SCALE DEMONSTRATION PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fuel cell demonstration was conducted on coalmine methane to demonstrate the utilization of methane emissions associated with underground coal mining operations in a carbonate Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) power plant. FuelCell Energy (FCE) conducted the demonstration with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and in cooperation with Northwest Fuel Development, the operator of the Rose Valley test site in Hopedale, Ohio. The fuel cell power plant, a first generation sub megawatt power plant, was operated on CMM between August 1, 2003 and December 13, 2003. The direct fuel cell operated on low-Btu CMM with 42% methane content and achieved performance levels comparable to natural gas on a Btu feed basis. During this period 1456 hours on-load operation was achieved. The total power generated using CMM was 134 megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity. The power generated was connected to the American Electric Power grid by a 69-kilovolt (kV) transformer. The maximum power level achieved was 140 kW. Efficiency of power generation was 40% based on the lower heating value (LHV) of the CMM. Compression and drying of the CMM resulted in additional parasitic load, which reduced the overall efficiency to 36 % LHV. In future applications, on-board compression and utilization of the saturated CMM without drying will be investigated in order to reduce the auxiliary power requirements. By comparison, the internal combustion engines operating on CMM at the Hopedale site operate at an over efficiency of 20%. The over-all efficiency for the fuel cell is therefore 80% higher than the internal combustion engine (36% vs. 20%). Future operation of a 250 kW Fuel Cell Power Plant on CMM will utilize 18,400,000 cubic feet of methane per year. This will be equivalent to: (a) avoiding 7428 metric tons of CO{sub 2} emissions, (b) avoiding 16.4 million pounds of CO{sub 2} emissions, (c) removing 1640 cars off the road for one year, (d) heating 267 households for 1 year, (e) planting 2234 acres of trees. Based on the results obtained in this demonstration it can be concluded that utilization of fuel cells to mitigate CMM emissions is an attractive option that can be utilized to generate power at high efficiencies and with very low emissions.

George Steinfeld; Jennifer Hunt

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

Methane Sulfonation A High-Yield Approach to the Sulfonation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Sulfonation A High-Yield Approach to the Sulfonation of Methane to Methanesulfonic Acid Initiated by H2O2 and a Metal Chloride** Sudip Mukhopadhyay and Alexis T. Bell* Methane is abundant reactivity of methane makes it difficult to develop commercially viable processes for methane conversion.[1

Bell, Alexis T.

330

METHANE AND ETHANE ON THE BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2005 FY9 M. E. Brown,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHANE AND ETHANE ON THE BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2005 FY9 M. E. Brown,1 K. M. Barkume,1 G. A regime and by absorption due to methane in the near-infrared. The solid methane absorption lines through the methane. These long path lengths can be parameterized as a methane grain size of approximately

Brown, Michael E.

331

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

Zhou, Yaoqi

332

Methane Hydrate Field Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMay 20Field Studies Methane Hydrate Field

333

Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMay 20Field Studies Methane Hydrate

334

Carbon dioxide adsorption and methanation on ruthenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a ruthenium-silica catalyst were studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature-programmed reaction (TPR). Carbon dioxide adsorption was found to be activated; CO/sub 2/ adsorption increased significantly as the temperature increased from 298 to 435 K. During adsorption, some of the CO/sub 2/ dissociated to carbon monoxide and oxygen; upon hydrogen exposure at room temperature, the oxygen reacted to water. Methanation of adsorbed CO and of adsorbed CO/sub 2/, using TPR in flowing hydrogen, yielded a CH/sub 4/ peak with a peak temperature of 459 K for both adsorbates, indicating that both reactions follow the same mechanism after adsorption. This peak temperature did not change with initial surface coverage of CO, indicating that methanation is first order in CO coverage. The desorption and reaction spectra for Ru/SiO/sub 2/ were similar to those previously obtained for Ni/SiO/sub 2/, but both CO/sub 2/ formation and CH/sub 4/ formation proceeded faster on Ru. Also, the details of CO desorption and the changes in CO/sub 2/ and CO desorptions with initial coverage were different on the two metals. 5 figures, 3 tables.

Zagli, E.; Falconer, J.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Alternative technologies to steam-methane reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam-methane reforming (SMR) has been the conventional route for hydrogen and carbon monoxide production from natural gas feedstocks. However, several alternative technologies are currently finding favor for an increasing number of applications. The competing technologies include: steam-methane reforming combined with oxygen secondary reforming (SMR/O2R); autothermal reforming (ATR); thermal partial oxidation (POX). Each of these alternative technologies uses oxygen as a feedstock. Accordingly, if low-cost oxygen is available, they can be an attractive alternate to SMR with natural gas feedstocks. These technologies are composed technically and economically. The following conclusions can be drawn: (1) the SMR/O2R, ATR and POX technologies can be attractive if low-cost oxygen is available; (2) for competing technologies, the H{sub 2}/CO product ratio is typically the most important process parameter; (3) for low methane slip, the SMR/O2R, ATR and POX technologies are favored; (4) for full CO{sub 2} recycle, POX is usually better than ATR; (5) relative to POX, the ATR is a nonlicensed technology that avoids third-party involvement; (6) economics of each technology are dependent on the conditions and requirements for each project and must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Tindall, B.M.; Crews, M.A. [Howe-Baker Engineers, Inc., Tyler, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction PotentialsModelInputs EmissionsFactors CO2Emissionfactorforgridelectricity(tonneCO2/MWh) CO2Emissionfactorforfuel(

Morrow III, William R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

Thornhill, D. A.

