Sample records for meteorological observation system

  1. Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

  2. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  4. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg).

  5. Meteorological Observations for Renewable Energy Applications at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Alai, M; Myers, K

    2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In early October 2010, two Laser and Detection Ranging (LIDAR) units (LIDAR-96 and LIDAR-97), a 3 m tall flux tower, and a 3 m tall meteorological tower were installed in the northern section of Site 300 (Figure 1) as a first step in development of a renewable energy testbed facility. This section of the SMS project is aimed at supporting that effort with continuous maintenance of atmospheric monitoring instruments capable of measuring vertical profiles of wind speed and wind direction at heights encountered by future wind power turbines. In addition, fluxes of energy are monitored to estimate atmospheric mixing and its effects on wind flow properties at turbine rotor disk heights. Together, these measurements are critical for providing an accurate wind resource characterization and for validating LLNL atmospheric prediction codes for future renewable energy projects at Site 300. Accurate, high-resolution meteorological measurements of wind flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface-atmosphere energy exchange are required for understanding the properties and quality of available wind power at Site 300. Wind speeds at heights found in a typical wind turbine rotor disk ({approx} 40-140 m) are driven by the synergistic impacts of atmospheric stability, orography, and land-surface characteristics on the mean wind flow in the PBL and related turbulence structures. This section of the report details the maintenance and labor required in FY11 to optimize the meteorological instruments and ensure high accuracy of their measurements. A detailed look at the observations from FY11 is also presented. This portion of the project met the following milestones: Milestone 1: successful maintenance and data collection of LIDAR and flux tower instruments; Milestone 2: successful installation of solar power for the LIDAR units; and Milestone 3: successful implementation of remote data transmission for the LIDAR units.

  6. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Winds: 10 meters • Temperature and Relative Humidity: 2 meters • Barometric Pressure: 1 meter. Depending upon the geographical location, different models and types of sensors may be used to measure the core variables due to the conditions experienced at those locations. Most sites have additional sensors that measure other variables that are unique to that site or are well suited for the climate of the location but not at others.

  7. 62 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Observations and infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . · The development of a risk-based asset replacement plan for 2014­15 and beyond was commenced, and an Asset Life-cycle, the Observing System Strategy has been developed and will be supported by an accompanying roadmap monitoring and review of the Bureau's observing systems is undertaken to assess performance and fitness

  8. Meteorological significance of frontal thin-line angel echoes observed by CPS-9 radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Donald Bradford

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METEOROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF FRONTAL THIN-LINE ANGEL ECHOES OBSERVED BY CPS-9 RADAR A Thesis By DONAID B. MILLER I/Lt USAF Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1959 Ma]or Sub)ect Meteorology METEOROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF FRONTAL THIN-LINE ANGEL ECHOES OBSERVED BY CPS-9 RADAR A Thesi. s By DONALD B. MILLER I/Lt USAF Approved as to style and content by...

  9. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  10. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  11. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  12. Meteorological Integration for the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System: General Guidance for BWIC Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, William J.; Wang, Weiguo; Rutz, Frederick C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Xie, YuLong; Seiple, Timothy E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for developing systems to detect the release of aerosolized bioagents in urban environments. The system that accomplishes this, known as BioWatch, is a robust first-generation monitoring system. In conjunction with the BioWatch detection network, DHS has also developed a software tool for cities to use to assist in their response when a bioagent is detected. This tool, the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System, will eventually be deployed to all BioWatch cities to aid in the interpretation of the public health significance of indicators from the BioWatch networks. BWIC consists of a set of integrated modules, including meteorological models, that estimate the effect of a biological agent on a city’s population once it has been detected. For the meteorological models in BWIC to successfully calculate the distribution of biological material, they must have as input accurate meteorological data, and wind fields in particular. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for cities to use in identifying sources of good-quality local meteorological data that BWIC needs to function properly. This process of finding sources of local meteorological data, evaluating the data quality and gaps in coverage, and getting the data into BWIC, referred to as meteorological integration, is described. The good news for many cities is that meteorological measurement networks are becoming increasingly common. Most of these networks allow their data to be distributed in real time via the internet. Thus, cities will often only need to evaluate the quality of available measurements and perhaps add a modest number of stations where coverage is poor.

  13. Emissions of crustal material in air quality forecast systems: Use of satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Emissions of crustal material in air quality forecast systems: Use of satellite observations) Natural (dust, fires, volcanos) Meteorology: Transport, turbulence Clouds and radiation, precipitations Chemistry-transport model Gas and particles concentrations Use of model outputs: Analysis Direct: model vs

  14. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  15. Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere -- in the Metric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eihle, W. O.; Powers, R. J.; Clark, R.A.

    TR-16 1968 Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere?in the Metric System W.O. Eihle R.J. Powers R.A. Clark...

  16. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

  17. Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study 457 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) © EGU Operational hydro forecasting system in the context of the Piemonte Regions hydro-meteorological operational alert procedure

  18. A recent study of meteorological conditions around the Pentagon will support development of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack. I nFEBRUARY 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | #12;of the most likely targets for a future terrorist attack

  19. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  20. TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION Mesoscale Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION ­ Mesoscale Meteorology Colorado State University The Department or associate level faculty position specializing in mesoscale meteorology. Exceptionally qualified candidates in linking models and/or theory with observations for the study of mesoscale processes. The successful

  1. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre] [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P. [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France)] [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France); Ecoffet, R. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)] [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  2. Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .bom.gov.au Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report | Low pressure system over southeast Australia A low pressure system of southeast Australia. In central Victoria, the low caused a storm surge and tidal flooding as well as large to power and transport as well as widespread coastal erosion. The strong winds caused downed trees, power

  3. Aircraft as a meteorological sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Meteorological Institute 2 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Photo cover: A KLM Airbus A330-200 landsAircraft as a meteorological sensor Using Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance data to derive upper air Meteorological Institute 3 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Aircraft as a meteorological sensor Using

  4. Approximation and inversion of a complex meteorological system via local linear filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    been the site of some of the nation's most severe air pollution (Lu et al., 1997b). In order to model to a complex mul- tivariate dynamic model for Southern California air quality is given and the method is shown, simulate, and predict levels of ozone and other pollutants, a multivariate dynamic modeling system called

  5. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  6. Time changes in a subtropical cloud and weather system as revealed by meteorological satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, Darryl

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United States. The 700-mb humidity chart in Figure 4 shows two very significant features. A narrow band of moist air 2 ~F80 s~oeo? + RO 60 45+M &1 f ) I I. J ~ S gD 40 20 'T fl i I pe ys p C 44 p I f I S+ lt 1 50- sS I'x gO 20 I C... TIROS I photographs as well as con- ventional analysis tools. A zone of maximum relative humidity was noted on the warm side of the axis of maxi- mum winds between the 700-mb and 400-mb levels. The cloud system developed from a poorly organized cloud...

  7. COMPARISON OF CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS RESULTS FROM TWO METHODS OF PROCESSING SITE METEOROLOGICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (NOEMAIL), D

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Consequence analysis to support documented safety analysis requires the use of one or more years of representative meteorological data for atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations. At minimum, the needed meteorological data for most atmospheric transport and dispersion models consist of hourly samples of wind speed and atmospheric stability class. Atmospheric stability is inferred from measured and/or observed meteorological data. Several methods exist to convert measured and observed meteorological data into atmospheric stability class data. In this paper, one year of meteorological data from a western Department of Energy (DOE) site is processed to determine atmospheric stability class using two methods. The method that is prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for supporting licensing of nuclear power plants makes use of measurements of vertical temperature difference to determine atmospheric stability. Another method that is preferred by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relies upon measurements of incoming solar radiation, vertical temperature gradient, and wind speed. Consequences are calculated and compared using the two sets of processed meteorological data from these two methods as input data into the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2 (MACCS2) code.

  8. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

  9. NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology Energy Technology (RET) projects. These climatological profiles are used for designing systems that have of the renewable energy resource potential can be determined for any location on the globe. That estimate may

  10. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) for the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zack, J; Natenberg, E J; Knowe, G V; Waight, K; Manobianco, J; Hanley, D; Kamath, C

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In this phase of the project the focus is on the Mid-Columbia Basin region, which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area (Figure 1) that includes the Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate the Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) observational system deployment approach in order to move closer to the overall goal: (1) Perform an Observing System Experiment (OSE) using a data denial approach. The results of this task are presented in a separate report. (2) Conduct a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for the Mid-Colombia basin region. This report presents the results of the OSSE task. The specific objective is to test strategies for future deployment of observing systems in order to suggest the best and most efficient ways to improve wind forecasting at BPA wind farm locations. OSSEs have been used for many years in meteorology to evaluate the potential impact of proposed observing systems, determine tradeoffs in instrument design, and study the most effective data assimilation methodologies to incorporate the new observations into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (Atlas 1997; Lord 1997). For this project, a series of OSSEs will allow consideration of the impact of new observing systems of various types and in various locations.

  11. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  12. Air pollution meteorology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eagleman, J.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Pollution Meteorology is divided into three parts: air pollution fundamentals; concentration calculations and distributions; and pollution and meteorological interactions. The first section includes chapters on the following topics: the problem; measurements, sources, and standards; air stagnation and pollutant index; and effects. The second section of the book includes chapters on diffusion theory, the Gaussian plume dispersion model, plume rise, various dispersion models, scale considerations, and concentration trends. The third and final section (on pollution and meteorological interactions) begins with two chapters on radiative and wind effects on dispersion, and then follows with chapters on acid rain, the ozone hole, the greenhouse effect, and nuclear winter. In summary, Air Pollution Meteorology does a good job of covering the field for physics, chemistry, and engineering students who want to obtain an overview of the subject.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A COASTAL MARGIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (CMOAS) TO CAPTURE THE EPISODIC EVENTS IN A SHALLOW BAY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Mohammad S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    in real-time monitoring of hydrodynamic, meteorological and water quality parameters in the bay. Three different platform types used for the installation of sensor systems are: 1) Fixed Robotic, 2) Mobile, and 3) Remote. An automated profiler system...

  14. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary and interpretation of information from National Weather Service watches and warnings by10 decision makers such an outlier to the regional severe weather climatology. An analysis of the synoptic and13 mesoscale

  15. In "Observation, Theory, and Modeling of Atmospheric Variability", edited by Zhu et al., World Scientific Series on Meteorology of East Asia, Vol. 3, World Scientific Publishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    of the climate system, three-dimensional numerical models are the only tools to reliably project future climate role in the sensitivity of the climate system. It reviews available cloud feedback diagnostic methods. Clouds reflect solar (shortwave) radiation to space, thus serving as a cooling agent to the Earth

  16. The Observers' Paradox: Apparent Computational Complexity in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, Jordan B.

    The Observers' Paradox: Apparent Computational Complexity in Physical Systems John F. Kolen Research Department of Computer and Information Sciences The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 kolen

  17. Navigation System for Ground Vehicles using Temporally Interconnected Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    navigation technique for an automotive vehicle. This method involves several observers, each designed for a particular type of trajectory, that are turned on and off according to a switching policy. Each observer of observer design of vehicular systems. A typical example of such practices1 is found in the navigation

  18. Version 3.0 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    D-33192 Version 3.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Data_04 Data November 5, 2007 Version 3.0 ii Earth Observing System (EOS) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer Jet Propulsion Laboratory #12;TES Validation Report ­ Version F04_04 Data November 5, 2007 Version 3.0

  19. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction that will achieve an integrated, comprehensive, and sustainable observing system enterprise for the Great Lakes

  20. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  1. Letter of transmittal Office of the Director of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ............................................ 138 South Australia....................................... 140 Western Australia Melbourne VIC 3001 Australia Australia's National Meteorological Service 700 Collins Street Docklands VIC continued its work of observing, analysing and predicting Australia's weather, climate, oceans and water

  2. Letter of transmittal Office of the Director of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .................................................... 92 South Australia ............................................... 94 Western Australia Melbourne VIC 3001 Australia Australia's National Meteorological Service 700 Collins Street Docklands VIC continued its work of observing, analysing and predicting Australia's weather, climate, oceans, water

  3. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................11 Table of Maximum Recorded Water Level Residuals (Storm Surge.................................................................17 Time-Series Plots of Observed, Predicted and Residual Water LevelsNOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY Silver Spring, Maryland January 24

  4. The data collection component of the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; Islam, M.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive program of meteorological monitoring is in place at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program involves the measurement, observation, and storage of various meteorological data; continuous monitoring of regional weather conditions by a staff of professional meteorologists; and around-the-clock forecasting of weather conditions for the Hanford Site. The objective of this report is to document the data collection component of the program. In this report, each meteorological monitoring site is discussed in detail. Each site's location and instrumentation are described and photographs are presented. The methods for processing and communicating data to the Hanford Meteorology Station are also discussed. Finally, the procedures followed to maintain and calibrate these instruments are presented. 2 refs., 83 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Rule-based system architecting of Earth observation satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva Valero, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System architecting is concerned with exploring the tradespace of early, high-level, system design decisions with a holistic, value-centric view. In the last few years, several tools and methods have been developed to ...

  6. School of Meteorology Comprehensive Exam Policy Below is the Comprehensive Exam Policy as approved by the School of Meteorology Faculty at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    , tropical meteorology, mesoscale meteorology, turbulence and computational fluid dynamics. Normally

  7. Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Brandon H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: meteorological instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meteorological instrumentation Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind...

  9. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  10. A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

  11. OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, William

    OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS WILLIAM OTT, MAURICIO A. RIVAS, AND JAMES WEST Abstract. Can the Lyapunov exponents of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems spaces generated by evolution partial differential equations. Contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1. Lyapunov

  12. Internal and Boundary Observability Estimates for the Heterogeneous Maxwell's System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicaise, Serge [Universite de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambresis, MACS, Institut des Sciences et Techniques de Valenciennes, 59313 Valenciennes Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: snicaise@univ-valenciennes.fr; Pignotti, Cristina [Dipartimento di Matematica Pura e Applicata, Universita di L'Aquila, Via Vetoio, Loc. Coppito, 67010 L'Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: pignotti@univqaq.it

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Observability estimates for Maxwell's system with variable coefficients are established using the differential geometry method recently developed for scalar wave equations.The main tool is that Maxwell's system is reducible to a perturbed vectorial wave equation with a decoupled principal part.

  13. Meteorological database for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, M.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Indoor Air Meteorological Database for the United StatesUC-402 Meteorological Database for the United States M.G.Abstract A meteorological database has been developed to aid

  14. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry in particular, they are used in the regulation of energy companies (including natural gas of 50 participants representing energy load forecasters, state regulators, federal climate scientists using the most recent 15 years of observations and a forecast of the next 15 years.52 * Climate Model

  15. Time evolution of observable properties of parametrized systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hajicek

    1996-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of some recent work on the problem of time and of observables for the reparametrization invariant systems is given. A talk presented at the Second Meeting on Constraint Dynamics and Quantum Gravity at Santa Marguerita Ligure, September 17--21 1996.

  16. Design of coherent quantum observers for linear quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanon L. Vuglar; Hadis Amini

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum versions of control problems are often more difficult than their classical counterparts because of the additional constraints imposed by quantum dynamics. For example, the quantum LQG and quantum H infinity optimal control problems remain open. To make further progress, new, systematic and tractable methods need to be developed. This paper gives three algorithms for designing coherent observers, i.e., quantum systems that are connected to a quantum plant and their outputs provide information about the internal state of the plant. Importantly, coherent observers avoid measurements of the plant outputs. We compare our coherent observers with a classical (measurement-based) observer by way of an example involving an optical cavity with thermal and vacuum noises as inputs.

  17. Collaborative process control: Observation of tracks generated by PLM system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkadiri, Soumaya; Delattre, Miguel; Bouras, Abdelaziz

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims at analyzing the problems related to collaborative work using a PLM system. This research is mainly focused on the organisational aspects of SMEs involved in networks composed of large companies, subcontractors and other industrial partners. From this analysis, we propose the deployment of an approach based on an observation process of tracks generated by PLM system. The specific contributions are of two fold. First is to identify the brake points of collaborative work. The second, thanks to the exploitation of generated tracks, it allows reducing risks by reacting in real time to the incidents or dysfunctions that may occur. The overall system architecture based on services technology and supporting the proposed approach is described, as well as associated prototype developed using an industrial PLM system.

  18. Algorithms, Protocols & Systems for Remote Observation Using Networked Robotic Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Ni

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    assist in waste cleanup using Point- and-Direct (PAD) commands. Users point to cleanup locations in a shared image and a robot excavates each location in turn. Recent developments in MOSR systems can be found in [26,27]. In [27] Goldberg et al. propose...ALGORITHMS, PROTOCOLS AND SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE OBSERVATION USING NETWORKED ROBOTIC CAMERAS A Dissertation by NI QIN Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  19. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. DEDICATION . iv vi TABLE OF CONTENTS . vii LIST OF TABLES. IX LIST OF FIGURES . LIST OF ACRONYMS CHAPTER xii I. INTRODUCTION 1. The Need for This Investigation 2. Present Status of Research Relating... to This Investigation 3. Objectives of the Investigation 4. Techniques and Scope of the Investigation. II. METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA . 10 1. Basic Radar Theory . 2. Earth Curvature Correction . 3. The TAMU Weather Radar System. 4. Data Reduction and Display 10...

  20. ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs, T. Eskridge, R. Hartley, H. Pfeiffer, and C. Soderlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Roger

    ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs mesoscale meteorological data fusion system is being developed as an intelligent interface between the U.S. Army's Integrated Meteorological System IM[ETS) mesoscale database and tactical decision aids (TDAs

  1. 1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | H PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH­ WARNING SYSTEM climatology-based heat watch­warning systems have been implemented across the United States in circula- tion, in order to increase heat loss through radiation, as well as evaporative cooling by sweat

  2. Computational methods in wind power meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational methods in wind power meteorology Bo Hoffmann Jørgensen, Søren Ott, Niels Nørmark, Jakob Mann and Jake Badger Title: Computational methods in wind power meteorology Department: Wind in connection with the project called Computational meth- ods in wind power meteorology which was supported

  3. Observational Techniques for Detecting Planets in Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew W. Muterspaugh; Maciej Konacki; Benjamin F. Lane; Eric Pfahl

    2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for planets in close binary systems explore the degree to which stellar multiplicity inhibits or promotes planet formation. There is a degeneracy between planet formation models when only systems with single stars are studied--several mechanisms appear to be able to produce such a final result. This degeneracy is lifted by searching for planets in binary systems; the resulting detections (or evidence of non-existence) of planets in binaries isolates which models may contribute to how planets form in nature. In this chapter, we consider observational efforts to detect planetary companions to binary stars in two types of hierarchical planet-binary configurations: first ``S-type'' planets which orbit just one of the stars, with the binary period being much longer than the planet's; second, ``P-type'' or circumbinary planets, where the planet simultaneously orbits both stars, and the planetary orbital period is much longer than that of the binary. The S-type planet finding techniques are different for binaries that can or cannot be spatially resolved. For wider systems, techniques reviewed include dualstar interferometric differential astrometry and precision radial velocities. Alternatively, unresolved binaries can be studied using modified dualstar "PHASES-style" differential astrometry or a modification of the radial velocity technique for composite spectra. Should a fortunately aligned--but still long period--binary be found, eclipse timing can also reveal the presence of S-type planets. Methods for detecting P-type planets include the composite-spectra variant of the radial velocity technique and eclipse timing.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  5. Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers (Ligda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    (Ligda) Possibility of such observations was predicted by Ryde (1941) MIT Radiation Laboratory made in 1943 First operational weather radar, Panama, 1943 Science of radar meteorology born from WWII research fluctuations at 1/2 the wavelength of the incident radiation (a few meters in this case). Power returned from

  6. Aerosol observing system platform integration and AAF instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springston, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the federal government’s 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. DOE Office of Science allocated funds for the capital upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility to improve and expand observational capabilities related to cloud and aerosol properties. The ARM Facility was established as a national user facility for the global scientific community to conduct a wide range of interdisciplinary science. Part of the ARRA-funded expansion of the ARM Facility includes four new Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS) to be designed, instrumented, and mentored by BNL. The enclosures will be customized SeaTainers. These new platforms ([AMF2]: ARM Mobile Facility-2; [TWP-D]: Tropical Western Pacific at Darwin; and [MAOS-A]/[MAOS-C]: Mobile Aerosol Observing System-Aerosol/-Chemistry) will provide a laboratory environment for fielding instruments to collect data on aerosol life cycle, microphysics, and optical/physical properties. The extensive instrument suite includes both established methods and initial deployments of new techniques to add breadth and depth to the AOS data sets. The platforms are designed: (1) to have all instruments pre-installed before deployment, allowing a higher measurement duty cycle; (2) with a standardized configuration improving the robustness of data inter-comparability; (3) to provide remote access capability for instrument mentors; and (4) to readily accommodate guest instrumentation. The first deployment of the AMF2 platform will be at the upcoming StormVEx campaign held at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, October 15, 2010–March 31, 2011 while the TWP-D AOS will be stationed at the ARM Darwin site. The maiden deployments of the MAOS-A and MAOS-C platforms will be during the Ganges Valley Experiment (GVAX) scheduled for April 2011–April 2012. In addition to the ground-based AOS platforms, thee major instrument builds for the AAF are also being undertaken (new trace gas package [NO, NOx, NOy, CO, O3, and SO2]; Scanning Mobility Particle Sampler [SMPS]; and Particle into Liquid Sampler [PILS]). The current status of the AOS platforms, instrument suites, instituted QA/QC activities, projected AOS VAPs, and inlet design, as well as still-unresolved issues, will be presented.

