National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for meteorological observation system

  1. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  2. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. 15th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation, AMS, Atlanta, 2010 RECENT RESEARCH ON METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AND INSTRUMENTATION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    15th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation, AMS, Atlanta, 2010 1 RECENT RESEARCH ON METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AND INSTRUMENTATION AT KNMI Hannelore Bloemink, Marijn de Haij are generated at about 30 locations in the meteorological network and are centrally available every 10 minutes

  4. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg).

  5. Meteorological Observations for Renewable Energy Applications at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Alai, M; Myers, K

    2011-10-26

    In early October 2010, two Laser and Detection Ranging (LIDAR) units (LIDAR-96 and LIDAR-97), a 3 m tall flux tower, and a 3 m tall meteorological tower were installed in the northern section of Site 300 (Figure 1) as a first step in development of a renewable energy testbed facility. This section of the SMS project is aimed at supporting that effort with continuous maintenance of atmospheric monitoring instruments capable of measuring vertical profiles of wind speed and wind direction at heights encountered by future wind power turbines. In addition, fluxes of energy are monitored to estimate atmospheric mixing and its effects on wind flow properties at turbine rotor disk heights. Together, these measurements are critical for providing an accurate wind resource characterization and for validating LLNL atmospheric prediction codes for future renewable energy projects at Site 300. Accurate, high-resolution meteorological measurements of wind flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface-atmosphere energy exchange are required for understanding the properties and quality of available wind power at Site 300. Wind speeds at heights found in a typical wind turbine rotor disk ({approx} 40-140 m) are driven by the synergistic impacts of atmospheric stability, orography, and land-surface characteristics on the mean wind flow in the PBL and related turbulence structures. This section of the report details the maintenance and labor required in FY11 to optimize the meteorological instruments and ensure high accuracy of their measurements. A detailed look at the observations from FY11 is also presented. This portion of the project met the following milestones: Milestone 1: successful maintenance and data collection of LIDAR and flux tower instruments; Milestone 2: successful installation of solar power for the LIDAR units; and Milestone 3: successful implementation of remote data transmission for the LIDAR units.

  6. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Winds: 10 meters • Temperature and Relative Humidity: 2 meters • Barometric Pressure: 1 meter. Depending upon the geographical location, different models and types of sensors may be used to measure the core variables due to the conditions experienced at those locations. Most sites have additional sensors that measure other variables that are unique to that site or are well suited for the climate of the location but not at others.

  7. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  8. Impact of incremental changes in meteorology on thermal compliance and power system operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.A.; Alavian, V.; Bender, M.D.

    1992-02-01

    The sensitivity of the TVA reservoir and power supply systems to extreme meteorology was evaluated using a series of mathematical models to simulate the relationship between incremental changes in meteorology, associated changes in water temperature, and power plant generation. Single variable analysis techniques were applied at selected TVA facilities for representative average and extreme weather conditions. In the analysis, base case simulations were first conducted for each representative year using observed meteorology (i.e., the no change condition). The impacts of changes in meteorology were subsequently analyzed by uniformly constant at their respective base case values. Project results are generally presented in terms of deviations from base case conditions for each representative year. Based on an analysis of natural flow and air temperature patterns at Chickamauga Dam, 1974 was selected to represent extreme cold-wet conditions; 1965 as reflecting average conditions; and 1986 as an example of an extremely hot-dry year. The extreme years (i.e., 1974 and 1986) were used to illustrate sensitivities beyond historical conditions; while the average year provided a basis for comparison. Observed reservoir conditions, such as inflows, dam releases, and reservoir elevations for each representative year, were used in the analysis and were assumed to remain constant in all simulations. Therefore, the Lake Improvement Plan (which was implemented in 1991) and its consequent effects on reservoir operations were not incorporated in the assessment. In the model simulations, computed water temperatures were based on vertically well-mixed conditions in the reservoirs.

  9. Six- and three-hourly meteorological observations from 223 USSR stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razuvaev, V.N.; Apasova, E.B.; Martuganov, R.A.; Kaiser, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    This document describes a database containing 6- and 3-hourly meteorological observations from a 223-station network of the former Soviet Union. These data have been made available through cooperation between the two principal climate data centers of the United States and Russia: the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), in Asheville, North Carolina, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information -- World Data Centre (RIHMI-WDC) in Obninsk. Station records consist of 6- and 3-hourly observations of some 24 meteorological variables including temperature, weather type, precipitation amount, cloud amount and type, sea level pressure, relative humidity, and wind direction and speed. The 6-hourly observations extend from 1936 to 1965; the 3-hourly observations extend from 1966 through the mid-1980s (1983, 1984, 1985, or 1986; depending on the station). These data have undergone extensive quality assurance checks by RIHMI-WDC, NCDC, and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The database represents a wealth of meteorological information for a large and climatologically important portion of the earth`s land area, and should prove extremely useful for a wide variety of regional climate change studies. These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and 40 data files that are available via the Internet or on 8mm tape. The total size of the database is {approximately}2.6 gigabytes.

  10. Time changes in a subtropical cloud and weather system as revealed by meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, Darryl

    1962-01-01

    TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub]ect: METEOROLOGY TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Approved as to style and content by...

  11. Investigating the observed sensitivities of air-quality extremes to meteorological drivers via quantile regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, D.

    Air pollution variability is strongly dependent on meteorology. However, quantifying the impacts of changes in regional climatology on pollution extremes can be difficult due to the many non-linear and competing meteorological ...

  12. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  13. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  14. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  15. Observability of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang-Yu

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the system’s internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal ...

  16. 9Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Agency overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    drought, floods, fires, storms, tsunamis and tropical cyclones. Through regular forecasts, warnings Hazards, Warnings and Forecasts Division Observations and Infrastructure Division Environment and Research Division Director of Meteorology Information Systems and Services Division Weather Forecasting Branch

  17. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

  18. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  19. Observability and Computability in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhash Kak

    2012-06-26

    This paper considers the relevance of the concepts of observability and computability in physical theory. Observability is related to verifiability which is essential for effective computing and as physical systems are computational systems it is important even where explicit computation is not the goal. Specifically, we examine two problems: observability and computability for quantum computing, and remote measurement of time and frequency.

  20. METEOROLOGY 163: Meteorological Instrumentation Course Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    1 METEOROLOGY 163: Meteorological Instrumentation Course Description In this course students will learn different measurement techniques and the instrumentation used in the atmospheric sciences to the techniques of instrument calibration, deployment, and data acquisition. Students will become familiar

  1. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 05: 31 December 2014 Prepared Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  2. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 04: 30 September 2014 Prepared Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  3. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 30 January 2014 Prepared for: NOAA IOOS Association Coastal Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012 and ADCP assets lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality

  4. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 01: 30 April 2014 Prepared for Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  5. GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7© GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS): Biodiversity, Ecosystems and GEO BON GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4 November 2008 Douglas M. Muchoney, Ph.D. U.S. Geological

  6. SPACE WEATHER OBSERVING SYSTEMS: CURRENT CAPABILITIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Coordinator for Meteorology DR. JOHN HAYES* Department of Commerce DR. FRED LEWIS* Department of Defense MR. W. RANDALL BELL Department of Energy MS. ROBIN FINEGAN* Department of Homeland Security MR. JAMES F. DEVINE* Department of the Interior MR. KENNETH HODGKINS Department of State MS. VICTORIA COX* Department

  7. TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION Mesoscale Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION ­ Mesoscale Meteorology Colorado State University The Department or associate level faculty position specializing in mesoscale meteorology. Exceptionally qualified candidates in linking models and/or theory with observations for the study of mesoscale processes. The successful

  8. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  9. Approximation and inversion of a complex meteorological system via local linear filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    been the site of some of the nation's most severe air pollution (Lu et al., 1997b). In order to model to a complex mul- tivariate dynamic model for Southern California air quality is given and the method is shown, simulate, and predict levels of ozone and other pollutants, a multivariate dynamic modeling system called

  10. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) for the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zack, J; Natenberg, E J; Knowe, G V; Waight, K; Manobianco, J; Hanley, D; Kamath, C

    2011-09-13

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In this phase of the project the focus is on the Mid-Columbia Basin region, which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area (Figure 1) that includes the Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate the Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) observational system deployment approach in order to move closer to the overall goal: (1) Perform an Observing System Experiment (OSE) using a data denial approach. The results of this task are presented in a separate report. (2) Conduct a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for the Mid-Colombia basin region. This report presents the results of the OSSE task. The specific objective is to test strategies for future deployment of observing systems in order to suggest the best and most efficient ways to improve wind forecasting at BPA wind farm locations. OSSEs have been used for many years in meteorology to evaluate the potential impact of proposed observing systems, determine tradeoffs in instrument design, and study the most effective data assimilation methodologies to incorporate the new observations into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (Atlas 1997; Lord 1997). For this project, a series of OSSEs will allow consideration of the impact of new observing systems of various types and in various locations.

  11. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government...

  12. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  13. Test, debug and development environment of Subaru Observation Software System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayashi, Saeko S.

    - 1/7 - Test, debug and development environment of Subaru Observation Software System Junichi have a computer system in Japan which simulates the network of the summit system in part. Software test, Japan ABSTRACT Subaru Observation Software System (SOSS) provides observers with so called high

  14. Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.

    2007-10-01

    This report provides a detailed description of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) Meteorological Component. The Meteorological Component includes four surface meteorological stations, miniSODAR, laptop computers, and communications equipment. This report describes the equipment that is used, explains the operation of the network, and gives instructions for setting up the Component and replacing defective parts. A detailed description of operation and use of the individual sensors, including the data loggers is not covered in the current document, and the interested reader should refer to the manufacturer’s documentation.

  15. METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    1 METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology Course Description This course will introduce the student to meteorological phenomena associated with mountain environments

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A COASTAL MARGIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (CMOAS) TO CAPTURE THE EPISODIC EVENTS IN A SHALLOW BAY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Mohammad S.

    2010-07-14

    in real-time monitoring of hydrodynamic, meteorological and water quality parameters in the bay. Three different platform types used for the installation of sensor systems are: 1) Fixed Robotic, 2) Mobile, and 3) Remote. An automated profiler system...

  17. Ocean Observing System Simulation Experiments at AOML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    criteria and rigorous validation methods developed for atmospheric OSSE systems* · Partnership with CIMAS The system has been rigorously validated to demonstrate that credible impact assessments are obtained without: Improve ocean analyses and forecasts for two applications · Predict transport and dispersion of oil spills

  18. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory AOML is an environmental research laboratory Laboratory conducts research that seeks to understand the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics;Organizational Structure The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) fits within

  19. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction that will achieve an integrated, comprehensive, and sustainable observing system enterprise for the Great Lakes

  20. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  1. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary microbursts than in many previously documented microbursts. Alignment of Doppler radar data to reports of wind-related damage to electrical power infrastructure in Phoenix allowed a comparison of microburst wind damage

  2. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary and interpretation of information from National Weather Service watches and warnings by10 decision makers such an outlier to the regional severe weather climatology. An analysis of the synoptic and13 mesoscale

  3. Rule-based system architecting of Earth observation satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva Valero, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    System architecting is concerned with exploring the tradespace of early, high-level, system design decisions with a holistic, value-centric view. In the last few years, several tools and methods have been developed to ...

  4. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2015) DOI:10.1002/qj.2554 On the microphysical effects of observed cloud edge charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambaum, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    collision processes than activation, for small droplets. Enhancing the collection efficiency of small density is influenced by both external (e.g. solar modulation of high-energy particles) and internal (e a possible route for expressing solar influences on the climate system and a teleconnection mechanism

  5. Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems) Peter Bulychev1 , Franck, Danish-Chinese Center for Cyber Physical Systems (IDEA4CPS) and VKR Center of Excellence MT-LAB. #12;The iterations. We apply our approach to timed systems. We have developed a tool prototype and analyze

  6. Scavenging quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

    2011-05-26

    Given an unknown state of a qudit that has already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? Clearly, after a maximally informative measurement, the state of the system `collapses' into a post-measurement state from which the {\\em{same}} observer cannot obtain further information about the original state of the system. However, the system still encodes a significant amount of information about the original preparation for a second observer who is unaware of the actions of the first one. We study how a series of independent observers can obtain, or scavenge, information about the unknown state of a system (quantified by the fidelity) when they sequentially measure it. We give closed-form expressions for the estimation fidelity, when one or several qudits are available to carry information about the single-qudit state, and study the `classical' limit when an arbitrarily large number of observers can obtain (nearly) complete information on the system. In addition to the case where all observers perform most informative measurements we study the scenario where a finite number of observers estimate the state with equal fidelity,regardless of their position in the measurement sequence; and the scenario where all observers use identical measurement apparata (up to a mutually unknown orientation) chosen so that a particular observer's estimation fidelity is maximized.

  7. Pole placement design for quantum systems via coherent observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zibo Miao; Matthew R. James; Valery A. Ugrinovskii

    2015-09-17

    We previously extended Luenberger's approach for observer design to the quantum case, and developed a class of coherent observers which tracks linear quantum stochastic systems in the sense of mean values. In light of the fact that the Luenberger observer is commonly and successfully applied in classical control, it is interesting to investigate the role of coherent observers in quantum feedback. As the first step in exploring observer-based coherent control, in this paper we study pole-placement techniques for quantum systems using coherent observers, and in such a fashion, poles of a closed-loop quantum system can be relocated at any desired locations. In comparison to classical feedback control design incorporating the Luenberger observer, here direct coupling between a quantum plant and the observer-based controller are allowed to enable a greater degree of freedom for the design of controller parameters. A separation principle is presented, and we show how to design the observer and feedback independently to be consistent with the laws of quantum mechanics. The proposed scheme is applicable to coherent feedback control of quantum systems, especially when the transient dynamic response is of interest, and this issue is illustrated in an example.

  8. Preprint, 9th Symposium on Integrated Observing and Assimilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    innovative observing systems for high- resolution sensing of the lower atmosphere. The devel- opment of low-cost with polarimetric capabilities is one of the first goals. Such networks are to probe the lower atmos- phere

  9. Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Brandon H

    2011-01-01

    The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

  10. Control Landscapes for Observable Preparation with Open Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebing Wu; Alexander Pechen; Herschel Rabitz; Michael Hsieh; Benjamin Tsou

    2007-08-16

    A quantum control landscape is defined as the observable as a function(al) of the system control variables. Such landscapes were introduced to provide a basis to understand the increasing number of successful experiments controlling quantum dynamics phenomena. This paper extends the concept to encompass the broader context of the environment having an influence. For the case that the open system dynamics are fully controllable, it is shown that the control landscape for open systems can be lifted to the analysis of an equivalent auxiliary landscape of a closed composite system that contains the environmental interactions. This inherent connection can be analyzed to provide relevant information about the topology of the original open system landscape. Application to the optimization of an observable expectation value reveals the same landscape simplicity observed in former studies on closed systems. In particular, no false sub-optimal traps exist in the system control landscape when seeking to optimize an observable, even in the presence of complex environments. Moreover, a quantitative study of the control landscape of a system interacting with a thermal environment shows that the enhanced controllability attainable with open dynamics significantly broadens the range of the achievable observable values over the control landscape.

  11. A digital video system for observing and recording occultations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, M A; Pavlov, Hristo; Hanna, William; McEwan, Alistair; Filipovic, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids and outer solar system bodies can offer ground based observers with modest telescopes and camera equipment the opportunity to probe the shape, size, atmosphere and attendant moons or rings of these distant objects. The essential requirements of the camera and recording equipment are: good quantum efficiency and low noise, minimal dead time between images, good horological faithfulness of the image time stamps, robustness of the recording to unexpected failure, and low cost. We describe the Astronomical Digital Video occultation observing and recording System (ADVS) which attempts to fulfil these requirements and compare the system with other reported camera and recorder systems. Five systems have been built, deployed and tested over the past three years, and we report on three representative occultation observations: one being a 9 +/-1.5 second occultation of the trans-Neptunian object 28978 Ixion (mv=15.2) at 3 seconds per frame, one being a 1.51 +/-0.017 second occultation ...

  12. Development and validation of standard classroom observation systems for school practitioners: Ecobehavioral Assessment Systems Software (EBASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Carta, Judith J.; Kamps, Debra; Terry, Barbara; Delquadri, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The development and validation of Ecobehavioral Assessment Systems Software (EBASS), a computer-assisted observational system for school practitioners, are described. Portable computers, used to support observational assessment, vastly improve...

  13. A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

  14. Circle criterion observer for a compression system Bjrnar Bhagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    .gravdahl@itk.ntnu.no Abstract-- Observers for a compression system using turbo compressors are derived for a model that captures speed. Results are validated by simulations. I. MOTIVATION Compression systems using turbo compressors, centrifugal or axial, are exposed to the phenomenons of surge and rotating stall. Surge is an axisymmtrical

  15. OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, William

    OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS WILLIAM OTT, MAURICIO A. RIVAS, AND JAMES WEST Abstract. Can the Lyapunov exponents of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems spaces generated by evolution partial differential equations. Contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1. Lyapunov

  16. School of Meteorology Comprehensive Exam Policy Below is the Comprehensive Exam Policy as approved by the School of Meteorology Faculty at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    , tropical meteorology, mesoscale meteorology, turbulence and computational fluid dynamics. Normally

  17. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  18. Meteorological database for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    to Indoor Air Meteorological Database for the United StatesUC-402 Meteorological Database for the United States M.G.Abstract A meteorological database has been developed to aid

  19. Formation of Double Neutron Star systems as implied by observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beniamini, Paz

    2015-01-01

    Double Neutron Stars (DNS) have to survive two supernovae and still remain bound. This sets strong limits on the nature of the second collapse in these systems. We consider the masses and orbital parameters of the DNS population and constrain the two distributions of mass ejection and kick velocities directly from observations with no a-priori assumptions regarding evolutionary models and/or the types of the supernovae involved. We show that there is strong evidence for two distinct types of supernovae in these systems, where the second collapse in the majority of the observed systems involved small mass ejection ($\\Delta M\\lesssim 0.5M_{\\odot}$) and a corresponding low-kick velocity ($v_{k}\\lesssim 30 km/sec$). This formation scenario is compatible, for example, with an electron capture supernova. Only a minority of the systems have formed via the standard SN scenario involving larger mass ejection of $\\sim 2.2 M_{\\odot}$ and kick velocities of up to $400$km/sec. Due to the typically small kicks in most DNS ...

  20. Towards the theory of control in observable quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V P Belavkin

    2004-08-02

    An operational description of the controlled Markov dynamics of quantum-mechanical system is introduced. The feedback control strategies with regard to the dynamical reduction of quantum states in the course of quantum real-time measurements are discribed in terms of quantum filtering of these states. The concept of sufficient coordinates for the description of the a posteriori quantum states from a given class is introduced, and it is proved that they form a classical Markov process with values in either state operators or state vector space. The general problem of optimal control of a quantum-mechanical system is discussed and the corresponding Bellman equation in the space of sufficient coordinates is derived. The results are illustrated in the example of control of the semigroup dynamics of a quantum system that is instantaneously observed at discrete times and evolves between measurement times according to the Schroedinger equation.

  1. Rule-Based System Architecting of Earth Observing Systems: Earth Science Decadal Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva, Daniel

    This paper presents a methodology to explore the architectural trade space of Earth observing satellite systems, and applies it to the Earth Science Decadal Survey. The architecting problem is formulated as a combinatorial ...

  2. Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Journal 62 (2012) 6370 The optimal placement of tsunameters in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    2012-01-01

    ). As part of the Australian Tsunami Warning System project, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (the Bureau.greenslade@bom.gov.au As part of the Australian Tsunami Warning System project, the Australian Bu- reau of Meteorology deployed in the provision of tsunami warnings is the ability to detect tsunamis through changes in sea level

  3. Solar System Formation Deduced from Observations of Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J M

    2004-01-01

    Aspects of our Solar System's formation are deduced from observations of the chemical nature of matter. Massive cores are indicative of terrestrial-planet-composition-similarity to enstatite chondrite meteorites, whose highly-reduced state of oxidation may be thermodynamically stable in solar matter only at elevated temperatures and pressures. Consistent with the formation of Earth as envisioned by Arnold Eucken, thermodynamic considerations lead to the deduction that the terrestrial planets formed by liquid-condensation, raining out from the central regions of hot, gaseous protoplanets. The mass of protoplanetary-Earth, estimated to be 275-305mE, is similar to the mass of Jupiter, 318mE. Solar primordial gases and volatile elements were separated from the terrestrial planets early after planet formation, presumably during some super-luminous solar event, perhaps even before Mercury had completely formed. The pre-super-luminosity-terrestrial-planet mass distribution appears to be more consistent with observat...

  4. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  5. METEOROLOGY 60: Meteorology I San Jos State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    for Meteorology majors (catalog entry). Lecture: 2 hours per week (2 units). In this course (which continues, winds, water vapor, and clouds. 2. Understand how basic thermodynamic concepts relate to the study). 5. Describe the processes involved in the formation of different cloud and precipitation types. 6

  6. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems (September 2011) Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems - 2011 Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems...

  7. ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs, T. Eskridge, R. Hartley, H. Pfeiffer, and C. Soderlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Roger

    ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs mesoscale meteorological data fusion system is being developed as an intelligent interface between the U.S. Army's Integrated Meteorological System IM[ETS) mesoscale database and tactical decision aids (TDAs

  8. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of aof

  9. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Research Review March 18-20, 2008. Quality: Assess the quality of the laboratory's research and development. Assess whether appropriate." · How does the quality of the laboratory's research and development rank among Research and Development

  10. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01

    DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONARY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDFRSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May I979 Ma jor Subject: Meteorology DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONAFY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDERSON Approved...