339

Electron Excitation Coefficients in Helium, Neon, Oxygen and Methane at High E/N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Swarm analysis is performed by comparing experimental and calculated transport coefficients. Comparisons are repeated until a satisfactory agreement is achieved after modifications of the cross sections. We have made an analysis of our excitation coefficient data for neon and methane by using detailed Monte Carlo simulation scheme. In this work we also present experimental electron excitation coefficients for other gases: helium, neon and oxygen. We used a drift tube technique to measure the absolute emission intensities in low current self sustained Townsend type discharges.

Nikitovic, Zeljka D. [Institute of Physics, P.O.B. 68, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

separate project funded by the EU through Universities of Bremen (Germany) and Tromso (Norway), will assess the response of methane hydrates to environmental changes at the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan exempts certain energy production related farm facilities from real and personal property taxes. Among exempted property are certain methane digesters, biomass gasification equipment,...

342

,"North Louisiana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

343

,"Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2010,"630...

344

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

345

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Reserves Revision Increases...

346

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Available; W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Reserves Adjustments...

347

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",201...

348

,"Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

349

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

350

,"NM, West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

351

WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS Applications of waterjeting to drill horizontal wells for the purpose of degassing coalbeds prior to mining (more)

Funmilayo, Gbenga M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","124...

353

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

354

,"West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

355

,"New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

356

,"TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

357

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

358

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

359

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

360

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

362

,"TX, RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

363

,"TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

364

,"NM, East Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

365

,"TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

366

,"Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

367

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

368

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

369

UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Analysis of a direct methane conversion to high molecular weight hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane conversion to heavier hydrocarbons was studied using electrical furnaces and a plasma apparatus. The experiments were performed with pure methane for the electrical furnace experiments while pure methane and additions such as hydrogen...

Al-Ghafran, Moh'd. J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential distribution of methane hydrate in the world'sisotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability duringHendy, L.L. , and R.J. Behl, Methane hydrates in quaternary

Reagan, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Depressurization in a Mount Elbert Sandstone Sample: Experimental Observations and Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S.S.H. , 1987. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition,T. J. , et al. (2007), Methane Hydrate Formation andCharting the future of methane hydrate research in the

Kneafsey, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Methane from UV-irradiated carbonaceous chondrites under simulated Martian conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane from UV-irradiated carbonaceous chondrites under simulated Martian conditions Andrew C process was studied for the production of methane from carbonaceous chondrites under simulated Martian conditions. Methane evolution rates from carbonaceous chondrites were found to be positively correlated

Schuerger, Andrew C.

375

SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN Sea Floor Methane Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN 1 Sea Floor Methane are exposed at the sea floor. A methane-oxidizing bacterial consortium populates the exposures of hydrate; colonies of vent macro-fauna are abundant as well. Discharge of methane from destabilized hydrate

Goldfinger, Chris

376

Mechanistic studies of electron transfer, complex formation, C-H bond activation, and product binding in soluble methane monooxygenase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase: Activation of Dioxygen and Methane The mechanisms by which soluble methane monooxygenase uses dioxygen to convert methane selectively to methanol have come into sharp focus. Diverse ...

Kopp, Daniel Arthur

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

On-line monitoring of incinerator emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of efforts to develop an on-line emissions monitor to detect specific organic compounds for incinerators, the authors tested a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) coupled with a long-path cell (LPC). A mixture of toluene, chlorobenzene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene with elemental ratio C:H:Cl = 3:3.1:0.9 was incinerated in a methane/air flame. The effluent was continuously passed through a heated long-path cell. Eleven target compounds were simultaneously analyzed: methane, toluene, chlorobenzene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, benzene, ethylene, hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. During the testing, the incinerator temperature and the excess air ratio were deliberately changed to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions in the incinerator. Test results indicate that the FTIR/LPC system can successfully follow concentration changes in the emissions that are associated with the change in the incinerator operations. In addition to carbon monoxide, methane, ethylene, and benzene have been found to be major products of incomplete combustion of the mixture. In this paper, the authors also discuss problems related to obtaining representative calibration standards and to developing adequate methods for continuous monitoring of emissions.

Mao, Zhuoxiong; Demirgian, J.C.; Hwang, E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions index, we use conversion factors. To determine theof Energy. 11 This conversion factor includes only thebe using different conversion factors for electricity in

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) of methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of piston engines on a compression ignition cycle using a lean, homogeneous charge has many potential attractive features. These include the potential for extremely low NO{sub x} and particulate emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency and not requiring the expensive high pressure injection system of the typical modem diesel engine. Using the HCT chemical kinetics code to simulate autoignition of methane-air mixtures, we have explored the ignition timing, burn duration, NO{sub x} production, indicated efficiency and power output of an engine with a compression ratio of 15:1 at 1200 and 2400 rpm. HCT was modified to include the effects of heat transfer. This study used a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by varying the intake equivalence ratio and varying the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both heat and combustion product species. It is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure. Inlet manifold temperature was held constant at 330 Kelvins. Results show that there is a narrow range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NO{sub x} levels below 100 ppm.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.M.; Westbrook, C.; Pitz, W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

6, 57735796, 2006 Vehicular emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be partly responsible for lower CO2 and higher CO and NO emission factors. Also, a fast reduction the emission (in g/km) of key and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO, NMHC, dur-10 of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO20 and CO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY Digesters Do Not Address theMethane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 1 (to sustain instream #12;Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology

385

Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting International Gas Hydrate...

386

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THEA. Digesters Have Received Attention for Their Potential to

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

1870 Organometallics 1994,13,1870-1877 Mechanism and Energetics for Dehydrogenation of Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1870 Organometallics 1994,13,1870-1877 Mechanism and Energetics for Dehydrogenation of Methane also activate CHI. 1. Introduction Becauseof the enormousworldwidereservesof methane (CH4)andthe

Goddard III, William A.

