National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for metalorganic chemical vapor

  1. SiC rapid thermal carbonization of the (111)Si semiconductor-on-insulator structure and subsequent metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    vapor deposition with mixtures of propane and H2 at atmospheric pressure. Carbonization temperatures metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of GaN A. J. Steckla) and J. Devrajan University of Cincinnati . Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of GaN on the 111 SiC SOI was carried out with trimethylgallium

  2. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  3. The influence of ammonia on rapid-ther al low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposited TIN, films from tetrakis (dimethylamido) titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    The influence of ammonia on rapid-ther al low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposited TIN, and stress of rapid- thermal low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposited (RT-LPMOCVD) TiN, films on In) liquid precursors, were studied. Enhanced deposition rates of l-3 nm s- ' at total chamber pressures

  4. In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on GaAs using trimethyaluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on Ga 26 June 2008; published online 21 July 2008 In situ atomic-layer deposition ALD of Al2O3 on p­4 Recently, many ex situ methods such as atomic-layer deposition ALD of high-k on GaAs have achieved success

  5. Inversion by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from N- to Ga-polar gallium nitride and its application to multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosalli, A. M.; Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Bedair, S. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Bharrat, D.; El-Masry, N. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth approach for inverting N-polar to Ga-polar GaN by using a thin inversion layer grown with high Mg flux. The introduction of this inversion layer allowed us to grow p-GaN films on N-polar GaN thin film. We have studied the dependence of hole concentration, surface morphology, and degree of polarity inversion for the inverted Ga-polar surface on the thickness of the inversion layer. We then use this approach to grow a light emitting diode structure which has the MQW active region grown on the advantageous N-polar surface and the p-layer grown on the inverted Ga-polar surface.

  6. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, P. Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ?10{sup 7?}cm{sup ?2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300?cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  7. Fermi level control of compensating point defects during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of Si-doped AlGaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Z; Bryan, I; Gaddy, BE; Reddy, P; Hussey, L; Bobea, M; Guo, W; Hoffmann, M; Kirste, R; Tweedie, J; Gerhold, M; Irving, DL; Sitar, Z; Collazo, R

    2014-12-01

    A Fermi-level control scheme for point defect management using above-bandgap UV illumination during growth is presented. We propose an extension to the analogy between the Fermi level and the electrochemical potential such that the electrochemical potential of a charged defect in a material with steady-state populations of free charge carriers may be expressed in terms of the quasi-Fermi levels. A series of highly Si-doped Al0.65Ga0.35N films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with and without UV illumination showed that samples grown under UV illumination had increased free carrier concentration, free carrier mobility, and reduced midgap photoluminescence all indicating a reduction in compensating point defects. (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Deposition of silicon carbide films using a high vacuum metalorganic chemical vapor deposition method with a single source precursor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boo, Jin-Hyo

    , high temperature, and high radiation environments. Conventional silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition CVD processes generally utilized multiple precursors such as silane and hydrocarbons, and required temperature alternatives to the conventional SiC CVD methods must be considered. To do this, a relatively

  9. Low-temperature growth and orientational control in RuO{sub 2} thin films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, G.R.; Wang, A.; Foster, C.M.; Vetrone, J.; Patel, J.; Wu, X.

    1996-08-01

    For growth temperatures in the range of 275 C to 425 C, highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films with either (110)- or (101)-textured orientations have been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on both SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) and Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates. Both the growth temperature and growth rate were used to control the type and degree of orientational texture of the RuO{sub 2} films. In the upper part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 350 C) and at a low growth rate (< 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (110)-textured. In contrast, at the lower part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 300 C) and at a high growth rate (> 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (101)-textured. In contrast, a higher growth temperatures (> 425 C) always produced randomly-oriented polycrystalline films. For either of these low-temperature growth processes, the films produced were crack-free, well-adhered to the substrates, and had smooth, specular surfaces. Atomic force microscopy showed that the films had a dense microstructure with an average grain size of 50--80 nm and a rms. surface roughness of {approximately} 3--10 nm. Four-probe electrical transport measurements showed that the films were highly conductive with resistivities of 34--40 {micro}{Omega}-cm ({at} 25 C).

  10. Issues associated with the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of ScGaN and YGaN alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Knapp, James Arthur; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Creighton, James Randall; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    The most energy efficient solid state white light source will likely be a combination of individually efficient red, green, and blue LED. For any multi-color approach to be successful the efficiency of deep green LEDs must be significantly improved. While traditional approaches to improve InGaN materials have yielded incremental success, we proposed a novel approach using group IIIA and IIIB nitride semiconductors to produce efficient green and high wavelength LEDs. To obtain longer wavelength LEDs in the nitrides, we attempted to combine scandium (Sc) and yttrium (Y) with gallium (Ga) to produce ScGaN and YGaN for the quantum well (QW) active regions. Based on linear extrapolation of the proposed bandgaps of ScN (2.15 eV), YN (0.8 eV) and GaN (3.4 eV), we expected that LEDs could be fabricated from the UV (410 nm) to the IR (1600 nm), and therefore cover all visible wavelengths. The growth of these novel alloys potentially provided several advantages over the more traditional InGaN QW regions including: higher growth temperatures more compatible with GaN growth, closer lattice matching to GaN, and reduced phase separation than is commonly observed in InGaN growth. One drawback to using ScGaN and YGaN films as the active regions in LEDs is that little research has been conducted on their growth, specifically, are there metalorganic precursors that are suitable for growth, are the bandgaps direct or indirect, can the materials be grown directly on GaN with a minimal defect formation, as well as other issues related to growth. The major impediment to the growth of ScGaN and YGaN alloys was the low volatility of metalorganic precursors. Despite this impediment some progress was made in incorporation of Sc and Y into GaN which is detailed in this report. Primarily, we were able to incorporate up to 5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} Y atoms into a GaN film, which are far below the alloy concentrations needed to evaluate the YGaN optical properties. After a no-cost extension was granted on this program, an additional more 'liquid-like' Sc precursor was evaluated and the nitridation of Sc metals on GaN were investigated. Using the Sc precursor, dopant level quantities of Sc were incorporated into GaN, thereby concluding the growth of ScGaN and YGaN films. Our remaining time during the no-cost extension was focused on pulsed laser deposition of Sc metal films on GaN, followed by nitridation in the MOCVD reactor to form ScN. Finally, GaN films were deposited on the ScN thin films in order to study possible GaN dislocation reduction.