  11. Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the history of a global governance institution, the World Me- teorological Organization (WMO), from its (from the 1967 inauguration of the Intelsat system) and global environmental monitoring (from the UN Confer- ence on the Human Environment, 1972). Throughout, Hewson sees global governance institutions

  12. Observations of designer behaviors in complex system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin-Breneman, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    The design of large-scale engineering systems requires design teams to balance a complex set of considerations. Formal approaches for optimizing complex system design assume that designers behave in a rational, consistent ...

  13. Navigation System for Ground Vehicles using Temporally Interconnected Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    navigation technique for an automotive vehicle. This method involves several observers, each designed attitude measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is performed (at rest) on the launch platform

  14. Quentin Bourgeois Department of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsson, Johan

    : Implementation in the ECHAM6-HAMMOZ model of a scheme describ- ing the impact of BC deposition onto snow Advisor for Cli- mate Systems Modeling, ETH Z¨urich, Switzerland Thesis title: Aerosol transport and distribution: A global modeling study con- strained by remote sensing observations Advisor: Dr. Isabelle Bey 2005 - 2006

  15. S3: THE IBM SMART SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM: FROM TRANSACTIONAL SYSTEMS TO OBSERVATIONAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Andrew

    sensor signals, indexing and searching sensor meta-data, data mining and scalability. In this paper we Computer Vision Group, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center ABSTRACT Pervasive sensor based systems. Enabling and building such systems also poses many technology challenges, extracting information from

  16. Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK AND WILLIAM R. COTTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK (Manuscript received 30 December 2005, in final form 4 October 2006) ABSTRACT Mesoscale convective systems of usefulness in operational forecasting. 1. Introduction Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) frequently de

  17. System architecting of a campaign of earth observing satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, Justin M

    2008-01-01

    Given the current level of concern over anthropogenic climate change, and the ongoing debate worldwide regarding what action should be taken to reduce and reverse future warming, the ability to collect data on Earth system ...

  18. Algorithms, Protocols & Systems for Remote Observation Using Networked Robotic Cameras 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Ni

    2010-01-16

    for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dezhen Song Committee Members, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna Dmitri Loguinov Ergun Akleman Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Algorithms... in remote observation using networked robotic cameras. v To my lovely cat Maomao, my dear family Yu and Amy, and my parents vi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Dezhen Song, and my committee members, Dr. Gutierrez-Osuna, Dr...

  19. NOAA's Integrated Observing System SSEC 50th Anniversary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /NASA/DoD mission, is the country's first operational space weather mission providing data to NOAA's Space Weather;2 Supporting NOAA's Mission NOAA is a science-based services agency engaged with the entire Earth system science enterprise. Climate Adaptation & Mitigation Weather Ready Nation Resilient Coastal Communities

  20. NASA's Earth Observing System CloudsandtheEarth'sRa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Gary G. Gibson, Head of the Radiation and Aerosols Branch, and Bruce A. Wielicki, CERES for improving our scientific understanding of ongoing natural and human-induced global climate change's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment is one of the highest priority sci- entific satellite instruments

  1. Mathematical Foundations for Efficient Structural Controllability and Observability Analysis of Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zufiria, Pedro J.

    The relationship between structural controllability and observability of complex systems is studied. Algebraic and graph theoretic tools are combined to prove the extent of some controller/observer duality results. Two ...

  2. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayati, Moosa [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Khaloozadeh, Hamid [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  3. Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting Nithya N. Vijayakumar {rramachandran, xli}@itsc.uah.edu Abstract-- Mesoscale meteorology forecasting as a data driven application Triggers, Data Mining, Stream Processing, Meteorology Forecasting I. INTRODUCTION Mesoscale meteorologists

  4. Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;SMCD Roadmap 2 NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap September 2005 NOAA Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 712, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;SMCD

  5. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier Office: Three, 1:00 ­ 2:30 pm Required Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes and physical analysis techniques to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale

  6. ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014 TR, 1:00-2:50 PM, ATS Room 101 Course Description and Prerequisites This course will cover the theory and application of mesoscale meteorology, and how mesoscale, students will be able to: · Describe the basic theories describing mesoscale weather phenomena · Understand

  7. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier (kkd Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes. Wiley-Blackwell, 430pp to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale," radar principles and interpretation

  8. THE APPLICATION OF AN EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHM TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF A MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; O'Steen, L.

    2008-02-11

    We show that a simple evolutionary algorithm can optimize a set of mesoscale atmospheric model parameters with respect to agreement between the mesoscale simulation and a limited set of synthetic observations. This is illustrated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). A set of 23 RAMS parameters is optimized by minimizing a cost function based on the root mean square (rms) error between the RAMS simulation and synthetic data (observations derived from a separate RAMS simulation). We find that the optimization can be efficient with relatively modest computer resources, thus operational implementation is possible. The optimization efficiency, however, is found to depend strongly on the procedure used to perturb the 'child' parameters relative to their 'parents' within the evolutionary algorithm. In addition, the meteorological variables included in the rms error and their weighting are found to be an important factor with respect to finding the global optimum.

  9. Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Jules Beersma #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. A Onderzoekschool (BBOS) #12;Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Extreme hydro

  10. A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model, J. Geophys System model Roman Olson,1 Ryan Sriver,1 Marlos Goes,2,3 Nathan M. Urban,4,5 H. Damon Matthews,6 MuraliA climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth

  11. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  12. Astrometrical Observations of Pluto - Charon System with the Automated Telescopes of Pulkovo Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devyatkin, Alexander V; Slesarenko, Vyacheslav Yu

    2015-01-01

    The space probe 'New Horizon' was launched on 19th of January 2006 in order to study Pluto and its moons. Spacecraft will fly by Pluto as close as 12500 km in the middle of July 2015 and will get the most detailed images of Pluto and its moon until this moment. At the same time, observation obtained by the ground-based telescopes may also be helpful for the research of such distant system. Thereby, the Laboratory of observational astrometry of Pulkovo Observatory of RAS made a decision to reprocess observations obtained during last decade. More than 350 positional observations of Pluto - Charon system were carried out with the mirror astrograph ZA-320M at Pulkovo and Maksutov telescope MTM-500M near Kislovodsk. These observations were processed by means of software system APEX-II developed in Pulkovo observatory and numerical simulation was performed to calculate the differences between positions of photocenter and barycenter of Pluto - Charon system.

  13. Surface Meteorological Instruments for TWP (SMET) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2009-01-01

    The TWP Surface Meteorology station (SMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute statistics of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure and rainfall amount.

  14. School of Meteorology Graduate Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Requirements 8 2.5.a. Master of Science in Meteorology 8 2.5.b. Non-Thesis MasterM 17 2.10.c. M.S. Committees 18 2.10.d. Ph.D. Committees 18 2.10.e. Agreement Prior To Fall 2013 26 3.1.a. Master of Science in Meteorology 26 3.1.b. Non

  15. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  16. Capability of the penetrator seismometer system for lunar seismic event observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, Nozomu

    Capability of the penetrator seismometer system for lunar seismic event observation R. Yamada a of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara Penetrator Moonquake Lunar exploration Planetary seismology a b s t r a c t We developed a seismometer system

  17. time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20) may also cause). At this stage, the core of star A undergoes collapse, and the residual nuclear fuel is ignited to power aware that both tidal and general relativistic ef- fects will be important in this system

  18. Stochastic Modeling and Optimization for Robust Power Management in a Partially Observable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    -of-the- art system modules are capable of trading power for performance or being put into sleep or low powerStochastic Modeling and Optimization for Robust Power Management in a Partially Observable System As the hardware and software complexity grows, it is unlikely for the power management hardware/software to have

  19. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue-Mei Deng; Yi Xie

    2015-10-10

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of \\textit{Cassini} to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun.

  20. Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe An; Daniel Rey; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

    2014-05-11

    Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the analysis of a broad spectrum of complex systems where measurements are sparse. When the model of the complex system has errors, the method still enables accurate estimation of the state of the model and thus evaluation of the model errors in a manner separated from uncertainties in the data assimilation procedure.

  1. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  2. Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalakes, John

    Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run John Michalakes Josh Hacker overview and petascale issues Nature run methodology Results and conclusion #12;Mesoscale & Microscale's atmosphere #12;Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR Description of Science · Kinetic energy

  3. Integrated Meteorology and Chemistry Modeling: Evaluation and Research Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Rao, S. T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Backlanov, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    This is a conference summary report that will be published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  4. Winter Precipitation Microphysics Characterized by Polarimetric Radar and Video Disdrometer Observations in Central Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    Observations in Central Oklahoma GUIFU ZHANG AND SEAN LUCHS School of Meteorology, and Atmospheric Radar Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma ALEXANDER RYZHKOV Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman, Oklahoma MING XUE School of Meteorology, and Center for Analysis

  5. Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    and Usage, a course that has evolved over the years into Introduction to Solar Energy and, this semesterFaculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford University's Leslie to make a major change in my research field. In graduate school and at Bell Labs I had studied noise

  6. Observation and Confirmation of Six Strong Lensing Systems in The Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nord, B; Lin, H; Diehl, H T; Helsby, J; Kuropatkin, N; Amara, A; Collett, T; Allam, S; Caminha, G; De Bom, C; Desai, S; Dúmet-Montoya, H; Pereira, M Elidaiana da S; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Furlanetto, C; Gaitsch, H; Gill, M; Merritt, K W; More, A; Tucker, D; Rykoff, E S; Rozo, E; Abdalla, F B; Agnello, A; Auger, M; Brunner, R J; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; Foley, R; Gerdes, D W; Glazebrook, K; Gschwend, J; Hartley, W; Kessler, R; Lagattuta, D; Lewis, G; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Menanteau, F; Niernberg, A; Scolnic, D; Vieira, J D; Gramillano, R; Abbott, T M C; Banerji, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Carretero, J; D'Andrea, C B; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Evrard, A E; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Li, T S; Lima, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Melchior, P; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation and confirmation of the first group- and cluster-scale strong gravitational lensing systems found in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. Through visual inspection of data from the Science Verification (SV) season, we identified 53 candidate systems. We then obtained spectroscopic follow-up of 21 candidates using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini South telescope and the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) at the Magellan/Baade telescope. With this follow-up, we confirmed six candidates as gravitational lenses: Three of the systems are newly discovered, and the remaining three were previously known. Of the 21 observed candidates, the remaining 15 were either not detected in spectroscopic observations, were observed and did not exhibit continuum emission (or spectral features), or were ruled out as lensing systems. The confirmed sample consists of one group-scale and five galaxy cluster-scale lenses. The lensed sources range in redshift z ~ 0.80-3.2...

  7. Strain and stress eld in Taiwan oblique convergent system: constraints from GPS observation and tectonic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jian-Cheng

    Strain and stress ¢eld in Taiwan oblique convergent system: constraints from GPS observation, Taiwan b Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Chungli 320, Taiwan c Laboratoire de Sciences, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 1-55, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan Received 20 January 2003; received

  8. High resolution remote sensing observations for missions to the Jovian system: Io as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    High resolution remote sensing observations for missions to the Jovian system: Io as a case study Keywords: Io Remote sensing Instruments a b s t r a c t We present modeled images of Io at a variety objectives that could be achieved from missions engaged in long range remote-sensing of Io during

  9. METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 00: 110 (0000)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    upon the uses of some recently-deployed meteorological sensing devices to investigate insect migratory of aerial insect biomass) was found to be positively correlated with maximum screen temperature. Copyright c movements using traditional entomological techniques. Thus, the deployment of special-purpose ento

  10. Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community Cliff Mass University of Washington: Although the U.S. remains a leader in mesoscale model development and application, the community is not fulfilling its potential. The resources of the U.S. mesoscale forecasting community are considerable

  11. David G. Eller Oceanography and Meteorology Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David G. Eller Oceanography and Meteorology Building Building # 0443 EMERGENCY EVACUATION PLAN Prepared by Maureen Reap, Building Proctor October 4, 2011 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION a building. Examples of such occasions include: smoke/fires, gas leaks, and bomb threats. Planning

  12. Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    -9 2011March 8 9, 2011 #12;LISF Solar Radiation and Meteorological Sensor Network ·· Technology Needs:TechnologyCharacterize the solar resource potential for feasibility assessment of centralized PV solarfeasibility assessment of centralized PV solar gene ating facilities in the No theastgene ating facilities in the No theastgenerating

  13. Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

    2005-11-30

    The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

  14. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  15. Optical observations of Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Kiziloglu; A. Baykal; N. Kiziloglu

    2006-08-05

    ROTSE-IIId observations of the Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300 obtained between September 2004 and December 2005 make it possible to study the correlation between optical and X-ray activity. The optical outburst of 0.1 mag was accompanied by an increase in X-ray flux in 2004 observations. Strong correlation between the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that neutron star directly accretes from the outflowing material of Be star. The nearly zero time lag between X-ray and optical light curves suggests a heating of the disk of Be star by X-rays. No optical brightening and X-ray enhancement was seen in 2005 observations. There is no indication of the orbital modulation in the optical light curve.

  16. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  17. Observation of transient gain without population inversion in a laser-cooled rubidium lambda system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. de Echaniz; Andrew D. Greentree; A. V. Durrant; D. M. Segal; J. P. Marangos; J. A. Vaccaro

    2001-05-17

    We have observed clear Rabi oscillations of a weak probe in a strongly driven three-level lambda system in laser-cooled rubidium for the first time. When the coupling field is non-adiabatically switched on using a Pockels cell, transient probe gain without population inversion is obtained in the presence of uncoupled absorptions. Our results are supported by three-state computations.

  18. 1471OCTOBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | T WORKSHOP ON VERTICAL PROFILES OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of changes in the energy of the system. This requires a holistic VERTICAL PROFILES OF TEMPERATURE TRENDS Kingdom; KARL--National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina; MURRAY--NOAA Office for Global1471OCTOBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | T WORKSHOP ON VERTICAL PROFILES OF TEMPERATURE

  19. Meteorological Services Annual Data Report for 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser J.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-21

    This document presents the meteorological data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Meteorological Services (Met Services) for the calendar year 2014. The purpose is to publicize the data sets available to emergency personnel, researchers and facility operations. Met services has been collecting data at BNL since 1949. Data from 1994 to the present is available in digital format. Data is presented in monthly plots of one-minute data. This allows the reader the ability to peruse the data for trends or anomalies that may be of interest to them. Full data sets are available to BNL personnel and to a limited degree outside researchers. The full data sets allow plotting the data on expanded time scales to obtain greater details (e.g., daily solar variability, inversions, etc.).

  20. Meteorological services annual data report for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser J.; Smith, S.

    2013-02-01

    This document presents the meteorological data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Meteorological Services (Met Services) for the calendar year 2012. The purpose is to publicize the data sets available to emergency personnel, researchers and facility operations. Met services has been collecting data at BNL since 1949. Data from 1994 to the present is available in digital format. Data is presented in monthly plots of one-minute data. This allows the reader the ability to peruse the data for trends or anomalies that may be of interest to them. Full data sets are available to BNL personnel and to a limited degree outside researchers. The full data sets allow plotting the data on expanded time scales to obtain greater details (e.g., daily solar variability, inversions, etc.).

  1. Constraints on the progenitor system and the environs of SN 2014J from deep radio observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Glorieta de las Astronomía, s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Lundqvist, P.; Björnsson, C. I.; Fransson, C. [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Argo, M. K. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paragi, Z. [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ryder, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Marcaide, J. M.; Ros, E.; Guirado, J. C. [Departamento de Astronomía i Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Vidal, I. [Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-01

    We report deep EVN and eMERLIN observations of the Type Ia SN 2014J in the nearby galaxy M82. Our observations represent, together with JVLA observations of SNe 2011fe and 2014J, the most sensitive radio studies of Type Ia SNe ever. By combining data and a proper modeling of the radio emission, we constrain the mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of SN 2014J to M-dot ?7.0×10{sup ?10} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1} (for a wind speed of 100 km s{sup –1}). If the medium around the supernova is uniform, then n {sub ISM} ? 1.3 cm{sup –3}, which is the most stringent limit for the (uniform) density around a Type Ia SN. Our deep upper limits favor a double-degenerate (DD) scenario—involving two WD stars—for the progenitor system of SN 2014J, as such systems have less circumstellar gas than our upper limits. By contrast, most single-degenerate (SD) scenarios, i.e., the wide family of progenitor systems where a red giant, main-sequence, or sub-giant star donates mass to an exploding WD, are ruled out by our observations. (While completing our work, we noticed that a paper by Margutti et al. was submitted to The Astrophysical Journal. From a non-detection of X-ray emission from SN 2014J, the authors obtain limits of M-dot ?1.2×10{sup ?9} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} (for a wind speed of 100 km s{sup –1}) and n {sub ISM} ? 3.5 cm{sup –3}, for the ??r {sup –2} wind and constant density cases, respectively. As these limits are less constraining than ours, the findings by Margutti et al. do not alter our conclusions. The X-ray results are, however, important to rule out free-free and synchrotron self-absorption as a reason for the radio non-detections.) Our estimates on the limits on the gas density surrounding SN2011fe, using the flux density limits from Chomiuk et al., agree well with their results. Although we discuss the possibilities of an SD scenario passing observational tests, as well as uncertainties in the modeling of the radio emission, the evidence from SNe 2011fe and 2014J points in the direction of a DD scenario for both.

  2. Sensor Configuration Selection for Discrete-Event Systems under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Algorithms for counting the occurrences of special events in the framework of partially-observed discrete event dynamical systems (DEDS) were developed in previous work. Their performances typically become better as the sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper addresses the problem of finding a sensor configuration that achieves an optimal balance between cost and the performance of the special event counting algorithm, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, a sensor optimization algorithm is developed using two greedy heuristics, one myopic and the other based on projected performances of candidate sensors. The two heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best sensor configurations. The developed algorithm is then applied to a sensor optimization problem for a multiunit- operation system. Results show that improved sensor configurations can be found that may significantly reduce the sensor configuration cost but still yield acceptable performance for counting the occurrences of special events.

  3. Transforming observational data and theoretical isochrones into the ACS/WFC Vega-mag system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi R. Bedin; Santi Cassisi; Fiorella Castelli; Giampaolo Piotto; Jay Anderson; Maurizio Salaris; Yazan Momany; Adriano Pietrinferni; .

    2004-12-14

    We propose a zero-point photometric calibration of the data from the ACS/WFC on board the Hubble Space Telescope, based on a spectrum of Vega and the most up to date in-flight transmission curves of the camera. This calibration is accurate at the level of a few hundredths of a magnitude. The main purpose of this effort is to transform the entire set of evolutionary models by Pietrinferni et al. (2004) into a simple observational photometric system for ACS/WFC data, and make them available to the astronomical community. We provide the zero points for the most used ACS/WFC bands, and give basic recipes for calibrating both the observed data and the models. We also present the Colour Magnitude Diagram (CMD) from ACS data of 5 Galactic globular clusters, spanning the metallicity range -2.2<[Fe/H]<-0.04, and provide fiducial points representing their sequences from several magnitudes below the turnoff to the red giant branch tip. The observed sequences are compared with the models in the newly defined photometric system.

  4. IRTF/SPEX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Lightcurve System KIC8462852

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisse, C M; Marengo, M

    2015-01-01

    We have utilized the NASA IRTF 3m SpeX instrument's high resolution spectral mode (Rayner et al. 2003) to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler lightcurve system KIC8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8 to 4.2 um spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analysis of the Rayner et al. 2009 catalogue, and the 25 system collection of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey (NIRDS; Lisse et al. 2016), we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene's (2014) emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring mater...

  5. Observation of a phononic Mollow triplet in a hybrid spin-nanomechanical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Pigeau; Sven Rohr; Laure Mercier de Lépinay; Arnaud Gloppe; Vincent Jacques; Olivier Arcizet

    2015-02-25

    Reminiscent of the bound character of a qubit's dynamics confined on the Bloch sphere, the observation of a Mollow triplet in the resonantly driven qubit fluorescence spectrum represents one of the founding signatures of Quantum Electrodynamics. Here we report on its observation in a hybrid spin-nanomechanical system, where a Nitro-gen Vacancy spin qubit is magnetically coupled to the vibrations of a Silicon Carbide nanowire. A resonant microwave field turns the originally parametric hybrid interac-tion into a resonant process, where acoustic phonons are now able to induce transitions between the dressed qubit states, leading to synchronized spin-oscillator dynamics. We further explore the vectorial character of the hybrid coupling to the bidimensional de-formations of the nanowire. The demonstrated microwave assisted synchronization of the spin-oscillator dynamics opens novel perspectives for the exploration of spin-dependent forces, the key-ingredient for quantum state transfer.

  6. JWST observations of stellar occultations by solar system bodies and rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos-Sanz, P; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Stansberry, J; Lin, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-W; Vilenius, E; Müller, Th; Ortiz, J L; Braga-Ribas, F; Bosh, A; Duffard, R; Lellouch, E; Tancredi, G; Young, L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of solar system bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings, and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange-point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a by-product of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  7. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  8. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Mann, Rita K.; Francesco, James Di; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda; Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bally, John

    2014-12-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ?9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ?72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  9. Synoptic Sensitivities of Subtropical Clouds : Separating Aerosol Effects from Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauger, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    meteorological quantities G. Subsidence and EntrainmentEntrainment rate (cm s ?1 ) Subsidence rate (cm s ?1 ) Bulkuxes, entrainment and subsidence rates, and temperature and

  10. Synoptic sensitivities of subtropical clouds separating aerosol effects from meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauger, Guillaume S.