388

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EM ProjectMemoDepartmentFY 2010 Methane Hydrate

390

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames K. Siegmanna) Swiss 96822 Received 24 August 1999; accepted 13 October 1999 A laminar diffusion flame of methane exhausts,7­17 coal-fired, electricity generating power plants,18,19 tobacco smoke,20 residential wood

Sattler, Klaus

391

Development of a Series of National Coalbed Methane Databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Series of National Coalbed Methane Databases Mohaghegh, S. D., Nunsavathu, U Growing Interest in Coalbed Methane ­ Elevated natural gas prices ­ Demand for clean energy sources DatabaseDatabase One Location Reservoir & Sorption Collection ­ 126 Coalbed Areas ­ 34 Parameters Ordered

Mohaghegh, Shahab

392

The thermal decomposition of methane in a tubular reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction rate of methane decomposition using a tubular reactor having a 1 inch inside diameter with an 8 foot long heated zone was investigated in the temperature range of 700 to 900 C with pressures ranging from 28.2 to 56.1 atm. Representing the rate by a conventional model, {minus}dC{sub CH4}/dt= k1 C{sub CH4} {minus}k2 C{sub H2}{sup 2}, the rate constant k1 for methane decomposition was determined. The activation energy, 31.3 kcal/mol, calculated by an Arrhenius Plot was lower than for previously published results for methane decomposition. This result indicates that submicron particles found in the reactor adhere to the inside of the reactor and these submicron high surface area carbon particles tend to catalyze the methane decomposition. The rate constant has been found to be approximately constant at 900 C with pressure range cited above. The rate of methane decomposition increases with methane partial pressure in first-order. The rate of the methane decomposition is favored by higher temperatures and pressures while the thermochemical equilibrium of methane decomposition is favored by lower pressures. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Kinetics of methanation on nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive steady-state and transient measurements of the disproportionation of carbon monoxide, the hydrogenation of deposited carbon, and methanation of carbon monoxide were performed over 2 and 10% nickel on silica support. The results indicated that the methanation of carbon monoxide involves competitively adsorbed species; that the reaction is nearly zero order in carbon monoxide at 0.1-0.5 atm CO and 1 atm H/sub 2/, but negative at higher CO partial pressures and that it becomes less negative with increasing temperature or increasing hydrogen pressure; and that the reaction order with respect to hydrogen changes from 0.5 to 1.0 with increasing CO pressure and decreasing H/sub 2/ pressure. A reaction mechanism is proposed which consists of the molecular adsorption of CO, the dissociative adsorption of H/sub 2/, dissociation of the surface CO species, and reaction of two adsorbed hydrogen atoms with the oxygen; and a multistep hydrogenation and desorption process for the adsorbed carbon. The dissociation and reaction of adsorbed CO is probably the rate-limiting step. The kinetic behavior is best represented with the assumption of a heterogeneous catalyst surface, containing three types of sites of widely varying activity.

Ho, S.V.; Harriott, P.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane. Topical report, March 1995--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this task is to test the technical viability of injecting CO{sub 2} into the Fruitland Coal to displace methane from the coal and to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions that are a consequence of primary coalbed methane production from surrounding wells in the area. To evaluate this technical viability, a field test was conducted and the test is being interpreted using data measured in WRI`s laboratory, as well as using Amoco`s state-of-the-art coalbed methane simulator. Also, a second pilot of the process is being evaluated using the simulator. Ultimately, the technology developed will be applied to a Wyoming coal.

Carlson, F.M.; Mones, C.G.; Johnson, L.A.; Barbour, F.A.; Fahy, L.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A STUDY ON SPHERICAL EXPANDING FLAME SPEEDS OF METHANE, ETHANE, AND METHANE/ETHANE MIXTURES AT ELEVATED PRESSURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-pressure experiments and chemical kinetics modeling were performed for laminar spherically expanding flames for methane/air, ethane/air, methane/ethane/air and propane/air mixtures at pressures between 1 and 10 atm and equivalence ratios...

De Vries, Jaap

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparative studies of methane and propane as fuels for spark ignition and compression ignition engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the combustion characteristics of the two fuels and sets out to consider their respective performance in both spark ignition and compression ignition engines. Results of comparative tests involving spark ignition engines over a wide range of operating conditions are presented and discussed. Some of the performance characteristics considered are those relating to power output, efficiency, tendency to knock, cyclic variations, optimum spark requirements and exhaust emissions. Similarly, some of the performance characteristics in compression ignition engines considered include power output, efficiency, tendency towards knock and autoignition, exhaust emissions and low operational temperature problems. Finally, the relative operational safety aspects of the two fuels are evaluated. It is then suggested that in this regard, methane has some excellent physical, chemical and combustion characteristics that makes it a particularly safe fuel.

Karim, G.A.; Wierzba, I.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A review on recent advances in the numerical simulation for coalbed-methane-recovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent advances in numerical simulation for primary coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and enhanced coalbed-methane recovery (ECBMR) processes are reviewed, primarily focusing on the progress that has occurred since the late 1980s. Two major issues regarding the numerical modeling will be discussed in this review: first, multicomponent gas transport in in-situ bulk coal and, second, changes of coal properties during methane (CH{sub 4}) production. For the former issues, a detailed review of more recent advances in modeling gas and water transport within a coal matrix is presented. Further, various factors influencing gas diffusion through the coal matrix will be highlighted as well, such as pore structure, concentration and pressure, and water effects. An ongoing bottleneck for evaluating total mass transport rate is developing a reasonable representation of multiscale pore space that considers coal type and rank. Moreover, few efforts have been concerned with modeling water-flow behavior in the coal matrix and its effects on CH{sub 4} production and on the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and CH{sub 4}. As for the second issue, theoretical coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical models have been proposed to describe the evolution of pore structure during CH{sub 4} production, instead of traditional empirical equations. However, there is currently no effective coupled model for engineering applications. Finally, perspectives on developing suitable simulation models for CBM production and for predicting CO{sub 2}-sequestration ECBMR are suggested.