  11. Effect of band alignment on photoluminescence and carrier escape from InP surface quantum dots grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, Nripendra N.; Biswas, Pranab; Banerji, P.; Dhabal Das, Tushar; Das, Sanat Kr.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Biswas, D.

    2014-01-28

    A detailed analysis of photoluminescence (PL) from InP quantum dots (QDs) grown on Si has been carried out to understand the effect of substrate/host material in the luminescence and carrier escape process from the surface quantum dots. Such studies are required for the development of monolithically integrated next generation III-V QD based optoelectronics with fully developed Si microelectronics. The samples were grown by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technique, and the PL measurements were made in the temperature range 10–80?K. The distribution of the dot diameter as well as the dot height has been investigated from atomic force microscopy. The origin of the photoluminescence has been explained theoretically. The band alignment of InP/Si heterostructure has been determined, and it is found be type II in nature. The positions of the conduction band minimum of Si and the 1st excited state in the conduction band of InP QDs have been estimated to understand the carrier escape phenomenon. A blue shift with a temperature co-efficient of 0.19?meV/K of the PL emission peak has been found as a result of competitive effect of different physical processes like quantum confinement, strain, and surface states. The corresponding effect of blue shift by quantum confinement and strain as well as the red shift by the surface states in the PL peaks has been studied. The origin of the luminescence in this heterojunction is found to be due to the recombination of free excitons, bound excitons, and a transition from the 1st electron excited state in the conduction band (e{sub 1}) to the heavy hole band (hh{sub 1}). Monotonic decrease in the PL intensity due to increase of thermally escaped carriers with temperature has been observed. The change in barrier height by the photogenerated electric-field enhanced the capture of the carriers by the surface states rather than their accumulation in the QD excited state. From an analysis of the dependence of the PL intensity, peak position, and line width with temperature and excitation source, the existence of free and bound excitonic recombination together with e{sub 1} ? hh{sub 1} transitions in the QDs is established.

  12. Surface structure, composition, and polarity of indium nitride grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition have been studied. Atomic hydrogen cleaning produced and heterostructures--which can be accomplished by low- pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD --the- rium vapor pressure of nitrogen during growth. This requires different approaches in growing structures

  13. Photopumped red-emitting InP/In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P self-assembled quantum dot heterostructure lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryou, J. H.; Dupuis, R. D.; Walter, G.; Kellogg, D. A.; Holonyak, N.; Mathes, D. T.; Hull, R.; Reddy, C. V.; Narayanamurti, V.

    2001-06-25

    We report the 300 K operation of optically pumped red-emitting lasers fabricated from InP self-assembled quantum dots embedded in In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P layers on GaAs (100) substrates grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Quantum dots grown at 650{degree}C on In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P layers have a high density on the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2} and the dominant size of individual quantum dots ranges from {similar_to}5 to {similar_to}10 nm for 7.5 monolayer {open_quotes}equivalent growth.{close_quotes} These InP/In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P quantum dot heterostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. Laser structures are prepared from wafers having two vertically stacked InP quantum dot active layers within a 100-nm-thick In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P waveguide and upper and lower 600 nm InAlP cladding layers. We observe lasing at {lambda}{similar_to}680 nm at room temperature in optically pumped samples. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Ylva Kristina

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Tyler Philip, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    There is large and growing interest in making a wide variety of materials and surfaces antimicrobial. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers ...

  16. Chemical vapor infiltration using microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Currier, Robert P. (Los Alamos, NM); Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A method for producing reinforced ceramic composite articles by means of chemical vapor infiltration and deposition in which an inverted temperature gradient is utilized. Microwave energy is the source of heat for the process.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  18. A Multiscale Simulator for Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Multiscale Simulator for Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition Matthias K. Gobbert Institute-6206 ABSTRACT An integrated simulator for chemical vapor deposition is introduced. In addition to a reactor

  19. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Gall, Kenneth A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Choudhury, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Pikarsky, J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Andruszkiewicz, Leanne (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2009-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berkman, Samuel (Florham Park, NJ)

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  1. Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager Mark 1. G. Aithouse, MEMBER SPIE U.S. Army Chemical Research Development and Engineering Center SMCCR-DDT Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland algorithm 7. Conclusions 8. Acknowledgments 9. References 1. INTRODUCTION Detection of chemical vapor clouds

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  4. Impact of thermal annealing on bulk InGaAsSbN materials grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. W.; Mawst, L. J.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. J.; Kuech, T. F.; Wells, N. P.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Sin, Y.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Moss, S. C.

    2014-02-03

    Two different thermal annealing techniques (rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and in-situ post-growth annealing in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) chamber) were employed to investigate their impact on the optical characteristics of double-heterostructures (DH) of InGaAsSbN/GaAs and on the performance of single-junction solar cell structures, all grown by MOVPE. We find that an optimized RTA procedure leads to a similar improvement in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity compared with material employing a multi-step optimized anneal within the MOVPE reactor. Time-resolved photoluminescence techniques at low temperature (LT) and room temperature (RT) were performed to characterize the carrier dynamics in bulk InGaAsSbN layers. Room temperature carrier lifetimes were found to be similar for both annealing methods, although the LT-PL (16?K) measurements of the MOVPE-annealed sample found longer lifetimes than the RTA-annealed sample (680?ps vs. 260?ps) for the PL measurement energy of 1.24?eV. InGaAsSbN-based single junction solar cells processed with the optimized RTA procedure exhibited an enhancement of the electrical performance, such as improvements in open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and efficiency over solar cells subjected to the in-situ MOVPE annealing technique.