  7. METEOROLOGICAL Monthly Weather Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    the lofting of supercooled water above the melting level, and an enhanced LDR "cap" above the column implied warm-cloud depths, increased ice mass observed just above the melting level, and a narrower with precipitation-sized ice extending to 15 km. In addition, the presence of ZDR columns in these cells indicated

  8. A new microtelesensor chip for meteorology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manges, W.W.; Smith, S.F.; Britton, C.L. [and others

    1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technology exploiting commercial, micro-sensors developed for atomic force microscopy offers breakthrough capability in high accuracy wireless sensors for meteorological measurements. Historically sensors used in air-borne and buoy-based platforms required compromises in performance to achieve the low-weight and low power requirements of the mobile platforms. Recent innovations in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) provided opportunities to reduce size, weight, and power requirements but each sensor required a specially fabricated device with inherent calibration, repeatability, and traceability problems. This new approach allows identical sensors to be fabricated on the same semiconductor substrate as the conditioning electronics and the telemetry components. Exploiting semiconductor fabrication technology offers the potential to reduce fabrication costs to a few dollars per component. Sensing humidity, temperature and pressure have been demonstrated with plans for meteorological deployment scheduled for later in 1997. Cost, reliability, size, power consumption, and accuracy are key factors in the deployment of advanced meteorological sensor arrays. ORNL is actively integrating the sensing technologies, electronic processing, and telemetry that build a family of sensors with multiple-input capabilities. One of the key elements in ORNL`s sensor technology is coated microcantilever arrays, which form a powerful universal platform for multiple physical and chemical measurements. Telemetry is also being developed to add robust spread-spectrum data transmission capabilities to the necessary signal processing electronics. In collaboration with the NOAA Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Lab, a chip-level temperature/humidity module with onboard telemetry is slated for demonstration later in 1997. Future additions would include sensors for atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, turbulence measurement, and radiometry.

  9. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation of aof

  10. Observability Criteria and Estimator Design for Stochastic Linear Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    . Alessandri and Coletta [5] proposed a Luenberger observer design methodology for deterministic linear hybrid

  11. 42 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Environment and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and hydrology to build world-class systems and prediction services to support decision-makers in government services, and energy and services sectors; · Australian, State and local governments and their agencies; · international organisations including the World Meteorological Organization and Pacific Island National

  12. A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Clément

    A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters: Satellite ocean color Observation operator Eutrophication Remote sensing Radiative transfer modeling

  13. Antenna system characteristic and solar radio burst observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Sha; Chen, Zhijun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Donghao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is an advanced aperture synthesis solar radio heliograph, developed by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences independently. It consists of 100 reflector antennas, which are grouped into two antenna arrays (CSRH-I and CSRH-II) for low and high frequency bands respectively. The frequency band of CSRH-I is 0.4-2GHz and for CSRH-II, the frequency band is 2-15GHz. In the antenna and feed system, CSRH uses an Eleven feed to receive signals coming from the Sun, the radiation pattern with lower side lobe and back lobe of the feed is well radiated. The characteristics of gain G and antenna noise temperature T effect the quality of solar radio imaging. For CSRH, measured G is larger than 60 dBi and $ T $ is less than 120K, after CSRH-I was established, we have successfully captured a solar radio burst between 1.2-1.6GHz on November 12, 2010 through this instrument and this event was confirmed through the observation of Solar Broadband Radio Spectromete...

  14. Technical Work Plan For: Meteorological Monitoring Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Green

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorological monitoring and analysis program has five objectives. (1) Acquire qualified meteorological data from YMP meteorological monitoring network using appropriate controls on measuring and test equipment. Because this activity is monitoring (i.e., recording naturally occurring events) pre-test predictions are not applicable. All work will be completed in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Repository Development (ORD) administrative procedures and Bechtel SAIC Co., LLC (BSC) line procedures. The meteorological monitoring program includes measuring and test equipment calibrations, operational checks, preventive and corrective maintenance, and data collection. (2) Process the raw monitoring data collected in the field and submit technically reviewed, traceable data to the Technical Data Management System (TDMS) and the Records Processing Center. (3) Develop analyses or calculations to provide information to data requesters and provide data sets as requested. (4) Provide precipitation amounts to Site Operations to support requirements to perform inspections in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (implemented in LP-OM-050Q-BSC) following storm events of greater than 0.5 inches. The program also provides meteorological data during extreme weather conditions (e.g., high winds, rainstorms, etc.) to support decisions regarding worker safety. (5) Collect samples of precipitation for chemical and isotopic analysis by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The BSC ES&H Environmental Compliance organization is responsible for performing this work. Data from calendar-year periods are submitted to the TDMS to provide YMP users with qualified meteorological data for scientific modeling and analyses, engineering designs of surface facilities, performance assessment analyses, and operational safety issues.

  15. On Optimal Control of a Class of Partially-Observed Discrete Event Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On Optimal Control of a Class of Partially-Observed Discrete Event Systems H e rv M a rch a n d theC-observer. Thissubmachineleadstothedesiredsupervisorforthesystem. Keywords: DiscreteEventSystems,SupervisoryControlProblem,Optimality(not) be reached in the controlled system, the Optimal Control under Par- tial Observation problem is solved

  16. Estimation of the WECC System Inertia Using Observed Frequency Transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David P. Chassin; Zhenyu Huang; Matthew K. Donnelly; Candee Hassler; Enrique Ramirez; Cody Ray

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer models being developed to understand the interaction between demand-response technology, power system deregulation and market transformation depend in part on understanding the relationship between system frequency and load-control. Frequency, load, and plant outage events data collected over the last several years have permitted analysis to determine the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) system's inertia during each event. This data was used to evaluate the relationship of system inertia to total load, which is used to model system response to load curtailment programs in next generation power system simulations.

  17. OBSERVED HYBRID OSCILLATIONS IN AN ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM Vaibhav Donde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 1 therefore provide an example of a hybrid limit cycle.1 Analysis of power system large disturbance-changing transformers and switched capacitors. Analysis required a hybrid systems framework, due to the non from usual power system oscillations [1]: 1) behav- iour was quite non-smooth, and 2) the oscillation

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced meteorological measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meteorological measurement Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy...

  19. Mathematical strategies for filtering complex systems: Regularly spaced sparse observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlim, J. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)], E-mail: jharlim@cims.nyu.edu; Majda, A.J. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real time filtering of noisy turbulent signals through sparse observations on a regularly spaced mesh is a notoriously difficult and important prototype filtering problem. Simpler off-line test criteria are proposed here as guidelines for filter performance for these stiff multi-scale filtering problems in the context of linear stochastic partial differential equations with turbulent solutions. Filtering turbulent solutions of the stochastically forced dissipative advection equation through sparse observations is developed as a stringent test bed for filter performance with sparse regular observations. The standard ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) has poor skill on the test bed and even suffers from filter divergence, surprisingly, at observable times with resonant mean forcing and a decaying energy spectrum in the partially observed signal. Systematic alternative filtering strategies are developed here including the Fourier Domain Kalman Filter (FDKF) and various reduced filters called Strongly Damped Approximate Filter (SDAF), Variance Strongly Damped Approximate Filter (VSDAF), and Reduced Fourier Domain Kalman Filter (RFDKF) which operate only on the primary Fourier modes associated with the sparse observation mesh while nevertheless, incorporating into the approximate filter various features of the interaction with the remaining modes. It is shown below that these much cheaper alternative filters have significant skill on the test bed of turbulent solutions which exceeds ETKF and in various regimes often exceeds FDKF, provided that the approximate filters are guided by the off-line test criteria. The skill of the various approximate filters depends on the energy spectrum of the turbulent signal and the observation time relative to the decorrelation time of the turbulence at a given spatial scale in a precise fashion elucidated here.

  20. Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK AND WILLIAM R. COTTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK (Manuscript received 30 December 2005, in final form 4 October 2006) ABSTRACT Mesoscale convective systems of usefulness in operational forecasting. 1. Introduction Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) frequently de

  1. Estimating Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Using Standard Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat stress management program at the Department of Energy''s Savannah River Site (SRS) requires implementation of protective controls on outdoor work based on observed values of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). To ensure continued compliance with heat stress program requirements, a computer algorithm was developed which calculates an estimate of WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. In addition, scripts were developed to generate a calculation every 15 minutes and post the results to an Intranet web site.

  2. Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting Nithya N. Vijayakumar {rramachandran, xli}@itsc.uah.edu Abstract-- Mesoscale meteorology forecasting as a data driven application Triggers, Data Mining, Stream Processing, Meteorology Forecasting I. INTRODUCTION Mesoscale meteorologists

  3. Estimation of WECC System Inertia Using Observed Frequency Transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Huang, Zhenyu; Donnelly, Matt K.; Hassler, Candee A.; Ramirez, Enrique; Ray, Cody W.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    As demand for electricity in the western United States increases, stresses upon the aging power grid are intensifying. Computer models based on complex mathematical relationships are being developed to assist in understanding the impact of deregulation and market transformation. Frequency, load, and plant outage events data collected over the last several years. Analysis of these events was performed to determine frequency deviation and the systems inertial constant (M) during each event. Utilizing a theoretical relationship that relates system inertia to power loss, M was calculated for 157 events. The relationship of M to system wide load was then examined.

  4. System architecting of a campaign of earth observing satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, Justin M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the current level of concern over anthropogenic climate change, and the ongoing debate worldwide regarding what action should be taken to reduce and reverse future warming, the ability to collect data on Earth system ...

  5. H observer for time-delay systems Application to FDI for irrigation canals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    H observer for time-delay systems Application to FDI for irrigation canals N. Bedjaoui, X. Litrico and isolation for time-varying delayed systems. It consists to develop a H observer that generates residuals occur on the regulation gates of an irrigation canal. The observer design uses a simplified approximate

  6. Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;SMCD Roadmap 2 NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap September 2005 NOAA Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 712, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;SMCD

  7. Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support for the Long Island Solar Farm and NSERCand NSERC-9 2011March 8 9, 2011 #12;LISF Solar Radiation and Meteorological Sensor Network ·· Technology Needs on intermittent source of solar radiationintermittent source of solar radiation #12;LISF Solar Radiation

  8. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier Office: Three, 1:00 ­ 2:30 pm Required Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes and physical analysis techniques to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale

  9. ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014 TR, 1:00-2:50 PM, ATS Room 101 Course Description and Prerequisites This course will cover the theory and application of mesoscale meteorology, and how mesoscale, students will be able to: · Describe the basic theories describing mesoscale weather phenomena · Understand

  10. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier (kkd Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes. Wiley-Blackwell, 430pp to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale," radar principles and interpretation

  11. Recycling of quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a finite number of copies of an unknown qubit state that have already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? We give a positive answer to this question and quantify the information obtainable by a given observer as a function of the number of copies in the ensemble, and of the number of independent observers that, one after the other, have independently measured the same ensemble of qubits before him. The optimality of the protocol is proven and extensions to other states and encodings are also studied. According to the general lore, the state after a measurement has no information about the state before the measurement. Our results manifestly show that this statement has to be taken with a grain of salt, specially in situations where the quantum states encode confidential information.

  12. Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Jules Beersma #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. A Onderzoekschool (BBOS) #12;Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Extreme hydro

  13. THE APPLICATION OF AN EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHM TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF A MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; O'Steen, L.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a simple evolutionary algorithm can optimize a set of mesoscale atmospheric model parameters with respect to agreement between the mesoscale simulation and a limited set of synthetic observations. This is illustrated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). A set of 23 RAMS parameters is optimized by minimizing a cost function based on the root mean square (rms) error between the RAMS simulation and synthetic data (observations derived from a separate RAMS simulation). We find that the optimization can be efficient with relatively modest computer resources, thus operational implementation is possible. The optimization efficiency, however, is found to depend strongly on the procedure used to perturb the 'child' parameters relative to their 'parents' within the evolutionary algorithm. In addition, the meteorological variables included in the rms error and their weighting are found to be an important factor with respect to finding the global optimum.

  14. Stochastic Modeling and Optimization for Robust Power Management in a Partially Observable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    Stochastic Modeling and Optimization for Robust Power Management in a Partially Observable System and issues control commands periodically. Reference [3] models the similar system using the continuous a full observation of the entire system status. In this paper, we propose a new modeling and optimization

  15. An Augmented Reality System for Astronomical Observations Andrei Lintu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnor, Marcus

    , but also depends on the visibility, sky brightness and telescope aper- ture. We propose a system which. For projection, a custom-built video projection mod- ule with high contrast and low maximum luminance value fascinated by the starry sky. It is one of the first natural phenomena that was investi- gated by humans

  16. Simulations of Solar System observations in alternative theories of gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hees; B. Lamine; S. Reynaud; M. -T. Jaekel; C. Le Poncin-Lafitte; V. Lainey; A. Füzfa; J. -M. Courty; V. Dehant; P. Wolf

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this communication, we focus on the possibility to test General Relativity (GR) with radioscience experiments. We present simulations of observables performed in alternative theories of gravity using a software that simulates Range/Doppler signals directly from the space time metric. This software allows one to get the order of magnitude and the signature of the modifications induced by an alternative theory of gravity on radioscience signals. As examples, we present some simulations for the Cassini mission in Post-Einsteinian gravity (PEG) and with Standard Model Extension (SME).

  17. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayati, Moosa [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Khaloozadeh, Hamid [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  18. OBSERVER DESIGN FOR NONLINEAR SYSTEMS BY USING INPUT-TO-STATE STABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    OBSERVER DESIGN FOR NONLINEAR SYSTEMS BY USING INPUT-TO-STATE STABILITY A. Alessandri Abstract by solving LMI problems [18]. A. Alessandri is with the Institute of Intelligent Systems for Automation

  19. Impulsive observer-based control for linear systems using irregularly sampled measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impulsive observer-based control for linear systems using irregularly sampled measurements Y linear state feedback controller and an impulsive observer to provide an estimate the non-measured states, which are subsequently fed back in the control algorithm. We consider linear systems that can

  20. A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model, J. Geophys System model Roman Olson,1 Ryan Sriver,1 Marlos Goes,2,3 Nathan M. Urban,4,5 H. Damon Matthews,6 MuraliA climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth

  1. A nonlinear observer to estimate unknown parameters during the synchronization of chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Torres

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes an Extended-Kalman-Filter-like observer for parameter estimation during synchronization of chaotic systems. The exponential stability of the observer is guaranteed by a persistent excitation condition. This approach is shown to be suitable for various classical chaotic systems and several simulations are presented accordingly.

  2. Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

  3. Direct observations of nitric oxide produced by energetic electron precipitation in1 to the Antarctic middle atmosphere2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    Observation, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.11 5 Max Planck Institut für Solar System (EEP) from the Earth's magnetosphere than by solar protons [Randall et al.,43 2005]. However, it is unclear which electron energy range is most important for44 stratospheric chemistry. At auroral

  4. CESM Community Earth System Model MODEL Meteorological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ­ Anthropogenic: POET, with REAS over Asia (time-varying for 1997-2010; 1997 used for 1992-1996). ­ Biomass. ­ Biogenic, soil, ocean, volcano: POET, GEIA, etc. as described in Emmons et al., 2010. Emissions in trop

  5. A Search for Additional Planets in the Nasa Epoxi Observations of the Exoplanet System Gj 436

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    We present time series photometry of the M dwarf transiting exoplanet system GJ 436 obtained with the Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) component of the NASA EPOXI mission. We conduct a search of ...

  6. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Hawaii Ocean Observing System (HiOOS) Employment Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UHM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Hawaii Ocean Observing System (HiOOS) Employment Opportunities FIELD TECHNICIAN OPPORTUNITY: employment with possible development of a senior thesis project in GESCarlo, edecarlo@soest.hawaii.edu JOB REFERENCE NUMBER ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEBSITE: none Student

  7. OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE OAH'U REGIONAL OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) site off the south coast of Oah'u as well as the circulation of Mamala analyses of the observing systems were conducted at the outflow plume depth of a potential pilot Ocean

  8. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  9. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  10. Clementine Observations of the Zodiacal Light and the Dust Content of the Inner Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    Clementine Observations of the Zodiacal Light and the Dust Content of the Inner Solar System Joseph Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 Bonnie Cooper Oceaneering Space Systems, 16665 Space Center Boulevard solar radii to the orbit of Venus. The averaged ecliptic surface brightness of the zodiacal light falls

  11. OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á & control General Terms Algorithms, Machine Learning, Measurement Keywords Occupancy, HVAC, Ventilation for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems[2]. Studies suggest that 15% to 25% of HVAC

  12. Progress Toward Observing Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System in Cryogenics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Jack

    , placed at 400 mK inside a 3 He fridge. The major goals of this research are: laser cooling the 261 kAbstract Progress Toward Observing Quantum Effects in an Optomechanical System in Cryogenics Cheng Yang 2011 Quantum optomechanical systems use radiation pressure of light to couple the optical field

  13. Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalakes, John

    Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run John Michalakes Josh Hacker overview and petascale issues Nature run methodology Results and conclusion #12;Mesoscale & Microscale's atmosphere #12;Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR Description of Science · Kinetic energy

  14. Winter Precipitation Microphysics Characterized by Polarimetric Radar and Video Disdrometer Observations in Central Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    Observations in Central Oklahoma GUIFU ZHANG AND SEAN LUCHS School of Meteorology, and Atmospheric Radar Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma ALEXANDER RYZHKOV Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman, Oklahoma MING XUE School of Meteorology, and Center for Analysis

  15. Integrated Meteorology and Chemistry Modeling: Evaluation and Research Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Rao, S. T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Backlanov, Alexander

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a conference summary report that will be published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  16. Cloud Properties over the North Slope of Alaska: Identifying the Prevailing Meteorological Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The meteorological categories are established by ap- plying an objective k-means clustering algorithm to 11 years as inputs to the k-means clustering, are found to differ significantly between the regimes and are also well­observation comparison studies. Each category comprises an ensemble of test cases covering a representative range

  17. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 134: 583593 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kossin, James P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land. This occurred in hurricane Andrew (1992) while making landfall near Homestead, Florida. As Andrew intensification. Copyright 2008 Royal Meteorological Society KEY WORDS hurricane; eyewall replacement cycle; moat fluctuations. An example of this behavior was observed in hurricane Allen (1980), which underwent repeated

  18. Dynamical and Observational Constraints on Additional Planets in Highly Eccentric Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Wittenmyer; Michael Endl; William D. Cochran; Harold F. Levison

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Long time coverage and high radial velocity precision have allowed for the discovery of additional objects in known planetary systems. Many of the extrasolar planets detected have highly eccentric orbits, which raises the question of how likely those systems are to host additional planets. We investigate six systems which contain a very eccentric (e>0.6) planet: HD 3651, HD 37605, HD 45350, HD 80606, HD 89744, and 16 Cyg B. We present updated radial-velocity observations and orbital solutions, search for additional planets, and perform test particle simulations to find regions of dynamical stability. The dynamical simulations show that short-period planets could exist in the HD 45350 and 16 Cyg B systems, and we use the observational data to set tight detection limits, which rule out additional planets down to a few Neptune masses in the HD 3651, HD 45350, and 16 Cyg B systems.