    2008-01-01

    meteorological quantities G. Subsidence and EntrainmentEntrainment rate (cm s ?1 ) Subsidence rate (cm s ?1 ) Bulkuxes, entrainment and subsidence rates, and temperature and

  11. Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: from Canopy to Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2008-01-01

    equations  for  some  soil  hydraulic properties.  Water Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: CA 94720  lpan@lbl.gov  Modeling Hydraulic Responses to 

  12. Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D; Famiglietti, J S

    2012-01-01

    of Meteorology and Hydrology, Barbados Tucker, C. J. ,islands of Trinidad, Barbados, and St. base period), withto reemerge. Whereas Barbados, Trinidad, and St. Kitts were

  13. Observational Properties of Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors in Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In several recent observational studies on Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c), the inferred ejecta masses have a peak value of 2.0 -- 4.0 $M_\\odot$, in favor of the binary scenario for their progenitors rather than the Wolf-Rayet star scenario. To investigate the observational properties of relatively low-mass helium stars in binary systems as SN Ib/c progenitors, we constructed atmospheric models with the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN, using binary star evolution models. We find that these helium stars can be characterized by relatively narrow helium emission lines if the mass-loss rate during the final evolutionary phase is significantly enhanced as implied by many SN Ib/c observations. The optical brightness of helium star progenitors can be meaningfully enhanced with a strong wind for $M \\gtrsim 4.4 M_\\odot$, but hardly affected or slightly weakened for relatively low-mass of $\\sim 3.0 M_\\odot$, compared to the simple estimate using blackbody approximation. We further confirm the previous suggestion...

  14. Transforming observational data and theoretical isochrones into the ACS/WFC Vega-mag system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedin, L R; Castelli, F; Piotto, G; Anderson, J; Salaris, M; Momany, Y; Pietrinferni, A; Bedin, Luigi R.; Cassisi, Santi; Castelli, Fiorella; Piotto, Giampaolo; Anderson, Jay; Salaris, Maurizio; Momany, Yazan; Pietrinferni, Adriano

    2004-01-01

    We propose a zero-point photometric calibration of the data from the ACS/WFC on board the Hubble Space Telescope, based on a spectrum of Vega and the most up to date in-flight transmission curves of the camera. This calibration is accurate at the level of a few hundredths of a magnitude. The main purpose of this effort is to transform the entire set of evolutionary models by Pietrinferni et al. (2004) into a simple observational photometric system for ACS/WFC data, and make them available to the astronomical community. We provide the zero points for the most used ACS/WFC bands, and give basic recipes for calibrating both the observed data and the models. We also present the Colour Magnitude Diagram (CMD) from ACS data of 5 Galactic globular clusters, spanning the metallicity range -2.2<[Fe/H]<-0.04, and provide fiducial points representing their sequences from several magnitudes below the turnoff to the red giant branch tip. The observed sequences are compared with the models in the newly defined photom...

  15. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  16. Meteorology A network of 14 meteorological stations was installed across the Annapurna range before

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    estimated on the basis of the fission-track age, and assuming a geothermal gradient of 100 8C km21 gradient shows little sensitivity to accumulation-area ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.8. Specific stream the meteorological network to define an average precipitation gradient perpendicular to the strike of the topography

  17. Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 8, The REVIEW computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, G.L.; Burk, K.W.

    1988-08-01

    The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) routinely collects meteorological data from sources on and off the Hanford Site. The data are averaged over both 15 minutes and 1 hour and are maintained in separate databases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS. The databases are transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) DEC VAX 11/750 computer. The EMS is part of the Unified Dose Assessment Center, which is located on on the ground-level floor of the Federal building in Richland and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program REVIEW is used to display meteorological data in graphical and alphanumeric form from either the 15-minute or hourly database. The code is available on the HMS and EMS computer. The REVIEW program helps maintain a high level of quality assurance on the instruments that collect the data and provides a convenient mechanism for analyzing meteorological data on a routine basis and during emergency response situations.

  18. 2.9 Programming and Platforms (PRO) CENS systems research strives to advance the state of the art in innovative in situ observing systems. To this end,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    in innovative in situ observing systems. To this end, our research efforts have focused on two critical themes that cut across our broad range of observing systems: the development of practical tools and platforms platform efforts have revolved around three activities: participatory sensing mobile to web platform

  19. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 301-445W, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  1. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  2. Topographic Distance Functions for Interpolation of Meteorological Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    Topographic Distance Functions for Interpolation of Meteorological Data Burkhard Lehner1 , Georg evapotranspiration ET0. It is usually estimated from other meteorological quantities measured at weather stations for agricultural and urban needs. Also for setting up a land use plan it can be a base for decisions. One important

  3. Assimilating GRACE, hydrology and hydro-meteorology datasets for estimating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Assimilating GRACE, hydrology and hydro-meteorology datasets for estimating monthly water storage from grace (M/t) #12;Datasets for assimilation: Geodesy 7 Power-law of the time-variable gravity field [mm/month] #12;Datasets for assimilation: Hydro-meteorology 9 Evapotranspiration (ETa) from era

  4. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY Silver Spring, Maryland January 24 Report HURRICANE SANDY Colleen Fanelli, Paul Fanelli, David Wolcott January 24, 2013 noaa National, Richard Edwing #12;NOAA NOS Hurricane Sandy Water Level & Meteorological Data Report 1 Table of Contents

  5. The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research A partnership between CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Stewart

    --Australia--Mathematical models. Tsunami Warning System--Australia--Data bases. Tsunami Warning System--Australia-- Mathematical of Meteorology An Enhanced Tsunami Scenario Database:T2 Diana J.M. Greenslade, M. Arthur Simanjuntak, Stewart C. R. Allen CAWCR Technical Report No. 014 August 2009 #12;#12;An Enhanced Tsunami Scenario Database:T2

  6. The system for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom based physical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Leon; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time ...

  7. CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

    2011-04-01

    Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

  8. The Research Vessel SurfaceThe Research Vessel Surface Meteorology Data Center ArchiveMeteorology Data Center Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Research Vessel SurfaceThe Research Vessel Surface Meteorology Data Center ArchiveMeteorology Data Center Archive Shawn R. Smith and Jennifer M. Lovell In collaboration with: Mark A. Bourassa University www.coaps.fsu.edu/WOCE #12;Who we areWho we are Data center specializing in the quality review

  9. Parameter Estimation of Systems Described by the Relation with Noisy Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of systems described by the equations [Bubnicki, 80a]. The problem of modeling and identification of systems

  10. SMA Observations of Class 0 Protostars: A High-Angular Resolution Survey of Protostellar Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xuepeng; Zhang, Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L; Launhardt, Ralf; Jorgensen, Jes K; Lee, Chin-Fee; Foster, Jonathan B; Dunham, Michael M; Pineda, Jaime E; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 um dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.5 arcsec, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64+/-0.08 and 0.91+/-0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I YSOs, and approxima...

  11. Data assimilation as a nonlinear dynamical systems problem: Stability and convergence of the prediction-assimilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Carrassi; Michael Ghil; Anna Trevisan; Francesco Uboldi

    2007-11-23

    We study prediction-assimilation systems, which have become routine in meteorology and oceanography and are rapidly spreading to other areas of the geosciences and of continuum physics. The long-term, nonlinear stability of such a system leads to the uniqueness of its sequentially estimated solutions and is required for the convergence of these solutions to the system's true, chaotic evolution. The key ideas of our approach are illustrated for a linearized Lorenz system. Stability of two nonlinear prediction-assimilation systems from dynamic meteorology is studied next via the complete spectrum of their Lyapunov exponents; these two systems are governed by a large set of ordinary and of partial differential equations, respectively. The degree of data-induced stabilization is crucial for the performance of such a system. This degree, in turn, depends on two key ingredients: (i) the observational network, either fixed or data-adaptive; and (ii) the assimilation method.

  12. Systems and Algorithms for Automated Collaborative Observation using Networked Robotic Cameras 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yiliang

    2011-10-21

    The development of telerobotic systems has evolved from Single Operator Single Robot (SOSR) systems to Multiple Operator Multiple Robot (MOMR) systems. The relationship between human operators and robots follows the ...

  13. Dynamics of Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroid Systems: A Study Based on Radar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    Murray and S.F. Dermott. Solar System Dynamics. CambridgeMurray and S.F. Dermott. Solar System Dynamics. Cambridgea wide range of important solar system processes that shape

  14. Quantum Dynamical Effects as a Singular Perturbation for Observables in Open Quasi-Classical Nonlinear Mesoscopic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennady P. Berman; Fausto Borgonovi; Diego A. R. Dalvit

    2008-01-29

    We review our results on a mathematical dynamical theory for observables for open many-body quantum nonlinear bosonic systems for a very general class of Hamiltonians. We show that non-quadratic (nonlinear) terms in a Hamiltonian provide a singular "quantum" perturbation for observables in some "mesoscopic" region of parameters. In particular, quantum effects result in secular terms in the dynamical evolution, that grow in time. We argue that even for open quantum nonlinear systems in the deep quasi-classical region, these quantum effects can survive after decoherence and relaxation processes take place. We demonstrate that these quantum effects in open quantum systems can be observed, for example, in the frequency Fourier spectrum of the dynamical observables, or in the corresponding spectral density of noise. Estimates are presented for Bose-Einstein condensates, low temperature mechanical resonators, and nonlinear optical systems prepared in large amplitude coherent states. In particular, we show that for Bose-Einstein condensate systems the characteristic time of deviation of quantum dynamics for observables from the corresponding classical dynamics coincides with the characteristic time-scale of the well-known quantum nonlinear effect of phase diffusion.

  15. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  16. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology Estimating Spatially Varying Severity Thresholds of the Forest Fire Danger Rating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Brian J.

    State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A. 5 Brian J. Reich Dept of Statistics, North Carolina meteorological elements. It combines information on wind speed, temperature, relative humidity and recent. Powered by Editorial Manager® and ProduXion Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation #12;Response

  17. Evaporation Duct Estimation from Clutter Using Meteorological Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Evaporation Duct Estimation from Clutter Using Meteorological Statistics Caglar Yardim*, Peter under duct- ing conditions. Electromagnetic ducts result in non-standard electromagnetic prop- agation addresses how to incorporate meteo- rological statistics into evaporative duct estimation within a Bayesian

  18. Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Vol. 95, No. 9, September, Martin P. Hoerling,Thomas C. Peterson, and Peter A. Stott Special Supplement to the Bulletin

  19. Analysis of Spatial Performance of Meteorological Drought Indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sandeep 1986-

    2013-01-14

    Meteorological drought indices are commonly calculated from climatic stations that have long-term historical data and then converted to a regular grid using spatial interpolation methods. The gridded drought indices are mapped to aid decision making...

  20. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  1. iv vBureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 | Our outcome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    as National Tidal Centre 2005 Major role for the Bureau in expanded Australian Tsunami Warning System 2007 is delivered through five internal portfolios: · Hazards Warnings Forecasts · Environment and Research · Observations and Infrastructure · Information Systems and Services · Corporate Services | Performance reporting

  2. How do two observers pool their knowledge about a quantum system?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs

    2002-09-13

    In the theory of classical statistical inference one can derive a simple rule by which two or more observers may combine {\\em independently} obtained states of knowledge together to form a new state of knowledge, which is the state which would be possessed by someone having the combined information of both observers. Moreover, this combined state of knowledge can be found without reference to the manner in which the respective observers obtained their information. However, in this note we show that in general this is not possible for quantum states of knowledge; in order to combine two quantum states of knowledge to obtain the state resulting from the combined information of both observers, these observers must also possess information about how their respective states of knowledge were obtained. Nevertheless, we emphasize this does not preclude the possibility that a unique, well motivated rule for combining quantum states of knowledge without reference to a measurement history could be found. We examine both the direct quantum analogue of the classical problem, and that of quantum state-estimation, which corresponds to a variant in which the observers share a specific kind of prior information.

  3. 24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

    1997-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

  4. Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sea surface temperature in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR; published 5 April 2006. [1] Satellite sea surface temperature (SST) measurements from Advanced Microwave. Sprintall, and C. Gentemann (2006), Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth

  5. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  6. Observations of prolific transient luminous event production above a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil F. T. São Sabbas,1 M. J. Taylor,2 P.D. Pautet,2 M. Bailey convective system (MCS) over Argentina, as part of the third sprite campaign in Brazil. GOES infrared (IR a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A

  7. Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new...

  8. A Fault Observant Real-Time Embedded Design for Network-on-Chip Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    : (1) Cos- mic radiation, particularly during solar flares, (2) electric interfer- ence in harsh missions use radiation-hardened processors to avoid damage from solar radiation. An alternative approach was supported in part by NSF grants CNS-0720496 and CNS-0905181 modify logic or data in systems leading

  9. Tracking tropical cloud systems - Observations for the diagnosis of simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E.; Jensen, M.; Zhang, M.

    2010-03-15

    To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the vicinity of the ARM Tropical Western Pacific sites. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest a computational paradox where, even though the size of the simulated systems are about half of that observed, their longevities are still similar. The explanation for this seeming incongruity will be explored.

  10. Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Saurin Bipin

    2007-04-25

    . This data is obtained from observation stations and distributed to various universities worldwide, using Unidata�s own Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, and software called the Local Data Manager (LDM). The existing solution for data distribution...

  11. Observation of sub-Doppler absorption in the /Lambda-type three-level Doppler-broadened cesium system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junmin Wang; Yanhua Wang; Shubin Yan; Tao Liu; Tiancai Zhang

    2003-12-31

    Thanks to the atomic coherence in coupling laser driven atomic system, sub-Doppler absorption has been observed in Doppler-broadened cesium vapor cell via the /Lambda-type three-level scheme. The linewidth of the sub-Doppler absorption peak become narrower while the frequency detuning of coupling laser increases. The results are in agreement with the theoretical prediction by G. Vemuri et al.[PRA,Vol.53(1996) p.2842].

  12. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  13. Meteorological monitoring at LANL and the LANL weather machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baars, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The meteorological monitoring program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consists of four main components: measurements, analysis, modeling, and data management. Measurements are conducted continuously across a network of towers and other measurement stations. The current network includes four meteorological towers on the Pajarito Plateau, one tower in Los Alamos Canyon, three additional precipitation stations, and one monostatic Doppler SODAR. The towers on the plateau range in height from 46 to 92 m, and the canyon tower is 23 m high. The mean spacing of the plateau towers is {approximately}7 km, so potential sources are never more than 3.5 km from a wind measurement site.

  14. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Steffen, Jason H.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  15. Sequential Window Diagnoser for Discrete-Event Systems Under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; David Thorsley; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the issue of counting the occurrence of special events in the framework of partiallyobserved discrete-event dynamical systems (DEDS). Developed diagnosers referred to as sequential window diagnosers (SWDs) utilize the stochastic diagnoser probability transition matrices developed in [9] along with a resetting mechanism that allows on-line monitoring of special event occurrences. To illustrate their performance, the SWDs are applied to detect and count the occurrence of special events in a particular DEDS. Results show that SWDs are able to accurately track the number of times special events occur.

  16. Compositional trends of ?-induced optical changes observed in chalcogenide glasses of binary As-S system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shpotyuk, M.; Shpotyuk, O.; Golovchak, Roman; McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.

    2014-01-23

    Compositional trends of ?-induced optical changes in chalcogenide glasses are studied with the binary As-S system. Effects of ?-irradiation and annealing are compared using the changes measured in the fundamental optical absorption edge region. It is shown that annealing near the glass transition temperature leads to bleaching of As-S glasses, while ?-irradiation leads to darkening; both depend on the glass composition and thermal history of the specimens. These results are explained in terms of competitive destruction–polymerization transformations and physical aging occurring in As-S chalcogenide glasses under the influence of ?-irradiation.

  17. The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

  18. The SegHidro Experience: Using the Grid to Empower a Hydro-Meteorological Scientific Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    The SegHidro Experience: Using the Grid to Empower a Hydro- Meteorological Scientific Network This paper describes our experience with SegHidro, a project that empowers hydro-meteorological researchers

  19. 1302 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    model of the Arctic. The model output is compared with meteorological and energy balance observations regional models of ice sheet climate are made. 1. Introduction a. General motivation Regional models have the potential to be used as smart interpolators, yielding useful data for a wide range of times and locations

  20. Clutter-Based Evaporation Duct Estimation Performance Using Meteorological Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Clutter-Based Evaporation Duct Estimation Performance Using Meteorological Statistics Caglar Yardim in different regions of the world with varying duct strengths and statistics. The performance of evaporation duct estimation is investigated in littoral zones such as the North Sea, Wallops Island, Coast

  1. Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    profiles, raise major challenges to wind power integration into the electricity grid. In this work we studyOptimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts Antonio that the inherent variability in wind power generation and the related difficulty in predicting future generation

  2. MPO 663 -Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MPO 663 - Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008 I intend for students and mesoscale phenomena. 2. Working understanding of several of these tools, cultivated via homework, including. A sense of how convective and mesoscale phenomena fit into larger scales, gained via short current

  3. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS component of wind velocity. Thus, there is no direct measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) wind field

  4. 227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    AviationSafetyAuthority CAWCR CentreforAustralianWeatherand ClimateResearch CCF CentralComputingFacility CDS Commonwealth227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 2013­14 AppendixB GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS | A ABC AustralianFloodEstimation ARBIS Automatic RadioBurstIdentification Software ARC AustralianResearchCouncil ARM Atmospheric

  5. Gridding NCDC daily meteorological data Version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Gridding NCDC daily meteorological data Version 2.0 Greg O'Donnell, Bernt V. Matheussen, Alan, and 2) appending more recent data downloaded from the NCDC On-Line Web Site. The core of the gridding;3 1.1 Basin Definition Before any preprocessing is possible the basin boundary at the gridded

  6. Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    atmosphere is of great importance for a variety of disciplines, from meteorology and urban planning to botany is highly anisotropic and inhomogeneous, since both the mean wind velocity and the turbulent diffusivity transport in a turbulent environment we adopt a standard model of turbulent diffusion, which is based

  7. Appendix to regridding NCDCs meteorological data 1 PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    10 Appendix to regridding NCDCs meteorological data 1 PRECIPITATION 1.1 cmb_prcp.dly Daily precipitation file downloaded directly from Earthinfo CDs. One year is on one line although you can not see.2 cmb_prcp.sta Precipitation station file downloaded from Earthinfo CDs MT|24|2827|EUREKA RS Prcp|771

  8. Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel R. Gautam, G. Cervone-sea interactions associated with Hurricane Isabel, which landed on the east coast of the United States on September 18, 2003. Hurricane Isabel is considered to be one of the most significant and severe tropical

  9. and the eddy-covariance system and meteorological station were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (GPP, NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP), and iii) parameterizing/ validating ecosystem process area (Nouvellon et al., 2009) have been studied at these sites. At Kissoko, NEP has been assessed

  10. EXTREME CONDITIONS IN A CLOSE ANALOG TO THE YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM: HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF ? ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaves, J. S. [SUPA, Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Sibthorpe, B.; Holland, W. S. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Acke, B.; Vandenbussche, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K. U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pantin, E. E. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service dAstrophysique, Bat.709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif- sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Olofsson, G.; Brandeker, A.; De Vries, B. L. [Stockholm University Astrobiology Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Dominik, C. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barlow, M. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bendo, G. J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dent, W. R. F. [ALMA SCO, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 763 0355, Santiago (Chile); Di Francesco, J. [Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Programs, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Fridlund, M. [ESA, SRE-SA, Keplerlaan 1, NL-2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gear, W. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Harvey, P. M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hogerheijde, M. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ivison, R. J., E-mail: jsg5@st-andrews.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-08-10

    Far-infrared Herschel images of the ? Eridani system, seen at a fifth of the Sun's present age, resolve two belts of debris emission. Fits to the 160 ?m PACS image yield radial spans for these belts of 12-16 and 54-68 AU. The south end of the outer belt is ?10% brighter than the north end in the PACS+SPIRE images at 160, 250, and 350 ?m, indicating a pericenter glow attributable to a planet ''c''. From this asymmetry and an upper bound on the offset of the belt center, this second planet should be mildly eccentric (e{sub c} ? 0.03-0.3). Compared to the asteroid and Kuiper Belts of the young Sun, the ? Eri belts are intermediate in brightness and more similar to each other, with up to 20 km sized collisional fragments in the inner belt totaling ?5% of an Earth mass. This reservoir may feed the hot dust close to the star and could send many impactors through the Habitable Zone, especially if it is being perturbed by the suspected planet ? Eri b, at semi-major axis ?3 AU.

  11. METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 15: 318 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Beth

    2008-01-01

    of forecasting systems, or the desire for more meaningful verification approaches that address specific forecast operational modelling centres select model upgrades, or to help power companies make decisions on the purchaseScience (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/met.52 Review Forecast verification: current status

  12. Aerosol Observing System Upgraded

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NA LY S IDOE Office2 Aerosol

  13. Earth System Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010Mesoscopy andSaving onEarth Day Earth Day An error4

  14. Active layer dynamics and arctic hydrology and meteorology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Man`s impact on the environment is increasing with time. To be able to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on an ecosystems, it is necessary first to understand all facets of how the ecosystems works: what the main processes (physical, biological, chemical) are, at what rates they proceed, and how they can be manipulated. Arctic ecosystems are dominated by physical processes of energy exchange. This project has concentrated on a strong program of hydrologic and meteorologic data collection, to better understand dominant physical processes. Field research focused on determining the natural annual and diurnal variability of meteorologic and hydrologic variables, especially those which may indicate trends in climatic change. Comprehensive compute models are being developed to simulate physical processes occurring under the present conditions and to simulate processes under the influence of climatic change.

  15. Gradients of meteorological parameters in convective and nonconvective areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCown, Milton Samuel

    1976-01-01

    involve horizontal gradients. For example, the equations of motion relate wind speed to pressure gradient, and the thermal wind equation relates vertical wind shear to the horizontal temperature gradient. The study of gradients may help... GRADIENTS OF METEOROLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CONVECTIVE AND NONCONVECTIVE AREAS A Thesis by Milton Samuel McCown Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  16. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  17. Re-visit of HST FUV observations of hot-Jupiter system HD 209458: No Si III detection and the need for COS transit observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballester, G E

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of OI atoms and CII ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet's Roche lobe. The derived ~10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, CII absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by SiIII ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS dataset showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar SiIII and CII emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5 and...