  5. Vapor-Phase Metalation by Atomic Layer Deposition in a Metal-Organic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vapor-Phase Metalation by Atomic Layer Deposition in a Metal- Organic Framework Joseph E. Mondloch introduce a new synthetic strategy capable of metallating MOFs from the gas phase: atomic layer deposition and in some instances host- guest interactions may lead to unstable metal@MOFs. Atomic layer deposition (ALD

  6. Advanced Chemical Heat Pumps Using Liquid-Vapor Reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirol, L.

    1987-01-01

    HEAT PUMPS USING LIQUID-VAPOR REACTIONS LANCE KIROL Senior Program Specialist Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho . ABSTRACT Chemical heat pumps utilizing liquid-vapor reactions can be configured in forms analogous... to electric drive vapor-compression heat pumps and heat activated absorption heat pumps. Basic thermodynamic considerations eliminate some heat pumps and place restrictive working fluid requirements on others, but two thermodynam ically feasible systems...

  7. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of functional polyacrylic thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Yu, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was explored as a novel method for synthesis of functional polyacrylic thin films. The process introduces a peroxide initiator, which can be decomposed at low temperatures (<200?C) ...

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon and sacrificial polymer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casserly, Thomas Bryan

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) produced films for a wide array of applications from a variety of organosilicon and organic precursors. The structure and properties of thin films were controlled by varying processing ...

  9. Photoinitiated chemical vapor depostion [sic] : mechanism and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxamusa, Salmaan Husain

    2009-01-01

    Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition (piCVD) is developed as a simple, solventless, and rapid method for the deposition of swellable hydrogels and functional hydrogel copolymers. Mechanistic experiments show that piCVD ...

  10. All graphene electromechanical switch fabricated by chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milaninia, Kaveh M.

    We demonstrate an electromechanical switch comprising two polycrystalline graphene films; each deposited using ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition. The top film is pulled into electrical contact with the bottom film ...

  11. PROJECT PROFILE: Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project is focused on novel approaches to remove risk related to the development of hybrid perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). Researchers will synthesize a new and chemically stable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite that eliminates decomposition of the absorber layer upon exposure to water vapor, which is a chief obstacle to widespread use of HPSC technology. They will also demonstrate a unique and industrially-scalable chemical vapor deposition method without halides or iodine, which are the main contributors to perovskite degradation.

  12. Improved sensor selectivity for chemical vapors using organic thin-film transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, James Edward

    2012-01-01

    2012, American Chemical Society 3.1 Abstract Air-stablethe American Chemical Society 4.1 Abstract Direct selectiveChemical Vapor Detection Abstract

  13. CHEMICALLY VAPOR DEPOSITED YTTRIA-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (YSZ) FOR THERMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIER COATING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varanasi, V.G.; Besmann, T.M.; Lothian, J.L.; Xu, W.; Starr, T.L.

    2003-04-22

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) to protect super-alloy blades such as Mar-M247 or Rene-N5 during engine operation. The current method for YSZ fabrication for TBC applications is by air-plasma spraying (APS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) (Haynes 1997). APS gives reasonable deposition rates, but has a limited life and aging effects due to its porous and lamellar structure. The EB-PVD coatings are more stable and can accommodate thermomechanical stresses due to their characteristic strain-tolerant, columnar microstructure. EB-PVD, however, is primarily line-of-sight, which often leaves ''hidden areas'' uncoated, has low throughput, and has high capital cost. The process of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is investigated here as an economical alternative to EB-PVD and APS, with the potential for better overall coverage as well as the ability to produce thick (100-250 {micro}m), strain-tolerant, columnar coatings. MOCVD of YSZ involves the use of zirconium and yttrium organometallic precursors reacting with an oxygen source. Previous researchers have used diketonate or chloride precursors and oxygen (Wahl et al. 2001a, Wahl et al. 2001b, Yamane and Harai 1989). These precursors have low transport rates due to their low carrier solvent solubility (Varanasi et al. 2003). Solvated zirconium and yttrium butoxide precursors were investigated here due to their higher vapor pressures and high solvent solubility. This work uses predictive equilibrium modeling and experiments involving butoxide precursors for tetragonal YSZ fabrication.

  14. AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR TRANSFERRING GRAPHENE GROWN BY CHEMICAL VAPOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR TRANSFERRING GRAPHENE GROWN BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION YUJIE REN Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials and Applications Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, P. R In this paper, we report an improved transfer of graphene by directly picking up the graphene with target

  15. Amine functionalization by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) for interfacial adhesion and film cohesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingjing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Amine functional polymer thin films provide a versatile platform for subsequent functionalization because of their diverse reactivity. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a polymer chemical vapor deposition ...

  16. Influence of process variables on electron beam chemical vapor deposition of platinum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Influence of process variables on electron beam chemical vapor deposition of platinum D. Beaulieu; accepted 8 August 2005; published 22 September 2005 Electron beam chemical vapor deposition was performed. DOI: 10.1116/1.2050672 I. INTRODUCTION Electron beam chemical vapor deposition EBCVD is a technology

  17. Optical characterization of InN layers grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    Optical characterization of InN layers grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition M. Alevli properties of InN layers grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition have been studied. Raman, infrared at elevated temperatures, a high-pressure chemical vapor deposition HPCVD system has been established at GSU.6

  18. A HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUE FOR THE BOLTZMANN EQUATION FOR LOW PRESSURE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markowich, Peter A.

    A HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUE FOR THE BOLTZMANN EQUATION FOR LOW PRESSURE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION 1 the approach. The setup models low pressure chemical vapor deposition processes in the manufacturing. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition is used in the manufactur- ing of integrated circuits

  19. Narrowband fluorescent nanodiamonds produced from chemical vapor deposition films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Elke; Gross, Elke; Hepp, Christian; Steinmetz, David; Zscherpel, Elisabeth; Ghodbane, Slimane; Sternschulte, Hadwig; Steinmueller-Nethl, Doris; Liang, Yuejiang; Krueger, Anke; Becher, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    We report on the production of nanodiamonds (NDs) with 70-80 nm size via bead assisted sonic disintegration (BASD) of a polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (CVD) film. The NDs display high crystalline quality as well as intense narrowband (7 nm) room temperature luminescence at 738 nm due to in situ incorporated silicon vacancy (SiV) centers. The fluorescence properties at room and cryogenic temperatures indicate that the NDs are, depending on preparation, applicable as single photon sources or as fluorescence labels.