  19. Testing a Coupled Global-limited-area Data Assimilation System Using Observations from the 2004 Pacific Typhoon Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Christina

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Statistical Spectral Interpolation, which was the operational data assimilation system of NCEP in 2004. The GFS Operational analysis assimilated a large number of satellite radiance observations in addition to the observations assimilated in our system. All...

  20. Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community Cliff Mass University of Washington: Although the U.S. remains a leader in mesoscale model development and application, the community is not fulfilling its potential. The resources of the U.S. mesoscale forecasting community are considerable

  1. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  2. High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave induced current (GIC) in the Scottish power system in southern Scotland, during a storm event, and exhibit significantly different amplitude characteristics. Finally, we compared in detail the geomagnetic

  3. Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford University's Leslie buildings use energy, and each year we conducted an energy audit of a local building, most often a house in town. We conducted energy audits of two Oberlin College buildings, the Wright Laboratory of Physics

  4. Observers for Nonlinear-Linear Cascade Systems Hvard Fjr Grip, Ali Saberi, and Tor A. Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Observers for Nonlinear-Linear Cascade Systems Håvard Fjær Grip, Ali Saberi, and Tor A. Johansen been Håvard Fjær Grip and Ali Saberi are with the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of Håvard Fjær Grip is supported by the Research Council of Norway. The work of Ali Saberi is partially

  5. HF radar in French Mediterranean Sea: an element of MOOSE Mediterranean Ocean Observing System on Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sea in the context of climate change and anthropogenic pressure and to supply and maintain longHF radar in French Mediterranean Sea: an element of MOOSE Mediterranean Ocean Observing System , Pascal Guterman2 , Karim Bernardet2 1 Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO, UM 110, USTV

  6. CONSTRAINING THE PLANETARY SYSTEM OF FOMALHAUT USING HIGH-RESOLUTION ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boley, A. C.; Payne, M. J.; Ford, E. B.; Shabram, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Corder, S. [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Dent, W. R. F. [ALMA, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical evolution of planetary systems leaves observable signatures in debris disks. Optical images trace micron-sized grains, which are strongly affected by stellar radiation and need not coincide with their parent body population. Observations of millimeter-sized grains accurately trace parent bodies, but previous images lack the resolution and sensitivity needed to characterize the ring's morphology. Here we present ALMA 350 GHz observations of the Fomalhaut debris ring. These observations demonstrate that the parent body population is 13-19 AU wide with a sharp inner and outer boundary. We discuss three possible origins for the ring and suggest that debris confined by shepherd planets is the most consistent with the ring's morphology.

  7. Meteorological services annual data report for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser J.; Smith, S.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the meteorological data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Meteorological Services (Met Services) for the calendar year 2012. The purpose is to publicize the data sets available to emergency personnel, researchers and facility operations. Met services has been collecting data at BNL since 1949. Data from 1994 to the present is available in digital format. Data is presented in monthly plots of one-minute data. This allows the reader the ability to peruse the data for trends or anomalies that may be of interest to them. Full data sets are available to BNL personnel and to a limited degree outside researchers. The full data sets allow plotting the data on expanded time scales to obtain greater details (e.g., daily solar variability, inversions, etc.).

  8. State observers and Kalman filtering for high performance vibration isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beker, M. G., E-mail: M.Beker@Nikhef.nl; Bertolini, A.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands) [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a strong scientific case for the study of gravitational waves at or below the lower end of current detection bands. To take advantage of this scientific benefit, future generations of ground based gravitational wave detectors will need to expand the limit of their detection bands towards lower frequencies. Seismic motion presents a major challenge at these frequencies and vibration isolation systems will play a crucial role in achieving the desired low-frequency sensitivity. A compact vibration isolation system designed to isolate in-vacuum optical benches for Advanced Virgo will be introduced and measurements on this system are used to present its performance. All high performance isolation systems employ an active feedback control system to reduce the residual motion of their suspended payloads. The development of novel control schemes is needed to improve the performance beyond what is currently feasible. Here, we present a multi-channel feedback approach that is novel to the field. It utilizes a linear quadratic regulator in combination with a Kalman state observer and is shown to provide effective suppression of residual motion of the suspended payload. The application of state observer based feedback control for vibration isolation will be demonstrated with measurement results from the Advanced Virgo optical bench suspension system.

  9. Kalman filter data assimilation: Targeting observations and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellsky, Thomas, E-mail: bellskyt@asu.edu; Kostelich, Eric J.; Mahalov, Alex [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)] [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the effect of targeted observations on state and parameter estimates determined with Kalman filter data assimilation (DA) techniques. We first provide an analytical result demonstrating that targeting observations within the Kalman filter for a linear model can significantly reduce state estimation error as opposed to fixed or randomly located observations. We next conduct observing system simulation experiments for a chaotic model of meteorological interest, where we demonstrate that the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) with targeted observations based on largest ensemble variance is skillful in providing more accurate state estimates than the LETKF with randomly located observations. Additionally, we find that a hybrid ensemble Kalman filter parameter estimation method accurately updates model parameters within the targeted observation context to further improve state estimation.

  10. Optical observations of Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Kiziloglu; A. Baykal; N. Kiziloglu

    2006-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ROTSE-IIId observations of the Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300 obtained between September 2004 and December 2005 make it possible to study the correlation between optical and X-ray activity. The optical outburst of 0.1 mag was accompanied by an increase in X-ray flux in 2004 observations. Strong correlation between the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that neutron star directly accretes from the outflowing material of Be star. The nearly zero time lag between X-ray and optical light curves suggests a heating of the disk of Be star by X-rays. No optical brightening and X-ray enhancement was seen in 2005 observations. There is no indication of the orbital modulation in the optical light curve.

  11. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  12. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Batalha, Natalie M.; /San Jose State U.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Bryson, Steve; /NASA, Ames; Buchhave, Lars A.; /Bohr Inst. /Copenhagen U.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  13. Observation of transient gain without population inversion in a laser-cooled rubidium lambda system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. de Echaniz; Andrew D. Greentree; A. V. Durrant; D. M. Segal; J. P. Marangos; J. A. Vaccaro

    2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed clear Rabi oscillations of a weak probe in a strongly driven three-level lambda system in laser-cooled rubidium for the first time. When the coupling field is non-adiabatically switched on using a Pockels cell, transient probe gain without population inversion is obtained in the presence of uncoupled absorptions. Our results are supported by three-state computations.

  14. Observational determination of the time delays in gravitational lens system Q2237+030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Vakulik; R. Schild; V. Dudinov; S. Nuritdinov; V. Tsvetkova; O. Burkhonov; T. Akhunov

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new brightness monitoring observations of the 4 components of gravitationally lensed system Q2237+0305, which show detection of an intrinsic quasar brightness fluctuation at a time of subdued microlensing activity, between June 27 and October 12, 2003. These data were used to determine the time delays between the arrivals of the four images. The measured delays are -6, 35, and 2 hours for images B, C and D relative to A, respectively, so they confirm that the long history of brightness monitoring has produced significant detection of microlensing. However the error bars associated with the delays, of order 2 days, are too large to discriminate between competing macro-imaging models. Moreover, our simulations show that for the amplitude of this intrinsic fluctuation and for photometric errors intrinsic to optical monitoring from our 1.5-m telescope or from the OGLE monitoring, a daily sampled brightness record cannot produce reliable lags for model discrimination. We use our simulations to devise a strategy for future delay determination with optical data. Nevertheless, we regard these first estimates to be significant, since they are the first direct measurements of time delays made for this system from ground-based observations in the visual wavelengths. Our results provide the most convincing confirmation of the gravitational-lens nature of Q2237+0305, and give observational justification to the extensive literature which attributes the quasar's previously observed brightness fluctuations to microlensing.

  15. air medical meteorology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameters during 96 h transport to SPC Boyer, Edmond 105 NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report Geosciences Websites Summary: and Hawaii Meteorological...

  16. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  17. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  18. Observable Consequences of Planet Formation Models in Systems with Close-in Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Avi M. Mandell

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, two planetary systems have been discovered with close-in, terrestrial-mass planets (planet; 4) formation from material being shepherded by moving secular resonances during dispersal of the protoplanetary disk; 5) tidal circularization of eccentric terrestrial planets with close-in perihelion distances; and 6) photo-evaporative mass loss of a close-in giant planet. Models 1-4 have been validated in previous work. We show that tidal circularization can form hot Earths, but only for relatively massive planets (> 5 Earth masses) with very close-in perihelion distances (planets of less than about 70 Earth masses, photo-evaporation can remove the planet's envelope and leave behind the solid core on a Gyr timescale, but only for planets inside 0.025-0.05 AU. Using two quantities that are observable by current and upcoming missions, we show that these models each produce unique signatures, and can be observationally distinguished. These observables are the planetary system architecture (detectable with radial velocities, transits and transit-timing) and the bulk composition of transiting close-in terrestrial planets (measured by transits via the planet's radius).

  19. Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 8, The REVIEW computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, G.L.; Burk, K.W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) routinely collects meteorological data from sources on and off the Hanford Site. The data are averaged over both 15 minutes and 1 hour and are maintained in separate databases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS. The databases are transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) DEC VAX 11/750 computer. The EMS is part of the Unified Dose Assessment Center, which is located on on the ground-level floor of the Federal building in Richland and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program REVIEW is used to display meteorological data in graphical and alphanumeric form from either the 15-minute or hourly database. The code is available on the HMS and EMS computer. The REVIEW program helps maintain a high level of quality assurance on the instruments that collect the data and provides a convenient mechanism for analyzing meteorological data on a routine basis and during emergency response situations.

  20. Daily Processing of Solar System Object Observations by Gaia UMR 6202 Cassiope, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    complex operations, devoted to obtain the best accuracies in the output. It will operate on data obtainedDaily Processing of Solar System Object Observations by Gaia Tanga, P. UMR 6202 Cassiopée to a selected event. For this reason, a pipeline performing fast processing of Gaia observations of Solar System

  1. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  2. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  4. UNIDATA AND THE SYNERGY BETWEEN GEODESY AND METEOROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    beneficial relationships have more staying power. Geodesy needs more meteorological input. · If meteorology is associated with the induced dipole moment of all atmospheric components (including water vapor). The wet involves using GPS to sense Z, isolate the wet delay Zw, and transform Zw to PW (the total vertical column

  5. Observational Properties of Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors in Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In several recent observational studies on Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c), the inferred ejecta masses have a peak value of 2.0 -- 4.0 $M_\\odot$, in favor of the binary scenario for their progenitors rather than the Wolf-Rayet star scenario. To investigate the observational properties of relatively low-mass helium stars in binary systems as SN Ib/c progenitors, we constructed atmospheric models with the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN, using binary star evolution models. We find that these helium stars can be characterized by relatively narrow helium emission lines if the mass-loss rate during the final evolutionary phase is significantly enhanced as implied by many SN Ib/c observations. The optical brightness of helium star progenitors can be meaningfully enhanced with a strong wind for $M \\gtrsim 4.4 M_\\odot$, but hardly affected or slightly weakened for relatively low-mass of $\\sim 3.0 M_\\odot$, compared to the simple estimate using blackbody approximation. We further confirm the previous suggestion...

  6. Heating and Dynamics of Two Flare Loop Systems Observed by AIA and EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y; Ding, M D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate heating and evolution of flare loops in a C4.7 two-ribbon flare on 2011 February 13. From SDO/AIA imaging observations, we can identify two sets of loops. Hinode/EIS spectroscopic observations reveal blueshifts at the feet of both sets of loops. The evolution and dynamics of the two sets are quite different. The first set of loops exhibits blueshifts for about 25 minutes followed by redshifts, while the second set shows stronger blueshifts, which are maintained for about one hour. The UV 1600 observation by AIA also shows that the feet of the second set of loops brighten twice. These suggest that continuous heating may be present in the second set of loops. We use spatially resolved UV light curves to infer heating rates in the few tens of individual loops comprising the two loop systems. With these heating rates, we then compute plasma evolution in these loops with the "enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops" (EBTEL) model. The results show that, for the first set of loops, the synthetic EU...

  7. 1 JULY 2002 1537W A T A N A B E E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    AND FEI-FEI JIN Department of Meteorology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University, Tokyo, Japan (Manuscript received 24 August 2001, in final form 6 December 2001) ABSTRACT by the leading principal component of the observed 300-hPa streamfunction anomalies, shows quite significant

  8. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 301-445W, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  9. High-speed, energy-resolved, STJ observations of the AM Her system V2301 Oph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Reynolds; G. Ramsay; J. H. J. de Bruijne; M. A. C. Perryman; M. Cropper; C. M. Bridge; A. Peacock

    2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high time-resolution optical energy-resolved photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable V2301 Oph made using the ESA S-Cam detector, an array of photon counting super-conducting tunnel junction (STJ) devices with intrinsic energy resolution. Three eclipses were observed, revealing considerable variation in the eclipse shape, particularly during ingress. The eclipse shape is shown to be understood in terms of AM Her accretion via a bright stream, with very little contribution from the white dwarf photosphere and/or hotspot. About two thirds of the eclipsed light arises in the threading region. Variation in the extent of the threading region can account for most of the variations observed between cycles. Spectral fits to the data reveal a 10,000K blackbody continuum with strong, time-varying emission lines of hydrogen and helium. This is the first time that stellar emission lines have been detected in the optical band using a non-dispersive photon-counting system.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A COASTAL MARGIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (CMOAS) TO CAPTURE THE EPISODIC EVENTS IN A SHALLOW BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Mohammad S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for the implementation of observational systems in other dynamic ecosystems for characterizing and predicting other episodic events such as harmful algal blooms, accidental oil spills, sediment resuspension events, etc. State-of-the-art sensor technologies are involved...

  11. CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

  12. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yan [I.M. Systems Group at NOAA/NCEP/EMC; Feng, Xia [George Mason University; Houser, Paul [George Mason University; Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Fan, Xingang [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; De Lannoy, Gabrielle [Ghent University, Belgium; Zhan, Xiwu [NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research; Dabbiru, Lalitha [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2007 1881 Analysis of Tap-Induced Oscillations Observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    analysis, tap-changing transformers, voltage oscillations. I. INTRODUCTION ANUMBER of years ago, voltage-Induced Oscillations Observed in an Electrical Distribution System Vaibhav Donde, Member, IEEE, and Ian A. Hiskens, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Slow oscillations, with a period of around 15 min, were observed in an 11-k

  14. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  15. Limits of control for quantum systems: kinematical bounds on the optimization of observables and the question of dynamical realizability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Schirmer; J. V. Leahy

    2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the limits of control for mixed-state quantum systems. The constraint of unitary evolution for non-dissipative quantum systems imposes kinematical bounds on the optimization of arbitrary observables. We summarize our previous results on kinematical bounds and show that these bounds are dynamically realizable for completely controllable systems. Moreover, we establish improved bounds for certain partially controllable systems. Finally, the question of dynamical realizability of the bounds for arbitary partially controllable systems is shown to depend on the accessible sets of the associated control system on the unitary group U(N) and the results of a few control computations are discussed briefly.

  16. Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

    TR-38 1971 Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  17. Data Archive of Tracer Experiments and Meteorology Roland R. Draxler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to address these issues. In particular there has been consistent emphasis on nuclear reactor accidents since the Chernobyl accident by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Meteorological

  18. Analysis of Spatial Performance of Meteorological Drought Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sandeep 1986-

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological drought indices are commonly calculated from climatic stations that have long-term historical data and then converted to a regular grid using spatial interpolation methods. The gridded drought indices are mapped to aid decision making...

  19. 2372 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 58, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 Observability of a Linear System Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yüksel, Serdar

    notion of controllability, these form the essence of modern linear control theory. In this technical note states intact. Furthermore, with the increasing emphasis on networked control systems, it has been realized that the controllability and observability concepts for linear systems with controllers having

  20. Observers for Interconnected Nonlinear and Linear Systems Havard Fjr Grip a, Ali Saberi a, and Tor A. Johansen b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Observers for Interconnected Nonlinear and Linear Systems H°avard Fjær Grip a, Ali Saberi a (Esfandiari and Khalil, 1987; Saberi and Sannuti, 1990), and non-left-invertible systems (e.g., Gauthier, Hammouri, and Othman, 1992; Bornard and Hammouri, 2002; Grip and Saberi, 2010); the exploitation

  1. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  2. SMA Observations of Class 0 Protostars: A High-Angular Resolution Survey of Protostellar Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xuepeng; Zhang, Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L; Launhardt, Ralf; Jorgensen, Jes K; Lee, Chin-Fee; Foster, Jonathan B; Dunham, Michael M; Pineda, Jaime E; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 um dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.5 arcsec, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64+/-0.08 and 0.91+/-0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I YSOs, and approxima...

  3. Effect of the N. Delta. interaction on observables of the. pi. NN and. gamma. NN systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, M.T. (Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa (INIC), 1699 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)); Garcilazo, H. (Theoretical Physics, University of Hannover, D-3000 Hannover (Germany)); Oelfke, U. (TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)); Sauer, P.U. (Theoretical Physics, University of Hannover, D-3000 Hannover (Germany) Nuclear Theory Group, Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects on the hadronic and electromagnetic properties of the two-nucleon system above pion threshold, arising from the interaction of the {Delta} isobar with nucleons, are investigated. The instantaneous nucleon-{Delta} potential is based on the meson exchange. Two-body reactions connecting channels with at most one pion and one photon are studied. Processes leading to a three-body pion-two-nucleon final state are considered in the restricted kinematic domain in which the pion forms the {ital P}{sub 33} resonance with one of the nucleons. The nucleon-{Delta} potential is seen to increase the relative importance of the inelastic strength of two-nucleon spin-triplet states with respect to spin-singlet states, correcting a deficiency common in most existing models. Theoretical predictions are compared with recent experimental data for the various reactions. In particular, the differential cross section and the proton beam asymmetry for {ital pp}{r arrow}{ital n}{Delta}{sup ++} ({ital p}{pi}{sup +}) are calculated, the latter observable being especially sensitive to the nucleon-{Delta} interaction.