Wei, X.R.; Wang, G.X.; Massarotto, P.; Golding, S.D.; Rudolph, V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

EFFECTS OF WATER SPRAYS AND SCRUBBER EXHAUST ON FACE METHANE CONCENTRATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane levels. KEYWORDS Ventilation, water sprays, methane, coal mining, dust scrubber INTRODUCTIONChapter 65 EFFECTS OF WATER SPRAYS AND SCRUBBER EXHAUST ON FACE METHANE CONCENTRATIONS Ch.D. Taylor-mounted scrubber and water sprays can reduced methane levels at the face. The current research was conducted

Saylor, John R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2010 A331 Biogenic methane potential for Surat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methane when native Walloon coal was provided as the sole organic carbon source. Methane generation rates]. This is the first direct evidence of real-time biogenic coal-to-methane potential for an Australian coal seam sample not produce methane from a non-native coal. Pathway and Bioavailability Results Six of the eight Surat Basin

402

Large-eddy simulation of lean hydrogenemethane turbulent premixed flames in the methane-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-eddy simulation of lean hydrogenemethane turbulent premixed flames in the methane- dominated to available experimental data. The enriched flame has 20% H2 in terms of mole fraction and lies in the methane methane flame in the methane- dominated regime. Copyright ª 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

Gülder, ?mer L.

403

CHEMISTRY OF METHANE AND RELATED HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF MARS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY OF METHANE AND RELATED HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF MARS. F. Lefèvre, LATMOS, Paris detection of methane on Mars [1,2,3,4] has revived the possibility of past or extant life on this planet of the recent observations of methane on Mars is that methane concentrations appear to be locally enhanced

404

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentialsand Its Impact on CO2 Emission," Iron & Steel, 2010, 45(5):Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Field emission properties of the polycrystalline diamond film prepared by microwave-assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field emission properties of the polycrystalline diamond film prepared by microwave-assisted plasma Field emission characteristics for the diamond films grown using a gas mixture of different methane V 3.0 V/ m and 9 V 5.5 V/ m , respectively, for the diamond emitter of a little poor quality grown

Lee, Jong Duk

406

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700C) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Single-well Modeling of Coalbed Methane Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presented study concerns the unconventional coal bed methane (CBM) fields that imply peculiarity of their evaluation. The theoretical basis of the CBM field development is briefly described, most widely known models of changes in the properties...

Martynova, Elena

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Direct Biological Conversion of Electrical Current into Methane by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrical energy and substrate heat of combustion energy (82%) (3). One disadvantage of electrically-chamber MEC, methane was produced at anoverallenergyefficiencyof80%(electricalenergyandsubstrate heat of combustion). These results show that electrometha- nogenesis can be used to convert electrical current

411

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

412

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

413

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

414

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

415

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6...

416

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

417

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

418

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

419

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

420

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Louisiana--North Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana--North Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

422

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

423

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

424

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

425

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

426

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

427

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

428

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

429

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

430

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

431

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

432

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

433

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

434

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

435

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

436

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0...

437

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

438

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

439

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

440

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0...

442

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

443

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0...

444

Commodity chemicals from natural gas by methane chlorination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethylene and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) can be produced from natural gas through methane chlorination by reacting methane and chlorine at 900/sup 0/C or higher. Experimental results indicate total ethylene equivalent yield from methane of 45%(wt) and marginal process economics. Fundamental kinetic modeling predicts improved C/sub 2/ yields of up to 70%(wt) at optimum reaction conditions. This optimum condition established the basis for the process design study to evaluate the potential for producing ethylene and VCM from natural gas. HCl by-product is recycled for economic viability. Using the Kel-Chlor process for recycling HCl, the proposed plant produces 27,200 TPA of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 383,800 TPA of VCM. The Midwest is an ethylene consumption area requiring imports of ethylene derivatives from other regions. A methane chlorination plant located on a Midwestern natural gas pipeline network has a good commercial potential.

Che, S.C.; Minet, R.G.; Giacobbe, F.; Mullick, S.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of predicted and measured methane gas production data within the heterogeneous porous methane hydrate sample.Global Distribution of Methane Hydrate in Ocean Hydrate.

Gupta, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench-scale. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. The project is on schedule and on budget. Task 4, a bench-scale demonstration of the ultra-fast TSA system is complete. Rapid thermal swing of an adsorbent bed using microchannels has been successfully demonstrated and the separation of a 70% methane and 30% nitrogen was purified to 92% methane. The bench-scale demonstration unit was small relative to the system dead volume for the initial phase of experiments and a purge step was added to sweep the dead volume prior to desorbing the bed and measuring purity. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system design and cost. The selected adsorbent, granular microporous carbon from either Barnaby-Sutcliffe or Calgon, experimentally demonstrated sufficient methane capacity under differential temperature at 100 pounds per square inch gauge. Several valve options were identified, including candidates that can operate millions of cycles between refurbishment. The microchannel adsorber and desorber designs were made using internal Velocys manufacturability standards, and the associated costs are acceptable as included with the complete nitrogen rejection unit (NRU) cost projection. A system design and cost estimate was completed for the NRU section of the methane upgrading system. As integrated into the complete system, the cost is in line with the market requirement.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

5616 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 91, 5616-5623 (parent methane), 105633-27-0;6,109745-47-3;6 (parent methane),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5616 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 91, 5616-5623 (parent methane), 105633-27-0;6,109745-47-3;6 (parent methane), 105633-31-6;7, 109745-48-4;8, 109745-49-5;8 (parent methane), 109745-52-0;9,109745-50-8;9 (parent methane), 105633-32-7;10, 109745-53-1;11, 109745-51-9;1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene,634

Goddard III, William A.