  20. Narrowband fluorescent nanodiamonds produced from chemical vapor deposition films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elke Neu; Carsten Arend; Felix Guldner; Elke Gross; Christian Hepp; David Steinmetz; Elisabeth Zscherpel; Slimane Ghodbane; Hadwig Sternschulte; Doris Steinmueller-Nethl; Yuejiang Liang; Anke Krueger; Christoph Becher

    2011-05-24

    We report on the production of nanodiamonds (NDs) with 70-80 nm size via bead assisted sonic disintegration (BASD) of a polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (CVD) film. The NDs display high crystalline quality as well as intense narrowband (7 nm) room temperature luminescence at 738 nm due to in situ incorporated silicon vacancy (SiV) centers. The fluorescence properties at room and cryogenic temperatures indicate that the NDs are, depending on preparation, applicable as single photon sources or as fluorescence labels.

  1. Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of 5 mm Hexagonal Single-Crystal Graphene from Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of 5 mm Hexagonal Single-Crystal Graphene from Ethanol Xiao Chen1 as large as 5 mm can be synthesized from ethanol via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Key conditions for the successful reduction in nucleation density are extremely low partial pressure of ethanol vapor and pre

  2. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Youngwoo, E-mail: youngwoo.nam@chalmers.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Woo Park, Yung [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-13

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  3. High optical quality polycrystalline indium phosphide grown on metal substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    transfer techniques have been explored in the past, where thin epitax- ial films of GaAs and InP and GaAs have the most ideal band gaps and highest the- oretical efficiencies for single-junction cells April 2012; accepted 21 May 2012; published online 25 June 2012) III­V semiconductor solar cells have

  4. Epitaxial growth of aligned AlGalnN nanowires by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Jung (Woodbridge, CT); Su, Jie (New Haven, CT)

    2008-08-05

    Highly ordered and aligned epitaxy of III-Nitride nanowires is demonstrated in this work. <1010> M-axis is identified as a preferential nanowire growth direction through a detailed study of GaN/AlN trunk/branch nanostructures by transmission electron microscopy. Crystallographic selectivity can be used to achieve spatial and orientational control of nanowire growth. Vertically aligned (Al)GaN nanowires are prepared on M-plane AlN substrates. Horizontally ordered nanowires, extending from the M-plane sidewalls of GaN hexagonal mesas or islands demonstrate new opportunities for self-aligned nanowire devices, interconnects, and networks.

  5. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Joel S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  6. Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

  7. Electronic Properties of Large-scale Graphene Films Chemical Vapor Synthesized on Nickel and on Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    transport properties of graphene films grown on Ni and Cu. Sample Preparation The synthesis of graphene film1 Electronic Properties of Large-scale Graphene Films Chemical Vapor Synthesized on Nickel of large scale graphene films grown by chemical vapor synthesis on Ni and Cu, and then transferred to SiO2

  8. Chemically vapor deposited diamond-tipped one-dimensional nanostructures and nanodiamondsilicananotube composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    Chemically vapor deposited diamond-tipped one-dimensional nanostructures and nanodiamond vapor deposition Composite thin films of nanodiamond and silica nanotubes were synthesized by means with nanodiamond particles. SEM, Raman spectroscopy, and EDX were used to analyze the composite. Wet chemical

  9. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon coatings on Mg alloy for biomedical application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon coatings on Mg alloy for biomedical application M was prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of SiH4 on WE43 alloy for biomedical [6], magnetron sputtering [7], alkaline heat treatment [8], micro-arc oxidation [9

  10. OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR K.J. BACHMANN simulations as a fundamental design tool in developing a new prototype high pressure organometallic chemical vapor deposition (HPOMCVD) reactor for use in thin film crystal growth. The advantages of such a reactor

  11. Selective Growth of Straight Carbon Nanotubes by Low-Pressure Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Selective Growth of Straight Carbon Nanotubes by Low-Pressure Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition) were grown by low-pressure thermal chemical vapor deposition using pure ethylene. It was found preferentially bridged between Fe nanoparticles under a low pressure of 100 Pa. Moreover, utilizing this method

  12. Alcohol chemical vapor deposition growth of millimeter-sized single-crystal of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Alcohol chemical vapor deposition growth of millimeter-sized single-crystal of graphene Sungjin Kim@photon,t,u-tokyo.ac.jp Abstract: The growth of large-sized single crystalline graphene with mono layer is necessary for large-scale integration of graphene devices. Ethanol as a precursor has proven effective in the chemical vapor deposition

  13. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

  14. A Two-Dimensional Model of Chemical Vapor Infiltration With Radio Frequency Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    by a finite element method to study carbon chemical vapor infiltration in a cylindrical carbon preformA Two-Dimensional Model of Chemical Vapor Infiltration With Radio Frequency Heating Vikas Midha studied. The power density distribution in the pre- form evolves in a complex manner as densified regions

  15. Thermodynamic analysis and growth of ZrO2 by chloride chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of zirconia. The results showed zirconia formation would occur at high) and high temperatures (N800 °C). Using these calculations as a guide, single-phase monoclinic zirconia.46 mg cm-2 h-1 . © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Chemical vapor deposition; Zirconia

  16. Low temperature chemical vapor deposition of Co thin films from Co2(CO)8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Low temperature chemical vapor deposition of Co thin films from Co2(CO)8 D.-X. Yea,*, S. Pimanpanga chemical vapor deposition with a metallorganic Co2(CO)8 precursor. After Ar sputtering of the surface, Co2(CO)8, has been extensively used in cobalt CVD and is attractive, since Co is in its elemental

  17. Highly oriented, free-standing, superconducting NbN films growth on chemical vapor deposited graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    Highly oriented, free-standing, superconducting NbN films growth on chemical vapor deposited oriented, free-standing, superconducting NbN films growth on chemical vapor deposited graphene Garima field of 33 T. In addition, we demonstrate a process for obtaining flexible, free-standing NbN films

  18. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbonanthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vaporFigure 1. A diagram of the microwave plasma chemical vapor

  19. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  20. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei 25137, Taiwan (China); Li, L. J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  1. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcinek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-tert-butoxide by a one step microwave plasma chemical vaporBatteries; Anode; Plasma; Microwave Corresponding author. E-

  2. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of conductive polymers for use in novel photovoltaic device architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howden, Rachel M. (Rachel Mary)

    2013-01-01

    The conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), (PEDOT), deposited via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) has been investigated for use in organic electronic devices. The oCVD process as well as the ...