  18. Testing General Relativity using Bayesian model selection: Applications to observations of gravitational waves from compact binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; John Veitch; Alberto Vecchio

    2011-01-07

    Second generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, are expected to begin operation by 2015. Such instruments plan to reach sensitivities that will offer the unique possibility to test General Relativity in the dynamical, strong field regime and investigate departures from its predictions, in particular using the signal from coalescing binary systems. We introduce a statistical framework based on Bayesian model selection in which the Bayes factor between two competing hypotheses measures which theory is favored by the data. Probability density functions of the model parameters are then used to quantify the inference on individual parameters. We also develop a method to combine the information coming from multiple independent observations of gravitational waves, and show how much stronger inference could be. As an introduction and illustration of this framework - and a practical numerical implementation through the Monte Carlo integration technique of nested sampling - we apply it to gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of coalescing binary systems as predicted by General Relativity and a very simple alternative theory in which the graviton has a non-zero mass. This method can trivially (and should) be extended to more realistic and physically motivated theories.

  19. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  20. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subj ect: Meteorology MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis...

  1. Snowpit Isotope Models at Jatunriti, 2012 Meteorological Station Observations, 2012-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for hydroelectricity, irrigation, and Andean population centers. However, climatic influences on precipitation delivery

  2. Bulk and size-segregated aerosol composition observed during INDOEX 1999: Overview of meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    India showed evidence of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and eolian material, with elemental Arabia showed little evidence of biomass burning but had more acidity, mineral dust, and higher nitrate to determine the extent of the impact of anthropogenic emissions in the tropics, the role of the Intertropical

  3. 1075AUGUST 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | hile the observational study of mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    CONIGLIO, GEORGE BRYAN, WILLIAM COTTON, DAVID DOWELL, BRIAN JEWETT, ROBERT JOHNS,* DAVID JORGENSEN, JASON. AFFILIATIONS: DAVIS, BRYAN, DOWELL, KNIEVEL, BARTELS, LEE, TRIER, AND WEISMAN--National Center for Atmospheric

  4. Introduction to special section: Recent Advances in Oceanography and Marine Meteorology of the Adriatic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Introduction to special section: Recent Advances in Oceanography and Marine Meteorology.-M. Poulain, and B. Cushman-Roisin (2007), Introduction to special section: Recent Advances in Oceanography

  5. ARM Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology Handbook - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2008-10-30

    The ARM Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology station (AMF MET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute statistics of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and rain-rate. Additional sensors may be added to or removed from the base set of sensors depending upon the deployment location, climate regime or programmatic needs. Additionally, sensor types may change depending upon the climate regime of the deployment. These changes/additions are noted in the Deployment Locations and History section.

  6. Meteorological measurements in the vicinity of a coal burning power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crescenti, G.H.; Gaynor, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    High concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are commonly observed during the cool season in the vicinity of a 2.5 GW coal burning power plant located in the Mae Moh Valley of northern Thailand. The power plant is the source for nearly all of the observed SO2 since there are no other major industrial activities in this region. These high pollution fumigation events occur almost on a daily basis, usually lasting for several hours between late morning and early afternoon. One-hour average SO2 concentrations commonly exceed 1,000 micrograms/cu m. As a result, an increase in the number of respiratory type health complaints have been observed by local clinics during this time of the year. Meteorological data were acquired from a variety of observing platforms during an intensive field study from December 1993 to February 1994. The measurements included horizontal and vertical wind velocity, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. In addition, turbulent flux measurements were acquired by a sonic anemometer. SO2 measurements were made at seven monitoring sites scattered throughout the valley. These data were used to examine the atmospheric processes which are responsible for these high pollution fumigation events.

  7. Dynamics of observables and exactly solvable quantum problems: Using time-dependent density functional theory to control quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Farzanehpour; I. V. Tokatly

    2015-06-29

    We use analytic (current) density-potential maps of time-dependent (current) density functional theory (TD(C)DFT) to inverse engineer analytically solvable time-dependent quantum problems. In this approach the driving potential (the control signal) and the corresponding solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation are parametrized analytically in terms of the basic TD(C)DFT observables. We describe the general reconstruction strategy and illustrate it with a number of explicit examples. First we consider the real space one-particle dynamics driven by a time-dependent electromagnetic field and recover, from the general TDDFT reconstruction formulas, the known exact solution for a driven oscillator with a time-dependent frequency. Then we use analytic maps of the lattice TD(C)DFT to control quantum dynamics in a discrete space. As a first example we construct a time-dependent potential which generates prescribed dynamics on a tight-binding chain. Then our method is applied to the dynamics of spin-1/2 driven by a time dependent magnetic field. We design an analytic control pulse that transfers the system from the ground to excited state and vice versa. This pulse generates the spin flip thus operating as a quantum NOT gate.

  8. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,and evaluation of an Earth-System model – HadGEM2, Geosci-

  9. A Note on Several Meteorological Topics Related to Polar Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the meteorology of Polar Regions is fundamental to the process of understanding the global climatology of the Earth and Earth-like planets. The nature of air circulation in a polar vortex is of preliminary importance. I have show that the local and continental spatiotemporal relationship between near surface wind events is self-organized criticality. In particular, the wind event size, wind event duration, and duration of quiescent wind event are well approximated by power-law distributions. On a continental scale, the wind events in the Antarctic tend to be self-organized criticality with ergodic properties. A similar self-organized criticality wind event was also found in Taylor Valley located at McMurdo Dry Valleys discovered by Captain Scott's expedition. Captain Scott's meteorological Terra Nova record was also examined. I have also revisited and re-analyzed wind events in Hornsund at Spitsbergen Island, in terms of marginal probabilities and marginal copulas which describe positive L\\'evy pr...

  10. NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling hurricanes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling worldwide (plus many TV & radio shows). An AOML's paper "Global warming and United States landfalling & Meteorological Laboratory Warming Occurs Almost Everywhere over the Global Ocean The first EOF mode from

  11. Particulate air quality model predictions using prognostic vs. diagnostic meteorology in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    Particulate air quality model predictions using prognostic vs. diagnostic meteorology in central a , Michael J. Kleeman c,* a Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, 1 Prognostic meteorological fields Data assimilation UCD/CIT air quality model California Regional Particulate

  12. Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network Jayson Maldonado-Meteorological stations. Research Objectives · Develop the hardware necessary for the collection atmospheric water content gives the real Water Vapor Content (WVC) in 3D instead of the Zenith Delay. Future Work · Testing

  13. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. High

  14. 1Bureau of Meteorology | Water Information > INFORMATION SHEET 6 > Flood Forecasting and Warning Services Flood Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    SHEET 6 1Bureau of Meteorology | Water Information > INFORMATION SHEET 6 > Flood Forecasting and Warning Services Flood Forecasting and Warning Services The Bureau of Meteorology (the Bureau) is responsible for providing an effective flood forecasting and warning service in each Australian state

  15. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  16. Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

  17. A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou Thompson1 Joel Reynolds1 Lawrence H. Cox2 Peter Guttorp1 Paul D.larry@epamail.epa.gov ABSTRACT: A variety of statistical methods for meteorological adjustment of ozone have been proposed

  18. DECEMBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1733 AFFILIATIONS: HACKER, BERNER, AND MORSS--National Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    DECEMBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1733 AFFILIATIONS: HACKER, BERNER, AND MORSS, Colorado CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Joshua Hacker, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 E-mail: hacker@ucar.edu DOI:10.1175/BAMS-86-12-1733 ©2005 American Meteorological

  19. Impact of meteorological data resolution on the forecasted ozone concentrations during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    al., 1997). Nested modeling with finer grids over urban area is thus often used for air quality as a complex meteorology. During the whole summer 2001, the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE was used-scale dynamics (sea breezes and orographical winds). To estimate the impact of meteorological forcing

  20. Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University Chapter 1 Overview 1.1 Introduction The so-called mesometeorology or mesoscale meteorology as mesoscale phenomena by others (e.g. Orlanski 1975; Thunis and Bornstein 1996). Therefore, a more precise

  1. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Two different approaches are described

  2. 1394 VOLUME 59J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    knowledge of wave sources and our understanding of the mechanisms for wave generation would be com- plete Meteorological Society Latitudinal Variations Observed in Gravity Waves with Short Vertical Wavelengths M. JOAN TOSHITAKA TSUDA Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan ROBERT A

  3. 1488 VOLUME 29J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCreary Jr., Julian P.

    Meteorological Society A Climatology of the Circulation and Water Mass Distribution near the Philippine Coast by using historical data combined with observations from dozens of recent cruises near the Philippine coast the Philippine coast. 1. Introduction Recent studies of decadal climate variability have fo- cused on the water

  4. New Meteorological and Geological Study of Acquapendente (VT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasselli, D; Bianchi, P

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the geological, meteorological and climatic data recorded in Acquapendente (VT) over 24 years. These data are compared to check local variations,long term trends, and correlation with maen annual temperature. The ultimate goal of this work is to understand logn term climatic changes in this geographic area. The analysis is performed using a statistical approach. From each long series of data calculate the hourly averages and that the monthly averages in order to reduce the fluctuations in the short time due to the day / night cycle. A particular care is used to minimize any effect due to prejudices in case of lack of data. Finally, we calculate the annual average from the monthly ones.

  5. Testing a Coupled Global-limited-area Data Assimilation System Using Observations from the 2004 Pacific Typhoon Season 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Christina

    2012-10-19

    Tropical cyclone (TC) track and intensity forecasts have improved in recent years due to increased model resolution, improved data assimilation, and the rapid increase in the number of routinely assimilated observations ...

  6. New Observations of Extra-Disk Molecular Gas in Interacting Galaxy Systems, Including a Two-Component System in Stephan's Quintet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Smith; C. Struck

    2000-11-03

    We present new CO (1 - 0) observations of eleven extragalactic tails and bridges in nine interacting galaxy systems, almost doubling the number of such features with sensitive CO measurements. Eight of these eleven features were undetected in CO to very low CO/HI limits, with the most extreme case being the NGC 7714/5 bridge. This bridge contains luminous H II regions and has a very high HI column density (1.6 X 10^21 cm^-2 in the 55" CO beam), yet was undetected in CO to rms T(R)* = 2.4 mK. The HI column density is higher than standard H2 and CO self-shielding limits for solar-metallicity gas, suggesting that the gas in this bridge is metal-poor and has an enhanced N(H2)/I(CO) ratio compared to the Galactic value. Only one of the eleven features in our sample was unambiguously detected in CO, a luminous HI-rich star formation region near an optical tail in the compact group Stephan's Quintet. We detect CO at two widely separated velocities in this feature, at ~6000 km/s and ~6700 km/s. Both of these components have HI and H-alpha counterparts. These velocities correspond to those of galaxies in the group, suggesting that this gas is material that has been removed from two galaxies in the group. The CO/HI/H-alpha ratios for both components are similar to global values for spiral galaxies.

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1999 1529 Improving the Observability and Controllability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 11 design observability and controllability. To facilitate debugging, and in particular error diagnosis, we-based debugging for full design visibility and controllability. The new debugging approach introduces several

  8. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  9. 350 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS, VOL. SMC-17, NO. 3, MAY/JUNE 1987 Interpreting Observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    , analyzing, debugging, and design- ing complex physical systems. A person operating a nuclear power plant . 2) domain-specific criteria are available for quantizing numerical data into an initial qualitative

  10. Introduction to meteorological measurements and data handling for solar energy applications. Task IV-Development of an insolation handbook and instrument package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Recognizing a need for a coordinated approach to resolve energy problems, certain members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) met in September 1974 and agreed to develop an International Energy Program. The International Energy Agency (IEA) was established within the OECD to administer, monitor and execute this International Energy Program. In July 1975, Solar Heating and Cooling was selected as one of the sixteen technology fields for multilateral cooperation. Five project areas, called tasks, were identified for cooperative activities within the IEA Program to Develop and Test Solar Heating and Cooling Systems. The objective of one task was to obtain improved basic resource information for the design and operation of solar heating and cooling systems through a better understanding of the required insolation (solar radiation) and related weather data, and through improved techniques for measurement and evaluation of such data. At the February 1976 initial experts meeting in Norrkoeping, Sweden, the participants developed the objective statement into two subtasks. (1) an insolation handbook; and (2) a portable meteorological instrument package. This handbook is the product of the first subtask. The objective of this handbook is to provide a basis for a dialogue between solar scientists and meteorologists. Introducing the solar scientist to solar radiation and related meteorological data enables him to better express his scientific and engineering needs to the meteorologist; and introducing the meteorologist to the special solar radiation and meteorological data applications of the solar scientist enables him to better meet the needs of the solar energy community.

  11. MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours 1 to understand onshore, offshore, and airborne wind power. Topics include: forces affecting winds; terrain and land-use effects; air turbulence; numerical modeling; wind power

  12. The influence of meteorology on the organic and inorganic properties of aerosols in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Mei

    The influence of meteorology on the organic and inorganic properties of aerosols in Hong Kong Mei, Fe) could be from coal flyash, the estimate of crustal material in the Dry-N period may include some

  13. Pollen Dispersion in Relation to Meteorological Conditions, Seasonality, Location and Elevation in College Station, Texas, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Kristen

    2012-04-30

    meteorological factors, including temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, pressure, rain, wind speed and wind direction. A biological microscope was used for identification of possible common species in College Station, Texas. Insight into the vertical...

  14. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  15. Ozone predictabilities due to meteorological uncertainties in the Mexico City basin using ensemble forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bei, Naifang

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the sensitivity of ozone (O3)[(O subscript 3)] predictions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) to meteorological initial uncertainties and planetary boundary layer ...

  16. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2014-12-04

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  17. Instrumentation, recording, and processing of meteorological data near Portage, Wisconsin: Wisconsin power plant impact study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearns, C.R.; Falconer, P.; Weidner, G.; Bowen, B.; Dzamba, L.

    1984-03-01

    As part of the Columbia Power Plant Impact Study meteorological data were collected at a network of monitoring sites from 1972 through 1977. The data were the basis for a series of studies whose purpose was to elucidate the transport of airborne pollutants and to assess the climatic impact of the power plant. In a pilot diffusion climatology survey, local wind structure was interpreted in the context of synoptic weather patterns. A significant new low wind statistic was introduced. A case study traced the movement of an elevated level of ozone from the Southern Plains across the Midwest to the East Coast. It showed that long distance transport is necessary for elevated O3 levels to occur in most parts of the U.S. The horizontal variation of the wind field is an important factor in the transport of atmospheric pollutants from 10 to 100 km. The wind field was shown to be organized as a function of wind direction and wind speed around the Baraboo Hills. Two models for estimating concentrations of SO2 at ground level were compared. Both used the Gaussian plume equation: one estimated the required dispersion coefficients from the Hino stability model; the other was based on data for horizontal and vertical hourly wind direction range. Overall, the climatic effects of the power plant and cooling pond appear small. Fogging, condensation, and riming may occur downwind on several days each year. Temperature increases of about 1C may also be observed for a short distance downwind.

  18. Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems -Beautiful Images and Perceptive Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems unable to replicate the successes of human pattern recognition. The growth of citizen science on the web-computational citizen science platform that combines the efforts of human classifiers with those of computational

  19. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  20. A performance study of an electron-tracking Compton camera with a compact system for environmental gamma-ray observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetsuya Mizumoto; Dai Tomono; Atsushi Takada; Toru Tanimori; Shotaro Komura; Hidetoshi Kubo; Yoshihiro Matsuoka; Yoshitaka Mizumura; Kiseki Nakamura; Shogo Nakamura; Makoto Oda; Joseph D. Parker; Tatsuya Sawano; Naoto Bando; Akira Nabetani

    2015-08-06

    An electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) is a detector that can determine the arrival direction and energy of incident sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray events on an event-by-event basis. It is a hybrid detector consisting of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC), that is the Compton-scattering target and the tracker of recoil electrons, and a position-sensitive scintillation camera that absorbs of the scattered gamma rays, to measure gamma rays in the environment from contaminated soil. To measure of environmental gamma rays from soil contaminated with radioactive cesium (Cs), we developed a portable battery-powered ETCC system with a compact readout circuit and data-acquisition system for the SMILE-II experiment. We checked the gamma-ray imaging ability and ETCC performance in the laboratory by using several gamma-ray point sources. The performance test indicates that the field of view (FoV) of the detector is about 1$\\;$sr and that the detection efficiency and angular resolution for 662$\\;$keV gamma rays from the center of the FoV is $(9.31 \\pm 0.95) \\times 10^{^-5}$ and $5.9^{\\circ} \\pm 0.6^{\\circ}$, respectively. Furthermore, the ETCC can detect 0.15$\\;\\mu\\rm{Sv/h}$ from a $^{137}$Cs gamma-ray source with a significance of 5$\\sigma$ in 13 min in the laboratory. In this paper, we report the specifications of the ETCC and the results of the performance tests. Furthermore, we discuss its potential use for environmental gamma-ray measurements.

  1. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Binary System PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 around the 2010/2011 Periastron Passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzi?ska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Aim. In this paper we present very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) data from the \\gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 taken around its periastron passage (15th of December 2010) with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Cherenkov Telescopes. We aim to search for a possible TeV counterpart of the GeV flare detected by the Fermi LAT. In addition, we aim to study the current periastron passage in the context of previous observations taken at similar orbital phases, testing the repetitive behavior of the source. Methods. Observations at VHE were conducted with H.E.S.S. from 9th to 16th of January 2011. The total dataset amounts to around 6 h of observing time. Results. The source is detected in the 2011 data at a significance level of 11.5\\sigma\\ revealing an averaged integral flux above 1 TeV of (1.01 \\pm 0.18_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys}) \\times 10^{-12} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. The differential energy spectrum follows a power-law shape with a spectral index \\Gamma = 2.92 \\pm 0.30_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys} and a ...

  2. Analysis of 2011 Meteorological Data from the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and Kesselring Site Operations Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aluzzi, F J

    2012-02-27

    Both the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) in Schenectady, NY and the Kesselring Site Operations (KSO) facility near Ballston Spa, NY are required to estimate the effects of hypothetical emissions of radiological material from their respective facilities by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which regulates these facilities. An atmospheric dispersion model known as CAP88, which was developed and approved by the EPA for such purposes, is used by KAPL and KSO to meet this requirement. CAP88 calculations over a given time period are based on statistical data on the meteorological conditions for that period. Both KAPL and KSO have on-site meteorological towers which take atmospheric measurements at a frequency ideal for EPA regulatory model input. However, an independent analysis and processing of the meteorological data from each tower is required to derive a data set appropriate for use in the CAP88 model. The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) was contracted by KAPL to process the on-site data for the calendar year 2011. The purpose of this document is to: (1) summarize the procedures used in the preparation/analysis of the 2011 meteorological data; and (2) document adherence of these procedures to the guidance set forth in 'Meteorological Monitoring Guidance for Regulatory Modeling Applications', EPA document - EPA-454/R-99-005 (EPA-454). This document outlines the steps in analyzing and processing meteorological data from the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and Kesselring Site Operations facilities into a format that is compatible with the steady state dispersion model CAP88. This process is based on guidance from the EPA regarding the preparation of meteorological data for use in regulatory dispersion models. The analysis steps outlined in this document can be easily adapted to process data sets covering time period other than one year. The procedures will need to be modified should the guidance in EPA-454 be updated or revised.

  3. COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA As represented by the BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Business Systems Group (EBSG) is responsible for the development, maintenance, and support of the Bureau's Enterprise Business Systems Group (EBSG) currently provide Finance, Human Resource, Logistics and Reporting

  4. Meteorology This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Hydrologist Hydrometeorological Technician Marine Meteorologist Mesoscale/Outlook Forecaster Meteorological Photographer/ Artist/Writer Solar Energy Meteorologist Statistician Storm Chaser Technical Marketer Warning

  5. Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual-to-decadal time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract An examination of a wide spectrum of hydro

  6. Seasonal changes in Titan's meteorology E. P. Turtle,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown, Titan's seasons have progressed from southern summer to early southern autumn, and changes

  7. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  8. Letter of transmittal Office of the Director of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ........................... 31 Aviation and Defence ................................... 38 Environment and research ................... 73 Systems development and maintenance...... 75 Environmental information management....... 78

  9. Meteorological conditions during the winter validation study at Rocky Flats, Colorado: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    The objective for the Winter Validation Study was to gather field data for validation of the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) under winter time meteorological conditions. Twelve tracer tests were conducted during a two-week period in February 1991. Each test lasted 12 hours, with releases of SF{sub 6} tracer from the Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado. The tests included ground-based and airborne sampling to 16 km from the release point. This presentation summarizes meteorological conditions during the testing period. Forty six viewgraphs are included.

  10. ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtendedPre-WorkshopListStratosphere

  11. ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurementsWarmingMethaneMission

  12. The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological, Satellite, and Model Archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University dwdubois@nmsu.edu Our community data portal is using in Agriculture, Meteorology and Environment (CARSAME) and New Mexico Climate Center but not available

  13. The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I: Present Time Simulation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    The Impact of Climate Change on Air Quality­Related Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I on meteorology and air quality conditions in Cal- ifornia by dynamically downscaling Parallel Climate Model (PCM: Present Time Simulation Analysis ZHAN ZHAO Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University

  14. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  15. Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    with meteorological observations and a heat flux model. South of the island, we compare the ULS and thermalObservations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite, this paper examines the behavior of the Bering Sea St. Lawrence Island polynya using a combination

  16. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 4 P HY S I CA L REV I E W L E T T ER S 23 JULY 2001 Observation of the Quantum Zeno and AntiZeno Effects in an Unstable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an unstable system. Cold sodium atoms are trapped in a far­detuned standing wave of light that is accelerated measurement­induced suppression of the dy­ namics of a two­state driven system has been observed [15 Zeno and Anti­Zeno Effects in an Unstable System M.C. Fischer, B. Gutiérrez­Medina, and M.G. Raizen

  17. ForPeerReview A 'Boscastle-type' quasi-stationary convective system over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    of Meteorology Kirshbaum, Daniel; McGill University, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Plant, Robert on 21 July 2010. This system was remarkably similar in its location and structure to one which caused: . . . Copyright c 0000 Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 00: 2­25 (0000) Prepared using qjrms4

  18. Weather observations on Whistler Mountain during five storms JULIE M. THERIAULT,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Weather observations on Whistler Mountain during five storms JULIE M. THE´RIAULT,1 KRISTEN L mountain ranges. The goal of this study is to investigate the wide range of meteorological conditions that generated precipitation on Whistler Mountain from 4­12 March 2010 during the SNOW-V10 field campaign. During

  19. Validation of satellite observed thermal emission with in-situ measurements over an urban surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunderle, Stefan

    Validation of satellite observed thermal emission with in-situ measurements over an urban surface: Meteorology applied to urban pollution problems). Besides very detailed field measurements of the structure and validations of thermal satellite imagery are conducted in rural, mostly homogeneous areas (Sobrino et al

  20. Observations and modeling of mixing processes in a fresh water reservoir - Valle de Bravo (Mexico) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhal, Gaurav

    2007-04-25

    layers. For our modeling efforts, a state-of-the-art one-dimensional turbulence model was used and forced with the observed surface meteorology to obtain simulated temperature and dissipation rate profiles. The model results were found to be in good...