  4. Systems and Algorithms for Automated Collaborative Observation using Networked Robotic Cameras 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yiliang

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of telerobotic systems has evolved from Single Operator Single Robot (SOSR) systems to Multiple Operator Multiple Robot (MOMR) systems. The relationship between human operators and robots follows the ...

  5. Systems and Algorithms for Automated Collaborative Observation using Networked Robotic Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yiliang

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of telerobotic systems has evolved from Single Operator Single Robot (SOSR) systems to Multiple Operator Multiple Robot (MOMR) systems. The relationship between human operators and robots follows the master-slave control architecture...

  6. 24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

  7. Defeating Network Node Subversion on SCADA Systems Using Probabilistic Packet Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    on SCADA systems was first proposed in [2]. It is assumed an operator has a model of a control system are manipulated. If no such manipulation takes place and the control signal is still anomalous, we can assume Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems form a vital part of the critical infrastructure

  8. Passive microwave observations of mesoscale convective systems over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Gary Rae

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents high resolution passive microwave measurements obtained in the western Pacific warm pool region. These measurements represent the first comprehensive observations of convection over the tropical oceans, and were obtained from...

  9. METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON VAPOR INCIDENTS IN THE 200 EAST & 200 WEST TANK FARMS FROM CY1995 TO CY2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOCKING, M.J.

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Revised for a more comprehensive overview of vapor incidents reported at the Hanford Tank Farms. Investigation into the meteorological influences on vapor incidents in the tank farm to determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases. Weather phenomena, specifically barometric pressure, and wind velocity and direction can potentially cause or exacerbate a vapor release within the farm systems. The purpose of this document is to gather and evaluate the meteorological and weather information for the Tank Farms Shift Log Vapor Incident entries and determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases such as propane. A part of the evaluation will be determining which of the incidents are related to actual ''intrusive'' work, and which are ''transient.'' Transient vapor incidents are herein defined as those vapors encountered during walkdowns, surveys, or other activities that did not require working directly with the tanks, pits, transfer lines, etc. Another part of the investigation will involve determining if there are barometric pressures or other weather related phenomena that might cause or contribute vapors being released when there are no ''intrusive'' activities. A final purpose is to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the 242-A Evaporator operations and Vapor Incidents entered on the Shift Log.

  10. The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

  11. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Prsa, Andrej, E-mail: jsteffen@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  12. LINEAR SYSTEMS WITH SIGN-OBSERVATIONS RENEE KOPLON AND EDUARDO D. SONTAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    relatively simple systems. However, for large-scale problems, controllers resulting from the application, various types of switching controllers, and humans ­or, more re- cently, expert systems,­ in supervisory the interplay of modern control theory with automata theory and other techniques from computer science

  13. Observations of prolific transient luminous event production above a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil F. T. São Sabbas,1 M. J. Taylor,2 P.D. Pautet,2 M. Bailey convective system (MCS) over Argentina, as part of the third sprite campaign in Brazil. GOES infrared (IR a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A

  14. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  15. The Earth Observing System (EOS)Aura satellite mission is scheduled to launch in June 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://cloudsat.atmos.colostate.edu/),which is to be launched in mid-2005 [Stephens et al.,2002]. This group of satellites,including the Centre National d? Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations from 1978 show a strong secular decrease in column the TOMS/SBUV global column and profile ozone trend measurements. What are the sources and processes

  16. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A... for measured solar radiation data and, as a result, rely on the values from typical meteorological years. Texas, in a similar fashion as other states in the US, does not have an active network for solar radiation data and has a variety of weather conditions...

  17. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    ESL-PA-13-11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models... for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

  18. The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

  19. SST subseasonal variability in the central Benguela upwelling system as inferred from satellite observations (19992009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    associated with the eastern flank of the semipermanent South Atlantic Anti- cyclone (SAA). Through Ekman of distinct physical and biological features, the Benguela system can be separated into three zones charac

  20. Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new...

  1. Dual-Doppler observations of the formative stage of an asymmetric squall line system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Daniel Richard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to document and explain the formation of a large asymmetric squall line system. Despite having a precipitation pattern similar to the conceptual model of an asymmetric squall line, the development and evolution...

  2. Experimental observation of a phase transition in the evolution of many-body systems with dipolar interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalo A. Alvarez; Dieter Suter; Robin Kaiser

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body systems is important in many branches of science, such as condensed matter, quantum chemistry, and ultracold atoms. Here we report the experimental observation of a phase transition of the quantum coherent dynamics of a 3D many-spin system with dipolar interactions, and determine its critical exponents. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on a solid-state system of spins at room-temperature, we quench the interaction Hamiltonian to drive the evolution of the system. The resulting dynamics of the system coherence can be localized or extended, depending on the quench strength. Applying a finite-time scaling analysis to the observed time-evolution of the number of correlated spins, we extract the critical exponents v = s = 0.42 around the phase transition separating a localized from a delocalized dynamical regime. These results show clearly that such nuclear-spin based quantum simulations can effectively model the non-equilibrium dynamics of complex many-body systems, such as 3D spin-networks with dipolar interactions.

  3. Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel R. Gautam, G. Cervone-sea interactions associated with Hurricane Isabel, which landed on the east coast of the United States on September 18, 2003. Hurricane Isabel is considered to be one of the most significant and severe tropical

  4. 1819Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catling, David C.

    reduc- tions in expenditures (and costs) for natural gas and heating oil, record seasonal sales their strategy for pur- chasing natural gas, leading to major savings to their customers. #12;1820 Vol. 80, No. 9 Meteorological Society ABSTRACT This paper assesses the major impacts on human lives and the economy

  5. MPO 663 -Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MPO 663 - Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008 I intend for students and mesoscale phenomena. 2. Working understanding of several of these tools, cultivated via homework, including. A sense of how convective and mesoscale phenomena fit into larger scales, gained via short current

  6. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study, this 3DVAR analysis method is adapted to perform multiple Doppler wind analysis for CASA radars, together

  7. RisR1212(EN) Meteorology and lidar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Jørgensen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark May 2002 #12;Abstract This report describes sensors, thermocouple arrays, a fully instrumented release rig, a passive smoke machine, a meteorological were set out in the far range for the purpose of studying environ- mental effects. This report deals

  8. air pollution meteorology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution meteorology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Air Pollution Spring 2010...

  9. Nonlinear Observer Design for Interconnected Power Systems M. A. Mahmud, Student Member, IEEE, M. J. Hossain, Member, IEEE, and H. R. Pota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Nonlinear Observer Design for Interconnected Power Systems M. A. Mahmud, Student Member, IEEE, M. J design method for interconnected power systems. The concepts of nonlinear coordinate transformation, Lie derivative, and relative degree are used to design the observer for power systems. In this proposed design

  10. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. IV. CONFIRMATION OF FOUR MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS BY SIMPLE PHYSICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Christiansen, Jessie L. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Haas, Michael R. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Department of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91126 (United States); Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas, Austin TX 78730 (United States); Fanelli, Michael N. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fischer, Debra [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Hall, Jennifer R., E-mail: daniel.fabrycky@gmail.com [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); and others

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present four sets of light curves from the Kepler spacecraft, each which of shows multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates that the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets' masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems' architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  11. This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

  12. An adaptive observer for hyperbolic systems with application to UnderBalanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    an UnderBalanced well. While a well is being drilled, a fluid circulates through the drilling system. The drilling fluid cools down the drillbit, and evacuates rock cuttings. More importantly, it pressurizes fluid is controlled by a valve, which enables tighter control of the pressure. UnderBalanced Drilling

  13. Observation and characterization of chimera states in coupled dynamical systems with nonlocal coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gopal; V. K. Chandrasekar; A. Venkatesan; M. Lakshmanan

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By developing the concepts of strength of incoherence and discontinuity measure, we show that a distinct quantitative characterization of chimera and multichimera states which occur in networks of coupled nonlinear dynamical systems admitting nonlocal interactions of finite radius can be made. These measures also clearly distinguish between chimera or multichimera states (both stable and breathing types) and coherent and incoherent as well as cluster states....

  14. UV Habitability of Possible Exomoons in Observed F-star Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Satoko

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study we explore the astrobiological significance of F-type stars of spectral type between F5 V and F9.5 V, which possess Jupiter-type planets within or close to their climatological habitable zones. These planets, or at least a subset of them, may also possess rocky exomoons, which potentially offer habitable environments. Our work considers eight selected systems. The Jupiter-type planets in these systems are in notably different orbits with eccentricities ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. Particularly, we consider the stellar UV environments provided by the photospheric stellar radiation in regard to the circumstellar habitability of the system. According to previous studies, DNA is taken as a proxy for carbon-based macromolecules following the paradigm that extraterrestrial biology might be based on hydrocarbons. Thus, the DNA action spectrum is utilized to represent the impact of the stellar UV radiation. Atmospheric attenuation is taken into account based on parameterized attenuation functions. ...

  15. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. II. CONFIRMATION OF TWO MULTIPLANET SYSTEMS VIA A NON-PARAMETRIC CORRELATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Allen, Christopher [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A., E-mail: eford@astro.ufl.edu [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Collaboration: Kepler Science Team; and others

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies is in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the TTVs of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple-planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  16. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Morehead, Robert C.; /Florida U.; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  17. and the eddy-covariance system and meteorological station were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in tropical plantations (rubber-tree, coco- nut-tree, coffee and eucalypt plantations) managed by the CIRAD the ecosystem and the atmos- phere, ii) identifying the main regulators of gross and net pri- mary production (GPP, NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP), and iii) parameterizing/ validating ecosystem process

  18. A case for variational geomagnetic data assimilation: insights from a one-dimensional, nonlinear, and sparsely observed MHD system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, Alexandre; Alboussière, Thierry

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secular variations of the geomagnetic field have been measured with a continuously improving accuracy during the last few hundred years, culminating nowadays with satellite data. It is however well known that the dynamics of the magnetic field is linked to that of the velocity field in the core and any attempt to model secular variations will involve a coupled dynamical system for magnetic field and core velocity. Unfortunately, there is no direct observation of the velocity. Independently of the exact nature of the above-mentioned coupled system -- some version being currently under construction -- the question is debated in this paper whether good knowledge of the magnetic field can be translated into good knowledge of core dynamics. Furthermore, what will be the impact of the most recent and precise geomagnetic data on our knowledge of the geomagnetic field of the past and future? These questions are cast into the language of variational data assimilation, while the dynamical system considered in this pape...

  19. Meteorological monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that wall be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

  20. METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 15: 318 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Beth

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of forecasting systems, or the desire for more meaningful verification approaches that address specific forecast operational modelling centres select model upgrades, or to help power companies make decisions on the purchaseScience (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/met.52 Review Forecast verification: current status

  1. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    [6, 7]. For the HWT Spring Experiments, Level-II radial velocity and reflectivity data from over 120 at the beginning of the assimilation cycles. 1. Introduction The effective assimilation of radar data operational Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radars were analyzed using the 3DVAR system

  2. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 136: 333353, January 2010 Part B Modelling convective processes during the suppressed phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    NASA Langley Research Center, USA d European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, UK e, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, China iMet Office, Exeter, UK jLawrence Livermore National evolution of convection is assessed as part of a Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Study

  3. Validation of the guidelines for portable meteorological instrument packages. Task IV. Development of an insolation handbook and instrumentation package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to show how the objective of developing guidelines for a solar energy related portable meteorology instrument package, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA), was carried out and preliminarily demonstrated and validated. A project to develop guidelines for such packages was initiated at IEA's Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings Program Expert's Meeting held in Norrkoping, Sweden in February 1976. An international comparison of resultant devices was conducted on behalf of the IEA at a conference held in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, in 1978. Results of the 1978 Hamburg comparison of two devices and the Swiss Mobile Solar Radiation System, using German meteorological standards, are discussed. The consensus of the IEA Task Group is that the objective of the subtask has been accomplished.

  4. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  5. Meteorological Simulations of Ozone Episode Case Days during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  6. Meteorological simulations of ozone episode case days during the 1996 Paso del Norte ozone study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13, 1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were performed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1, 2, 4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11--13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawinsonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. The authors found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  7. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

  8. Aerosol Observing System Upgraded

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for AdvancedSensitivitySensitivity of2

  9. Relationship between meteorological variables and total suspended and heavy metal particulates in Little Rock, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avery, Mary Gwendolyn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY NFXAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLl'N AVERY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY METAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLYN AVERY Approved...

  10. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subj ect: Meteorology MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis...

  11. Bulk and size-segregated aerosol composition observed during INDOEX 1999: Overview of meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., 1998; Streets and Waldhoff, 1998, 1999; Dickerson et al., 2002]. [4] The combustion of coal, oil India showed evidence of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and eolian material, with elemental

  12. Weather Observations and a Tentative Meteorological Analysis of the Period May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    understanding in three areas: past climate history and its impact on humanity; the course and causes.S. Douglas and H. H. Lamb 1979 Climatic Research Unit School of Environmental Sciences University of East with the study of natural and anthropogenic climate change. CRU is part of the School of Environmental Sciences

  13. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  14. A Note on Several Meteorological Topics Related to Polar Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the meteorology of Polar Regions is fundamental to the process of understanding the global climatology of the Earth and Earth-like planets. The nature of air circulation in a polar vortex is of preliminary importance. I have show that the local and continental spatiotemporal relationship between near surface wind events is self-organized criticality. In particular, the wind event size, wind event duration, and duration of quiescent wind event are well approximated by power-law distributions. On a continental scale, the wind events in the Antarctic tend to be self-organized criticality with ergodic properties. A similar self-organized criticality wind event was also found in Taylor Valley located at McMurdo Dry Valleys discovered by Captain Scott's expedition. Captain Scott's meteorological Terra Nova record was also examined. I have also revisited and re-analyzed wind events in Hornsund at Spitsbergen Island, in terms of marginal probabilities and marginal copulas which describe positive L\\'evy pr...

  15. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 133: 101106 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Durranc a Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Croatia b Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Croatia c Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, WA Stiperski, Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Gric 3, HR -10000 Zagreb, Croatia. E-mail: stiperski

  16. A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou Thompson1 Joel Reynolds1 Lawrence H. Cox2 Peter Guttorp1 Paul D.larry@epamail.epa.gov ABSTRACT: A variety of statistical methods for meteorological adjustment of ozone have been proposed

  17. Master thesis in Leipzig Cooperation of TROPOS Leipzig and Solar Energy Meteorology at Uni Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master thesis in Leipzig ­ Cooperation of TROPOS Leipzig and Solar Energy Meteorology at Uni in meteorology, satellite remote sensing and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good at the surface can be determined from satellite data using the Heliosat method, which is widely used for solar

  18. Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

  19. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. HighSelected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology

  20. Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University Chapter 1 Overview 1.1 Introduction The so-called mesometeorology or mesoscale meteorology as mesoscale phenomena by others (e.g. Orlanski 1975; Thunis and Bornstein 1996). Therefore, a more precise

  1. Marion Meteorological Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated in the monthly wind monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Marion Meteorological Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated on the meteorological tower at Marion: Great Hill Dairy. A wind vane and two anemometers are located at two heights on the tower: 50 m and 38 m. Details of the equipment and models are: · NRG model Symphonie Cellogger · 4 ­ #40

  2. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  3. Time changes in gradient and observed winds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD DALE CARLSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillm=n of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1972 Major Subject...: Meteorology TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD D. CARLSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co , ee) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT Time Changes in Gradient and Observed Winds. (May 1972) Ronald Dale...

  4. Dynamics of observables and exactly solvable quantum problems: Using time-dependent density functional theory to control quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Farzanehpour; I. V. Tokatly

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic (current) density-potential maps of time-dependent (current) density functional theory (TD(C)DFT) to inverse engineer analytically solvable time-dependent quantum problems. In this approach the driving potential (the control signal) and the corresponding solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation are parametrized analytically in terms of the basic TD(C)DFT observables. We describe the general reconstruction strategy and illustrate it with a number of explicit examples. First we consider the real space one-particle dynamics driven by a time-dependent electromagnetic field and recover, from the general TDDFT reconstruction formulas, the known exact solution for a driven oscillator with a time-dependent frequency. Then we use analytic maps of the lattice TD(C)DFT to control quantum dynamics in a discrete space. As a first example we construct a time-dependent potential which generates prescribed dynamics on a tight-binding chain. Then our method is applied to the dynamics of spin-1/2 driven by a time dependent magnetic field. We design an analytic control pulse that transfers the system from the ground to excited state and vice versa. This pulse generates the spin flip thus operating as a quantum NOT gate.

  5. In operando observation system for electrochemical reaction by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with potential modulation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasaka, Masanari, E-mail: nagasaka@ims.ac.jp; Kosugi, Nobuhiro [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Yuzawa, Hayato; Horigome, Toshio [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate local structures of electrolytes in electrochemical reactions under the same scan rate as a typical value 100 mV/s in cyclic voltammetry (CV), we have developed an in operando observation system for electrochemical reactions by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a potential modulation method. XAS spectra of electrolytes are measured by using a transmission-type liquid flow cell with built-in electrodes. The electrode potential is swept with a scan rate of 100 mV/s at a fixed photon energy, and soft X-ray absorption coefficients at different potentials are measured at the same time. By repeating the potential modulation at each fixed photon energy, it is possible to measure XAS of electrochemical reaction at the same scan rate as in CV. We have demonstrated successful measurement of the Fe L-edge XAS spectra of aqueous iron sulfate solutions and of the change in valence of Fe ions at different potentials in the Fe redox reaction. The mechanism of these Fe redox processes is discussed by correlating the XAS results with those at different scan rates.

  6. VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D- erated in this way seem to be frequent in the record of a month-long experiment. Model results suggest and linear dispersion. They have been observed on the continental shelf (Ostrovsky and Stepanyants 1989

  7. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liljegren, J. C.; Carhart, R. A.; Lawday, P.; Tschopp, S.; Sharp, R.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  8. U and Th zonation in apatite observed by laser ablation ICPMS, and implications for the (UTh)/He system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    U and Th zonation in apatite observed by laser ablation ICPMS, and implications for the (U A laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique was developed to measure U, Th

  9. New Observations of Extra-Disk Molecular Gas in Interacting Galaxy Systems, Including a Two-Component System in Stephan's Quintet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Smith; C. Struck

    2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new CO (1 - 0) observations of eleven extragalactic tails and bridges in nine interacting galaxy systems, almost doubling the number of such features with sensitive CO measurements. Eight of these eleven features were undetected in CO to very low CO/HI limits, with the most extreme case being the NGC 7714/5 bridge. This bridge contains luminous H II regions and has a very high HI column density (1.6 X 10^21 cm^-2 in the 55" CO beam), yet was undetected in CO to rms T(R)* = 2.4 mK. The HI column density is higher than standard H2 and CO self-shielding limits for solar-metallicity gas, suggesting that the gas in this bridge is metal-poor and has an enhanced N(H2)/I(CO) ratio compared to the Galactic value. Only one of the eleven features in our sample was unambiguously detected in CO, a luminous HI-rich star formation region near an optical tail in the compact group Stephan's Quintet. We detect CO at two widely separated velocities in this feature, at ~6000 km/s and ~6700 km/s. Both of these components have HI and H-alpha counterparts. These velocities correspond to those of galaxies in the group, suggesting that this gas is material that has been removed from two galaxies in the group. The CO/HI/H-alpha ratios for both components are similar to global values for spiral galaxies.