  3. Bilayer graphene growth by low pressure chemical vapor deposition on copper foil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Wenjing, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Successfully integrating graphene in standard processes for applications in electronics relies on the synthesis of high-quality films. In this work we study Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) growth of bilayer ...

  4. Carrier concentration and surface electron accumulation in indium nitride layers grown by high pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    pressure chemical vapor deposition R. P. Bhatta, B. D. Thoms,a A. Weerasekera, A. G. U. Perera, M. Alevli properties of InN layer grown by high pressure chemical vapor deposition have been studied by high-nitride alloys is challenging under low pressure process conditions due to higher equilibrium vapor pressure

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA); Kramer, Keith (Avon Lake, OH); Liang, Haifan (Santa Clara, CA)

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.

  6. Testing of a model to estimate vapor concentration of various organic chemicals. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakalyar, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A model developed by Dr. Parker C. Reist to predict the build-up and decay rates of vapor concentrations following a chemical spill and clean-up was tested. The chemicals tested were: acetone, butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, hexane, methylene chloride, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene. The evaporation rates of these chemicals were determined both by prediction, using a model developed by I. Kawamura and D. Mackay, and empirically and these rates were used in the Reist model. Chamber experiments were done to measure actual building-up and decay of vapor concentrations for simulated spills and simulated clean-up.

  7. Ge incorporation inside 4H-SiC during Homoepitaxial growth by chemical vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Ge incorporation inside 4H-SiC during Homoepitaxial growth by chemical vapor deposition. Kassem Ilmenau (Germany) Abstract. In this work, we report on the addition of GeH4 gas during homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC by chemical vapour deposition. Ge introduction does not affect dramatically the surface

  8. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 924930 Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    - enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) [4], ex- panding thermal plasma [5], and vacuum arc depositionSolar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 924­930 Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition 2007; accepted 14 February 2007 Available online 6 April 2007 Abstract The plasma-enhanced chemical

  9. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  10. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  11. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  12. Growth Inhibition to Enhance Conformal Coverage in Thin Film Chemical Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors predicts that it will be necessary to replace PVD with chemical vapor@scs.uiuc.edu; abelson@illinois.edu Many important technological applications depend crucially on the ability to deposit in a feature of given AR depends on the reactive sticking probability ( ) of the gas phase precursor

  13. Chemical Vapor Deposition-Derived Graphene with Electrical Performance of Exfoliated Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Chemical Vapor Deposition-Derived Graphene with Electrical Performance of Exfoliated Graphene a scalable method to produce large-area graphene, CVD-grown graphene has heretofore exhibited inferior of CVD-grown graphene in which two important sources of disorder, namely grain boundaries and processing

  14. Epitaxial graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition on single crystal thin iridium films on sapphire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Epitaxial graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition on single crystal thin iridium films 2004, there has been an increasing effort in developing efficient methods for preparing graphene graphene can be prepared, which is favorable for the achievement of high quality graphene; it is also known

  15. Device for rapid sample insertion and extraction in thermal chemical vapor deposition tube furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Device for rapid sample insertion and extraction in thermal chemical vapor deposition tube furnace a tube furnace is described. The device operates in an atmosphere that is separate from ambient actuation through the walls of a quartz tube furnace is entirely general to any procedure using a tube

  16. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  17. An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    ) their unique structure makes them suitable for tailored nanometer- scale membranes and molecular sieves [5]; (dAn atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes M Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth Lynn (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Paul M. (Albuquerque, NM); Custer, Jonathan S. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Ronald V. (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolet, Marc-A. (Pasadena, CA); Madar, Roland (Eybens, FR); Bernard, Claude (Brie et Angonnes, FR)

    1999-01-01

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF.sub.6, either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W--Si--N or W--B--N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications.

  19. Nanoimprint mold fabrication and replication by room-temperature conformal chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoimprint mold fabrication and replication by room-temperature conformal chemical vapor for the replication of molds for nanoimprint lithography NIL without solvents or etching. A thin hard amorphous from the polymer original, the thin hard film forms a NIL mold that is the inverse of the polymer

  20. Robust Numerical Simulation of Porosity Evolution in Chemical Vapor In ltration II: Two Dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Shi

    -solid reactions with solid deposition are exempli#12;ed by the fabrication of ceramic matrix composites through #3) process, during which a matrix of ceramic #12;bers is chemically vapor deposited within a porous preform practical approach to fabricate ceramic composites. Among these composites, #12;ber-reinforced composites

  1. Self-Limiting Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Monolayer Graphene from Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Self-Limiting Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Monolayer Graphene from Ethanol Pei Zhao, and systematically investigate the growth of graphene from ethanol and compare its self-limiting behavior over copper facets with different identities. Results show that the growth of graphene from ethanol in the LPCVD

  2. Selective Chemical Vapor Deposition of Platinum and Palladium Directed by Monolayers Patterned Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    , and bis(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)palladium(II), Pd- (hfac)2, in the presence of hydrogen. This processSelective Chemical Vapor Deposition of Platinum and Palladium Directed by Monolayers Patterned 61801 Received February 18, 1997. In Final Form: May 5, 1997X High-purity platinum and palladium thin

  3. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of fluoropolymer coatings for the surface modification of complex geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Malancha, 1980-

    2007-01-01

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a one-step, soventless process that can be used to produce polymeric thin films. The iCVD technique has been used to polymerize a wide variety of vinyl monomers such as glycidyl ...