448

Tetrahedral Symmetry for Methane The infrared spectrum of methane shows two absorptions: a bend at 1306 cm-1 and a stretch at 3019 cm-1. Demonstrate that a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tetrahedral Symmetry for Methane The infrared spectrum of methane shows two absorptions: a bend symmetry for methane is consistent with this spectroscopic data. Also predict how many Raman active modes methane should have. E C3 C2 S4 A1 : x2 + y2 + z2 A2 C Td 1 1 2 3 3 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1

Rioux, Frank

449

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process is described which is combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C{sub +2} hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment. 10 figs.

Lokhandwala, K.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Proceedings of the international coalbed methane symposium. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains 36 papers divided among the following sessions: Resources/development potential; Mine safety and productivity issues; Reservoir characterization, modeling, and well testing; and a Poster session whose papers discuss coal geology, well completion methods, origin of coalbed methane, rock mechanics of coal seams, geologic fractures in coal seams, and the use of coalbed methane for mitigation of greenhouse gases. All papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nuclear magnetic resonance study of methane adsorbed on porous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by FENG I I Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1992 Major Subject: Physics NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by FENG LI Approved as to style and content by: . P. Kirk (Chair of Committee) i G. Agnolet (Member) J. H. Ross, r (Member) M...

Li, Feng

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The study of methane adsorbed on porous silicon by NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON BY NMR A Thesis by ADAM KAZIMIERZ CZERMAK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986... Major Subject: Physics THE STUDY OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON BY NMR A Thesis by ADAM KAZIMIERZ CZERMAK Approved as to style and content by: e Wile . Kirk (Chairman of Committee) J eevak M. Par pi a (Member) Randall L. Geiger...

Czermak, Adam Kazimierz

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VELOCITY OF SOUND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physics VELOCITY OF SOVND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Approved as to style and content by& (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departsmnt) (Mem er (Member) May 1968...

Whitehead, John Martin

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Two dimensional properties of methane adsorbed on porous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO DIMENSIONAL PROPERTIES OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by RICHARD FRANKLIN TENNIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Physics TWO DIMENSIONAL PROPERTIES OF METHANE ADSORBED ON POROUS SILICON A Thesis by RICHARD FRANKLIN TENNIS Approved as to style and content by: P. Kirk (C ir of Committee) Glenn olet (M er) Da J. Ernst...

Tennis, Richard Franklin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method of determining methane and electrochemical sensor therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about about 1.4 volts versus R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Otagawa, Takaaki (Westmont, IL); Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As predicted, from an evolving coalbed methane producibility model, prolific coalbed methane production is precluded in the Piceance Basin by the absence of coal bed reservoir continuity and dynamic ground-water flow. The best potential for production may lie at the transition zone from hydropressure to hydrocarbon overpressure and/or in conventional traps basinward of where outcrop and subsurface coals are in good reservoir and hydraulic communication. Geologic and hydrologic synergy among tectonic and structural setting, depositional systems and coal distribution, coal rank, gas content, permeability and hydrodynamics are the controls that determine the coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin. Within the coal-bearing Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, the prime coalbed methane target, reservoir heterogeneity and thrust faults cause coal beds along the Grand Hogback and in the subsurface to be in modest to poor reservoir and hydraulic communication, restricting meteoric ground water recharge and basinward flow. Total subsurface coalbed methane resources are still estimated to be approximately 99 Tcf (3.09 Tm{sup 3}), although coalbed methane resource estimates range between 80 (2.49 Tm{sup 3}) and 136 Tcf (4.24 Tm{sup 3}), depending on the calculation method used. To explore for high gas contents or fully gas-saturated coals and consequent high productivity in the Piceance Basin, improved geologic and completion technologies including exploration and development for migrated conventionally and hydrodynamically trapped gases, in-situ generated secondary biogenic gases, and solution gases will be required.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Diffusion and adsorption of methane confined in nanoporous carbon aerogel: a combined quasi-elastic and small-angle neutron scattering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusion of methane confined in nano-porous carbon aerogel with the average pore size 48 {angstrom} and porosity 60% was investigated as a function of pressure at T = 298 K using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The diffusivity of methane shows a clear effect of confinement: it is about two orders of magnitude lower than in bulk at the same thermodynamic conditions and is close to the diffusivity of liquid methane at 100 K (i.e. {approx} 90 K below the liquid-gas critical temperature T{sub C} {approx} 191 K). The diffusion coefficient (D) of methane initially increases with pressure by a factor of {approx}2.5 from 3.47 {+-} 0.41 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 0.482 MPa to D = 8.55 {+-} 0.33 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 2.75 MPa and starts to decrease at higher pressures. An explanation of the observed non-monotonic behavior of the diffusivity in the confined fluid is based on the results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments of the phase behavior of methane in a similar carbon aerogel sample. The initial increase of the diffusion coefficient with pressure is explained as due to progressive filling of bigger pores in which molecular mobility in the internal pore volume is less affected by the sluggish liquid-like molecular mobility in the adsorbed phase. Subsequent decrease of D, is associated with the effect of intermolecular collisions, which result in a lower total molecular mobility with pressure, as in the bulk state. The results are compared with the available QENS data on the methane diffusivity in zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and porous silica as well as with the molecular dynamics simulations of methane in nano-porous carbons and silica zeolites.