  10. Below Canopy Meteorological Measurements at Three Florida Sites with Varying Tree Cover and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J. K.; Vieira, R. K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . However, less research has examined how the heat island is impacted by the more localized meteorological environment. How does suburban development and tree canopy cover impact micro-climates in a suburban environment? This has implications, both...

  11. Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Timothy E.

    in uncovering linear relationships between meteorology and air pollutants in Chicago and aided in determining possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution . Multivariate statistics . Principal component analysis . Trace gasses Introduction Many air

  12. MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    to understand onshore, offshore, and airborne wind power. Topics include: forces affecting-level winds: Pressure Gradient Force and Coriolis (pressure surfaces, geostrophic flowMAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours 1

  13. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  14. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  15. Ozone predictabilities due to meteorological uncertainties in the Mexico City basin using ensemble forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bei, Naifang

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the sensitivity of ozone (O3)[(O subscript 3)] predictions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) to meteorological initial uncertainties and planetary boundary layer ...

  16. Daily pollution forecast using optimal meteorological data at synoptic and local scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Ana; Raischel, Frank; Trigo, Ricardo; Mendes, Manuel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple framework to easily pre-select the most essential data for accurately forecasting the concentration of the pollutant PM$_{10}$, based on pollutants observations for the years 2002 until 2006 in the metropolitan region of Lisbon, Portugal. Starting from a broad panoply of different data sets collected at several meteorological stations, we apply a forward stepwise regression procedure that enables us not only to identify the most important variables for forecasting the pollutant but also to rank them in order of importance. We argue the importance of this variable ranking, showing that the ranking is very sensitive to the urban spot where measurements are taken. Having this pre-selection, we then present the potential of linear and non-linear neural network models when applied to the concentration of pollutant PM$_{10}$. Similarly to previous studies for other pollutants, our validation results show that non-linear models in average perform as well or worse as linear models for PM$_{10}$. F...

  17. Instrumentation, recording, and processing of meteorological data near Portage, Wisconsin: Wisconsin power plant impact study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearns, C.R.; Falconer, P.; Weidner, G.; Bowen, B.; Dzamba, L.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Columbia Power Plant Impact Study meteorological data were collected at a network of monitoring sites from 1972 through 1977. The data were the basis for a series of studies whose purpose was to elucidate the transport of airborne pollutants and to assess the climatic impact of the power plant. In a pilot diffusion climatology survey, local wind structure was interpreted in the context of synoptic weather patterns. A significant new low wind statistic was introduced. A case study traced the movement of an elevated level of ozone from the Southern Plains across the Midwest to the East Coast. It showed that long distance transport is necessary for elevated O3 levels to occur in most parts of the U.S. The horizontal variation of the wind field is an important factor in the transport of atmospheric pollutants from 10 to 100 km. The wind field was shown to be organized as a function of wind direction and wind speed around the Baraboo Hills. Two models for estimating concentrations of SO2 at ground level were compared. Both used the Gaussian plume equation: one estimated the required dispersion coefficients from the Hino stability model; the other was based on data for horizontal and vertical hourly wind direction range. Overall, the climatic effects of the power plant and cooling pond appear small. Fogging, condensation, and riming may occur downwind on several days each year. Temperature increases of about 1C may also be observed for a short distance downwind.

  18. Correlation of meteorological variables with total suspended particulate matter in Harris County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, G. Anderson

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conducive to pollutant transport into their respective regions. Thurston and Spengler did not attempt to relate a single event, such as pollution level, to meteorological conditions. Allender and Dejardin (1981) used a statistical method to predict air.... Meteorological variables used were maximum temperature, 1800 LST wind speed, and cosine of the wind direction at 0000 LST for the day previous to the forecast period. Selection of these parameters came from previous work. Allender and Dejardin claimed 85...

  19. Event-Triggered Observer-based Output-Feedback Stabilization of Linear System with Communication Delays in the Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Department of GIPSA-lab, CNRS, Univ. of Grenoble, Grenoble, France. Institute of Engineering, UNAM, Mexico City, Mexico. Faculty of Electronics, Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP), Puebla, Mexico. E, miniaturized and interconnected systems, there is a growing interest in Net- worked Control Systems (NCSs

  20. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, K., E-mail: fujii@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8540 (Japan)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8540 (Japan); Goto, M.; Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (?20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmer-? emissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  1. Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachnik, Justin Paul

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a series of work related to the representation of the Hadley circulation (HC) in atmospheric reanalyses and general circulation models (GCMs), with connections to the underlying tropical and subtropical cloud systems...

  2. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  3. Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems -Beautiful Images and Perceptive Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems unable to replicate the successes of human pattern recognition. The growth of citizen science on the web-computational citizen science platform that combines the efforts of human classifiers with those of computational

  4. Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual-to-decadal time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract An examination of a wide spectrum of hydro

  5. Impacts of Large-scale Surface Modifications on Meteorological Conditions and Energy Use: A 10-Region Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    104. Pielke, R, 1984: Mesoscale Meteorological Modeling . •the CSUMM, as any other mesoscale model, is typically runApplications International Mesoscale Model. SYSAPP- 921069,

  6. The formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: observations from three diverse river systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dietrich, William E [UC BERKELEY; Day, Geoff [NEWCREST MINING; Parker, Gary [UNIV OF ILLINOIS

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology, yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea, the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V shaped cross-section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bi-directional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  7. Spectrum of wind speed fluctuations encountered by a rotating blade of a wind energy conversion system: observations and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, J.R.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report proves that the characteristics of turbulence that are experienced by a rotating wind turbine rotor blade are in principle and in practice very different than those experienced by a nonrotating rotor blade. Thus conventional wind characteristics, which are formulated for the nonrotating frame of reference, are more inaccurate than generally supposed. The measurements and mathematical model that are presented for turbulence observed in the rotating frame of reference represent the third phase of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory work aimed at providing an accurate turbulence description for use in the design and evaluation of the performance of wind turbines. The first phase of work was the measurement of wind with a vertical plane array of anemometers. The second phase was the physical interpretation of the measurements in terms of implications for wind turbine rotors and initiation of development of a model of wind/wind turbine interaction. The third phase involved measurement of turbulence by rotating sensors and mathematical development of a physical model of this representation of turbulence as independent checks and expansions of the vertical plane array results. A fourth phase, to correlate real wind turbine response with rotationally measured turbulence and thereby understand the wind/wind turbine interaction, is in progress and preliminary results are quite promising.

  8. 286 BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY ANNUAL REPORT 201213 Glossary of acronyms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Automated Thunderstorm Alert Service ATWS Automatic Tsunami Warning System AuASB Australian Auditing

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS AROUND PLANETS IN WIDE ORBITS: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORMATION THEORY, OBSERVATIONS, AND MOON SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabram, Megan; Boley, Aaron C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we explore the evolution of circumplanetary disks around wide-orbit proto-gas giants. At large distances from the star ({approx}100 AU), gravitational instability followed by disk fragmentation can form low-mass substellar companions (massive gas giants and/or brown dwarfs) that are likely to host large disks. We examine the initial evolution of these subdisks and their role in regulating the growth of their substellar companions, as well as explore consequences of their interactions with circumstellar material. We find that subdisks that form in the context of GIs evolve quickly from a very massive state. Long-term accretion rates from the subdisk onto the proto-gas giant reach {approx}0.3 Jupiter masses kyr{sup -1}. We also find consistency with previous simulations, demonstrating that subdisks are truncated at {approx}1/3 of the companion's Hill radius and are thick, with (h/r) of {approx}> 0.2. The thickness of subdisks draws to question the use of thin-disk approximations for understanding the behavior of subdisks, and the morphology of subdisks has implications for the formation and extent of satellite systems. These subdisks create heating events in otherwise cold regions of the circumstellar disk and serve as planet formation beacons that can be detected by instruments such as ALMA.

  10. AUGUST 2002 705H A N S T R U M E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    -Season Tornadoes of California and Southern Australia BARRY N. HANSTRUM Bureau of Meteorology, Perth, Western Australia and Western Australia combined (gray) for each month for the 10 yr, 1987­96. FIG. 2. Map showing Australia, Australia GRAHAM A. MILLS Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  11. The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological, Satellite, and Model Archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University dwdubois@nmsu.edu Our community data portal is using in Agriculture, Meteorology and Environment (CARSAME) and New Mexico Climate Center but not available

  12. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  13. ICOWES2013 Conference 17-19 June 2013, Lyngby WINDS OBSERVED IN THE NORTHERN EUROPEAN SEAS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    ICOWES2013 Conference 17-19 June 2013, Lyngby 1 WINDS OBSERVED IN THE NORTHERN EUROPEAN SEAS and SSM/I have been compared to offshore meteorological data. For the final satellite-based wind atlas 9 shear observed from the lidars. #12;Another aim was to produce a wind atlas based on satellite data

  14. CURRICULUM VITAE -RYAN H SMITH Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Implementation of moored oceanographic sensor arrays. Development of real-time oceanographic monitoring stations for Understanding Coral Reef Dynamics and Processes: Photo-Systems to Coral Reef Systems, 5, 415-431. contributing

  15. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahlers, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Almela, A.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Nicolas /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  16. Comments on: Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program: 30 Years of Polar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Lazzara et al. (2012) presented a review of the technical and scientific progress in deployment, data collection and analysis of the Automated Weather Stations (AWS) in the Antarctic. In the subsection entitled Science Applications using AWS Observations, the authors briefly account for several scientific occurrences of meteorological data collected by AWS.

  17. GIS Applications in MeteorologyGIS Applications in Meteorology Adventures in a Parallel UniverseAdventures in a Parallel Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ),(NWS HQ), developed for Sterling, VA WFO (LWX)developed for Sterling, VA WFO (LWX) GIS Applications System (GIS) Forum. The Systems Engineering Center has set up a list server for theThe Systems Engineering Center has set up a list server for the purpose of starting apurpose of starting a dialog

  18. Using meteorological data to forecast seasonal runoff on the River Jhelum, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    Using meteorological data to forecast seasonal runoff on the River Jhelum, Pakistan D.R. Archer a of Pakistan. Seasonal forecasts of spring and summer flow provide the opportunity for planning and would of Control between In- dia and Pakistan. The Jhelum then flows through the plains of the Punjab, where

  19. Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station. Introduction The European Wind Atlas in combination with the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAs (DEWI), EbertstraÃ?e 96, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany Abstract The practice of using the European Wind

  20. Switching Kalman Filters for Prediction and Tracking in an Adaptive Meteorological Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Switching Kalman Filters for Prediction and Tracking in an Adaptive Meteorological Sensing Network locations. While Kalman filters and their extensions are commonly used for prediction and tracking explore the advantages and limitations of using Kalman filters to track objects with nonstationary

  1. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 7690 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack covariance flux sites across China, and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and water useDirect Agricultural and Forest Meteorology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agrformet Carbon fluxes

  2. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics Thunderstorm charging Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES

  3. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday as atmospheric electricity and optics. Specific topics that will be covered are as follows: Cloud physics: Review Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES Homework problems: 20% Quiz

  4. Abstract--Meteorological time series are characterized by important spatial and temporal variation. Model determination and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    of the meteorological time series used, which includes the use of statistical techniques to detect whether there exist for the time series using an evolutionary algorithm that adaptively adjusts some of its parameters during its and temperatures collected in a region of Romania. The results are promising for the analysis of such time series

  5. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecastsEWEC2006 ­ Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1 Durante5 , Jörg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University

  6. Partial Support for the Federal Committee for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Samuel P

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE E-link Report Number DOE/ER62778 1999-2012 Please see attached Final Technical Report (size too large to post here). Annual Products Provided to DOE: Federal Plan for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research; National Hurricane Operations Plan; Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference Summary Report. All reports and publications can be found on the OFCM website, www.ofcm.noaa.gov.

  7. FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL-POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Iain B.

    FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL- POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA D.B. Hayman Fresnel-zone holographic technique was used to obtain the radiation pattern for the upgraded antenna in the measurement of this antenna and the analysis of the results. Keywords: Antenna measurements, Fresnel zone

  8. ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1 , and F. For- get2 to advances in computational resources and modeling techniques. Note also that mesoscale modeling and Large: general circulation models, mesoscale models, microscale models [Large-Eddy Simulations]. Figure 1

  9. Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hameed, Sultan

    Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1 and Sultan Hameed2 Received] Determining the rate of global sea level rise (GSLR) during the past century is critical to understanding a suite of coastal oceanographic processes. These findings reduce variability in regional sea level rise

  10. DECEMBER 2004 1117D A I E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Drought Severity Index for 1870­2002: Relationship with Soil Moisture and Effects of Surface Warming AIGUO.g., meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural droughts; see Wilhite 2000 and Keyantash and Dracup 2002 (Manuscript received 24 February 2004, in final form 26 May 2004) ABSTRACT A monthly dataset of Palmer Drought

  11. 1771DECEMBER 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | ne of the more stunning features of the images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ILLINGWORTH AND O'CONNOR--Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom of the atmosphere. By tracking movements of individual cloud elements we can also determine the wind fields (e the energy budget of the planet. They tend to cool the earth by reflecting sunlight back to space while

  12. Meteorological conditions associated with the full-span galloping oscillations of overhead transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    -span galloping of bundled conductors, and it was not possible to assess how close the critical wind speedMeteorological conditions associated with the full-span galloping oscillations of overhead,Wind ABSTRACT The recorded phase-to-phase faults associated with the full-span galloping of CEGB overhead

  13. 227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    TsunamiAdvisoryGroup ATSAS AutomatedThunderstormAlertService ATWS AutomaticTsunamiWarningSystem AuASB Australian Auditingand

  14. The design and implementation of a demonstration supplementary control system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruane, Michael Frederick

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Chestnut Ridge Supplemental Control System (SCS) demonstration project was to demonstrate how an existing monitoring network, existing air quality models, and existing meteorological forecasting ...

  15. ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARMMeasurementsMethane Gas

  16. ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstruments NSASteering

  17. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  18. The recent proliferation of affordable data gathering and storage media and powerful computing systems have provided a solid foundation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantaphyllou, Evangelos

    , genetic algorithms (GAs), ant colony systems, Bayes networks, rule induction, etc. There are pros and cons are various natural phenomena or systems. Examples can be found in meteorology, earth sciences, astronomy

  19. Lord Julian Hunt FRS Meteorological Office 1990-1992 Professor VI Arnold Steklov Institute, Moscow 1990-1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lord Julian Hunt FRS Meteorological Office 1990-1992 Professor VI Arnold Steklov Institute, Moscow 1990-1993 Professor PG Burke FRS Queen's University, Belfast 1990-1993 Professor IG Halliday University

  20. Conference on Mountain Meteorology, 7-11 August 2000 Aspen, Colorado, Amer. Meteor. Soc., Preprint p.11-14.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    9th Conference on Mountain Meteorology, 7-11 August 2000 Aspen, Colorado, Amer. Meteor. Soc-11 August 2000 Aspen, Colorado, Amer. Meteor. Soc., Preprint p.11-14. the Osservatorio Ticinese at Locarno

  1. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanography and Meteorology Building.The Doppler weather radar on the roof of the building is a campus Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar (SMART-R).This radar is used in national and international

  2. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  4. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  5. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  6. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  7. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  8. Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 1, The GEN computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, J.W.; Andrews, G.L.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Meteorological Station, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, issues general weather forecasts twice a day. The GEN computer code is used to archive the 24-hour forecasts and apply quality assurance checks to the forecast data. This code accesses an input file, which contains the date and hour of the previous forecast, and an output file, which contains 24-hour forecasts for the current month. As part of the program, a data entry form consisting of 14 fields that describe various weather conditions must be filled in. The information on the form is appended to the current 24-hour monthly forecast file, which provides an archive for the 24-hour general weather forecasts. This report consists of several volumes documenting the various computer codes used at the Hanford Meteorological Station. This volume describes the implementation and operation of the GEN computer code at the station.

  9. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  12. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  13. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  14. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  15. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Barrow (METTWR4H) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights (2m, 10m, 20m and 40m) on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at the base of the tower. Additionally, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer and an Ultrasonic wind speed sensor are located near the 2m level for comparison purposes.

  16. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  17. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  18. 3892 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California E. SMALL Department considerable attention in the hydro- meteorology community. This is partially because most of the monsoon

  19. Urban morphological analysis for mesoscale meteorological and dispersion modeling applications : current issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Ching, J. (Jason); Cheuk, M. L. (Mang Lung); Yuan, M. (May); McKinnon, A. T. (Andrew T.); Han, W. S. (Woo Suk)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate predictions of air quality and atmospheric dispersion at high spatial resolution rely on high fidelity predictions of mesoscale meteorological fields that govern transport and turbulence in urban areas. However, mesoscale meteorological models do not have the spatial resolution to directly simulate the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics in and around buildings and other urban structures that have been shown to modify micro- and mesoscale flow fields (e.g., see review by Bornstein 1987). Mesoscale models therefore have been adapted using numerous approaches to incorporate urban effects into the simulations (e.g., see reviews by Brown 2000 and Bornstein and Craig 2002). One approach is to introduce urban canopy parameterizations to approximate the drag, turbulence production, heating, and radiation attenuation induced by sub-grid scale buildings and urban surface covers (Brown 2000). Preliminary results of mesoscale meteorological and air quality simulations for Houston (Dupont et al. 2004) demonstrated the importance of introducing urban canopy parameterizations to produce results with high spatial resolution that accentuates variability, highlights important differences, and identifies critical areas. Although urban canopy parameterizations may not be applicable to all meteorological and dispersion models, they have been successfully introduced and demonstrated in many of the current operational and research mode mesoscale models, e.g., COAMPS (Holt et al. 2002), HOTMAC (Brown and Williams 1998), MM5 (e.g., Otte and Lacser 2001; Lacser and Otte 2002; Dupont et al. 2004), and RAMS (Rozoff et al. 2003). The primary consequence of implementing an urban parameterization in a mesoscale meteorological model is the need to characterize the urban terrain in greater detail. In general, urban terrain characterization for mesoscale modeling may be described as the process of collecting datasets of urban surface cover physical properties (e.g., albedo, emissivity) and morphology (i.e., ground elevation, building and tree height and geometry characteristics) and then processing the data to compute physical cover and morphological parameters. Many of the surface cover and morphological parameters required for mesoscale meteorological models are also needed by atmospheric dispersion models. Thus, most of the discussion below is relevant to both types of modeling. In this paper, the term urban morphological analysis will be used to define the component of urban terrain characterization concerned with the morphological parameters. Furthermore, the focus will be building morphological parameters; therefore, the term urban morphological analysis will refer exclusively to the task of inventorying, computing or estimating building morphological parameters. Several approaches to perform urban morphological analysis exist; however, all have in common three types of practice issues related to the uncertainty of (1) data, (2) parameter definitions and calculation methods, and (3) extrapolation techniques. The objective of this paper is to describe the state-of-the-practice of urban morphological analysis by reviewing the primary approaches presented in the literature and outlining and commenting on key aspects of the three types of practice issues listed above.