  4. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Films for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Aeronautics and Space Administration, John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 Michael H.-C. Jin Sci. and Eng., 1304 West Green Street. #12;American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2 I

  5. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  6. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris Kagan; K.K. Gan; Richard Kass

    2009-03-31

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  7. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainer Wallny

    2012-10-15

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  8. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Caputo, Anthony J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  9. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) technologies: Rapid, controllable growth of epitaxial silicon films

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-12-27

    NREL scientists have discovered a unique way to quickly grow epitaxial Si using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which holds the potential to greatly decrease costs within the manufacturing of Si substrates.  With NREL’s HWCVD technology, Si material use and costs are dramatically reduced with scalable manufacturing and lower deposition temperatures.  NREL’s unique HWCVD technique can easily be integrated into existing manufacturing processes, allowing...

  10. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  11. The Growth of InGaAsN for High Efficiency Solar Cells by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; BANKS,JAMES C.; GEE,JAMES M.; JONES,ERIC D.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.

    1999-09-16

    InGaAsN alloys are a promising material for increasing the efficiency of multi-junction solar cells now used for satellite power systems. However, the growth of these dilute N containing alloys has been challenging with further improvements in material quality needed before the solar cell higher efficiencies are realized. Nitrogen/V ratios exceeding 0.981 resulted in lower N incorporation and poor surface morphologies. The growth rate was found to depend on not only the total group III transport for a fixed N/V ratio but also on the N/V ratio. Carbon tetrachloride and dimethylzinc were effective for p-type doping. Disilane was not an effective n-type dopant while SiCl4 did result in n-type material but only a narrow range of electron concentrations (2-5e17cm{sup -3}) were achieved.

  12. Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    completely. When working in the hood, position the sash as low as possible to minimize risk of exposure with high vapor pressure when releasing chemical vapors which could ignite when working with compounds with offensive odors Good work practices include: Check the airflow rate on the monitor/alarm to ensure

  13. Low-temperature germanium ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition for back-end photonic integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimerling, Lionel C.

    Polycrystalline germanium (poly-Ge) grown on amorphous Si (a-Si) by ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD) over oxide barriers at low temperatures (Tles450degC) exhibits a larger grain size and lower defect ...

  14. Surface roughening in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition Jason T. Drotar, Y.-P. Zhao, T.-M. Lu, and G.-C. Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Surface roughening in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition Jason T. Drotar, Y.-P. Zhao, T.-M. Lu etching, the pressure is usually low enough so that the mean free path of the vapor particles is much of a reemission model for chemical vapor deposition. We find that, for pure first-order reemission, the interface

  15. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  16. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  17. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4??m, with a peak responsivity of up to ?100??A/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140?K.

  18. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Joiner, C. A.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Liu, L.; Gu, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, 1520 Middle Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Barrera, S. de la; Feenstra, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene symmetric field effect transistors. Gate control of the tunneling characteristics is observed similar to previously reported results for exfoliated graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene devices. Density-of-states features are observed in the tunneling characteristics of the devices, although without large resonant peaks that would arise from lateral momentum conservation. The lack of distinct resonant behavior is attributed to disorder in the devices, and a possible source of the disorder is discussed.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition techniques and related methods for manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Donald B. (Albuquerque, NM); Sadwick, Laurence P. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wernsman, Bernard R. (Clairton, PA)

    2002-06-25

    Methods of manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs made using the methods of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

  20. Growth of highly oriented carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Z.P.; Xu, J.W.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Provencio, P.N.

    1998-12-01

    Highly oriented, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown on polished polycrystalline and single crystal nickel substrates by plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 666 {degree}C. The carbon nanotubes range from 10 to 500 nm in diameter and 0.1 to 50 {mu}m in length depending on growth conditions. Acetylene is used as the carbon source for the growth of the carbon nanotubes and ammonia is used for dilution gas and catalysis. The plasma intensity, acetylene to ammonia gas ratio, and their flow rates, etc. affect the diameters and uniformity of the carbon nanotubes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Improved process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackey, W.J. Jr.; Caputo, A.J.

    1984-09-07

    A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  2. Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowires via Chemical Vapor Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2006-01-01

    6 Growth Rate (um/hr) Vapor Pressure (Torr) In2O3 Ga2O3 SnO2Rate (µm/hr) Metal Vapor Pressure (Torr) Crystalline phaseto the source metal vapor pressure. Initial experiments show

  3. Growth of Highly-Oriented Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Z.P.; Provencio, P.N.; Ren, Z.F.; Siegal, M.P.; Wang, J.H.; Xu, J.W.

    1998-10-11

    Highly-oriented, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were grown on polished polycrystalline and single crystal nickel substrates by plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 666"C. The carbon nanotubes range from 10 to 500 nm in diameter and 0.1 to 50 pm in length depending on growth conditions. Acetylene is used as the carbon source for the growth of the carbon nanotubes and ammonia is used for dilution gas and catalysis. The plasma intensity, acetylene to ammonia gas ratio and their flow rates, etc. affect the diameters and uniformity of the carbon nanotubes. In summary, we synthesized large-area highly-oriented carbon nanotubes at temperatures below 666C by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Acetylene gas is used to provide carbon for nanotube growth and ammonia gas is used for dilution and catalysis. Plasma intensity is critical in determining the nanotube aspect ratios (diameter and length), and range of both site and height distributions within a given film.

  4. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Fluoroalkylsilane Monolayer Films for Adhesion Control in Microelectromechanical Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAYER,THOMAS M.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SHINN,NEAL D.; CLEWS,PEGGY J.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.

    2000-01-26

    We have developed a new process for applying a hydrophobic, low adhesion energy coating to microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices. Monolayer films are synthesized from tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) and water vapor in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature. Film thickness is self-limiting by virtue of the inability of precursors to stick to the fluorocarbon surface of the film once it has formed. We have measured film densities of {approx}3 molecules nm{sup 2} and film thickness of {approx}1 nm. Films are hydrophobic, with a water contact angle >110{sup o}. We have also incorporated an in-situ downstream microwave plasma cleaning process, which provides a clean, reproducible oxide surface prior to film deposition. Adhesion tests on coated and uncoated MEMS test structures demonstrate superior performance of the FOTS coatings. Cleaned, uncoated cantilever beam structures exhibit high adhesion energies in a high humidity environment. An adhesion energy of 100 mJ m{sup -2} is observed after exposure to >90% relative humidity. Fluoroalkylsilane coated beams exhibit negligible adhesion at low humidity and {<=} 20 {micro}J m{sup -2} adhesion energy at >90% relative humidity. No obvious film degradation was observed for films exposed to >90% relative humidity at room temperature for >24 hr.