  1. GIS Applications in MeteorologyGIS Applications in Meteorology Adventures in a Parallel UniverseAdventures in a Parallel Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ),(NWS HQ), developed for Sterling, VA WFO (LWX)developed for Sterling, VA WFO (LWX) GIS Applications System (GIS) Forum. The Systems Engineering Center has set up a list server for theThe Systems Engineering Center has set up a list server for the purpose of starting apurpose of starting a dialog

  2. 1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    the United States some 10,000 deaths may have been associated with the oppressive heat (National Climatic climatology-based heat watch­warning systems have been implemented across the United States to improve. Systems are in place (Table 1) in a number of cities within the United States, including

  3. AUGUST 2004 1083L I E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    and Applications, Madison, Wisconsin FENGYING SUN Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies's (EOS's) Aqua satellite enable improved global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. MODIS is able temperature, moisture, and cloud structure. The significant new information on multilayer clouds re- trieved

  4. A Clustering Method for Identifying Ozone Episodes with Similar Meteorological Conditions: Application to Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    the Usefulness of VOC Data as Indicators of Change in Fuel Composition in the South Coast Air Basin (California113C.06 Facility Data Management and Emission Estimation Software Author(s): KJ Hickey, J Gresko: 95-FA152.03 Management of Meteorological Data at a Former Nuclear Weapon Facility Author(s): CL

  5. ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1 , and F. For- get2 to advances in computational resources and modeling techniques. Note also that mesoscale modeling and Large: general circulation models, mesoscale models, microscale models [Large-Eddy Simulations]. Figure 1

  6. 14 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 About our performance framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Perform ance #12;14 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 2013­14 About our performance framework. The performance of this programme is measured by a number of deliverables and key performance indicators (KPIs.17) for the then Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities portfolio. Although the Bureau is responsible

  7. THE NEW YORK MIDTOWN DISPERSION STUDY (MID-05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; SULLIVAN, T.M.; SMITH, S.; CASSELLA, V.

    2007-01-01

    The New York City midtown dispersion program, MID05, examined atmospheric transport in the deep urban canyons near Rockefeller Center. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion under such conditions, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons and examined response over a much larger area. During August, 2005, a series of six gas tracer tests were conducted and sampling was conducted over a 2 km grid. A critical component of understanding gas movement in these studies is detailed wind and meteorological information in the study zone. To support data interpretation and modeling, several meteorological stations were installed at street level and on roof tops in Manhattan. In addition, meteorological data from airports and other weather instrumentation around New York City were collected. This document describes the meteorological component of the project and provides an outline of data file formats for the different instruments. These data provide enough detail to support highly-resolved computational simulations of gas transport in the study zone.

  8. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 113 (2002) 223243 Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 113 (2002) 223­243 Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites Kell Abstract A comprehensive evaluation of energy balance closure is performed across 22 sites and 50 site ecosystems and climates. En- ergy balance closure was evaluated by statistical regression of turbulent energy

  9. THE CLASSICAL JOURNAL 105.1 (2009) 2742 ANCIENT METEOROLOGICAL OPTICS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of these and associated phenomena are cataloged. Aristotle's streak, Octavian's halo, Vitellius' antisun and Constantine into fire and its condensation into clouds and then water. Anaxagoras and others built on this foundation the reader, a synopsis of modern meteorological optics is presented first in a non-technical format

  10. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Durante5 , Jörg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University, 34119 Kassel, Germany 5 DEWI, German Wind Energy Institute, Wilhelmshaven, Germany 6 PhysicalEWEC2006 ­ Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1

  11. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday as atmospheric electricity and optics. Specific topics that will be covered are as follows: Cloud physics: Review Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES Homework problems: 20% Quiz

  12. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics Thunderstorm charging Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES

  13. FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL-POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Iain B.

    FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL- POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA D.B. Hayman Fresnel-zone holographic technique was used to obtain the radiation pattern for the upgraded antenna in the measurement of this antenna and the analysis of the results. Keywords: Antenna measurements, Fresnel zone

  14. 2415Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    that measure the exchanges of car- bon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere2415Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Ecosystem-Scale Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Flux Densities Dennis

  15. Partial Support for the Federal Committee for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Samuel P

    2012-04-30

    DOE E-link Report Number DOE/ER62778 1999-2012 Please see attached Final Technical Report (size too large to post here). Annual Products Provided to DOE: Federal Plan for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research; National Hurricane Operations Plan; Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference Summary Report. All reports and publications can be found on the OFCM website, www.ofcm.noaa.gov.

  16. The design and implementation of a demonstration supplementary control system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruane, Michael Frederick

    1980-01-01

    The overall goal of the Chestnut Ridge Supplemental Control System (SCS) demonstration project was to demonstrate how an existing monitoring network, existing air quality models, and existing meteorological forecasting ...

  17. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali Leonid Reyzin November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such "physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  18. Observation of the Anomalously Slow (Power-Law) Relaxation of the System of Interacting Liquid Nanoclusters in the Disordered Confinement of a Random Porous Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Borman; A. A. Belogorlov; V. N. Tronin

    2015-05-20

    The time evolution of the system of water in the Libersorb 23 (L23) disordered nanoporous medium after the complete filling at excess pressure and the subsequent removal of excess pressure has been studied. It has been found that three stages can be identified in the relaxation of the L23-water system under study. At the first stage, a portion of water at the removal of excess pressure rapidly flows out in the pressure reduction time, i.e., following a decrease in the pressure. It has been shown that, at temperatures below the dispersion transition temperature $T pressure. At the second stage of relaxation, the degree of filling ${\\theta}$ varies slowly according to a power law ${\\theta} \\sim t^{-\\alpha}$ with the exponent ${\\alpha} 10^5$ s, the formed metastable state decays, which is manifested in the transition to a power-law dependence ${\\theta}(t)$ with a larger exponent. The extrusion-time distribution function of pores has been calculated along with the time dependence of the degree of filling, which qualitatively describes the observed anomalously slow relaxation and crossover of the transition to the stage of decay with a power-law dependence ${\\theta}(t)$ with a larger exponent. It has been shown that the relaxation and decay of the metastable state of the confined nonwetting liquid at ${\\theta}>{\\theta_c}$ are attributed to the appearance of local configurations of liquid clusters in confinement and their interaction inside the infinite percolation cluster of filled pores.

  19. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  20. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

  1. 73Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    modernisation and expansion of the platforms. High-performance computing capacity and other computing solutions Target 99.8% Result 99.9% Mid-range systems services 99.8% 99.9% High performance computing 99.5% 99

  2. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. The meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance and quality assurance programs at a former nuclear weapons facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The purposes of the meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance, and quality assurance programs at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), are to (1) support Emergency Preparedness (EP) programs at the Site in assessing the transport, dispersion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations; and (2) provide information for onsite and offsite projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, and remediation activities. The risk from the Site includes chemical and radioactive emissions historically related to nuclear weapons component production activities that are currently associated with storage of large quantities of radionuclides (plutonium) and radioactive waste forms. The meteorological monitoring program provides information for site-specific weather forecasting, which supports Site operations, employee safety, and Emergency Preparedness operations.

  4. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  5. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2010-04-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  6. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  7. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  8. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2009-07-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  9. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  12. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  13. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  14. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  15. Meteorology This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Photographer/ Artist/Writer Solar Energy Meteorologist Statistician Storm Chaser Technical Marketer Warning Hydrologist Hydrometeorological Technician Marine Meteorologist Mesoscale/Outlook Forecaster Meteorological Department of Agriculture Department of Defense Department of Energy Educational Institutions Energy

  16. FEBRUARY 2001 7S L A T E R E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom k Laboratoire de Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, Australia e Department of Environmental of Hydrology, NOAA, Silver Spring, Maryland o Meteorology Department, Reading University, Reading, United

  17. Meteorological Factors Regulating the Population Expansion and Contraction of Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coburn, Jordan McQuade

    2010-10-12

    FACTORS REGULATING THE POPULATION EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF AMBLYOMMA MACULATUM (ACARI: IXODIDAE) IN TEXAS A Thesis by JORDAN MCQUADE COBURN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Entomology METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS REGULATING THE POPULATION EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF AMBLYOMMA MACULATUM (ACARI: IXODIDAE) IN TEXAS A Thesis by JORDAN...

  18. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    2013-01-01

    -11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han..., U.S.A. Abstract Building thermal performance and potential solar applications depend on the quality of the solar resource data available. Unfortunately, most of the locations do not account for measured solar radiation data and, as a result, rely...

  19. Advanced chemistry-transport modeling and observing systems allow daily air quality observations, short-term forecasts, and real-time analyses of air quality at the global and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , French legislation has been adapted in such a way that the local authorities in charge of air pollution can now inform the public and take emergency decisions re- lated to air pollution control not onlyOLOGICAL SOCIETy | #12;air quality monitoring system. In case of a pollution episode, when concentrations exceed

  20. Salt Repository Project site study plan for meteorology/air quality: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The Site Study Plan for Meteorology/Air Quality describes a field program consisting of continuous measurements of wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, dew point, and pressure neede for later modeling and dose calculations. These measurements will include upper level winds, vertical temperature structure, and vertical wind speed. All measurements will be made at a site located within the 9-m/sup 2/ site area but remote from the ESF. The SSP describes the need for each study; its design and design rationale; analysis, management, and use of data; schedule of field activities, organization of field personnel and sample management and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. Although titled Meteorology/Air Quality, this SSP addresses only meteorology, as there are no air quality data needs in the SCP. A correction to the title will be made in a later revision. 27 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  2. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  3. U.S. NO2 trends (2005–2013): EPA Air Quality System (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO2 levels have decreased by 30-40% in the last decade. We quantify NO2 trends (2005-2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite.We demonstrate that the current OMI NO2 algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trendsmore »and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO2 concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO2 standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO2 reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO2 VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly correlate with those estimated from surface concentrations (r -- 0.83, N -- 355). We then explore the observed correspondence of trends estimated from OMI and AQS data. We find a significant, but slightly weaker, correspondence (i.e., r -- 0.68, N -- 208) than predicted by the model and discuss some of the important factors affecting the relationship, including known problems (e.g., NOz interferents) associated with the AQS data. This significant correspondence gives confidence in trend and surface concentration estimates from OMI VCDs for locations, such as the majority of the U.S. and globe, that are not covered by surface monitoring networks. Using our improved trend model and our enhanced OMI data product, we find that both OMI and AQS data show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 38% for each over the U.S. The annual reduction rates inferred from OMI and AQS measurements are larger (#3;-4.8 ± 1.9%/yr, #3;-3.7 ± 1.5%/yr) from 2005 to 2008 than 2010 to 2013 (-#3;1.2 ± 1.2%/yr, #3;-2.1 ± 1.4%/yr). We quantify NO2 trends for major U.S. cities and power plants; the latter suggest larger negative trend (#3;-4.0 ± 1.5%/yr) between 2005 and 2008 and smaller or insignificant changes (-#3;0.5 ± 1.2%/yr) during 2010-2013.« less

  4. U.S. NO? trends (2005–2013): EPA air quality system (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO?) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO? levels have decreased by 30–40% in the last decade. We quantify NO? trends (2005–2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO? vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite.We demonstrate that the current OMI NO? algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trendsmore »and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO? concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO? standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO? reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO? VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly correlate with those estimated from surface concentrations (r = 0.83, N = 355). We then explore the observed correspondence of trends estimated from OMI and AQS data. We find a significant, but slightly weaker, correspondence (i.e., r = 0.68, N = 208) than predicted by the model and discuss some of the important factors affecting the relationship, including known problems (e.g., NOz interferents) associated with the AQS data. This significant correspondence gives confidence in trend and surface concentration estimates from OMI VCDs for locations, such as the majority of the U.S. and globe, that are not covered by surface monitoring networks. Using our improved trend model and our enhanced OMI data product, we find that both OMI and AQS data show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 38% for each over the U.S. The annual reduction rates inferred from OMI and AQS measurements are larger (–4.8 ± 1.9%/yr, –3.7 ± 1.5%/yr) from 2005 to 2008 than 2010 to 2013 (–1.2 ± 1.2%/yr, –2.1 ± 1.4%/yr). We quantify NO? trends for major U.S. cities and power plants; the latter suggest larger negative trend (–4.0 ± 1.5%/yr) between 2005 and 2008 and smaller or insignificant changes (–0.5 ± 1.2%/yr) during 2010-2013.« less

  5. 1934 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 6, NO. 4, AUGUST 2013 A Web-Based System for Classification of Remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    in many different fields. This paper describes a web-based system (available online: http://hypergim.ceta-ciemat

  6. QUALIFIED FORECAST OF ENSEMBLE POWER PRODUCTION BY SPATIALLY DISPERSED GRID-CONNECTED PV SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    , Energy Meteorology Group, D-26111 Oldenburg, Germany, elke.lorenz@uni-oldenburg.de + UniversityQUALIFIED FORECAST OF ENSEMBLE POWER PRODUCTION BY SPATIALLY DISPERSED GRID- CONNECTED PV SYSTEMS Schneider° * University of Oldenburg, Institute of Physics, Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory

  7. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Young, D. E.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-15

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physico-chemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air quality models. more »Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as part of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. The average submicron aerosol (PM1) concentration was 31.0 ?g m?3 and the total mass was dominated by organic aerosols (OA, 55 %), followed by ammonium nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA; O / C = 0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 28 % of total OA; O / C = 0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OAs (BBOA1; 13 % of total OA; O / C = 0.33 and BBOA2; 20 % of total OA; O / C = 0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA; O / C = 0.63) and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA; O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a~previous wintertime campaign (winter 2010), most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly three times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 to 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemistry might also be higher in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.« less

  8. 3892 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California E. SMALL Department considerable attention in the hydro- meteorology community. This is partially because most of the monsoon

  9. A study of the use of meteorological factors as criteria for irrigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satterwhite, Leron Eugene

    1956-01-01

    of an atmosphere, T being the mean aiz' tempez atua??aando being Stefan's constant e = same as used in equation l. (3) ~ Combination of equation 1 and 2: K (0. 27K $+8)/(0 27 Z(A) mm. /day ?haze E = slope of vapor-pressure curve at mean aiz temperatuze (mm...IIURP. UY A & M & 'LL&ci: gp y: r&& A STUDY OF THE USE OF METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS AS CRITERIA FOR IRRICAT ICE A. Thesis LEECH EUGEEE SATTERV'HITE Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial...

  10. Experimental Observation of Critical Phenomena in a Laser Light System Amir Rosen, Rafi Weill, Boris Levit, Vladimir Smulakovsky, Alexander Bekker, and Baruch Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Baruch

    , Boris Levit, Vladimir Smulakovsky, Alexander Bekker, and Baruch Fischer Department of Electrical of gas-liquid and magnetic spin systems. The laser light modes provide a special nonthermodynamic many. Canonical examples are the gas-liquid-solid and magnetic spin systems. This work deals with a non

  11. Candidate wind-turbine-generator site summarized meteorological data for December 1976-December 1981. [Program WIND listed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    Summarized hourly meteorological data for 16 of the original 17 candidate and wind turbine generator sites collected during the period from December 1976 through December 1981 are presented. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and provide data that could be considered representative of long-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and a topographic map showing the location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for long-term average wind energy production at each site.

  12. What can U.S. dermatology learn from health care systems abroad? An observation of Taiwan’s system of clinical efficiency as a possible model for increased patient access to care and affordability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamangar, Faranak; Millsop, Jillian W; Tsai, Dino; Koo, John YM

    2015-01-01

    clinics operate very efficiently with a range of 30 patientsa model of a highly efficient system to deliver adequates system of clinical efficiency as a possible model for

  13. Meso-scale cooling effects of high albedo surfaces: Analysis of meteorological data from White Sands National Monument and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishman, B.; Taha, H.; Akbari, H.

    1994-05-20

    Urban summer daytime temperatures often exceed those of the surrounding rural areas. Summer ``urban heat islands`` are caused by dark roofs and paved surfaces as well as the lack of vegetation. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are interested in studying the effects of increasing the albedo of roof tops and paved surfaces in order to reduce the impacts of summer urban heat islands. Increasing the albedo of urban surfaces may reduce this heat island effect in two ways, directly and indirectly. The direct effect involves reducing surface temperature and, therefore, heat conduction through the building envelope. This effect of surface albedo on surface temperatures is better understood and has been quantified in several studies. The indirect effect is the impact of high albedo surfaces on the near surface air temperatures. Although the indirect effect has been modeled for the Los Angeles basin by Sailor, direct field observations are required. The objective of this report is to investigate the meso-scale climate of a large high albedo area and identify the effects of albedo on the near surface air temperature. To accomplish this task, data from several surface weather stations at White Sands, New Mexico were analyzed. This report is organized into six sections in addition to this introduction. The first gives the general geological, topographic, and meteorological background of White Sands. The second is a discussion of the basic surface meteorology of the White Sands region. This section is followed by a general discussion of the instrumentation and available data. The fourth section is a description of the method used for data analyis. The fifth section which presents the results of this analysis. Finally, the last section is the summary and conclusion, where a discussion of the results is presented.

  14. Sub-daily Statistical Downscaling of Meteorological Variables Using Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Bjørn-Gustaf J. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2012-01-01

    A new open source neural network temporal downscaling model is described and tested using CRU-NCEP reanal ysis and CCSM3 climate model output. We downscaled multiple meteorological variables in tandem from monthly to sub-daily time steps while also retaining consistent correlations between variables. We found that our feed forward, error backpropagation approach produced synthetic 6 hourly meteorology with biases no greater than 0.6% across all variables and variance that was accurate within 1% for all variables except atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and precipitation. Correlations between downscaled output and the expected (original) monthly means exceeded 0.99 for all variables, which indicates that this approach would work well for generating atmospheric forcing data consistent with mass and energy conserved GCM output. Our neural network approach performed well for variables that had correlations to other variables of about 0.3 and better and its skill was increased by downscaling multiple correlated variables together. Poor replication of precipitation intensity however required further post-processing in order to obtain the expected probability distribution. The concurrence of precipitation events with expected changes in sub ordinate variables (e.g., less incident shortwave radiation during precipitation events) were nearly as consistent in the downscaled data as in the training data with probabilities that differed by no more than 6%. Our downscaling approach requires training data at the target time step and relies on a weak assumption that climate variability in the extrapolated data is similar to variability in the training data.

  15. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  16. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  17. The Central American cold surge: an observational analysis of the deep southward penetration of North American cold fronts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reding, Philip John

    1992-01-01

    THE CENTRAL AMERICAN COLD SURGE: AN OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE DEEP SOUTHWARD PENETRATION OF NORTH AMERICAN COLD FRONTS A Thesis by PHILIP JOHN REDING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A &M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology THE CENTRAL AMERICAN COLD SURGE: AN OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE DEEP SOUTHWARD PENETRATION OF NORTH AMERICAN COLD FRONTS A Thesis by PHILIP...

  18. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  19. Center for Climate Systems Modeling Center for Climate Systems Modeling (C2SM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    C2SM Center for Climate Systems Modeling Contact Center for Climate Systems Modeling (C2SM) Dr of the Earth's weather and climate.» Nicolas Gruber, Chair C2SM Partner institutions · ETH Zurich: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich · MeteoSwiss: Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology · Empa

  20. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 00: 116 (2013) Parameterised diabatic processes in numerical simulations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    2013-01-01

    . S. Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom Correspondence contributions to be tracked back to their time and location of occurrence. We have used this approach. 2012). Copyright c 2013 Royal Meteorological Society Prepared using qjrms4.cls [Version: 2011/05/18 v1

  1. Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface between the two simulations. Mesoscale atmospheric models such as the Pennsylvania State University for the Phoenix metropolitan area was implemented in the fifth- generation PSU/NCAR mesoscale meteorological model

  2. THE FIRST OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-REDSHIFT DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS WITH THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AND AFFILIATED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battisti, A. J.; Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) measurements of metal abundances in eight 0.083 < z{sub abs} < 0.321 damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption systems serendipitously discovered in the COS-Halos survey. We find that these systems show a large range in metallicities, with -1.10 < [Z/H] < 0.31, similar to the spread found at higher redshifts. These low-redshift systems on average have subsolar metallicities, but do show a rise in metallicity over cosmic time when compared to higher-redshift systems. We find that the average sub-DLA metallicity is higher than the average DLA metallicity at all redshifts. Nitrogen is underabundant with respect to {alpha}-group elements in all but perhaps one of the absorbers. In some cases, [N/{alpha}] is significantly below the lowest nitrogen measurements in nearby galaxies. Systems for which depletion patterns can be studied show little, if any, depletion, which is characteristic of Milky Way halo-type gas. We also identify affiliated galaxies for three of the sub-DLAs using spectra obtained from a Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS). None of these sub-DLAs arise in the stellar disks of luminous galaxies; instead, these absorbers may exist in galaxy halos at impact parameters ranging from 38 to 92 kpc. Multiple galaxies are present near two of the sub-DLAs, and galaxy interactions may play a role in the dispersal of the gas. Many of these low-redshift absorbers exhibit simple kinematics, but one sub-DLA has a complicated mix of at least 13 components spread over 150 km s{sup -1}. We find three galaxies near this sub-DLA, which also suggests that galaxy interactions roil the gas. This study reinforces the view that DLAs have a variety of origins, and low-redshift studies are crucial for understanding absorber-galaxy connections.