  20. THE CLOUDSAT MISSION AND THE A-TRAIN A New Dimension of Space-Based Observations of Clouds and Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ILLINGWORTH AND O'CONNOR--Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom the wind fields (e.g., Menzel 2001). These large cloud systems are not mere passive tracers of wide. Clouds also dominate the energy budget of the planet. They tend to cool the earth by reflecting sunlight

  1. Update of HB-line consequences based on new meteorological and population databases in AXAIR89Q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DelGenio, M.E.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional analyses and upgrading of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) is needed for an Environmental Assessment (EA) currently being prepared for HB-Line. Since the JCO and SAR do not include population doses for two accidents; a propagated fire and a ground level release for an earthquake, this analysis will provide these doses. Population distribution information has been updated to 1992. This analysis will analyze the onsite worker at a distance of 640 meters from the release point using 50% meteorology in accordance with more recent DOE guidance. The doses will be calculated for all the accidents reported in the JCO. This analysis will update maximum offsite individual doses using a new meteorological database based on more recent data collected from 1987-1991. The new meteorological database results in a decrease in the dose from a release from H-Area.

  2. Patterns of satellite-viewed, subtropical, jet-stream clouds in relation to the observed wind field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, Richard Joel

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PATTERNS OF SATELLITE-VIEWED, SUBTROPICAL, JET- STREAM CLOUDS IN RELATION TO THE OBSERVED WIND FIELD A Thesis by RICHARD JOEL VOGT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject: Meteorology PATTERNS OP SATELLITE-VIEWED, SUBTROPICAL, JET-STREAM CLOUDS IN RELATION TO THE OBSERVED WIND FIELD A Thesis by RICHARD JOEL VOGT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  3. The Central American cold surge: an observational analysis of the deep southward penetration of North American cold fronts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reding, Philip John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CENTRAL AMERICAN COLD SURGE: AN OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE DEEP SOUTHWARD PENETRATION OF NORTH AMERICAN COLD FRONTS A Thesis by PHILIP JOHN REDING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A &M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology THE CENTRAL AMERICAN COLD SURGE: AN OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE DEEP SOUTHWARD PENETRATION OF NORTH AMERICAN COLD FRONTS A Thesis by PHILIP...

  4. THE MADISON SQUARE GARDEN DISPERSION STUDY (MSG05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSG05 was a study of atmospheric transport and dispersion in the deep urban canyons of Midtown New York City, in the area of Madison Square Garden. This downtown area is considered to be a prime target for terrorist activities, and has one of the largest commuter populations in the world. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion in such scenarios, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons. On March 10 and 14, 2005, a series of Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) tracers were released and tracked with about 30 sampling stations at radial distances of about 0.2 and 0.4 km, with vertical profiles near a 250 m tall building (One Penn Plaza). Meteorological stations collected wind data in the MSG vicinity, at street level and rooftop level. MSG05 is expected to provide useful information on rapid vertical dispersion will assist in planning for more extensive studies. This data release is being made available to a restricted group of key scientists who have worked on the project. Part of the QA program involves feedback from scientists and modelers who are working on this study. This document describes the meteorological component of the project. The file organization and metadata are detailed so that a researcher can work with the data sets.

  5. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  6. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  7. METEOROLOGY 130 Boundary Layer Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    4) Turbulence Kinetic Energy · TKE budget and terms · Stability concepts · Richardson number 5) Measuring the Boundary Layer · Balloons · Radars · Sodars · Towers (micrometeorology) · Measuring Turbulence Time Series Analysis 8) Similarity Theory and Turbulence Closure 9) Surface Energy Budgets 10) Special

  8. Simulated and observed fluxes of sensible and latent heat and CO2 at the WLEF-TV tower using SiB2.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Simulated and observed fluxes of sensible and latent heat and CO2 at the WLEF-TV tower using SiB2, Boulder, CO, USA Abstract Three years of meteorological data collected at the WLEF-TV tower were used the WLEF tower, which were not present in the SiB simulation. The model overestimated the magnitude

  9. 15 MARCH 1999 829J I A N D W A N G 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pao K.

    to the flux on a stationary crystal gives the ventilation coefficient. The local flow velocity profiles around15 MARCH 1999 829J I A N D W A N G 1999 American Meteorological Society Ventilation Coefficients (Manuscript received 20 November 1997, in final form 8 May 1998) ABSTRACT The ventilation coefficients

  10. SEPTEMBER 2003 2071V A N L E E U W E N 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

    SEPTEMBER 2003 2071V A N L E E U W E N 2003 American Meteorological Society A Variance and with a multilayer quasigeostrophic model of the ocean area around South Africa. It is recalled that Kalman after analysis, without extra computations. It is based on ensemble or Monte Carlo integrations

  11. Acquisition of a Multi-Core Server for the Enhancement of the Meteorology Program at Central Michigan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acquisition of a Multi-Core Server for the Enhancement of the Meteorology Program at Central addresses a much needed upgrade to an aging, overloaded, and in- creasingly unstable server which with fast local storage, the server will act as both an ingestion engine running the LDM and its associ

  12. 1 JUNE 2001 2443G U A N D L I O U 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    and in all seasons with a global cloud cover of about 20%­30% and more than 70% in the Tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The effects of cirrus clouds on the radiation budget of the earth and the atmosphere, and hence1 JUNE 2001 2443G U A N D L I O U 2001 American Meteorological Society Radiation Parameterization

  13. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  14. ACE 1992 summary data report: Aircraft measurements of meteorological parameters and SF6. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, B.A.; Boatman, J.F.; Wellman, D.L.; Wilkison, S.W.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological parameters and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were measured with the NOAA King Air C-90 aircraft during October 1992 in central Florida as part of the Air Force Technical Applications Command (AFTAC) Airborne Collection Equipment (ACE 1992) experiment. Airborne sampling was used to locate a plume containing SF6 as a tracer. Before take off, a trajectory model was used to provide the expected plume path. An onboard tracking program gave current predictions of the location of the plume, based on the location of tetroons expected to travel with the plume. Once the plume was located, samples were collected of triethyl phosphate oxide and methyl salicylate, which had been released with the SF6. This report discusses the objectives of ACE 1992, the instrumentation used and the data obtained by the NOAA King Air ground and airborne operation.

  15. Influence of meteorology in assessing energy externalities: application of the damage function approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.; Miller, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McIlvaine, C.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating energy externalities. These externalities are environmental, health, and other damages and benefits that traditionally have not been considered as part of the cost of producing and consuming goods and services. An example of externalities is the effect on human health from exposure to ozone formed by NO{sub x} and other emissions from electric power plants. These damages are valued adversely by individuals (and by society) but are not reflected in the price of electricity. The damage function approach is a methodology which is used for developing quantitative estimates of externalities. This paper describes the five major steps in the damage function approach, focuses on the use of ozone models in that framework, and points out the effects of meteorological variables on estimates of ozone concentrations.

  16. Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. 846 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS ON LEARNING SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 5, MAY 2012 [9] D. Cheng and H. Qi, "Controllability and observability of Boolean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    . 3, pp. 512­521, Mar. 2009. [31] D. Cheng, H. Qi, and Z. Li, Analysis and Control of Boolean Networks: A Semi-Tensor Product Approach. London, U.K.: Springer-Verlag, 2011. [32] D. Cheng, H. Qi, and Z. Li846 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS ON LEARNING SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 5, MAY 2012 [9] D. Cheng

  18. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg \\Lambda Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  19. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  20. [10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

  1. A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab; ,

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

  2. Systematic lidar observations of Saharan dust over Europe in the frame of EARLINET (20002002)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Malta, Valletta, Malta. 12 Now at World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. 13

  3. Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Gruess, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the origin of the architectures of low mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range $(1-4)\\ \\rmn{M}_{\\oplus}.$ These evolve for up to $2\\times10^7 \\rmn{yr}$ under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow ircularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few $\\%$ terminating in second order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small $< 0.1$ and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced o...

  4. Real-time Coastal Observation Network (ReCON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research. Deploy observations systems on portable, low cost buoys and fixed platforms of opportunity systems. The project will establish a test bed for observing system network design studies and develop

  5. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A. [University of Washington Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  6. Accurate economic analysis of photovoltaic (PV) systems performance over the system lifetime requires knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    modules will work over long periods. Nine years of PV data at Ashland, Oregon are used to determine and meteorological measurements. 1. INTRODUCTION As the solar industry matures, more and more emphasis is being. The benefits, costs, and design of the feed-in tariffs require knowledge of system output over time. Second

  7. 1052 VOLUME 18W E A T H E R A N D F O R E C A S T I N G 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    of Meteorology, Perth, Western Australia, Australia i European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading to frontogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for precipitation, and the energy budget during ET. Finally, a summary

  8. JANUARY 2003 83B A R T H E L M I E A N D P R Y O R 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    .barthelmie@risoe.dk ships and buoy networks with data from a few offshore meteorological masts (Barthelmie 1999a), marine. In the case of wind energy applications, available wind power density is related to the cube of the wind speed

  9. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. Improvement of weather analysis in isolated areas of the southern hemisphere by meteorological satellite information: a case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Jose? Angel

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure Temperature Wind Upper-air circulation Fronts Cloudiness Cyclonic and anticyclonic activity. Weather patterns Summary of the status of available information Status of the Use of Information from Meteorological Satellites as Applied... del Fuego and South Patagonia, unpredictable most of the time except for the orographic effects, is due to the changes in the atmospheric circulation in the vicinity of the Drake Passage . Aircraft of Argentine and Chilean airlines operate...

  12. The artificial night sky brightness mapped from DMSP Operational Linescan System measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Cinzano; F. Falchi; C. D. Elvidge; K. E. Baugh

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to map the artificial sky brightness across large territories in astronomical photometric bands with a resolution of approximately 1 km. This is useful to quantify the situation of night sky pollution, to recognize potential astronomical sites and to allow future monitoring of trends. The artificial sky brightness present in the chosen direction at a given position on the Earth's surface is obtained by the integration of the contributions produced by every surface area in the surrounding. Each contribution is computed based on detailed models for the propagation in the atmosphere of the upward light flux emitted by the area. The light flux is measured with top of atmosphere radiometric observations made by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System. We applied the described method to Europe obtaining the maps of artificial sky brightness in V and B bands.

  13. Sensitivity and uncertainty studies of the CRAC2 code for selected meteorological models and parameters. [CRAC2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.; Kocher, D.C.; Hicks, B.B.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.; Ku, J.Y.; Rao, K.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the sensitivity of results from the CRAC2 computer code, which predicts health impacts from a reactor-accident scenario, to uncertainties in selected meteorological models and parameters. The sources of uncertainty examined include the models for plume rise and wet deposition and the meteorological bin-sampling procedure. An alternative plume-rise model usually had little effect on predicted health impacts. In an alternative wet-deposition model, the scavenging rate depends only on storm type, rather than on rainfall rate and atmospheric stability class as in the CRAC2 model. Use of the alternative wet-deposition model in meteorological bin-sampling runs decreased predicted mean early injuries by as much as a factor of 2-3 and, for large release heights and sensible heat rates, decreased mean early fatalities by nearly an order of magnitude. The bin-sampling procedure in CRAC2 was expanded by dividing each rain bin into four bins that depend on rainfall rate. Use of the modified bin structure in conjunction with the CRAC2 wet-deposition model changed all predicted health impacts by less than a factor of 2. 9 references.

  14. Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    1 23 Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and Computational Research on the Climate System.6, and -22.5 Wm-2 , respectively, indicating a net cooling effect of clouds on the TOA radiation budget-2 , respectively, resulting in a larger net cooling effect of 2.9 Wm-2 in the model simu- lations

  15. 1 DECEMBER 2004 4541L U O A N D R O S S O W 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project (ISCCP) data and the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical.g., large-scale lifting) replenish the particles to maintain tropical cirrus. Consequently, tropical cirrus- cesses, such as the mesoscale circulations of larger storm systems, large-scale lifting or gravity waves

  16. Belief space planning assuming maximum likelihood observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Perez, Tomas

    observations are modelled as Gaussian noise. Given this model of the dynamics, two planning and control methods-locating the sensors with the contacts this way complicates planning and control because it forces the system to trade of the partially observable control problem, often modeled as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP

  17. JPL D-33509 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cofield, David T. Cuddy, Lucien Froidevaux, Ryan A Fuller, Robert F. Jarnot, Jonathan H. Jiang, Yibo B

  18. JPL D-33509 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cuddy, Lucien Froidevaux, Ryan A Fuller, Robert F. Jarnot, Jonathan H. Jiang, Yibo B. Jiang, Brian W

  19. JPL D-33509 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1000 1200 FWHM / km Nathaniel J. Livesey, William G. Read, Lucien Froidevaux, Alyn Lambert, Gloria L

  20. JPL D-28534 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 June 15, 2004 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.4 Zeeman Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Magnetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 Tensor magnetic susceptibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2

  1. GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ 2009-11 Work Plan Objective: to improve the management and protection of terrestrial, coastal Survey #12;© GEO Secretariat Trees are so much more sensible than people, steadier and more enduring and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7

  2. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName4ServicesTribalWorkplaceAutomated SteelAutomated

  3. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  4. HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

  5. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  6. VLT/UVES observations of extremely strong intervening damped Lyman-alpha systems: Molecular hydrogen and excited carbon, oxygen and silicon at log N(HI)=22.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noterdaeme, P; Rahmani, H; Petitjean, P; Pâris, I; Ledoux, C; Gupta, N; López, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of three extremely strong intervening DLAs (log N(HI)>=21.7) observed towards quasars with VLT/UVES. We measure overall metallicities of [Zn/H]~-1.2, -1.3 and -0.7 at respectively zabs=2.34 towards SDSS J2140-0321 (log N(HI) = 22.4+/-0.1), zabs=3.35 towards SDSS J1456+1609 (log N(HI) = 21.7+/-0.1) and zabs=2.25 towards SDSS J0154+1935 (log N(HI) = 21.75+/-0.15). We detect H2 towards J2140-0321 (log N(H2) = 20.13+/-0.07) and J1456+1609 (log N(H2) = 17.10+/-0.09) and argue for a tentative detection towards J0154+1935. Absorption from the excited fine-structure levels of OI, CI and SiII are detected in the system towards J2140-0321, that has the largest HI column density detected so far in an intervening DLA. This is the first detection of OI fine-structure lines in a QSO-DLA, that also provides us a rare possibility to study the chemical abundances of less abundant atoms like Co and Ge. Simple single phase photo-ionisation models fail to reproduce all the observed quantities. Inst...

  7. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  8. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  9. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  10. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  11. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  12. Real-Time Forecasting for the Antarctic: An Evaluation of the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS)*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Real-Time Forecasting for the Antarctic: An Evaluation of the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System. MANNING AND JORDAN G. POWERS Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division, National Center.S. Antarctic Program's field operations, the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) was implemented in Oc

  13. Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1. Systems. 1.1. On Line. In this introductory section we will pose no exercises, but instead, will detail. how to use Maple to solve problems in linear ...

  14. 27/10/2010 12:48AGU: Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/rs/rs1002/2009RS004215/2009RS004215.xml&t=

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    27/10/2010 12:48AGU: Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low Abstract Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave characteristics. Finally, we compared in detail the geomagnetic induced current (GIC) in the Scottish power system

  15. Early warning systems: An economic approach to dam safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, B.D. [National Weather Service Colorado River Basin Forecasting Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An early warning system can provide a relatively low-cost method for addressing dam safety issues. Bureau of Reclamation engineers have developed a systematic approach for designing warning systems while effectively balancing safety and economic concerns. Rather than addressing the dam itself, the system addresses the embayment and those meteorological/hydrological factors affecting the embayment. Characteristics of the mathematical model developed are addressed in this paper.

  16. Near-Infrared Observations April 9, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    idea: correct wavefront distortions using a deformable secondary mirror · can achieve better correction;Energy Generation · what are we seeing when we observe solar system objects in the NIR? · reflected

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSIENT LUMINOUS EVENT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSIENT LUMINOUS EVENT- PRODUCING MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Timothy LangC by positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning can lead to transient luminous events (TLEs; Williams 1998; Lyons

  18. B. MAPES et al.November 2008 175Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 86A, pp. 175-185, 2008 Predictability Aspects of Global Aqua-planet Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapes, Brian

    B. MAPES et al.November 2008 175Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 86A, pp. 175;Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan Vol. 86A176 1. Introduction In principle, anything Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder

  19. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One group served as control subjects while the other group functioned as a treated group (observers). The observers were allowed to watch a correctly performed discrimination task prior to testing of a learning response using the same task.... Discrimination testing was conducted on all horses daily for 14 days with criterion set at seven out of eight responses correct with the last five consecutively correct. The maximum number of trials performed without reaching set criterion was limited...

  20. If physics is an information science, what is an observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretations of quantum theory have traditionally assumed a "Galilean" observer, a bare "point of view" implemented physically by a quantum system. This paper investigates the consequences of replacing such an informationally-impoverished observer with an observer that satisfies the requirements of classical automata theory, i.e. an observer that encodes sufficient prior information to identify the system being observed and recognize its acceptable states. It shows that with reasonable assumptions about the physical dynamics of information channels, the observations recorded by such an observer will display the typical characteristics predicted by quantum theory, without requiring any specific assumptions about the observer's physical implementation.