Mavila Chathoth, Suresh [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Zamponi, Michaela M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Methods for applying microchannels to separate methane using liquid absorbents, especially ionic liquid absorbents from a mixture comprising methane and nitrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of using microchannel separation systems including absorbents to improve thermal efficiency and reduce parasitic power loss. Energy is typically added to desorb methane and then energy or heat is removed to absorb methane using a working solution. The working solution or absorbent may comprise an ionic liquid, or other fluids that demonstrate a difference in affinity between methane and nitrogen in a solution.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Dublin, OH); Litt, Robert D. (Westerville, OH); Dongming, Qiu (Dublin, OH); Silva, Laura J. (Plain City, OH); Lamont, Micheal Jay (Plain City, OH); Fanelli, Maddalena (Plain City, OH); Simmons, Wayne W. (Plain city, OH); Perry, Steven (Galloway, OH)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

460

Chemical response of methane/air diffusion flames to unsteady strain rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of unsteady strain rate on the response of methane/air diffusion flames are studied. The authors use the finite-domain opposed flow configuration in which the nozzle exit velocity is imposed as a function of time. The GRI mechanism v2.11 is used for the detailed methane/air chemistry. The response of individual species to monochromatic oscillation in strain rate with various frequencies reveals that the fluctuation of slow species, such as CO and NO{sub x}, is more rapidly suppressed as the flow time scale decreases. It is also observed that the maximum CO concentration is very insensitive to the variation in the scalar dissipation rate. An extinction event due to an abrupt imposition of high strain rates is also simulated by an impulsive velocity with various frequencies. For a fast impulse, a substantial overshoot in NO{sub 2} concentration is observed after extinction. Finally, the overall fuel burning rate shows a nonmonotonic response to the variation in characteristic unsteady time scale, while the emission indices for NO{sub x} shows monotonic decay in response as frequency is increased.

Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, J.Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Methane generation at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methane generation at Grand Gulf has been brought to light twice. The initial event occurred in February 1990 and the second in December 1993. Both events involved the receipt of a cask at Barnwell Waste Management Facility that when opened indicated a gas escaping. The gas was subsequently sampled and indicated a percentage of explosive gas. Both events involved powdered resin and indicated that the generation was from a bacterial attack of the organic materials (cellulose in the powdered resin mixture). The first event occurred and was believed to be isolated in a particular waste stream. The situation was handled and a biocide was found to be effective in treatment of liners until severe cross contamination of another waste stream occurred. This allowed the shipment of a liner that was required to be sampled for explosive gases. The biocide used by GGNS was allowed reintroduction into the floor drains and this allowed the buildup of immunity of the bacterial population to this particular biocide. The approval of a new biocide has currently allowed GGNS to treat liners and ship them offsite.

Carver, M.L. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Port Gibson, MS (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Field Exploration of Methane Seep Near Atqasuk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.

Katey Walter, Dennis Witmer, Gwen Holdmann

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Methane conversion for application in fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional steam reformers are large and expensive for small scale fuel cell installations. But also the high endothermicity of the reforming reaction for the production of synthesis gas is a drawback. An alternative to conventional steam reforming is the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. This process is slightly exothermic. The flexibility of the process makes small scale application possible. However, the partial oxidation process seems especially attractive for application within a high temperature fuel cell, because of relatively high CO/H{sub 2}-ratio for the output gases. In this paper the results of the study on the mechanism of the partial oxidation to synthesis gas on silica-supported nickel catalysts are discussed. Moreover, a process for the partial oxidation is proposed in which air instead of oxygen can be used. Based on the results of the mechanistic study two processes for the catalytic partial oxidation are proposed and simulated using the Aspen Plus flowsheeting program with which the mass and heat balances were optimized.

Mulder, A. [Gastec N.V., Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Looy, F. van [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Waveren, A. van; Wingerden, A.J.M. van

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on San Juan Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of this project were to (a) measure the adsorption behavior of pure methane, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and their binary and ternary mixtures on wet Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia; (b) correlate the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data using the extended Langmuir model, the Langmuir model, the loading ratio correlation and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson equation of state; and (c) establish sorption-time estimates for the pure components. Specific accomplishments are summarized below regarding the complementary tasks involving experimental work and data correlation. Representative coal samples from BP Amoco Tiffany Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 were prepared, as requested. The equilibrium moisture content and particle size distribution of each coal sample were determined. Compositional coal analyses for both samples were performed by Huffman Laboratories, Inc. Pure gas adsorption for methane on wet Tiffany coal samples from Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 was measured separately at 130 F (327.6 K) and pressures to 2000 psia (13.7 MPa). The average expected uncertainty in these data is about 3% (9 SCF/ton). Our measurements indicate that the adsorption isotherms of the two coal samples exhibit similar Langmuir-type behavior. For the samples from the two wells, a maximum variation of about 5% in the amount adsorbed is observed at 2000 psia. Gas adsorption isotherms were measured for pure methane, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} on a wet, mixed Tiffany coal sample. The coal sample was an equal-mass mixture of coals from Well No.1 and Well No.10. The adsorption measurements were conducted at 130 F at pressures to 2000 psia. The adsorption isotherms have average expected experimental uncertainties of 3% (9 SCF/ton), 6% (8 SCF/ton), and 7% (62 SCF/ton) for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}, respectively. Adsorption isotherms were measured for methane/nitrogen, methane/CO{sub 2} and nitrogen/CO{sub 2} binary mixtures on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia. These measurements were conducted for a single molar feed composition for each mixture. The expected uncertainties in the amount adsorbed for these binary mixtures vary with pressure and composition. In general, average uncertainties are about 5% (19 SCF/ton) for the total adsorption; however, the expected uncertainties in the amount of individual-component adsorption are significantly higher for the less-adsorbed gas at lower molar feed concentrations (e.g., nitrogen in the 20/80 nitrogen/CO{sub 2} system). Adsorption isotherms were measured for a single methane/nitrogen/CO{sub 2} ternary mixture on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia. The nominal molar feed composition was 10/40/50. The average expected uncertainty for the total adsorption and CO{sub 2} adsorption is about 5% (16 SCF/ton). However, the low adsorption of nitrogen and methane in this ternary yield average experimental uncertainties of 14% (9 SCF/ton) and 27% (9 SCF/ton), respectively. Limited binary and ternary gas-phase compressibility factor measurements at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia involving methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} were conducted to facilitate reduction of our ternary adsorption data. These newly acquired data (and available data from the literature) were used to improve the Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) equation-of-state (EOS) compressibility factor predictions, which are used in material balance calculations for the adsorption measurements. In general, the optimized BWR EOS represents the experimental compressibility factor data within 0.5% AAD. The Langmuir/loading ratio correlation (LRC) and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson (ZGR) two-dimensional EOS were used to analyze the newly acquired adsorption data. Model parameters were obtained for the systems studied. The LRC and ZGR EOS were used to correlate the adsorption data for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} and their mixtures on wet Tiffany coal. The model parameters were determined by minimizing the sum of squares of weighted errors in the calculated amounts of gas adsorbed. The results