  5. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (White Rock, NM)

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  6. Carbon impurities on graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on platinum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael S., E-mail: michael.fuhrer@monash.edu [Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA and School of Physics, Monash University, 3800 Victoria (Australia)

    2014-07-28

    We report nanocrystalline carbon impurities coexisting with graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on platinum. For certain growth conditions, we observe micron-size island-like impurity layers which can be mistaken for second graphene layers in optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The island orientation depends on the crystalline orientation of the Pt, as shown by electron backscatter diffraction, indicating growth of carbon at the platinum surface below graphene. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy indicates that in addition to uniform single-crystal graphene, our sample is decorated with nanocrystalline carbon impurities with a spatially inhomogeneous distribution. The impurity concentration can be reduced significantly by lowering the growth temperature. Raman spectra show a large D peak, however, electrical characterization shows high mobility (?8000?cm{sup 2}/Vs), indicating a limitation for Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic quality of graphene.

  7. Selective charge doping of chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene by interface modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shengnan, E-mail: wang.shengnan@lab.ntt.co.jp; Suzuki, Satoru; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Orofeo, Carlo M.; Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)] [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-16

    The doping and scattering effect of substrate on the electronic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene are revealed. Wet etching the underlying SiO{sub 2} of graphene and depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilane between graphene and SiO{sub 2} are used to modify various substrates for CVD graphene transistors. Comparing with the bare SiO{sub 2} substrate, the carrier mobility of CVD graphene on modified substrate is enhanced by almost 5-fold; consistently the residual carrier concentration is reduced down to 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?2}. Moreover, scalable and reliable p- and n-type graphene and graphene p-n junction are achieved on various silane SAMs with different functional groups.

  8. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, Wilfried; Nguyen, Luan; Bhaktha, S N B; Sebbah, Patrick; Pal, Bishnu P; Dussardier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium co-doped fibers were fabricated. Optical transmission in term of loss due to scattering as well as some spectroscopic characteristics of the erbium ions was studied. For low Mg content, nano-scale particles could be grown with and relatively low scattering losses were obtained, whereas large Mg-content causes the growth of larger particles resulting in much higher loss. However in the latter case, certain interesting alteration of the spectroscopic properties of the erbium ions were observed. These initial studies should be useful in incorporati...

  9. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  10. The influence of substrate polarity on the structural quality of InN layers grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    the growth temperatures to below 650 °C for low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor depo- sition MOCVDThe influence of substrate polarity on the structural quality of InN layers grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition N. Dietz,1,a M. Alevli,1 R. Atalay,1 G. Durkaya,1 R. Collazo,2 J. Tweedie,2 S

  11. Highly stable silicon dioxide films deposited by means of rapid thermal -low-pressure chemical vapor deposition onto InP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    grown by rapid thermal, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (RT-LPCVD), using pure oxygen (0,) and 2Highly stable silicon dioxide films deposited by means of rapid thermal - low-pressure chemical vapor deposition onto InP A. Katz, A. Feingold, U. K. Chakrabarti, and S. J. Peat-ton AT&T Bell

  12. A molecular dynamics study of the graphitization ability of transition metals for catalysis of carbon nanotube growth via chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    of carbon nanotube growth via chemical vapor deposition Yasushi Shibuta a,*, James A. Elliott b a Department for carbon nanotube growth via chemical vapor deposition has been investigated via classical molecular and graphene sheet was found to be higher than for clusters comprising cobalt or nickel, since the high energy

  13. Surface passivation of c-Si by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of Al2O3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    passivation has to date been mostly deposited by conventional atomic layer deposition (ALD), a technique-effect transistors subjected to on-state bias stress J. Appl. Phys. 111, 084504 (2012) Atomic imaging of atomic layerSurface passivation of c-Si by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of Al2O3 Lachlan E

  14. Emission and absorption cross-sections of an Er:GaN waveguide prepared with metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Dahal, R.; Feng, I. W.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Hui, Rongqing

    2011-01-01

    We repost the characterization of emission and absorption cross-sections in an erbium-doped GaN waveguide prepared by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The emission cross-section was obtained with the Füchtbauer–Ladenburg equation based...

  15. HfB2 and HfBN hard coatings by chemical vapor deposition S. Jayaraman a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    are popular materials for hard and environmental coat- ings [1­16]. Applications include cutting tools, wearHfB2 and Hf­B­N hard coatings by chemical vapor deposition S. Jayaraman a,c , J.E. Gerbi a,c , Y rights reserved. Keywords: Hafnium diboride; Hafnium borohydride; CVD; Hard coating; Nanoindentation

  16. Thermoelectric properties of lattice-matched AlInN alloy grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Thermoelectric properties of lattice-matched AlInN alloy grown by metal organic chemical vapor Seebeck coefficient and resistance measurement system for thermoelectric materials in the thin disk geometry Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 025101 (2012) High-temperature thermoelectric properties of Cu1­xInTe2

  17. Effect of Chemical Composition on Enthalpy of Evaporation and Equilibrium Vapor Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kh. Dobruskin

    2010-04-20

    Proceeding from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, the relation is derived that establishes a correlation between the partial enthalpy of evaporation from binary solutions, concentrations of components, and equilibrium vapor pressures. The difference between enthalpies of evaporation of components from solutions and those from the pure liquids, D(DH), depends on the chemical nature and concentrations, X, of solutions. The effect of concentrations on D(DH) makes different appearances in ideal and non-ideal solutions, although, as a whole, D(DH) increases with the growth of concentration of the second component. A model is introduced, which considers D(DH) as the sum of energetic changes of three sequential stages: passage of molecules from the bulk liquid into the surface layer, exit of the molecules on the outer side of the interface, and the following desorption into the gas phase. In the framework of the model, the main contribution to enthalpy of evaporation comes from the processes in the surface layer. It is suggested that adsorption from solutions, which changes the chemical composition of the surface layer with respect to that of the bulk solution, determines, to great extent, the difference in the forms of the curves D(DH)=f(X) for ideal and non-ideal solutions.