  3. System implementation for US Air Force Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simunich, K.L.; Pinkerton, S.C.; Michalakes, J.G.; Christiansen, J.H.

    1997-03-01

    The Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS) is intended to provide war fighters and decision makers with timely, accurate, and tailored meteorological and oceanographic (METOC) information to enhance effective employment of battlefield forces. Of critical importance to providing METOC theater information is the generation of meteorological parameters produced by numerical prediction models and application software at the Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC), Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Ultimately, application-derived data will be produced by the regional Joint METOC Forecast Units and by the deployed teams within a theater. The USAF Air Staff contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for assistance in defining a hardware and software solution using off-the-shelf technology that would give the USAF the flexibility of testing various meteorological models and the ability to use the system within their daily operational constraints.

  4. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; M. D'Agostino

    2006-11-09

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurational energy fluctuations, that may give important information on the heat capacity of the fragmenting system at the freeze out stage, are not fully compatible among different data sets and require further analysis to properly account for Coulomb effects and secondary decays. Some basic theoretical questions, concerning the interplay between the dynamics of the collision and the fragmentation process, and the cluster definition in dense and hot media, are still open and are addressed at the end of the paper. A comparison with realistic models and/or a quantitative analysis of the fluctuation properties will be needed to clarify in the next future the nature of the transition observed from compound nucleus evaporation to multi-fragment production.

  5. SNR G320.4-01.2 and PSR B1509-58: New radio observations of a complex interacting system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Gaensler; K. T. S. Brazier; R. N. Manchester; S. Johnston; A. J. Green

    1999-01-20

    We describe radio continuum and spectral line observations of the source G320.4-01.2 (MSH 15-52) and the coincident young pulsar B1509-58 made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Based on a comparison between X-ray and radio observations, we argue that the two main radio components of G320.4-01.2 are a single supernova remnant (SNR), which HI absorption indicates is at a distance of 5.2+/-1.4 kpc. A high-resolution correspondence between radio and X-rays argues that the pulsar is interacting with the SNR via an opposed pair of collimated outflows. The outflow itself is seen as an elongated X-ray feature surrounded by a highly polarized radio sheath, while the interaction with the SNR manifests itself as a ring of radio/X-ray knots within the optical nebula RCW 89. We reject the hypothesis that the pulsar outflow powers the entire RCW 89 region. SNR G320.4-01.2 and PSR B1509-58 agree in distance and in rotation measure, and appear to be interacting. We thus conclude that the two objects are associated and have an age of energy or low-mass supernova which occurred near the edge of an elongated cavity. Such a model can account for the SNR's bilateral appearance, its large apparent age, the significant offset of the pulsar from the SNR's centre and the faintness of the pulsar-powered nebula at radio wavelengths.

  6. Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol. 23 page 48 Southern Hemisphere regional precipitation and climate variability: Extremes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    a characteristic dipole pattern of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, with features of both), and rainfall anomalies are shown using sun/cloud symbols. #12;Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol. 23 page 49 The changed East African rainfall distribution can be explained

  7. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric scientists apply physics, mathematics, and chemistry to understandAtmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric the atmosphere and its interactions with land and sea. One of the goals of atmospheric science is to understand

  8. 15 DECEMBER 2003 3021H A F N E R A N D X I E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    on the stratification and maximum elevation. For ex- ample, the Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Hawaii are in a similar Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii SHANG-PING XIE International Pacific Research Center, and Department of Meteorology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii

  9. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115 (2003) 91107 Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassar, Ray

    2003-01-01

    Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115 (2003) 91­107 Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal forest: evidence from towers, aircraft and remote sensing Brian D. Amiroa,, J. Ian ecosystem exchange by eddy covariance) and remote sens- ing/modeling (net primary productivity

  10. Copyright 2005, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 11/05 Knowledge Expectations for METR 2023

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    meteorology, air pollution, forecasting, and climate change Topical Knowledge Expectations I. Atmospheric. Be able to use it quantitatively to solve problems related to the thermal structure of the atmosphere. · Understand the thermal wind and how it relates to backing and veering winds as well as the structure

  11. DECEMBER 2001 579D E R Y A N D Y A U 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    ), there is renewed interest in examining hydrometeoro- logical processes in the Arctic. With its prevailing subDECEMBER 2001 579D E´ R Y A N D Y A U 2001 American Meteorological Society Simulation of an Arctic depression over the frozen Arctic Ocean. The event is first simulated at a horizontal grid size of 18 km

  12. 5th Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology and the 2nd International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    More 5th Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology and the 2nd International Wildland Fire Ecology and Fire Management Congress Monday, 17 November 2003 Fire severity classification: uses and abuses Theresa B. Jain, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, Idaho, ID; and R. T. Graham Burn severity (also referred

  13. Copyright 2004, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 04/04 Knowledge Expectations for METR 4233

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and diffuse radiation. · For solar (short-wave) radiation, understand the definition of the albedo and know of solar radiation in the atmosphere. · For long-wave radiation in the atmosphere, understand the important for METR 4233 Physical Meteorology III: Radiation and Climate Purpose: This document describes

  14. Influence of meteorology in assessing energy externalities: application of the damage function approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.; Miller, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McIlvaine, C.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-09-14

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating energy externalities. These externalities are environmental, health, and other damages and benefits that traditionally have not been considered as part of the cost of producing and consuming goods and services. An example of externalities is the effect on human health from exposure to ozone formed by NO{sub x} and other emissions from electric power plants. These damages are valued adversely by individuals (and by society) but are not reflected in the price of electricity. The damage function approach is a methodology which is used for developing quantitative estimates of externalities. This paper describes the five major steps in the damage function approach, focuses on the use of ozone models in that framework, and points out the effects of meteorological variables on estimates of ozone concentrations.

  15. Meteorological data for water years 1988-94 from five weather stations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flint, A.L.; Davies, W.J.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes meteorological data collected from five weather stations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from as early as April 1987 through September 1994. The measurements include solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind vector magnitude, wind direction, wind vector direction, barometric pressure, and precipitation. Measurements were made very 10 seconds and averaged every 15 minutes. The data were collected as part of the geologic and hydrologic site-characterization studies of Yucca Mountain, a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. Precipitation at the site ranged from a low of 12 millimeters total for water year 1989 to a high of 312 millimeters total for water year 1993. Air temperature ranged from a low of 15.1 degrees Celsius in December 1990 (water year 1991) to a high of 41.9 degrees Celsius in July 1989 (water year 1989). The weather station network also provides information on the spatial variability of precipitation and temperature.

  16. PRECISE ESTIMATES OF THE PHYSICAL PARAMETERS FOR THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM HD 17156 ENABLED BY HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FINE GUIDANCE SENSOR TRANSIT AND ASTEROSEISMIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutzman, Philip; Charbonneau, David; Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L.; McCullough, Peter R.; Nelan, Edmund P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Brown, Timothy M., E-mail: pnutzman@cfa.harvard.edu [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of three distinct transits of HD 17156b obtained with the Fine Guidance Sensors on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We analyzed both the transit photometry and previously published radial velocities to find the planet-star radius ratio R{sub p} /R{sub *} = 0.07454 {+-} 0.00035, inclination i = 86.49{sup +0.24}{sub -0.20} deg, and scaled semimajor axis a/R{sub *} = 23.19{sup +0.32}{sub -0.27}. This last value translates directly to a mean stellar density determination {rho}{sub *} = 0.522{sup +0.021}{sub -0.018} g cm{sup -3}. Analysis of asteroseismology observations by the companion paper of Gilliland et al. provides a consistent but significantly refined measurement of {rho}{sub *} = 0.5308 {+-} 0.0040. We compare stellar isochrones to this density estimate and find M{sub *} = 1.275 {+-} 0.018 M{sub sun} and a stellar age of 3.37{sup +0.20}{sub -0.47} Gyr. Using this estimate of M{sub *} and incorporating the density constraint from asteroseismology, we model both the photometry and published radial velocities to estimate the planet radius R{sub p} = 1.0870 {+-} 0.0066 R{sub J} and the stellar radius R{sub *} = 1.5007 {+-} 0.0076 R{sub sun}. The planet radius is larger than that found in previous studies and consistent with theoretical models of a solar-composition gas giant of the same mass and equilibrium temperature. For the three transits, we determine the times of mid-transit to a precision of 6.2 s, 7.6 s, and 6.9 s, and the transit times for HD 17156 do not show any significant departures from a constant period. The joint analysis of transit photometry and asteroseismology presages similar studies that will be enabled by the NASA Kepler Mission.

  17. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali # Leonid Reyzin +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali # Leonid Reyzin + November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such ``physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  18. COS OBSERVATIONS OF METAL LINE AND BROAD LYMAN-{alpha} ABSORPTION IN THE MULTI-PHASE O VI AND Ne VIII SYSTEM AT z = 0.20701 TOWARD HE 0226-4110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, B. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Narayanan, A. [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

    2011-12-20

    Observations of the QSO HE 0226-4110 (z{sub em} = 0.495) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) from 1134 to 1796 A with a resolution of {approx}17 km s{sup -1} and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) per resolution element of 20-40 are used to study the multi-phase absorption system at z = 0.20701 containing O VI and Ne VIII. The system was previously studied with lower S/N observations with Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The COS observations provide more reliable measures of the H I and metal lines present in the system and reveal the clear presence of broad Ly{alpha} (BLA) absorption with b = 72(+13, -6) km s{sup -1} and log N(H I) = 13.87 {+-} 0.08. Detecting BLAs associated with warm gas absorbers is crucial for determining the temperature, metallicity, and total baryonic content of the absorbers. The BLA is probably recording the trace amount of thermally broadened H I in the collisionally ionized plasma with log T {approx} 5.7 that also produces the O VI and Ne VIII absorption. The total hydrogen column in the collisionally ionized gas, log N(H) {approx} 20.1, exceeds that in the cooler photoionized gas in the system by a factor of {approx}22. The oxygen abundance in the collisionally ionized gas is [O/H] = -0.89 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.07. The absorber probably occurs in the circumgalactic environment (halo) of a foreground L = 0.25L{sub *} disk galaxy with an impact parameter of 109 h{sub 70}{sup -1} kpc identified by Mulchaey and Chen.

  19. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A.

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  20. [10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

  1. What can U.S. dermatology learn from health care systems abroad? An observation of Taiwan’s system of clinical efficiency as a possible model for increased patient access to care and affordability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamangar, Faranak; Millsop, Jillian W; Tsai, Dino; Koo, John YM

    2015-01-01

    it behooves us to study the Taiwan system with respect andPMID: 18723242] 4. Cheng TM. Taiwan's new national health12757273] 5. Chiang TL. Taiwan's 1995 health care reform.

  2. Wind measurements in Mars' middle atmosphere at equinox and solstice: IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometric CO observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, R; Encrenaz, T; Forget, F; Chassefière, E; Hourdin, F; Guilloteau, S; Guilloteau, St\\'{e}phane

    2007-01-01

    Characterizing the Martian atmosphere is an essential objective to understand its meteorology and its climate. The lower atmosphere (< 40 km) and middle atmosphere (40-80 km) of Mars appear dynamically coupled at much higher levels than in the case of the Earth. The vertical extension of the weather phenomena is considerable with for example Hadley's cells reaching the top of the neutral atmosphere (120 km). The circulation in the middle atmosphere modifies the meteorology of the lower atmosphere, affecting the transport and climatic processes Observations of the CO rotational lines at millimeter (mm) wavelengths (Clancy et al 1990) have strongly contributed in the study of the vertical distribution of this compound and the thermal profile in the atmosphere of Mars over 0-70 km. Singledish observations of the CO Doppler lineshift have allowed direct wind measurements in the martian middle atmosphere near 50 km altitude (Lellouch et al 1991), but at a low spatial resolution (12'') enabling only an essential...

  3. Observations & Thoughts on Controller Assessment &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Thomas J.

    & Assessment Design & interpretation of monitoring & assessment methods cannot be divorced from processObservations & Thoughts on Controller Assessment & Performance Monitoring T.J. Harris Queen's University harrist@post.queensu.ca Control Systems 2004 #12;Acknowledge Contributions of NSERC Imperial Oil

  4. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  5. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  6. The GAPS Programme with HARPS-N at TNG VIII: Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and characterisation of the transiting planetary systems HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, L; Covino, E; Raia, G; Southworth, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Biazzo, K; Bonomo, A; Desidera, S; Lanza, A F; Maciejewski, G; Poretti, E; Sozzetti, A; Borsa, F; Bruni, I; Ciceri, S; Claudi, R; Cosentino, R; Gratton, R; Fiorenzano, A F Martinez; Lodato, G; Lorenzi, V; Marzari, F; Murabito, S; Affer, L; Bignamini, A; Bedin, L R; Boccato, C; Damasso, M; Henning, Th; Maggio, A; Micela, G; Molinari, E; Pagano, I; Piotto, G; Rainer, M; Scandariato, G; Smareglia, R; Sanchez, R Zanmar

    2015-01-01

    We determine the true and the projected obliquity of HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10 systems, respectively, which are both composed of a relatively cool star and a hot-Jupiter planet. Thanks to the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for both the systems by acquiring precise radial-velocity measurements during planetary transit events. We also present photometric observations comprising six light curves covering five transit events, obtained using three medium-class telescopes and the telescope-defocussing technique. One transit of WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was followed contemporaneously from two observatories. The three transit light curves of HAT-P-36b show anomalies attributable to starspot complexes on the surface of the parent star, in agreement with the analysis of its spectra that indicate a moderate activity. By analysing the complete HATNet data set of HAT-P-36, we estimated the stellar rotation period by detecting a periodic photometric modulation in the light curve...

  7. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 87, No. 3, pp. 403--421, 2009. 403 DOI:10.2151/jmsj.87.403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 87, No. 3, pp. 403--421, 2009. 403 DOI:10.2151/jmsj.87.403 Sensitivity of Numerical Simulations of the Early Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Emily

  8. The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research A partnership between CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spillman, Claire

    of Meteorology ReefTemp Next Generation L.A. Garde, C.M Spillman, L. Majewski, C. Griffin, G. Kruger and H. Beggs , L. Majewski2 , C. Griffin2 , G. Kruger1, 2 and H. Beggs1 1 Centre for Australian Weather and Climate-in-Publication entry Author: L.A. Garde, C.M Spillman, L. Majewski, C. Griffin, G. Kruger and H. Beggs Title: Reef

  9. Assessment of offsite, real-time dose measurement systems for emergency situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeck, W.J.; Hoffman, L.G.; Staples, B.A.; Keller, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation is made of the effectiveness of fixed, real-time monitoring systems around nuclear power stations in determining the magnitude of unmonitored releases. The effects of meteorological conditions on the accuracy with which the magnitude of unmonitored releases is determined and the uncertainties inherent in defining these meteorological conditions are discussed. The number and placement of fixed field detectors in a system is discussed, and the data processing equipment required to convert field detector output data into release rate information is described. Cost data relative to the purchase and installation of specific systems are given, as well as the characteristics and information return for a system purchased at an arbitrary cost.

  10. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Meteorological Drought Variability in the Indian Region Using Standardized Precipitation Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M Naresh; Sai, M V R Sesha; Roy, P S

    2015-01-01

    Grid (1{\\deg} latitude x 1{\\deg} longitude) level daily rainfall data over India from June to September for the years 1951 to 2007, generated by India Meteorological Department, was analyzed to build monthly time series of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). Analysis of SPI was done to study the spatial and temporal patterns of drought occurrence in the country. Geographic spread of SPI derived Area under Dryness (AUD) in different years revealed the uniqueness of 2002 drought with wide spread dryness in July. Mann-Kendal trend analysis and moving average based trends performed on AUD indicated increasing trend in July. The area under moderate drought frequency has increased in the most recent decade. Ranking of years based on Drought Persistency Score (DPS) indicated that the year 1987 was the severe-most drought year in the country. The results of the study have revealed various aspects of drought climatology in India. A similar analysis with the SPI of finer spatial resolution and relating it to crop p...

  11. Candidate wind-turbine generator site cumulative meteorological data summary and data for January 1982 through September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.; Bradymire, S.L.; Gregory, J.L.

    1983-08-01

    Summarized cumulative hourly meteorological data for 20 new sites selected in early 1980 as part of the expanded candidate site program are presented. The reporting period is July 1980 through September 1982. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and to provide data that could be considered representative of longer-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and in a topographic map showing the approximated location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of the information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for longer-term average wind energy production at each site. Two appendices of other data are provided. Appendix A contains summarized data collected at new and original sites during the period January 1982 through September 1982. Appendix B contains cumulative summarized data for those original sites selected in 1976 with data collection programs continuing into 1982.

  12. AUGUST 2001 2049S U T Y R I N E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    of Baroclinic Meanders and Deep Eddies in a Gulf Stream­type Jet over a Sloping Bottom GEORGI G. SUTYRIN, ISAAC Spatiotemporal evolution of a small localized meander on a Gulf Stream­type baroclinically unstable jet over of the jet is consistent with observations in the Gulf Stream system downstream of Cape Hatteras. 1

  13. Electromagnetic Observables in Few-Nucleon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonia Bacca

    2012-10-10

    The electromagnetic probe is a very valuable tool to study the dynamics of few nucleons. It can be very helpful in shedding light on the not yet fully understood three-nucleon forces. We present an update on the theoretical studies of electromagnetic induced reactions, such as photo-disintegration and electron scattering off 4He. We will show that they potentially represent a tool to discriminate among three-nucleon forces. Then, we will discuss the charge radius and the nuclear electric polarizability of the 6He halo nucleus.

  14. Invited Paper THE EARTH OBSERVING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    (with MISR). * Through their intake and emission of carbon dioxide, the primary anthropogenic greenhouse-8194-0600-7/91/$4.OO SPIE Vol. 1491 Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Chemistry(1991) / 117 Downloaded From gas, terrestrial and marine plants are a key part of the global carbon cycle. To better understand

  15. Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    waters • Sensor-equipped buoys, robotic boats and pier-and biological parameters. Buoy and robotic boat in KingCombined use of static buoy, mobile robotic boat and

  16. Glider and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Observing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    + H Energy consumption per unit distance Ratio Glider/Large AUV R=0.033 R3=0.0027 R=0.05 R=0 Mbyte per hour Yes 10 Mbits per sec surface short range J Sensors discussed later J Water sampling 50

  17. JPL D-28534 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 June 15, 2004 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.4 Zeeman Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Magnetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 Tensor magnetic susceptibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2

  18. AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and variability from observa- tional data, but it does not include attribution of the causes of climate change and Reynolds--NOAA/ National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina; lumpkin several NOAA offices: theClimateProgramOffice(CPO)in SilverSpring,Maryland;theNational Climatic Data

  19. Glider and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Observing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    .1 Performance metrics for AUV surveys Present-day limitations, for example in the energy available in autonomous of harmful algal blooms (HABs) that remains a challenge for the marine science community, not the technology changes occur over a range of time and space scales. A simple metric for estimating the information

  20. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 4 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 23 JULY 2001 Observation of the Quantum Zeno and Anti-Zeno Effects in an Unstable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. Our experiment consists of ultracold sodium atoms in an accelerated standing wave of light which measurement-induced suppression of the dy- namics of a two-state driven system has been observed [15 of the Quantum Zeno and Anti-Zeno Effects in an Unstable System M. C. Fischer, B. Gutiérrez-Medina, and M

  1. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  2. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  3. Six-week time series of eddy covariance CO2 flux at Mammoth Mountain, California: performance evaluation and role of meteorological forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer; Lewicki, J.L.; Fischer, M.L.; Hilley, G.E.

    2007-10-15

    CO{sub 2} and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO{sub 2} emission rates. EC CO{sub 2} fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (mean = 1346 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}). Using footprint modeling, EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were compared to CO{sub 2} fluxes measured by the chamber method on a grid repeatedly over a 10-day period. Half-hour EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were moderately correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.42) with chamber fluxes, whereas average-daily EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were well correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.70) with chamber measurements. Average daily EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were correlated with both average daily wind speed and atmospheric pressure; relationships were similar to those observed between chamber CO{sub 2} fluxes and the atmospheric parameters over a comparable time period. Energy balance closure was assessed by statistical regression of EC energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) against available energy (net radiation, less soil heat flux). While incomplete (R{sup 2} = 0.77 for 1:1 line), the degree of energy balance closure fell within the range observed in many investigations conducted in contrasting ecosystems and climates. Results indicate that despite complexities presented by the HLTK, EC can be reliably used to monitor background variations in volcanic CO{sub 2} fluxes associated with meteorological forcing, and presumably changes related to deeply derived processes such as volcanic activity.

  4. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  5. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  6. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  7. Observations of LSI+61303 with Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Holder; A. Falcone; D. Morris

    2007-09-18

    The TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary system LSI+61303 was observed with the Swift satellite from early September 2006 to early January 2007. Many of these observations were contemporaneous with TeV observations. The data consist of observations on 24 separate days with durations ranging between 700s and 4700s, and partially cover 4.5 orbital periods of the binary system. We present here an analysis of the 0.2 to 10keV X-ray data from the Swift-XRT instrument. Contemporaneous optical data from UVOT are also available.