K. A. M. Gasem; R. L. Robinson; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Electrochemistry of soluble methane monooxygenase on a modified gold electrode : implications for chemical sensing in natural waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work explored the possibility of using the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) enzyme, a three-component enzyme which catalyzes the oxygenation of methane and other substrates, to design a methane sensor for use in ...

Chuang, Janet Duanping

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Ocean Field Test of Methane Hydrate Formation from aW.J. , and Mason, D.H. , Methane Hydrate Formation inNatural and Laboratory--Formed Methane Gas Hydrate. American

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these e?orts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these e?orts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and o?ers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate Science Challenges and linking them with Technical Challenges and potential field program locations.

Collett, Tim; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta; Myers, Greg; Divins, David; Morell, Margo

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optimal irreversible stimulated emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

469

Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench scale. The project is on schedule and on budget. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system design and cost. The selected adsorbent, granular microporous carbon from either Barnaby-Sutcliffe or Calgon, experimentally demonstrated sufficient methane capacity under differential temperature at 100 pounds per square inch gauge. Several valve options were identified, including candidates that can operate millions of cycles between refurbishment. The microchannel adsorber and desorber designs were made using internal Velocys manufacturability standards, and the associated costs are acceptable as included with the complete nitrogen rejection unit (NRU) cost projection. A system design and cost estimate was completed for the NRU section of the methane upgrading system. As integrated into the complete system, the cost is in line with the market requirement. The system has six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration will be initiated in the next fiscal year. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

49 new T dwarfs identified using methane imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of 49 new photometrically classified T dwarfs from the combination of large infrared and optical surveys combined with follow-up TNG photometry. We used multi-band infrared and optical photometry from the UKIRT and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to identify possible brown dwarf candidates, which were then confirmed using methane filter photometry. We have defined a new photometric conversion between CH4s - CH4l colour and spectral type for T4 to T8 brown dwarfs based on a part of the sample that has been followed up using methane photometry and spectroscopy. Using methane differential photometry as a proxy for spectral type for T dwarfs has proved to be a very efficient technique. Of a subset of 45 methane selected brown dwarfs that were observed spectroscopically, 100% were confirmed as T dwarfs. Future deep imaging surveys will produce large samples of faint brown dwarf candidates, for which spectroscopy will not be feasible. When broad wavelength coverage is unavailable, methane imaging...

Cardoso, C V; Smart, R L; van Spaandonk, L; Baker, D; Smith, L C; Andrei, A H; Bucciarelli, B; Dhital, S; Jones, H R A; Lattanzi, M G; Magazzu, A; Pinfield, D J; Tinney, C G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - air methane vam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reagents Methane (99.99 v.%, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.) and propane (99.0 v.%, Praxair) were used... of carbon catalyst activation on the rate of methane decomposition...

477

Biogeochemical modelling of anaerobic vs. aerobic methane oxidation in a meromictic crater lake (Lake Pavin, France)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Géosciences, 1A rue de la Férolerie, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its concentration in the atmosphere has increased over the past decades. Methane produced

Boyer, Edmond

478

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Washington, D.C. -- Increased understanding of methane's role in the global climate cycle and the potential of methane hydrate as a future energy resource could result from a recent joint research...

479

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION of Technology August 2008 #12;MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET

Seitzman, Jerry M.

480

Department of Mechanical & Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Converting Methane into Ethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical & Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Converting Methane catalyst production labs, reactor testing lab, and testing equipment. Team Methane Fuzion was responsible. Temperature of the catalyst was closely monitored in order to prevent catalyst sintering. Testing

Demirel, Melik C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "methane emission factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Abiotic Aerobic Methane Release from Plant Material Dan Bruhn, Per Ambus & Teis N Mikkelsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abiotic Aerobic Methane Release from Plant Material Dan Bruhn, Per Ambus & Teis N Mikkelsen)1 reported a new finding of aerobic methane (CH4) release by living plant and even dead tissue. Keppler et al

482

ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL recovered. Carbon sequestration, therefore, allows the utilization of unexploited mineral resources while potential of coalbed methane production using carbon dioxide sequestration in the Central Appalachian Basin

483

New mineralogy of the outer solar system and the high-pressure behaviour of methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis will introduce the study of methane as a mineral. Along with ammonia and water, methane is one of the main planetary-forming materials in the outer solar system. The topic of `new mineralogy of the outer solar ...

Maynard-Casely, Helen E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane the current study and the previous measurements in similar flames with methane, ethane, and propane flames

Gülder, ?mer L.