  1. Observations of the Icy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  2. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  3. Mars atmosphere modelling and observations workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, François

    /TES (W. C. Maguire et al.): 10' · Mars surface boundary layer meteorology (S. E. Larsen, H. E. Jørgensen. Lewis et al.) 10' · Assimilation of TES data from the Mars Global Surveyor scientific mapping phase. (L : Breeding vectors and predictability in the Oxford Mars GCM (C. E. Newman, P. L. Read and S. R. Lewis) 3

  4. Statistical approach to lorig-term performances of photovoltaic systems B. Bartoli, U. Coscia, V. Cuomo, F. Fontana and V. Silvestrini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    281 Statistical approach to lorig-term performances of photovoltaic systems B. Bartoli, U. Coscia in the problem : system sizes and meteorological parameters. Furthermore we study the reliability of our model represent the size and the technical properties of the system [2]. This approach allows a drastic

  5. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  6. Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions in South Florida and its possible impacts on the number of Asthma cases: Five years of correlations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions, wind speed and direction), and air quality indicators (ozone O3 and particulate matter PM2.5) are presented in this study. Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter have been both important triggers of asthma

  7. MAY 1999 661M A T T H E W S A N D K I L A D I S 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    MAY 1999 661M A T T H E W S A N D K I L A D I S 1999 American Meteorological Society The Tropical with enhanced convection over the East Indian Ocean and Indonesia, and suppressed convection over the South and forms an integral part of the slowly varying diabatic heating field of the MJO. In the opposite phase

  8. 2078 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    2078 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society Long-Term Ice,* ROGER COLONY,* MARK A. JOHNSON,# VALERII P. KARKLIN, DAVID WALSH,* AND ALEXANDER V. YULIN *International patterns manifested locally by SAT and wind variability (Walsh and Johnson 1979; Overland and Pease 1982

  9. Meteorology Group, Departament de Fsica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, Spain IMEDEA, UIB-CSIC, Palma de Mallorca, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Romu

    , Spain 2 IMEDEA, UIB-CSIC, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 3 Instituto Nacional de Meteorologõ�a, Madrid, Spain Geltru, Barcelona, Spain A Case of Convection Development over the Western Mediterranean Sea: A Study of precipitation were recorded in coastal lands of eastern Spain, and 180 mm were estimated over the sea with radar

  10. Oumbe A., Blanc Ph., Schroedter-Homscheidt M., Wald L., 2010. Solar surface irradiance from new meteorological satellite data. In Proceedings of the 29th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tech, Center for Energy and Processes, BP 207, 06904 Sophia Antipolis, France b German Aerospace CenterOumbe A., Blanc Ph., Schroedter-Homscheidt M., Wald L., 2010. Solar surface irradiance from new, 320-328, doi:10.3233/978-1-60750-494-8-320 Solar surface irradiance from new meteorological satellite

  11. 504 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Polar Meteorology Group, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio ROBERT J Program, Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (Manuscript received 4, there is significant weakening of the midlatitude circulation and reduction of 500-hPa eddy kinetic energy

  12. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 137: 118136, January 2011 Initiation of deep convection at marginal instability in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    , Germany bNational Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, UK cDepartment of Meteorology of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany gInstitut f¨ur Physik der Atmosph¨are, Deutsches Zentrum f¨ur Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany hM´et´eo-France, Toulouse, France i Laboratoire Atmosph`eres, Milieux

  13. 1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere­ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society The Deep-Ocean, Washington (Manuscript received 20 June 2002, in final form 3 November 2002) ABSTRACT The deep-ocean heat

  14. 264 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2000 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the relationship between the earth radiation budget or sur- face radiation budget and total cloud cover (see refer shortwave and longwave radiative flux- es as much as changes in total cloud cover and because264 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2000 American Meteorological Society Radiative Effects

  15. 3010 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1998 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junhong

    of the role of clouds in the climate is on the average cloud effects on the earth and surface radiation3010 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1998 American Meteorological Society Effects of Cloud macroscale cloud vertical structures (CVS). The overall effect of clouds, the role of their geographic

  16. Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) General System Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;ACU Option Comparison Battery Bank to power Hydrogen Fuel Engine Generator the existing UPS Cell Special battery venting to outside required; difficult to replenish Must be stored outside; easy cost Quarterly testing; Batteries replaced every 4 - 5 yrs (> $8.5K) Limited maintenance costs yearly

  17. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

  18. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

  19. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  20. Combined influence of atmospheric physics and soil hydrology on the simulated meteorology at the SIRTA atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

    for This paper is a contribution to the special issue on the IPSL and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models it to evaluate the standard and new parametrizations of boundary layer/convection/clouds in the Earth System Model (ESM) of Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), which differentiate the IPSL-CM5A and IPSL- CM5B

  1. NOVEMBER 1999 2597L I U E T A L . 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    of Hurricane Andrew (1992). Part II: Kinematics and Inner-Core Structures YUBAO LIU Department of Atmospheric of a storm. In this study, the results of a 72-h explicit simulation of Hurricane Andrew (1992) with a grid-core structures of hurricanes is very limited owing to the lack of continuous high-resolution observational data

  2. A Distributed Modeling System for Short-Term to Seasonal Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting in Snowmelt Dominated Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Gill, Muhammad K.; Coleman, Andre M.; Prasad, Rajiv; Vail, Lance W.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a distributed modeling system for short-term to seasonal water supply forecasts with the ability to utilize remotely-sensed snow cover products and real-time streamflow measurements. Spatial variability in basin characteristics and meteorology is represented using a raster-based computational grid. Canopy interception, snow accumulation and melt, and simplified soil water movement are simulated in each computational unit. The model is run at a daily time step with surface runoff and subsurface flow aggregated at the basin scale. This approach allows the model to be updated with spatial snow cover and measured streamflow using an Ensemble Kalman-based data assimilation strategy that accounts for uncertainty in weather forecasts, model parameters, and observations used for updating. Model inflow forecasts for the Dworshak Reservoir in northern Idaho are compared to observations and to April-July volumetric forecasts issued by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) for Water Years 2000 – 2006. October 1 volumetric forecasts are superior to those issued by the NRCS, while March 1 forecasts are comparable. The ensemble spread brackets the observed April-July volumetric inflows in all years. Short-term (one and three day) forecasts also show excellent agreement with observations.

  3. A simplified system of pressure surfaces for atmospheric analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Francis Schofield

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A g M COLLEGE OF TEXAS A SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF PRESSURE SURFACES FOR ATMOSPHERIC ANALYSIS A Thesis By FRANCIS S. SHAY + Captain USAF Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1959 Major Subject: Meteorology A SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF PRESSURE SURFACES FOR ATMOSPHERIC ANALYSIS A Thesis By FRANCIS S. SHAY Captain USAF jpp roved j as to style and content...

  4. Observational Mishaps - a Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; Kristin Chiboucas; Denise Hurley-Keller

    1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a World-Wide-Web-accessible database of astronomical images which suffer from a variety of observational problems, ranging from common occurences, such as dust grains on filters and/or the dewar window, to more exotic phenomena, such as loss of primary mirror support due to the deflation of the support airbags. Apart from its educational usefulness, the purpose of this database is to assist astronomers in diagnosing and treating errant images at the telescope, thus saving valuable telescope time. Every observational mishap contained in this on-line catalog is presented in the form of a GIF image, a brief explanation of the problem, and, when possible, a suggestion for improving the image quality.

  5. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

  6. Rintoul, S.R., M.P. Meredith, O. Schofield, and L. Newman. 2012. The Southern Ocean Observing System. Oceanography 25(3):6869, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2012.76.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the stability of the Antarctic ice sheets and their contributions to sea level rise 4. The future observations. recognition of this need motivated the community to develop a strategy for a Southern Ocean large impact on the remote and poorly observed Southern Ocean. Argo has already collected many more

  7. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, andObservations Projected

  8. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation ofEdge

  9. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

  10. 255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    that determine the surface energy budget and the sea­ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean­ice­atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

  11. On Some Meteorological Patterns in the Dead Sea Area during Advective Sharav Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    power (Weiner, 1980), moti- vated the model analysis presented here. Evaluation of evaporation rates of fine grid resolution over the lake area,which becomesexpensivewhen applied in a 3-D model. Verification systems associatedwith an advective sha'ravsituation (based on Levi, 1967). II Results The model

  12. 17FEBRUARY 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he International MODIS (Moderate Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    , ELISABETH WEISZ, THOMAS RINK, KEVIN BAGGETT, JIM DAVIES, WILLIAM L. SMITH, AND JAMES C. DODGE SYSTEMS detection, fisheries management, weather forecasting, aviation safety, and ice forecasts. To date- AFFILIATIONS: HUANG, GUMLEY, STRABALA, LI, WEISZ, RINK, BAGGETT, AND DAVIES--Cooperative Institute

  13. Observations on European Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Manure ............................................. 9 ........................................ ~pplication of Manure 11 ............................ ............. dffects of Manure -- 12 ............................... rhird-Purchase of Imported....i& includes leguminous crops to gather nitrogen from the air, and thereby enrich the soil. The crops are never turned under but q fed and the manure saved. Second, it is due to a general use of a system of grain and live. stock farming in which all...

  14. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April, distributed, and cited, but please be aware that there will be visual differences and possibly some content to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds

  15. 1406 VOLUME 61J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhulst, Ferdinand

    Meteorological Institute, De Bilt, and Department of Mathematics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands J. D Research, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands F. VERHULST Department of Mathematics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands (Manuscript received 22 October 2002, in final form 21 November 2003

  16. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  17. Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

  18. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  19. Observing alternatives to inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Peter

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

  20. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  1. The effect of urban canopy parameterizations on mesoscale meteorological model simulations in the Paso del Norte area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Williams, M.D.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since mesoscale numerical models do not have the spatial resolution to directly simulate the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics in and around urban structures, urban canopy parameterizations are sometimes used to approximate the drag, heating, and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy (tke) produced by the sub-grid scale urban elements. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the urban canopy parameterizations used in the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model by turning the parameterizations on and off. The model simulations were performed in the Paso del Norte region, which includes the cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez, the Franklin and Sierra Juarez mountains, and the Rio Grande. The metropolitan area is surrounded by relatively barren scrubland and is intersected by strips of vegetation along the Rio Grande. Results indicate that the urban canopy parameterizations do affect the mesoscale flow field, reducing the magnitude of wind speed and changing the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and tke in the metropolitan area. A nighttime heat island and a daytime cool island exist when urban canopy parameters are turned on, but associated recirculation flows are not readily apparent. Model-computed solar, net, and longwave radiation values look reasonable, agreeing for the most part with published measurements.

  2. Sensitivity and uncertainty studies of the CRAC2 code for selected non-meteorological models and parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.; Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the sensitivity of health impacts and economic costs from hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents, as predicted by the CRAC2 computer code, to undertainties in selected non-meteorological models and parameters. The sources of uncertainty include (1) dose conversion factors for inhalation as affected by uncertainties in the particle size of the carrier aerosol and clearance of radionuclides from the respiratory tract, (2) the weathering half-time for external ground-surface exposure, and (3) transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways. Uncertainties in inhalation dose conversion factors affected predicted early injuries by as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in runs with fixed weather sequences, whereas the effects on early fatalities were less than a factor of 2 and on latent cancer fatalities less than 10%. Uncertainties in the weathering half-time for ground-surface exposure affected latent fatalities by a factor of 2 to 3 but economic costs by less than a factor of 2. Uncertainties in the transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways affected latent fatalities by less than 15% and had no effect on economic costs. 10 references.

  3. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  4. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;7/30/2006 IGARSS_2006 Integrated Systems for Agriculture 2 Convergence of Evidence, All Gov't Policy Makers Reference Model: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service PECAD:Production Estimates

  5. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Observations and simulations improve space weather models June 25, 2014 Los Alamos with fast-moving particles and a space weather system that varies in response to incoming energy computer simulations of the space weather that can affect vital technology, communication and navigation

  6. A single sediment-Microbial Fuel Cell powering a wireless telecommunication system Yohann R. J. Thomas a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    demonstration of an MFC as a viable power supply for a meteorological buoy in an estuary. Other applications1 A single sediment-Microbial Fuel Cell powering a wireless telecommunication system Yohann R. J Abstract We report the ability of a single sediment-Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) to power wireless sensor

  7. THE PRECIPITATION REGIME OF DRONNING MAUD LAND, ANTARCTICA, DERIVED FROM AMPS (ANTARCTIC MESOSCALE PREDICTION SYSTEM) ARCHIVE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Elisabeth

    THE PRECIPITATION REGIME OF DRONNING MAUD LAND, ANTARCTICA, DERIVED FROM AMPS (ANTARCTIC MESOSCALE. Manning2) 1) Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, University of Innsbruck, Austria 2) Mesoscale the temporal and spatial distribution of precipitation in DML using AMPS (Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System

  8. A meteorological experiment in the melting zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)); Vugts, H.F. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program on land ice and sea level change. Seven meteostations were operated along a transect running from the tundra well onto the ice sheet. At the ice edge, humidity, temperature, and wind profiles were obtained with a tethered balloon. On the ice sheet, 90 km from the edge, a boundary-layer research unit, including a sound detecting and ranging system (SODAR) and a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), was established. Although focusing on the relation between surface energy balance, glacier mass balance, and ice flow, the experiment has also delivered a unique dataset on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer around the warm tundra-cold ice sheet transition. Unexpected behavior was found for the surface albedo during the melt season. Lowest values are not found close to the ice edge, which is usual for glaciers, but higher on the ice sheet. Meltwater accumulation due to inefficient surface drainage was found to be the cause for this. The wind regime is dominated by katabatic flow from the ice sheet. The katabatic layer is typically 100-200 m thick. Close to the ice edge, the flow exhibits a very regular daily rhythm, with maximum wind speed in the afternoon. Farther on the ice sheet, the regime changes, and wind speed reaches maximum values in late night/early morning.

  9. Modelling TOVS radiances of synoptic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coe, Thomas Eddy

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODELLING TOVS RADIANCES OF SYNOPTIC SYSTEMS A Thesis THOMAS EDDY COE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of TBxBs AFxM Unlvezs&ty in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major... Subject: Meteorology MODELLING TOVS RADIANCES OF SYNOPTIC SYSTEMS THOMAS EDDY COE Approved as to style and content by: James P. McGairk (Chair of Committee) gW('. Denrus M. Driscoll (~) J B. Valdes ~) ~ J. Zi (Head of Deparbrent) Decemter 1992...

  10. 2128 VOLUME 127M O N T H L Y W E A T H E R R E V I E W 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jidong

    A Variational Method for the Analysis of Three-Dimensional Wind Fields from Two Doppler Radars JIDONG GAO. In it, a cost function, defined as the distance between the analysis and the observations at the data coordinate system. Brandes (1977) used a dual-Doppler analysis scheme in which wind components were

  11. Effect of linear lumping on controllability and observability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tóth, János

    Effect of linear lumping on controllability and observability Zs´ofia Horv´ath October 2006 Email to reduce the number of state variables on controllability and observability of linear differential the effect of linear lumping on such properties of the system as controllability and observability and apply

  12. A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc. The author has developed a general systems theory which predicts the observed selforganised criticality as a signature of quantumlike chaos in dynamical systems. The model predictions are (i) The fractal fluctuations can be resolved into an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure. (ii) The probability distribution represents the power (variance) spectrum for fractal fluctuations and follows universal inverse power law form incorporating the golden mean. Such a result that the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability distribution is observed in the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the electron or photon. Therefore the irregular or unpredictable fractal fluctuations exhibit quantumlike chaos. (iii) Atmospheric aerosols are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric aerosol size spectrum is derived in terms of the universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy energy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following two experimentally determined atmospheric aerosol data sets, (i) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000 (CARG) (ii) World Data Centre Aerosols data sets for the three stations Ny {\\AA}lesund, Pallas and Hohenpeissenberg.

  13. Apparatus for observing a hostile environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

  14. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  15. Robust energy transfer mechanism via precession resonance in nonlinear turbulent wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn; Dan Lucas

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via triads with nonzero frequency mismatch, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. We introduce the concepts of truly dynamical degrees of freedom and triad precession. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the triads' precession frequencies resonate with the system's nonlinear frequencies, leading to a collective state of synchronised triads with strong turbulent cascades at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  16. Observable Proxies For 26 Al Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Patrick A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellinger, Carola I [ASU; Arnett, William D [UNIV ARIZONA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the cospatial production of elements in supernova explosions to find observationally detectable proxies for enhancement of {sup 26}Al in supernova ejecta and stellar systems. Using four progenitors we explore a range of 1D explosions at different energies and an asymmetric 3D explosion. We find that the most reliable indicator of the presence of {sup 26}Al in unmixed ejecta is a very low S/Si ratio ({approx} 0.05). Production of N in O/S/Si-rich regions is also indicative. The biologically important element P is produced at its highest abundance in the same regions. Proxies should be detectable in supernova ejecta with high spatial resolution multi wavelength observations, but the small absolute abundance of material injected into a proto-planetary disk makes detection unlikely in existing or forming stellar/planetary systems.

  17. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHotSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingOTYa

  18. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found

  19. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing mode

  20. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing

  1. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  2. Passive solar systems performance under conditions in Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, A.B.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents energy performance of 12 passive solar systems for three climatically different zones of Bulgaria. The results are compared with a base-case residential house that has a design typical for these areas. The different passive solar systems are compared on the basis of the percentage of solar savings and the yield, which is the annual net benefit of adding the passive solar system. The analyses are provided based on monthly meteorological data, and the method used for calculations is the Solar Load Ratio. Recommendations for Bulgarian conditions are given. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. SATELLITE METEOROLOGY Guosheng Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , USA Key Words: absorption, brightness temperature, radiometer, radiative transfer equation, remote Remote Sensing 2.1 Radiative Transfer in the Atmosphere 2.2 Thermal Radiation under Clear-Sky 2 Variation 3.2.4 Latent Heating 3.3 Clouds and Surface Energy Fluxes 3.3.1 Cloud Properties 3.3.2 Surface

  4. Informal Report METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No.DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy .................................................................................................................................................................1 Instrument Towers .........................................................................................................................................2 85-meter Tower

  5. METEOROLOGICAL Monthly Weather Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    (reduced) in the CCE (LC). Less wind-driven kinetic energy was available to increase vertical shears PDF of the author-produced manuscript that has been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication. Since it is being posted so soon after acceptance, it has not yet been copyedited, formatted, or processed by AMS

  6. 8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

  7. Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

  8. Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec,1,2 O. Santoli´k,3 January 2006; published 22 April 2006. [1] Results of a systematic survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation from the electric power systems which are magnetically conjugated with the place of observation

  9. What is the reference frame of an accelerated observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -P. Marzlin

    1998-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The general construction of extended refrence frames for noninertial observers in flat space is studied. It is shown that, if the observer moves inertially before and after an arbitrary acceleration and rotation, the region where reference frames can coincide with an inertial system is bounded for final velocities exceeding 0.6 c.

  10. Nembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nembhard, Harriet Black

    observations. The Shewhart chart has been well-discussed in the literature and introductory texts on SPC (seeNembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts for Systems with Response Lags Engineering April 2002 Abstract Previously, it has been held that statistical process control (SPC

  11. Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Michael I.

    1 Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations Bruno Sinopoli, Luca Schenato, Massimo within sensor networks, we consider the prob- lem of performing Kalman filtering with intermittent be neglected. We address this problem starting from the discrete Kalman filtering formulation, and modelling

  12. Radio Observations of Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Reich

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae release an enormous amount of energy into the interstellar medium. Their remnants can observationally be traced up to several ten-thousand years. So far more than 230 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) have been identified in the radio range. Detailed studies of the different types of SNRs give insight into the interaction of the blast wave with the interstellar medium. Shock accelerated particles are observed, but also neutron stars left from the supernova explosion make their contribution. X-ray observations in conjunction with radio data constrain models of supernova evolution. A brief review of the origin and evolution of SNRs is given, which are compared with supernova statistics and observational limitations. In addition the morphology and characteristics of the different types of SNRs are described, including some recent results and illustrated by SNRs images mostly obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope.

  13. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  14. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  15. Multi-Use List for the provision of goods and services for the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for an Australian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    for an Australian Tsunami Warning System (ATWS) Servicing Charter Ref: MUL 148-2011 PART B ­ APPLICATION FORM

  16. Multi-Use List for the provision of goods and services for the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for an Australian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    for an Australian Tsunami Warning System (ATWS) Servicing Charter Ref: MUL 039-2012-13 PART B ­ APPLICATION FORM

  17. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meteorological phenomenon of particular interest to forecasters is the mesoscale convective system (MCS). Chappell (1986) defines an MCS as "any multicellular storm or group of interacting storms that suggests some organization in its forcing". An MCS...VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  18. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  19. Properties of inflow and downdraft air of tropical mesoscale convective systems and the effect of downdrafts on the surface fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Jeane Margaret

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPERTIES OF INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE FLUXES A Thesis by JEANE MARGARET GRIFFITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MAS'IER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology PROPERTIES OF THE INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE...

  20. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the ESG-CET team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (e.g., Couple Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and so forth), and analysis and visualization tools, all of which serve a diverse community of users. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL) as well as at unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory. More recently, ESG-CET has been extending services beyond data-file access and delivery to develop more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis capabilities. These will allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. Continued ESGF progress will result in a production ultrascale data system for empowering scientists who attempt new and exciting data exchanges that could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate-science discoveries.