  8. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  9. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  10. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  11. HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

  12. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  13. In "Observation, Theory, and Modeling of Atmospheric Variability", edited by Zhu et al., World Scientific Series on Meteorology of East Asia, Vol. 3, World Scientific Publishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    of required research on this subject. 1. Introduction Potential global warming caused by increasing greenhouse reduce or amplify a global warming projection. Figure 1. Schematic illustration of the solar and infrared discrepancy in the magnitude of the simulated global warming in different models. In response to a doubling

  14. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  15. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  16. Real-Time Forecasting for the Antarctic: An Evaluation of the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS)*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Real-Time Forecasting for the Antarctic: An Evaluation of the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System. MANNING AND JORDAN G. POWERS Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division, National Center.S. Antarctic Program's field operations, the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) was implemented in Oc

  17. Weather: National | Victoria | NSW | ACT | Queensland | South Aus | Western Aus | Nthn. Territory | Tasmania FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Brisbane River catchment to Brisbane City, where major flooding can still occur from local area run | Tasmania FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the UPPER BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM This brochure describes the flood warning system operated by the Bureau of Meteorology for the upper Brisbane River above Wivenhoe

  18. A mobile platform to constrain regional estimates of evapotranspiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    observations and ancillary meteorological measurements.and/or a lack of ancillary meteorological measurements (Rana

  19. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  20. Green River air quality model development: meteorological and tracer data, July/August 1982 field study in Brush Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.; Lee, R.N.; Orgill, M.M.; Zak, B.D.

    1984-06-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric tracer studies were conducted during a 3-week period in July and August of 1982 in the Brush Creek Valley of northwestern Colorado. The objective of the field experiments was to obtain data to evaluate a model, called VALMET, developed at PNL to predict dispersion of air pollutants released from an elevated stack located within a deep mountain valley in the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period. Three tracer experiments were conducted in the valley during the 2-week period. In these experiments, sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was released from a height of approximately 100 m, beginning before sunrise and continuing until the nocturnal down-valley winds reversed several hours after sunrise. Dispersion of the sulfur hexafluoride after release was evaluated by measuring SF/sub 6/ concentrations in ambient air samples taken from sampling devices operated within the valley up to about 8 km down valley from the source. An instrumented research aircraft was also used to measure concentrations in and above the valley. Tracer samples were collected using a network of radio-controlled bag sampling stations, two manually operated gas chromatographs, a continuous SF/sub 6/ monitor, and a vertical SF/sub 6/ profiler. In addition, basic meteorological data were collected during the tracer experiments. Frequent profiles of vertical wind and temperature structure were obtained with tethered balloons operated at the release site and at a site 7.7 km down the valley from the release site. 10 references, 63 figures, 50 tables.

  1. Investigation Of The Hydro-Meteorological Hazards Along The Bulgarian Coast Of The Black Sea By Reconstructions Of Historical Storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galabov, Vasko; Bogatchev, Andrey; Tsenova, Boryana

    2015-01-01

    Information about the hydro-meteorological parameters during the extreme sea storms is of significant importance for the sustainable development in the context of flood risk for the coastal areas. Usually there is a lack of sufficiently long history of instrumental measurements of the extreme winds, waves and storm surges. Simulation of historical storms is an important tool to evaluate the potential coastal hazards. In the absence of measured data hindcasts can satisfy the need for historical data. The wave and storm-surge regional numerical simulations have been carried out for the ten most severe storms over the Bulgarian coast of the Black Sea from the period 1972-2012. The ERA-Interim and ERA-40 reanalysis of wind at 10 m and mean sea level pressure have been downscaled with a high resolution atmospheric model ALADIN to the horizontal and time scales suitable for precise evaluation of hydro-meteorological parameters during the storms. The downscaled fields of wind and sea level pressure have been used as...

  2. If physics is an information science, what is an observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2012-02-11

    Interpretations of quantum theory have traditionally assumed a "Galilean" observer, a bare "point of view" implemented physically by a quantum system. This paper investigates the consequences of replacing such an informationally-impoverished observer with an observer that satisfies the requirements of classical automata theory, i.e. an observer that encodes sufficient prior information to identify the system being observed and recognize its acceptable states. It shows that with reasonable assumptions about the physical dynamics of information channels, the observations recorded by such an observer will display the typical characteristics predicted by quantum theory, without requiring any specific assumptions about the observer's physical implementation.

  3. Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere -- in the Metric System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eihle, W. O.; Powers, R. J.; Clark, R.A.

    1968-01-01

    The hydrometeorologist is often confronted with the problem of determination of precipitable water in the atmosphere based on surface dewpoints and the assumption of a saturated atmosphere with a pseudoadiabatic lapse rate. ...

  4. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  5. 1036 VOLUME 34J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    energy. This increase in the energy conversion is absent in the wind-driven case, indicating an important Meteorological Society Remote Wind-Driven Overturning in the Absence of the Drake Passage Effect BARRY A. KLINGER Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany JEFFERY R. SCOTT Massachusetts Institute

  6. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  7. Selecting Observation Platforms for Optimized Anomaly Detectability under Unreliable Partial Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Diagnosers for keeping track on the occurrences of special events in the framework of unreliable partially observed discrete-event dynamical systems were developed in previous work. This paper considers observation platforms consisting of sensors that provide partial and unreliable observations and of diagnosers that analyze them. Diagnosers in observation platforms typically perform better as sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper proposes a methodology for finding an observation platform that achieves an optimal balance between cost and performance, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, an observation platform optimization algorithm is utilized that uses two greedy heuristics, one myopic and another based on projected performances. These heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best observation platforms. The developed algorithm is then applied to an observation platform optimization problem for a multi-unit-operation system. Results show that improved observation platforms can be found that may significantly reduce the observation platform cost but still yield acceptable performance for correctly inferring the occurrences of special events.

  8. Combined influence of atmospheric physics and soil hydrology on the simulated meteorology at the SIRTA atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

    for This paper is a contribution to the special issue on the IPSL and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models it to evaluate the standard and new parametrizations of boundary layer/convection/clouds in the Earth System Model (ESM) of Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), which differentiate the IPSL-CM5A and IPSL- CM5B

  9. FEBRUARY 2004 115M A Y E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Beth

    systems. The need for end-to-end design of systems from data gathering, to analysis and product generation, forecasts of storm movement, precipitation forecasts, and wind shifts. These nowcasts are an important included wind shifts and nonsevere rain affecting sporting events or aircraft operations as well as severe

  10. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 1 of 2 1. Geostrophic Flow: Should horizontal winds turn clockwise or counter diagram of press, coriolis and drag accelerations for air parcel between isobars). 2. Hydrostatic Balance

  11. September 2008AmerICAN meteOrOLOGICAL SOCIetY | 1275 AffiliAtions: Lyon--Department of Physical Geography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    September 2008AmerICAN meteOrOLOGICAL SOCIetY | 1275 AffiliAtions: Lyon--Department of Physical University, Boston, Massachusetts Corresponding Author: Steve W. Lyon, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden E-mail: steve.lyon@natgeo.su.se DOI: 10

  12. The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part II: Present versus Future Time Simulation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    results to infer potential air pollution changes in California. Changes in both the meteorological fields of stagnation days (NNSD) integrating all stagnation events, during which most of the air pollution episodes will be stronger in the future for the two main air pollution seasons (i.e., summer and winter). Increases

  13. Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions in South Florida and its possible impacts on the number of Asthma cases: Five years of correlations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions, wind speed and direction), and air quality indicators (ozone O3 and particulate matter PM2.5) are presented in this study. Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter have been both important triggers of asthma

  14. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 140: 792804, April 2014 Sensitivity of tropical-cyclone models to the surface drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    , University of Munich, Germany b Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA cHurricane in this direction. Key Words: hurricanes; tropical cyclones; typhoons; surface drag coefficient; frictional drag in deep rotating clouds. A fraction of the angular momentum drawn inwards is lost because

  15. To appear in the Journal of Geophysical Research, 1998, Version Date: September 30, 1998. Comparisons of aircraft, ship, and buoy meteorological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    . Comparisons of aircraft, ship, and buoy meteorological measurements from TOGA COARE Sean P. Burns, 1 Djamal measurements from buoys and ships, led to proposed offsets for the aircrafts' temperature, humidity data to the individual ship and buoy sensor heights for 264 over­flight comparisons. In addition, all

  16. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 1389--1397, 2004 1389 Mesoscale Assimilation of TMI Rainfall Data with 4DVAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 1389--1397, 2004 1389 Mesoscale rainfall data into a mesoscale model, using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR on mesoscale forecasts (e.g., Supertyphoon Paka in 1997 (Pu et al. 2002)), as the global analysis provide

  17. With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air quality implications of a changing climate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air?" noting that ". . . changing climatic conditions could significantly affect the air quality in some quality implications of a changing climate. D iscussion of the potential sensitivity of air quality

  18. 1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere­ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society The Deep-Ocean, Washington (Manuscript received 20 June 2002, in final form 3 November 2002) ABSTRACT The deep-ocean heat

  19. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  20. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  1. Observations on European Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  2. FORECAST OF ENSEMBLE POWER PRODUCTION BY GRID-CONNECTED PV SYSTEMS Elke Lorenz*, Detlev Heinemann*, Hashini Wickramarathne*, Hans Georg Beyer +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    of Physics, Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Energy Meteorology Group, 26111 Oldenburg, GermanyH, Spicherer Straße 48, D-86157 Augsburg, Germany ABSTRACT: The contribution of power production by PV systemsFORECAST OF ENSEMBLE POWER PRODUCTION BY GRID-CONNECTED PV SYSTEMS Elke Lorenz*, Detlev Heinemann

  3. The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

    2010-08-15

    The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

  4. AOML FY-2008 Publications Page 1 Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Melbourne, Australia, December 3-6, 2007. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), in press. In Marine Pollution: New Research, T.N. Hofer (ed.). Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, in press (2008. Langdon. The Integrated Coral Observing Network (ICON): Sensor solutions for sensitive sites. Proceedings

  5. A Distributed Modeling System for Short-Term to Seasonal Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting in Snowmelt Dominated Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Gill, Muhammad K.; Coleman, Andre M.; Prasad, Rajiv; Vail, Lance W.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a distributed modeling system for short-term to seasonal water supply forecasts with the ability to utilize remotely-sensed snow cover products and real-time streamflow measurements. Spatial variability in basin characteristics and meteorology is represented using a raster-based computational grid. Canopy interception, snow accumulation and melt, and simplified soil water movement are simulated in each computational unit. The model is run at a daily time step with surface runoff and subsurface flow aggregated at the basin scale. This approach allows the model to be updated with spatial snow cover and measured streamflow using an Ensemble Kalman-based data assimilation strategy that accounts for uncertainty in weather forecasts, model parameters, and observations used for updating. Model inflow forecasts for the Dworshak Reservoir in northern Idaho are compared to observations and to April-July volumetric forecasts issued by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) for Water Years 2000 – 2006. October 1 volumetric forecasts are superior to those issued by the NRCS, while March 1 forecasts are comparable. The ensemble spread brackets the observed April-July volumetric inflows in all years. Short-term (one and three day) forecasts also show excellent agreement with observations.

  6. A simplified system of pressure surfaces for atmospheric analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Francis Schofield

    1959-01-01

    LIBRARY A g M COLLEGE OF TEXAS A SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF PRESSURE SURFACES FOR ATMOSPHERIC ANALYSIS A Thesis By FRANCIS S. SHAY + Captain USAF Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1959 Major Subject: Meteorology A SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF PRESSURE SURFACES FOR ATMOSPHERIC ANALYSIS A Thesis By FRANCIS S. SHAY Captain USAF jpp roved j as to style and content...

  7. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProductsObservations Projected

  8. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

  9. OLAF ---A General Modeling System to Evaluate and Optimize the Location of an Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fliege, Jörg

    OLAF --- A General Modeling System to Evaluate and Optimize the Location of an Air Polluting.2 The Air Dispersion Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3 Ecology and Chemokinetics 17 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 6.1.3 Meteorological Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 6.1.4 Pollutant Data

  10. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Deepto Chakrabarty; John Chiu; Mark H. Finger; Danny T. Koh; Robert W. Nelson; Thomas A. Prince; Bradley C. Rubin; D. Matthew Scott; Mark Stollberg; Brian A. Vaughan; Colleen A. Wilson; Robert B. Wilson

    1997-07-22

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources.

  11. VLA multifrequency observations of RS CVn binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Garcia-Sanchez; J. M. Paredes; M. Ribo

    2003-03-21

    We present multiepoch Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 1.4 GHz, 4.9 GHz, 8.5 GHz and 14.9 GHz for a sample of eight RS CVn binary systems. Circular polarization measurements of these systems are also reported. Most of the fluxes observed are consistent with incoherent emission from mildly relativistic electrons. Several systems show an increase of the degree of circular polarization with increasing frequency in the optically thin regime, in conflict with predictions by gyrosynchrotron models. We observed a reversal in the sense of circular polarization with increasing frequency in three non-eclipsing systems: EI Eri, DM Uma and HD 8358. We find clear evidence for coherent plasma emission at 1.4 GHz in the quiescent spectrum of HD 8358 during the helicity reversal. The degrees of polarization of the other two systems could also be accounted for by a coherent emission process. The observations of ER Vul revealed two U-shaped flux spectra at the highest frequencies. The U-shape of the spectra may be accounted for by an optically thin gyrosynchrotron source for the low frequency part whereas the high frequency part is dominated by a thermal emission component.

  12. 27/10/2010 12:48AGU: Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/rs/rs1002/2009RS004215/2009RS004215.xml&t=

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    frequency radio wave receiver systems Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/rs/rs1002/2009RS004215/2009RS004215.xml&t= Keywords radio waves induced currents geomagnetic Index Terms Ionosphere Abstract Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave

  13. On Some Meteorological Patterns in the Dead Sea Area during Advective Sharav Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    power (Weiner, 1980), moti- vated the model analysis presented here. Evaluation of evaporation rates of fine grid resolution over the lake area,which becomesexpensivewhen applied in a 3-D model. Verification systems associatedwith an advective sha'ravsituation (based on Levi, 1967). II Results The model

  14. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 112 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01

    , even when renewable energy production was included as a fossil fuel carbon offset. The most productive. To account for C removed in harvestable biomass we calculated adjusted Net Ecosystem Production (NEPadj; g C recommendations for future establishment of biofuels feedstock and row agriculture systems with different

  15. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 134: 385402 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Romu

    2008-01-01

    de Mallorca, Spain ABSTRACT: The theory of potential vorticity (PV) allows us to describe the life nonlinear mass­wind-balance approximation. Then it combines a prognostic system of balance equations motion) around the cyclone, with low computational cost. The potential of the method to elucidate

  16. Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Suspended Particulates: Comparison with Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-08-25

    Atmospheric flows exhibit self-similar fractal space-time fluctuations on all space-time scales in association with inverse power law distribution for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as wind, temperature, etc., and thus implies long-range correlations, identified as self-organized criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature. A general systems theory based on classical statistical physical concepts developed by the author visualizes the fractal fluctuations to result from the coexistence of eddy fluctuations in an eddy continuum, the larger scale eddies being the integrated mean of enclosed smaller scale eddies. The model satisfies the maximum entropy principle and predicts that the probability distributions of component eddy amplitudes and the corresponding variances (power spectra) are quantified by the same universal inverse power law distribution which is a function of the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric particulate size spectrum is derived in terms of the model predicted universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following four experimentally determined data sets: (i) CIRPAS mission TARFOX_WALLOPS_SMPS aerosol size distributions (ii) CIRPAS mission ARM-IOP (Ponca City, OK) aerosol size distributions (iii) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 (CARG Aerosol and Cloud Data) cloud drop size distributions and (iv) TWP-ICE (Darwin, Australia) rain drop size distributions.

  17. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  18. Numerical Model Construction with Closed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Dietrich; Gerta Köster; Hans-Joachim Bungartz

    2015-10-18

    Performing analysis, optimization and control using simulations of many-particle systems is computationally demanding when no macroscopic model for the dynamics of the variables of interest is available. In case observations on the macroscopic scale can only be produced via legacy simulator code or live experiments, finding a model for these macroscopic variables is challenging. In this paper, we employ time-lagged embedding theory to construct macroscopic numerical models from output data of a black box, such as a simulator or live experiments. Since the state space variables of the constructed, coarse model are dynamically closed and observable by an observation function, we call these variables closed observables. The approach is an online-offline procedure, as model construction from observation data is performed offline and the new model can then be used in an online phase, independent of the original. We illustrate the theoretical findings with numerical models constructed from time series of a two-dimensional ordinary differential equation system, and from the density evolution of a transport-diffusion system. Applicability is demonstrated in a real-world example, where passengers leave a train and the macroscopic model for the density flow onto the platform is constructed with our approach. If only the macroscopic variables are of interest, simulation runtimes with the numerical model are three orders of magnitude lower compared to simulations with the original fine scale model. We conclude with a brief discussion of possibilities of numerical model construction in systematic upscaling, network optimization and uncertainty quantification.

  19. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  20. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  1. Introduction to meteorological measurements and data handling for solar energy applications. Task IV. Development of an isolation handbook and instrument package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The following are covered: the Sun and its radiation, solar radiation and atmospheric interaction, solar radiation measurement methods, spectral irradiance measurements of natural sources, the measurement of infrared radiation, the measurement of circumsolar radiation, some empirical properties of solar radiation and related parameters, duration of sunshine, and meteorological variables related to solar energy. Included in appendices are manufacturers and distributors of solar radiation measuring instruments and an approximate method for quality control of solar radiation instruments. (MHR)

  2. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-01-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  3. Personal observations on interdisciplinarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, E. N.

    1999-10-11

    The author's assignment was to report on how I{sup 3} relates to professional societies and journals he has known, a not unreasonable request given past associations with the Materials Research Society (MRS) and its journal, JMR, particularly in their more formative years. Some recollections and some comments on current postures of MRS and JMR will be found in the section following. There are manifold anecdotes one might relate about overcoming (or not) barriers raised by disciplinary preconception and much revered institutional norms. But to what end? On recalling his own involvements and on trying to discern the common elements, the author concludes that lessons learned from such accounts are, at the detail level, too situation-specific to be generally useful while at the same time being easily generalized to a few tenets that most of us by now find obvious in principle but that provide no actionable roadmap for implementing I{sup 3} in a specific new arena. How can that be? Other contributors are submitting the I{sup 3}R challenge to scholarly analysis and reporting on significant impediments and enviable achievements. He notes that the common themes permeating the entire discussion reduce to a few fundamental aspects of human nature well known and ubiquitous not merely in the universe of science, technology and research, but in broader society. He feels it is important not to lose sight of this as one examines I{sup 3} problems and solutions, for it is often the larger context that rises to thwart the best of local intentions. He feels that humans are a risk averse species. This translates into resistance to change and thus to institutional inertia. When taken in concert with the subjective propensity to categorize and the objective need at any given stage of development to parse complex systems into manageable subunits, it becomes clear why rigid taxonomies are the rule. Be they definitions of departments on campus, political labels, or finding program classifications. It is fair to say that in the examples presented at this gathering, the origin of hurdles confronting introduction of an I{sup 3} approach in extant systems is the inevitable rigidity of existing structures. Similarly, successes seem to arise when one or more of a few criteria are met. Based on enlightened self-interest, the principal movers find the risk-reward calculus of success compelling enough to pay the price of breaking with tradition. This is often facilitated when the entrepreneurial venture does not risk the mainstay of the principals' vocations. Also, barriers are lowered considerably when the new I{sup 3} enterprise is green field i.e., not making a frontal assault on a preexisting structure. Otherwise, the organizations involved must offer some open avenues to change or at least to circumvent boundaries. Having the right-sized, well-positioned resources is certainly also necessary. Of course, it would be naive to underestimate the importance of the details underlying any and all I{sup 3} successes, but these must be devised in the milieu of the particular people and institutions involved. The author believes that no generic protocols for barrier reduction or for incentives that balance risk will fit differing circumstances. Attempts to map one successful formula onto a new situation are likely to disappoint. Likewise, general programs to promote I{sup 3} in a top down fashion may raise awareness and enthusiasm, but are always tested at the bench--just as in technology transfer, I{sup 3}R is a contact sport. Although not sufficient, it is nevertheless still clearly a necessary prerequisite to create and sustain genuine and practical inducements that mitigate the risk attendant to disturbing the status quo and blunt institutional disincentives.

  4. Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effective low cost ocean observing system. This system was recently developed and deployed for offshore oil. The Fetch node was deployed in 550 feet of water to measure ocean temperature and pressure, and the Tsunami Observing Initiatives Pioneer Array. The Fetch will record pressure and temperatures at this site prior

  5. THEORY OF THE CONTROL OF OBSERVABLE QUANTUM V. P. BELAVKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belavkin, Viacheslav P.

    . The general problem of optimal control of a quantum-mechanical system is discussed and the corre- sponding], of the dynamical observation and feedback control optimization problems for such systems has provided a means measurement and control of classical (i.e., non-quantum) Markov processes with quantum observation channels

  6. AUGUST 2001 1779P R O T A T A N D L E M A I^ T R E 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    , and kinematic and thermodynamic structure of a tropical mesoscale convective system observed by instrumented and morphological structures. The retrieved kinematic and ther- modynamic structures are compared in detail is suspected to be the triggering mechanism for S2. 1. Introduction One of the main objectives of the Tropical

  7. Wind measurements in Mars' middle atmosphere at equinox and solstice: IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometric CO observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Moreno; E. Lellouch; T. Encrenaz; F. Forget; E. Chassefiere; F. Hourdin; Stéphane Guilloteau

    2007-01-31

    Characterizing the Martian atmosphere is an essential objective to understand its meteorology and its climate. The lower atmosphere (< 40 km) and middle atmosphere (40-80 km) of Mars appear dynamically coupled at much higher levels than in the case of the Earth. The vertical extension of the weather phenomena is considerable with for example Hadley's cells reaching the top of the neutral atmosphere (120 km). The circulation in the middle atmosphere modifies the meteorology of the lower atmosphere, affecting the transport and climatic processes Observations of the CO rotational lines at millimeter (mm) wavelengths (Clancy et al 1990) have strongly contributed in the study of the vertical distribution of this compound and the thermal profile in the atmosphere of Mars over 0-70 km. Singledish observations of the CO Doppler lineshift have allowed direct wind measurements in the martian middle atmosphere near 50 km altitude (Lellouch et al 1991), but at a low spatial resolution (12'') enabling only an essentially hemispheric resolution of the martian disk. The use of mm interferometry has allowed us to better spatially resolve the Martian disk, in order to obtain wind maps of the middle atmosphere (Moreno et al 2001).