485

Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

Safety at coal mines: what role does methane play?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent Sago Mine disaster in West Virginia and other widely publicized coal mine accidents around the world have received a great deal of attention and have generated some confusion about the link between methane drainage and safety. In response, this article provides an overview of safety concerns faced by coal mines and how they do or do not relate to methane. The first section explains the variety of safety issues a coal mine must take into consideration, including methane build-up. The second section summarizes the recent coal mines accident at Sago Mine in West Virginia. The final section describes the regulatory and legislative responses in the US. 2 refs., 2 figs.

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Financing coal mine, methane recovery and utilization projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article describes types and sources of funding that may be available to project developers and investors that are interested in pursuing coal mine methane (CMM) project opportunities particularly in developing countries or economies in transition. It briefly summarizes prefeasibility and feasibility studies and technology demonstrations. It provides a guide to key parties involved in project financing (equity, debt or carbon financing) as well as project risk reduction support. This article provides an update to the information contained in two previous guides - Catalogue of Coal Mine Methane Project Finance Sources (2002) and A Guide to Financing Coalbed Methane Projects (1997) - both available on the CMOP web site http://www.epa.gov/cmop/resources/reports/finance.html.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA A. López (a) , R. Molina (b) (a limited due to several factors. These factors include the need of greater computational time than to the projection data to obtain two-dimensional slices or cross sections (images) of activity distribution. #12

Granada, Universidad de

490

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric * Hydroelectric reservoirs cover an area of 3.4 ? 105 km2 and comprise about 20% of all reservoirs. In addition dioxide and methane from hydroelectric reservoirs, on the basis of data from 85 globally distributed

491

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geology and gas-phase (methane) seepage for the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field, one of the worldORIGINAL Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field's largest and best-studied marine oil and gas seep fields, located over a producing hydrocarbon reservoir

Luyendyk, Bruce

492

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion Factors methodology as well as conversion factors used for the CO 2related emissions. Conversion Factors This study uses the

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Adsorption Mechanism and Uptake of Methane in Covalent Organic Frameworks: Theory and Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this disadvantage include · storing methane as liquefied natural gas (LNG, at 112 K) or compressed natural gas (CNG

Yaghi, Omar M.

495

Dissociative Adsorption of Methane on Surface Oxide Structures of Pd-Pt Alloys Arezoo Dianat,*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/C ratio of methane, the heat of combustion per mole of generated CO2 is higher than for other fuels

Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

496

Physiology and Genetics of Biogenic Methane-Production from Acetate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass conversion catalyzed by methanogenic consortia is a widely available, renewable resource for both energy production and waste treatment. The efficiency of this process is directly dependent upon the interaction of three metabolically distinct groups of microorganisms; the fermentative and acetogenic Bacteria and the methanogenic Archaea. One of the rate limiting steps in the degradation of soluble organic matter is the dismutation of acetate, a predominant intermediate in the process, which accounts for 70 % or more of the methane produced by the methanogens. Acetate utilization is controlled by regulation of expression of carbon monoxide dehydrogensase (COdh), which catalyzes the dismutation of acetate. However, physiological and molecular factors that control differential substrate utilization have not been identified in these Archaea. Our laboratory has identified sequence elements near the promoter of the gene (cdh) encoding for COdh and we have confirmed that these sequences have a role in the in vivo expression of cdh. The current proposal focuses on identifying the regulatory components that interact with DNA and RNA elements, and identifying the mechanisms used to control cdh expression. We will determine whether expression is controlled at the level of transcription or if it is mediated by coordinate interaction of transcription initiation with other processes such as transcription elongation rate and differential mRNA stability. Utilizing recently sequenced methanosarcinal genomes and a DNA microarray currently under development genes that encode regulatory proteins and transcription factors will be identified and function confirmed by gene disruption and subsequent screening on different substrates. Functional interactions will be determined in vivo by assaying the effects of gene dosage and site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory gene on the expression of a cdhA?::lacZ operon fusion. Results of this study will reveal whether this critical catabolic pathway is controlled by mechanisms similar to those employed by the Bacteria and Eukarya, or by a regulatory paradigm that is unique to the Archaea. The mechanism(s) revealed by this investigation will provide insight into the regulatory strategies employed by the aceticlastic methanogenic Archaea to efficiently direct carbon and electron flow in anaerobic consortia during fermentative processes.

Sowers, Kevin R

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

497

Detection of methane on Kuiper Belt Object (50000) Quaoar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near-infrared spectrum of (50000) Quaoar obtained at the Keck Observatory shows distinct absorption features of crystalline water ice, solid methane and ethane, and possibly other higher order hydrocarbons. Quaoar is only the fifth Kuiper belt object on which volatile ices have been detected. The small amount of methane on an otherwise water ice dominated surface suggests that Quaoar is a transition object between the dominant volatile-poor small Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) and the few volatile-rich large KBOs such as Pluto and Eris.

E. L. Schaller; M. E. Brown

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

498

Methane Hydrate R&D | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EM ProjectMemoDepartmentFY 2010 Methane HydrateMethane

499

Compatibility of selected ceramics with steam-methane reformer environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional steam reforming of methane to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}) hasa conversion efficiency of about 85%. Replacement of metal tubes in the reformer with ceramic tubes offers the potential for operation at temperatures high enough to increase the efficiency to 98-99%. However, the two candidate ceramic materials being given strongest consideration, sintered alpha Si carbide and Si carbide particulate-strengthened alumina, have been shown to react with components of the reformer environment. Extent of degradation as a function of steam partial pressure and exposure time has been studied, and results suggest limits under which these structural ceramics can be used in advanced steam-methane reformers.

Keiser, J.R.; Howell, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Williams, J.J.; Rosenberg, R.A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1 Xixi Wang, Assefa M. Melesse, Michael E. McClain, and Wanhong Yang2 ABSTRACT: Coalbed methane (CBM the Powder River. (KEY TERMS: coalbed methane, produced water; Montana; natural gas; pattern analysis

McClain, Michael