  1. Cite as: Lundquist, J.K., F. K. Chow, J. D. Mirocha, and K.A. Lundquist, 2007: An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7 th Symposium

  2. Rigollier C., Lefvre M., Cros S., Wald L., 2003, Heliosat 2: an improved method for the mapping of the solar radiation from Meteosat imagery. In Proceedings of the 2002 EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the solar radiation from Meteosat imagery. In Proceedings of the 2002 EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellite. HELIOSAT 2: AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE MAPPING OF THE SOLAR RADIATION FROM METEOSAT IMAGERY C. Rigollier, M INTRODUCTION Mapping solar radiation at the ground level is an important issue for several applications

  3. 2072 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    2072 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society Stabilization of Climate Regimes by Noise in a Simple Model of the Thermohaline hysteresis responses to steady changes in freshwater forcing, such that the transitions between regimes

  4. JULY 1999 1711N O T E S A N D C O R R E S P O N D E N C E 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Surface Winds at Landfall of Hurricane Andrew (1992)--A Reply DA-LIN ZHANG Department of Meteorology appreciate this opportunity to (i) clarify the sim- ulation of surface winds at landfall of Hurricane Andrew comparisons with one of the most sophisticated surface analyses of a land- fallen hurricane by Powell

  5. VOLUME 30 1 AUGUST 2000J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2000 American Meteorological Society 1833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Meteorological Society 1833 Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences J. CARTER OHLMANN Scripps ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by 23 and 34 W m 2 , respectively transmission in the upper few meters as a greater portion of the irradiance exists in the deep-penetrating

  6. 3528 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    current breaks up into a series of plumes that penetrate downslope into the deeper ocean, producing strong Meteorological Society Instability of Abyssal Currents in a Continuously Stratified Ocean with Bottom Topography. The instability manifests itself in the overlying ocean as an amplifying topographic Rossby wave. Alternating

  7. 1036 VOLUME 34J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    or deeper in the thermocline as well. Subsurface cooling in the wind-forcing region reduces the remote Meteorological Society Remote Wind-Driven Overturning in the Absence of the Drake Passage Effect BARRY A. KLINGER winds to drive strong remote meridional overturning. Here, idealized numerical experiments examine

  8. Tailoring Strong Lensing Cosmographic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong lensing time delay cosmography has excellent complementarity with other dark energy probes, and will soon have abundant systems detected. We investigate two issues in the imaging and spectroscopic followup required to obtain the time delay distance. The first is optimization of spectroscopic resources. We develop a code to optimize the cosmological leverage under the constraint of constant spectroscopic time, and find that sculpting the lens system redshift distribution can deliver a 40% improvement in dark energy figure of merit. The second is the role of systematics, correlated between different quantities of a given system or model errors common to all systems. We show how the levels of different systematics affect the cosmological parameter estimation, and derive guidance for the fraction of double image vs quad image systems to follow as a function of differing systematics between them.

  9. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  10. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 170 (2013) 216227 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uncertainty Early warning systems Environmental variability Environmental time series Global warming a b s t r Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK c Crop Management and Production Systems Division, International Potato Center, PO Box 1558, Lima 12, Peru d Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  11. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  12. 15 APRIL 2001 1809C L A R K E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California RICHARD J. HARDING Centre for Ecology and Hydrology shows the observed difference in rainfall over TNA between the periods 1931­60 and 1961­90. The data come from an updated version of the gridded, gauge-based climatology described by Hulme (1992b

  13. 15 AUGUST 2002 2163C H A N G E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sukyoung

    , and provides a context within which both observational and modeling results can be interpreted. The eddy energy forecasting. The synoptic classification of such preferred regions of storm (cyclone) activity, or storm the East China Sea across the Pacific, shading into weaker ac- tivity over the Rockies; a second maxima

  14. 15 MARCH 2004 715S T E P H E N S E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    of the Parameterization of Subgrid-Scale Cloud Effects on Radiative Transfer. Part I: Vertical Overlap GRAEME L. STEPHENS approaches for parameterizing the effects of vertical variability of cloudiness on radiative transfer a consequence of the nature of the cloud cover statistics associated with the lidar/radar observations used

  15. OBSERVED HYBRID OSCILLATIONS IN AN ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM Vaibhav Donde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    reported in [2]. The paper therefore provides, in Section 2, a brief dis- cussion of modelling extensions due to the discreteness of transformer taps and capac- itors respectively. Accurate modelling must>0) Tap decrement logic (y2>0) (y2

  16. Campaign-level science traceability for Earth observation system architecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seher, Theodore K. (Theodore Kimball)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Sciences Decadal Survey of 2007 presented a comprehensive vision for the evolution of space-based Earth Science resources. The practical development of the Decadal campaign, however, has highlighted four challenges ...

  17. Observing ocean changes at the nation's first SWAC system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (conductivity, temperature, pressure) · + oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity · ADCP: 300kHz · Nitrate sensor-2 years operational Items of note and path forward Photo: Christopher Pala, www.onewater.org Mahalo

  18. Regularized Nonlinear Moving Horizon Observer for Detectable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    ], Alessandri et al. [2008] for different formulation relying on somewhat different assumptions. Such a moving

  19. Observations of englacial water passages: a fracture-dominated system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobel, Robert W.

    hydraulics of glaciers have focused on the subglacial regime. In temperate alpine glaciers and ice caps controls the spatial distribution of water at the bed, which may affect local ice movement. These passages and the outward melting of the ice walls due to the frictional heat produced by the flowing water. The processes

  20. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment. CashDay-JuneOffice of

  1. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational| Department ofCommittee Report for

  2. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYear 2015Energy Automated

  3. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  4. Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  5. 1 JANUARY 2004 21T O N I A Z Z O E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybrechts, Philippe

    with preindustrial atmospheric greenhouse gas composition and with the Greenland ice sheet removed. Two separate pressure center that forces cyclone systems (and hence precipitation) to skirt along its sides with little

  6. Odds of observing the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlen, A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eternal inflation predicts that our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound is given by the bubble nucleation rate times (H{sub O}/H{sub I}){sup 2}, where H{sub O} is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and H{sub I} is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel et al. using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here, it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well.

  7. Odds of observing the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Dahlen

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Eternal inflation predicts our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light-cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound given by the bubble nucleation rate times ($H_{\\rm{O}}/H_{\\rm{I}})^2$, where $H_{\\rm{O}}$ is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and $H_{\\rm{I}}$ is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel \\emph{et al.} using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well. A significant error in a previous draft was corrected in order to arrive at this result.

  8. This brochure describes the flood warning system operated by the Australian Government, Bureau of Meteorology for the Condamine River catchment to Cotswold. It includes reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    the main towns such as Warwick, Dalby and Chinchilla is not a regular occurrence and does not overshadow Bridge, Chinchilla Weir, and Condamine Town on the main river and Chinchilla on Charley's Creek. Local

  9. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Neufeld; Joel D. Green; David J. Hollenbach; Paule Sonnentrucker; Gary J. Melnick; Edwin A. Bergin; Ronald L. Snell; William J. Forrest; Dan M. Watson; Michael J. Kaufman

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a factor 2 - 3 below the values obtained previously from observations of atomic deuterium in the local bubble and the Galactic halo. However, similarly low gas-phase deuterium abundances have been inferred previously for molecular gas clouds in the Orion region, and in atomic clouds along sight-lines within the Galactic disk to stars more distant than 500 pc from the Sun.

  10. Magnetars: the physics behind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turolla, Roberto; Watts, Anna

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetars are the strongest magnets in the present universe and the combination of extreme magnetic field, gravity and density makes them unique laboratories to probe current physical theories (from quantum electrodynamics to general relativity) in the strong field limit. Magnetars are observed as peculiar, burst--active X-ray pulsars, the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs); the latter emitted also three "giant flares," extremely powerful events during which luminosities can reach up to 10^47 erg/s for about one second. The last five years have witnessed an explosion in magnetar research which has led, among other things, to the discovery of transient, or "outbursting," and "low-field" magnetars. Substantial progress has been made also on the theoretical side. Quite detailed models for explaining the magnetars' persistent X-ray emission, the properties of the bursts, the flux evolution in transient sources have been developed and confronted with observations. New insight on neu...

  11. Conformal Relativity: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pervushin; V. Zinchuk; A. Zorin

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and observational arguments are listed in favor of a new principle of relativity of units of measurements as the basis of a conformal-invariant unification of General Relativity and Standard Model by replacement of all masses with a scalar (dilaton) field. The relative units mean conformal observables: the coordinate distance, conformal time, running masses, and constant temperature. They reveal to us a motion of a universe along its hypersurface in the field space of events like a motion of a relativistic particle in the Minkowski space, where the postulate of the vacuum as a state with minimal energy leads to arrow of the geometric time. In relative units, the unified theory describes the Cold Universe Scenario, where the role of the conformal dark energy is played by a free minimal coupling scalar field in agreement with the most recent distance-redshift data from type Ia supernovae. In this Scenario, the evolution of the Universe begins with the effect of intensive creation of primordial W-Z-bosons explaining the value of CMBR temperature, baryon asymmetry, tremendous deficit of the luminosity masses in the COMA-type superclusters and large-scale structure of the Universe.

  12. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, D A; Hollenbach, D J; Sonnentrucker, P; Melnick, G J; Bergin, E A; Snell, R L; Forrest, W J; Watson, D M; Kaufman, M J; Neufeld, David A.; Green, Joel D.; Hollenbach, David J.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Melnick, Gary J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Snell, Ronald L.; Forrest, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Kaufman, and Michael J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a facto...

  13. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  14. Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

  15. JUNE 2001 243E A S T M A N E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    of the United States. The modeling system was then integrated, with a time step of 90 s, for a period covering 1 a cooling response in daily maximum temperatures to removal of grazing. The opposite trends were found decade, progress in vegetation modeling suggests that simplified assumptions of static vegetation

  16. 15 JUNE 2003 2067P O L Y A K O V E T A L . 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    %­50% since the beginning of the industrial era, may drive sub- stantial changes in the climate system. Using and Mann 2000) as well as diagnosis of slow thermohaline circulation changes in coupled climate model Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia #Institute of Marine Science, University

  17. 1 JULY 2003 1593W A N G A N D Z H A N G 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    system is tested with an explicit simulation of Hurricane Andrew (1992) with the finest grid size of 6 km Diagnosis of a Simulated Hurricane. Part I: Formulation and Quasi-Balanced Flow XINGBAO WANG AND DA conducted to investigate the inner-core quasi-balanced characteristics of hurricanes. In this study

  18. DOI 10.1007/s10546-005-9005-9 Boundary-Layer Meteorology (2006) 119: 135157 Springer 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and to the thermal internal boundary-layer formation. The strong coastal and orographic influences sensing systems such as lidars use aerosols as tracers, with the optical power measured by a lidar proportional to the aerosol content of the atmosphere. The lidar signal shows strong backscattering within

  19. Autonomous observing strategies for the ocean carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, James K.; Davis, Russ E.

    2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the exchanges of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean and the fate of carbon delivered to the deep sea is fundamental to the evaluation of ocean carbon sequestration options. An additional key requirement is that sequestration must be verifiable and that environmental effects be monitored and minimized. These needs can be addressed by carbon system observations made from low-cost autonomous ocean-profiling floats and gliders. We have developed a prototype ocean carbon system profiler based on the Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO; Davis et al., 1999). The SOLO/ carbon profiler will measure the two biomass components of the carbon system and their relationship to physical variables, such as upper ocean stratification and mixing. The autonomous observations within the upper 1500 m will be made on daily time scales for periods of months to seasons and will be carried out in biologically dynamic locations in the world's oceans that are difficult to access with ships (due to weather) or observe using remote sensing satellites (due to cloud cover). Such an observational capability not only will serve an important role in carbon sequestration research but will provide key observations of the global ocean's natural carbon cycle.

  20. Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

  1. Disk Evolution in Young Binaries: from Observations to Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -L. Monin; C. J. Clarke; L. Prato; C. McCabe

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of a binary system surrounded by disks is the most common outcome of stellar formation. Hence studying and understanding the formation and the evolution of binary systems and associated disks is a cornerstone of star formation science. Moreover, since the components within binary systems are coeval and the sizes of their disks are fixed by the tidal truncation of their companion, binary systems provide an ideal "laboratory" in which to study disk evolution under well defined boundary conditions. In this paper, we review observations of several inner disk diagnostics in multiple systems, including hydrogen emission lines (indicative of ongoing accretion), $K-L$ and $K-N$ color excesses (evidence of warm inner disks), and polarization (indicative of the relative orientations of the disks around each component). We examine to what degree these properties are correlated within binary systems and how this degree of correlation depends on parameters such as separation and binary mass ratio. These findings will be interpreted both in terms of models that treat each disk as an isolated reservoir and those in which the disks are subject to re-supply from some form of circumbinary reservoir, the observational evidence for which we will also critically review. The planet forming potential of multiple star systems is discussed in terms of the relative lifetimes of disks around single stars, binary primaries and binary secondaries. Finally, we summarize several potentially revealing observational problems and future projects that could provide further insight into disk evolution in the coming decade

  2. High-resolution radio observations of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Miller-Jones

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an overview of important results obtained using high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of X-ray binary systems. These results derive from both astrometric observations and resolved imaging of sources, from black holes to neutron star and even white dwarf systems. I outline a number of upcoming developments in instrumentation, both new facilities and ongoing upgrades to existing VLBI instruments, and I conclude by identifying a number of important areas of investigation where VLBI will be crucial in advancing our understanding of X-ray binaries.

  3. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico K.

    During the dry season of 2004–2005 we carried out field measurements of air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, a bowl-shaped urban basin in the Himalayan foothills of Nepal. We measured the trace ...

  4. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  5. Quintom Cosmology: Theoretical implications and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Mohammad R. Setare; Jun-Qing Xia

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the paradigm of quintom cosmology. This scenario is motivated by the observational indications that the equation of state of dark energy across the cosmological constant boundary is mildly favored, although the data are still far from being conclusive. As a theoretical setup we introduce a no-go theorem existing in quintom cosmology, and based on it we discuss the conditions for the equation of state of dark energy realizing the quintom scenario. The simplest quintom model can be achieved by introducing two scalar fields with one being quintessence and the other phantom. Based on the double-field quintom model we perform a detailed analysis of dark energy perturbations and we discuss their effects on current observations. This type of scenarios usually suffer from a manifest problem due to the existence of a ghost degree of freedom, and thus we review various alternative realizations of the quintom paradigm. The developments in particle physics and string theory provide potential clues indicating that a quintom scenario may be obtained from scalar systems with higher derivative terms, as well as from non-scalar systems. Additionally, we construct a quintom realization in the framework of braneworld cosmology, where the cosmic acceleration and the phantom divide crossing result from the combined effects of the field evolution on the brane and the competition between four and five dimensional gravity. Finally, we study the outsets and fates of a universe in quintom cosmology. In a scenario with null energy condition violation one may obtain a bouncing solution at early times and therefore avoid the Big Bang singularity. Furthermore, if this occurs periodically, we obtain a realization of an oscillating universe. Lastly, we comment on several open issues in quintom cosmology and their connection to future investigations.

  6. Site in the Sky: Climate Facility Offers New Observational Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeder, Lynne R.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is intended for publication in the trade journal, Meteorological Technology International. Its purpose is to introduce the audience to the ARM Climate Research Facility by describing its key capabilities (fixed, mobile and aerial facilities) with examples of field campaigns using each. It also summarizes coming enhancements to the facility through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and mentions the data archive and proposal opportunities to use the facility.

  7. Stability and Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Comparison of Remote Sensing and Tower Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Kalina, E. A.; Marshall, R. F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Vaisala frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

  8. Intermittent turbulence events observed with a sonic anemometer and minisodar during CASES99.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coulter, R. L.; Doran, J. C.

    2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cooperative Air Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES99), designed to investigate in detail the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) of the atmosphere with particular emphasis on turbulence and turbulence events, took place during October 1999, within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) region east of Wichita KS. The principal measurement site was a heavily instrumented 2-km square located near Leon (LE), KS, but additional sites at Smileyberg (SM) and Beaumont (BE) were also used. The authors augmented the normal ABLE measurements at Beaumont (radar wind profiler, minisodar, 10-m meteorological tower, precipitation gauge) with a sonic anemometer mounted on the tower, 7 m above the surface. For this campaign, the minisodar data were saved in single-pulse mode with no averaging. The Beaumont site is within gently rolling rangeland used primarily for grazing. The site is on a flat plain rising gradually to the east.The Flint Hills escarpment, located approximately 2 km to the east, marks the highest point in, and the eastern boundary of, the Walnut River watershed. Although most terrain features are subtle, terrain effects on atmospheric flows are still possible, particularly in stable conditions. The intent was to observe turbulence and, hopefully, turbulence events with the sonic anemometer and minisodar. The horizontal extent of these occurrences can be studied by including the Beaumont data with those obtained at the Leon site. In this report the authors are concerned with the occurrence of intermittent turbulence.

  9. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  10. Interpreting observed northern hemisphere snow trends with large ensembles of climate simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Atmospheric Research's Community Earth System Model. Two 40-member ensembles driven by historical radiative for Atmospheric Research's Community Earth System Model (CCSM4), in comparison with observations. Each ensemble

  11. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  12. INTEGRAL observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldoni, P; Laurent, P; Cassé, M; Paul, J; Sarazin, C L

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster of galaxies are the largest concentrations of visible mass in the Universe and therefore a fundamental topic of cosmology and astrophysics. Recent radio, EUV, and X-ray observations suggest that clusters contain large populations of diffuse nonthermal relativistic and/or superthermal particles. These particles may be produced by acceleration in cluster merger shocks, AGNs, and/or supernovae in cluster galaxies. Models for the nonthermal populations in clusters indicate that they should produce substantial hard X-ray and $\\gamma$ luminosities. The possible role of nonthermal particles in the dynamics of clusters is one of the greatest uncertainties in their use as cosmological probes. INTEGRAL offers, for the first time, the possibility of simultaneous medium resolution imaging (~ 12 arcmin) and high resolution spectroscopy (DeltaE/E ~ 2 keV @ 1.3 MeV) with exceptional sensitivity in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray band. The spatial resolution will allow discrete sources, such as AGNs, to be separated fr...

  13. 12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 1 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 2 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 3 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10

  14. Programming Infinite Objects by Observations Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    ), and observe its result (behavior). Application is the defining principle of functions [Granstr¨om

  15. Programming Infinite Objects by Observations Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    (experiment), and observe its result (behavior). Application is the defining principle of functions [Granstr¨om

  16. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  17. Future prospects in n-nuclear interactions. [Polarization observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, J.M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine in detail two research areas, polarization observables and antiproton-nucleus reactions, which should have near-term future impact on our understanding of the interaction of medium-energy nucleons in nuclei. More speculative future experiments employing cooled beams, double spectrometer systems, and large Q-valure low momentum-transfer reactions are also discussed.

  18. Observation of Bogoliubov excitations in exciton-polariton condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Observation of Bogoliubov excitations in exciton-polariton condensates S. UTSUNOMIYA1 predicted the occurrence of Bose­Einstein condensation (BEC) in an ideal gas of non-interacting bosonic Bose condensed system was developed by Bogoliubov in 1947, which predicted the phonon-like excitation

  19. Observation of the negative muonium ion in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Yunan

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative muonium ion (M/sup /minus//), which is the bound system of a positive muon and two electrons, has been produced and observed for the first time. Its counterpart H/sup /minus// is well known, and spectroscopy and collision studies with H/sup /minus// have yielded many fruitful results. Noteworthy are recent investigations of the photoionization of a relativistic H/sup /minus// beam. The negative positronium ion has also been formed and observed. The discovery of M/sup /minus// provides us with a new leptonic system for spectroscopy and collision studies, which may reveal interesting physics associated with mass effects. Since M/sup /minus// is a charged particle, it can also be used to produce a beam of exotic atoms with a small phase space. This dissertation is a detailed account of the observation of M/sup /minus//. 93 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.