  8. Supplementary material for "Atmospheric Brown Clouds in the Himalayas: first two years of continuous observations at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    simulation of the Khumbu valley meteorology for the analysis of air-mass transport to NCO-P involved

  9. THE PRECIPITATION REGIME OF DRONNING MAUD LAND, ANTARCTICA, DERIVED FROM AMPS (ANTARCTIC MESOSCALE PREDICTION SYSTEM) ARCHIVE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Elisabeth

    THE PRECIPITATION REGIME OF DRONNING MAUD LAND, ANTARCTICA, DERIVED FROM AMPS (ANTARCTIC MESOSCALE. Manning2) 1) Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, University of Innsbruck, Austria 2) Mesoscale the temporal and spatial distribution of precipitation in DML using AMPS (Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System

  10. Idaho Field Experiment 1981. Volume 1. Experimental design and measurement systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Start, G E; Cate, J H; Dickson, C R; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R

    1983-10-01

    The Idaho Field Experiment is reported in three volumes and supplemented by special contractor reports. Volume I describes the design and goals of the measurement program and the measurement systems utilized during the field program. The measurement systems layouts are described as well. The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in South East Idaho over the Upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were measured between July 15 and 30, 1981. Eight-hour releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made from 46 m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24 km square. Also, a single total integrated sample, of about 30 hours duration, was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72 km (using 6 km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plumes were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High-altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were also collected. 10 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Apparatus for observing a hostile environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

  12. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  13. AUGUST 2003 649S C H E R T Z E R E T A L . 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanken, Peter D.

    occurred in 1998, but larger vapor pressure gradients over water and 8% higher solar radiation was observed was observed in 1998 in the spring warming phase. Passive microwave imagery [from the Special Sensor Microwave

  14. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and OilPublictearing

  15. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and

  16. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeeding access

  17. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  18. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  19. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Messenger

    2015-06-22

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield detections of $10^3-10^7$ binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope with the one year of observations. We find by direct simulation of $10^3$ detections of binary neutron stars that, within our simplifying assumptions, $H_0,\\Omega_m,\\Omega_\\Lambda,w_0$ and $w_1$ can be measured at the $95\\%$ level with an accuracy of $\\sim 8\\%,65\\%,39\\%,80\\%$ and $90\\%$, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is reached for a number of observed events $O(10^{6-7})$

  20. Accelerated Expansion: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Polarski

    2001-09-20

    The present paradigm in cosmology is the usual Big-Bang Cosmology in which two stages of accelerated expansion are incorporated: the inflationary phase in the very early universe which produces the classical inhomogeneities observed in the universe, and a second stage of acceleration at the present time as the latest Supernovae observations seem to imply. Both stages could be produced by a scalar field and observations will strongly constrain the microscopic lagrangian of any proposed model.

  1. Robust energy transfer mechanism via precession resonance in nonlinear turbulent wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn; Dan Lucas

    2014-04-30

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via triads with nonzero frequency mismatch, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. We introduce the concepts of truly dynamical degrees of freedom and triad precession. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the triads' precession frequencies resonate with the system's nonlinear frequencies, leading to a collective state of synchronised triads with strong turbulent cascades at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  2. Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions: A Data Requirements and Gaps Analysis for Offshore Renewable Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Dennis; Frame, Caitlin; Gill, Carrie; Hanson, Howard; Moriarty, Patrick; Powell, Mark; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, Jim; Wynne, Jason

    2012-03-01

    The offshore renewable energy industry requires accurate meteorological and oceanographic (“metocean”) data for evaluating the energy potential, economic viability, and engineering requirements of offshore renewable energy projects. It is generally recognized that currently available metocean data, instrumentation, and models are not adequate to meet all of the stakeholder needs on a national scale. Conducting wind and wave resource assessments and establishing load design conditions requires both interagency collaboration as well as valuable input from experts in industry and academia. Under the Department of Energy and Department of Interior Memorandum of Understanding, the Resource Assessment and Design Condition initiative supports collaborative national efforts by adding to core atmospheric and marine science knowledge relevant to offshore energy development. Such efforts include a more thorough understanding and data collection of key metocean phenomena such as wind velocity and shear; low-level jets; ocean, tidal, and current velocities; wave characteristics; geotechnical data relating to surface and subsurface characteristics; seasonal and diurnal variations; and the interaction among these conditions. Figure 1 presents a graphical representation of some metocean phenomena that can impact offshore energy systems. This document outlines the metocean observations currently available; those that are not available; and those that require additional temporal-spatial coverage, resolution, or processing for offshore energy in an effort to gather agreed-upon, needed observations.

  3. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barrau; J. Grain

    2015-10-28

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  4. Observational Study PAUL R. ROSENBAUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    . Howell John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 2005 #12;Observational Study Observational Studies Defined describing the subjects before treatment. As a consequence, random assignment tends to make the groups comparable both in terms of measured char- acteristics and characteristics that were not or could

  5. Passive solar systems performance under conditions in Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, A.B.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1989-12-01

    This paper presents energy performance of 12 passive solar systems for three climatically different zones of Bulgaria. The results are compared with a base-case residential house that has a design typical for these areas. The different passive solar systems are compared on the basis of the percentage of solar savings and the yield, which is the annual net benefit of adding the passive solar system. The analyses are provided based on monthly meteorological data, and the method used for calculations is the Solar Load Ratio. Recommendations for Bulgarian conditions are given. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  7. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woollings, Tim

    eddy-driven jet stream. In previous studies it has been argued that a slow decay of the autocorrelation trend of the jet stream which cannot be explained as aris- ing from climate noise. These findings have through north-south shifts of the atmospheric eddy-driven jet stream. The jet stream steers weather

  8. Implementing Industrial MultiAgent Systems using Rick Evertsz 1 , Martyn Fletcher 1 , Richard Jones 1 , Jacquie Jarvis 1 , James Brusey 2 , and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dance, Sandy

    Implementing Industrial Multi­Agent Systems using JACK TM Rick Evertsz 1 , Martyn Fletcher 1 the development of two industrial applications that made use of JACK TM (a meteorological alerting environment and a responsive manufacturing set­up). 1 Introduction Over the past decade, there has been an increased industry

  9. Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

    2009-01-01

    The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

  10. Observation of Magnetoelectric Multiferroicity in a Cubic Perovskite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of Magnetoelectric Multiferroicity in a Cubic Perovskite System:LaMn3Cr4O12 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August...

  11. Passive States for Essential Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Strich

    2008-01-23

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given in \\cite{bb99} and \\cite{bs04} which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g. $d$-dimensional Minkowski space-time for $d\\geq 3$). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer travelling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a KMS-state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also the modular objects associated to such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  12. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  13. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  14. Mm/submm observations of symbiotic binary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mikolajewska; R. J. Ivison; A. Omont

    2002-10-22

    We present and discuss mm/submm observations of quiescent S-type symbiotic systems, and compare them with popular models proposed to account for their radio emission. We find that the M giant mass-loss rates derived from our observations are systematically higher than those reported for single M giants.

  15. General relativistic observables of the GRAIL mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turyshev, Slava G; Sazhin, Mikhail V

    2012-01-01

    We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be ...

  16. General relativistic observables of the GRAIL mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Viktor T. Toth; Mikhail V. Sazhin

    2012-12-18

    We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be used to further improve the already impressive results of this lunar gravity recovery experiment after the mission is complete. Finally, we present transformation rules for frequencies and gravitational potentials and their application to GRAIL.

  17. Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Couds over Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, J.; Read, William G.; Massie, Steven T.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Colarco, Peter; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2011-06-01

    Aerosols can affect cloud particle size and lifetime, which impacts precipitation, radiation and climate. Previous studies1-4 suggested that reduced ice cloud particle size and fall speed due to the influence of aerosols may increase evaporation of ice crystals and/or cloud radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), leading to higher water vapor abundance in air entering the stratosphere. Observational substantiation of such processes is still lacking. Here, we analyze new observations from multiple NASA satellites to show the imprint of pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. We focus our analysis on the highly-polluted South and East Asia region during boreal summer. We find that "polluted" ice clouds have smaller ice effective radius than "clean" clouds. In the TTL, the polluted clouds are associated with warmer temperature and higher specific humidity than the clean clouds. The water vapor difference between the polluted and clean clouds cannot be explained by other meteorological factors, such as updraft and detrainment strength. Therefore, the observed higher water vapor entry value into the stratosphere in the polluted clouds than in the clean clouds is likely a manifestation of aerosol pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. Given the radiative and chemical importance of stratospheric water vapor, the increasing emission of aerosols over Asia may have profound impacts on stratospheric chemistry and global energy balance and water cycle.

  18. The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research A partnership between CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Stewart

    --Measurement. Tide-gages--Australia. Tide-gages--South Pacific Ocean. Tsunami Warning System--South Pacific Ocean

  19. Observations of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the state of research that employs astronomical (remote sensing) observations of solids ("dust") in young circumstellar disks to learn about planet formation. The intention is for it to serve as an accessible, introductory, pedagogical resource for junior scientists interested in the subject. After some historical background and a basic observational primer, the focus is shifted to the three fundamental topics that broadly define the field: (1) demographics -- the relationships between disk properties and the characteristics of their environments and hosts; (2) structure -- the spatial distribution of disk material and its associated physical conditions and composition; and (3) evolution -- the signposts of key changes in disk properties, including the growth and migration of solids and the impact of dynamical interactions with young planetary systems. Based on the state of the art results in these areas, suggestions are made for potentially fruitful lines of work in the near future.

  20. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  1. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Whalen; Sean N. Brennan; Timothy D. Sauer; Steven J. Schiff

    2014-10-06

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces can be difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since almost all of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and nonlinear measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. Our analysis shows that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks.

  2. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01

    VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Approved...

  3. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  4. CHANGESINPERMEABILITYCAUSEDBYTRANSIENT STRESSES: FIELD OBSERVATIONS, EXPERIMENTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to seal pores. Monitor- ing permeability in geothermal systems where there is abun- dant seismicity increase permeability and fluid mobility in geo- logic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated

  5. Tailoring Strong Lensing Cosmographic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    Strong lensing time delay cosmography has excellent complementarity with other dark energy probes, and will soon have abundant systems detected. We investigate two issues in the imaging and spectroscopic followup required to obtain the time delay distance. The first is optimization of spectroscopic resources. We develop a code to optimize the cosmological leverage under the constraint of constant spectroscopic time, and find that sculpting the lens system redshift distribution can deliver a 40% improvement in dark energy figure of merit. The second is the role of systematics, correlated between different quantities of a given system or model errors common to all systems. We show how the levels of different systematics affect the cosmological parameter estimation, and derive guidance for the fraction of double image vs quad image systems to follow as a function of differing systematics between them.

  6. A NEW PARAMETRIZATION OF OBSERVERS INGRID BLUMTHALER AND JOCHEN TRUMPF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trumpf, Jochen

    by inspection. 1. Problem formulation. We study plants (observed systems) of the form P = w1 w2 w3 Fw1+w order, matrix) differential operators and the plant P is a linear time-invariant continuous time system is that the signal module F is an injective cogenerator in the category of D-modules, cf. [1]. Following the ideas

  7. Objectivity of Quantum Measurement in Many-Observer World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng-Wen Li; C. Y. Cai; X. F. Liu; C. P. Sun

    2015-08-06

    The objectivity of quantum measurement is treated as an emergent phenomenon with $N$ observers who can agree to the same result of measurement, and meanwhile, they can identify their records with each other. In this many-observer world (MOW), an objective quantum measurement is dealt with as a multipartite [$(N+1)$-body] quantum correlation among the measured system and $N$ observers when its bipartite reductions are the same classical correlations. With this conceptual clarification, we find that, an objective quantum measurement is implemented if and only if the MOW is initially factorized in a pure state and then the total system can evolve into a generalized GHZ state with respect to the orthogonal basis preferred by each observer. Especially, such objective quantum measurement is recast in ideal classical correlation when the observer world is macroscopic for $N\\rightarrow\\infty$.

  8. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-03

    For the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the ESG-CET team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (e.g., Couple Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and so forth), and analysis and visualization tools, all of which serve a diverse community of users. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL) as well as at unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory. More recently, ESG-CET has been extending services beyond data-file access and delivery to develop more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis capabilities. These will allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. Continued ESGF progress will result in a production ultrascale data system for empowering scientists who attempt new and exciting data exchanges that could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate-science discoveries.

  9. The Case for Mobile Devices in Environmental Observing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to interact with the embedded cyberinfrastructure, such as the sensor network. To bridge this gap, we argue devices such as PDAs and smart phones. We identify several key use cases and user bases, and explain how to be considered. We identify several key use case scenarios and user bases. In order to bridge this gap

  10. Observable behavior of dynamic systems: component reasoning for concurrent objects #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Einar Broch

    concurrent objects. # This research is partially funded by the EU project IST­33826 CREDO: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services (http://credo.cwi.nl). 1 Email: johand

  11. Observable behavior of dynamic systems: component reasoning for concurrent objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Einar Broch

    concurrent objects. This research is partially funded by the EU project IST-33826 CREDO: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services (http://credo.cwi.nl). 1 Email: johand

  12. On asymptotically efficient estimation in partially observed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Hemipshere's Autumn or Fall Equinox hasn't happened since 1662 and will not happen again until March 20, 2034 the March Equinox A total solar eclipse coinciding with Northern Hemisphere's Spring Equinox and Southern

  13. Disappearing Evidence: the Need for a Global Paleoclimate Observing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    are relatively rare in most reef areas of the world. Unfortu- nately, a significant number of these corals have, diatoms, cladocereans), isotopes, and other proxy measurements in lake and ocean sediments, corals coordinated effort, GPOS, designed to rescue endangered natural archives of past environ- mental variability

  14. AEROSOL OBSERVING SYSTEMS (AOS): NEW CAPABILITIES FOR ASR RESEARCHERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Three new AOS units, including.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish

  15. Campaign-level science traceability for Earth observation system architecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seher, Theodore K. (Theodore Kimball)

    2009-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Decadal Survey of 2007 presented a comprehensive vision for the evolution of space-based Earth Science resources. The practical development of the Decadal campaign, however, has highlighted four challenges ...

  16. On the Observability of Linear Systems from Random, Compressive Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy Grant DE-FG36-08GO88100. we have yK = OKx0. (3) If OK has full column rank (i Property (RIP), which is central to much analysis in CS. We also illustrate our results with a simple case-0830320, DARPA Grant HR0011-08- 1-0078, NSF grant CNS-0931748 and Department of Energy, Office of Energy

  17. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartmentAudits and6AuidtWorkplace

  18. Augmenting system reliability analyses with observation priors (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect AssessingBasinLecture)SciTechscales|

  19. Augmenting system reliability analyses with observation priors (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect AssessingBasinLecture)SciTechscales||

  20. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June 22, 2015OperationNonprofit| Department

  1. Observation on growth of bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    3013and g2009g3009 are the gain of the bandpass function at frequencies of g1858g3030, g1858g3013 and g1858g3009, respectively. For typical bandpass filtering, g2009g3030 ? 1 (3.6) g2009g3013 = g2009g3009 < g2009g3030 . (3.7) Thus, it is always... Sequence of Bandpass System .................................. 33 3.6 Jitter Transfer Function of Bandpass System ................................................... 34 3.7 Jitter Transfer Functions of Bandpass Systems with Q over 3 ? 30...

  2. TV Meteor Observations from Modra J. Toth L. Kornos S. Gajdos D. Kalmancok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veres, Peter

    results of single-station observation using the new fish-eye TV system, as well as double station TV observation of the Geminids 2006 shower. The fixed fish-eye TV system was developed for monitoring meteor the UFOAnalyser software. Keywords Fish-eye lenses Á Meteor shower Á TV meteor observations 1 Introduction

  3. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  4. Chaos, Dirac observables and constraint quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca Dittrich; Philipp A. Hoehn; Tim A. Koslowski; Mike I. Nelson

    2015-08-08

    There is good evidence that full general relativity is non-integrable or even chaotic. We point out the severe repercussions: differentiable Dirac observables and a reduced phase space do not exist in non-integrable constrained systems and are thus unlikely to occur in a generic general relativistic context. Instead, gauge invariant quantities generally become discontinuous, thus not admitting Poisson-algebraic structures and posing serious challenges to a quantization. Non-integrability also renders the paradigm of relational dynamics cumbersome, thereby straining common interpretations of the dynamics. We illustrate these conceptual and technical challenges with simple toy models. In particular, we exhibit reparametrization invariant models which fail to be integrable and, as a consequence, can either not be quantized with standard methods or lead to sick quantum theories without a semiclassical limit. These troubles are qualitatively distinct from semiclassical subtleties in unconstrained quantum chaos and can be directly traced back to the scarcity of Dirac observables. As a possible resolution, we propose to change the method of quantization by refining the configuration space topology until the generalized observables become continuous in the new topology and can acquire a quantum representation. This leads to the polymer quantization method underlying loop quantum cosmology and gravity. Remarkably, the polymer quantum theory circumvents the problems of the quantization with smooth topology, indicating that non-integrability and chaos, while a challenge, may not be a fundamental obstruction for quantum gravity.

  5. VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D leading ISW. The leading ISW gave rise to reversed flow in an 8-m layer above the bottom. It is argued 1991). This situation reinforces the importance of resuspension and mixing processes at the present

  6. VOLUME 29 MARCH 1999J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society 313

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui Xin

    jet stream. 1. Introduction Sea surface height (SSH), as measured by a radar altimeter, contains Meteorological Society 313 Seasonal Variations of Sea Surface Height in the Gulf Stream Region* KATHRYN A. KELLY Based on more than four years of altimetric sea surface height (SSH) data, the Gulf Stream shows

  7. 1910 VOLUME 29J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Meteorological Society Jet Streaks in the Gulf Stream STEPHAN D. HOWDEN* AND D. RANDOLPH WATTS Graduate School. The presence of the jet streaks can be explained kinematically as a superposition of the Gulf Stream differs from the canonical picture of jet streak/baroclinic wave development in the atmospheric jet stream

  8. VOLUME 30 1 AUGUST 2000J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2000 American Meteorological Society 1833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Meteorological Society 1833 Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences J. CARTER OHLMANN Scripps ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by 23 and 34 W m 2 , respectively transmission in the upper few meters as a greater portion of the irradiance exists in the deep-penetrating

  9. 3528 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    current breaks up into a series of plumes that penetrate downslope into the deeper ocean, producing strong Meteorological Society Instability of Abyssal Currents in a Continuously Stratified Ocean with Bottom Topography. The instability manifests itself in the overlying ocean as an amplifying topographic Rossby wave. Alternating

  10. 140 VOLUME 59J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauluis, Olivier M.

    Meteorological Society Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative­Convective Equilibrium. Part II: Latent Heat to the regions where condensation occurs. This transport is associated with three other aspects of convection, providing a quantitative relationship between these three aspects of moist convection. The water vapor

  11. 2320 VOLUME 33J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huck, Thierry

    Meteorological Society Basin-Mode Interactions and Selection by the Mean Flow in a Reduced´ Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France THIERRY HUCK Laboratoire de Physique des Oce´ans, CNRS, Brest of Rossby basin modes are investigated in the reduced-gravity quasigeostrophic framework. The linear

  12. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-04-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  13. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  14. RHESSI observation of flare elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2006-02-14

    RHESSI observations of elementary flare bursts are presented. These solar flare elements are distinct emission peaks of a duration of some tens of seconds present in the hard X-ray light curves. They are characterized by consistent soft-hard-soft spectral behavior, which can be described in a quantitative way and compared which predictions from acceleration models. A detailed analysis of hard X-ray images for an M5 class flare shows that elementary flare bursts do not occur at distinct locations, but as twin X-ray sources move smoothly along an arcade of magnetic loops. This observation apparently contradicts the predictions of standard translation invariant 2.5-dimensional reconnection models.

  15. Complete measurements of quantum observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

    2012-06-12

    We define a complete measurement of a quantum observable (POVM) as a measurement of the maximally refined version of the POVM. Complete measurements give information from the multiplicities of the measurement outcomes and can be viewed as state preparation procedures. We show that any POVM can be measured completely by using sequential measurements or maximally refinable instruments. Moreover, the ancillary space of a complete measurement can be chosen to be minimal.

  16. JUNE 2003 701T U R N E R E T A L . 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    in the energy balance of the earth because of their absorption and scattering of solar and infrared radiation advantage of the differences in the index of refraction of ice and water between 11 and 19 m infrared radi- ance observations (Rossow and Schiffer 1999). Other investigators have taken advantage

  17. 15 APRIL 2001 1809C L A R K E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California RICHARD J. HARDING Centre for Ecology and Hydrology shows the observed difference in rainfall over TNA between the periods 1931­60 and 1961­90. The data come from an updated version of the gridded, gauge-based climatology described by Hulme (1992b

  18. Humboldtian Science, Creole Meteorology, and the Discovery of Human-Caused Climate Change in Northern South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman, Gregory T.

    2011-01-01

    of the Lake Valencia basin in Venezuela and the desert coast of Peru as natural laboratories for observing the interaction between geophysical and cultural forces was central to this discovery, as was Humboldt’s belief that European colonialism was especially...

  19. 15 NOVEMBER 2003 3617J O N E S E T A L . 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    Waves on African Desert Dust Transport CHARLES JONES Institute for Computational Earth System Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California NATALIE MAHOWALD Institute of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, and National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder

  20. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.