  18. The effect of chemical residues on the physical and electrical properties of chemical vapor deposited graphene transferred to SiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is etched away.10 Removal of PMMA from graphene is problematic. Conventional semiconductor surface cleaning deposited graphene transferred to SiO2 A. Pirkle,1 J. Chan,1 A. Venugopal,2 D. Hinojos,1 C. W. Magnuson,3 S) The effects of residues introduced during the transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene from a Cu

  19. TANK VAPOR CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN & EXISTING DIRECT READING INSTRUMENTION & PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUTLER, N.K.

    2004-11-01

    This document takes the newly released Industrial Hygiene Chemical Vapor Technical Basis (RPP-22491) and evaluates the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) identified for selected implementation actions by the industrial hygiene organization. This document is not intended as a hazard analysis with recommended controls for all tank farm activities. Not all of the chemicals listed are present in all tanks; therefore, hazard analyses can and should be tailored as appropriate. Detection of each chemical by current industrial hygiene non-specific instrumentation in use at the tank farms is evaluated. Information gaps are identified and recommendations are made to resolve these needs. Of the 52 COPC, 34 can be detected with existing instrumentation. Three additional chemicals could be detected with a photoionization detector (PID) equipped with a different lamp. Discussion with specific instrument manufacturers is warranted. Consideration should be given to having the SapphIRe XL customized for tank farm applications. Other instruments, sampling or modeling techniques should be evaluated to estimate concentrations of chemicals not detected by direct reading instruments. In addition, relative instrument response needs to be factored in to action levels used for direct reading instruments. These action levels should be correlated to exposures to the COPC and corresponding occupational exposure limits (OELs). The minimum respiratory protection for each of the COPC is evaluated against current options. Recommendations are made for respiratory protection based on each chemical. Until exposures are sufficiently quantified and analyzed, the current use of supplied air respiratory protection is appropriate and protective for the COPC. Use of supplied air respiratory protection should be evaluated once a detailed exposure assessment for the COPC is completed. The established tank farm OELs should be documented in the TFC-PLN-34. For chemicals without an established tank farm OEL, consideration should be given to adopting protective limits from NIOSH, AIHA, or developing OELs. Protective gloves and suits are evaluated for each chemical for which information is available. Information gaps are identified for some of the compounds and materials. Recommendations are made for resolving these needs. Based on available information, Silver Shield{reg_sign} gloves are promising for tank farm applications. However, permeation testing documentation is needed for the COPC and mixtures for Silver Shield{reg_sign} gloves to evaluate their protectiveness. North Safety Products is expected to provide the requested documentation. Multiple Tychem{reg_sign} products are available. There is overlap between chemicals and effective materials. Further hazard evaluation to determine actual hazards and permeation testing documentation is required to assess the efficacy of a single Tychem{reg_sign} product for tank farm applications. All of this chemical specific data is combined into a spreadsheet that will assist the industrial hygienist in the selection of monitoring instruments, respiratory protection selection and protective clothing for performing work at a specific tank(s).

  20. Effect of Chemical Composition on Enthalpy of Evaporation and Equilibrium Vapor Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobruskin, Vladimir Kh

    2010-01-01

    Proceeding from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, the relation is derived that establishes a correlation between the partial enthalpy of evaporation from binary solutions, concentrations of components, and equilibrium vapor pressures. The difference between enthalpies of evaporation of components from solutions and those from the pure liquids, D(DH), depends on the chemical nature and concentrations, X, of solutions. The effect of concentrations on D(DH) makes different appearances in ideal and non-ideal solutions, although, as a whole, D(DH) increases with the growth of concentration of the second component. A model is introduced, which considers D(DH) as the sum of energetic changes of three sequential stages: passage of molecules from the bulk liquid into the surface layer, exit of the molecules on the outer side of the interface, and the following desorption into the gas phase. In the framework of the model, the main contribution to enthalpy of evaporation comes from the processes in the surface layer. It ...

  1. Nitrogen doping of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on 4H-SiC (0001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, J. M.; Binder, J.; Wysmo?ek, A.; D?browski, P.; Strupi?ski, W.; Kopciuszy?ski, M.; Ja?ochowski, M.; Klusek, Z.

    2014-06-21

    We present optical, electrical, and structural properties of nitrogen-doped graphene grown on the Si face of 4H-SiC (0001) by chemical vapor deposition method using propane as the carbon precursor and N{sub 2} as the nitrogen source. The incorporation of nitrogen in the carbon lattice was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows carrier behavior characteristic for massless Dirac fermions and confirms the presence of a graphene monolayer in the investigated nitrogen-doped samples. The structural and electronic properties of the material were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. A systematical analysis of the graphene Raman spectra, including D, G, and 2D bands, was performed. In the case of nitrogen-doped samples, an electron concentration on the order of 5–10 × 10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?2} was estimated based upon Raman and Hall effect measurements and no clear dependence of the carrier concentration on nitrogen concentration used during growth was observed. This high electron concentration can be interpreted as both due to the presence of nitrogen in graphitic-like positions of the graphene lattice as well as to the interaction with the substrate. A greater intensity of the Raman D band and increased inhomogeneity, as well as decreased electron mobility, observed for nitrogen-doped samples, indicate the formation of defects and a modification of the growth process induced by nitrogen doping.

  2. Fabrication of layered self-standing diamond film by dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. C.; Dai, F. W.; Li, B.; Lan, H.; Askari, J.; Tang, W. Z.; Lu, F. X.

    2007-01-15

    Layered self-standing diamond films, consisting of an upper layer, buffer layer, and a lower layer, were fabricated by fluctuating the ratio of methane to hydrogen in high power dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition. There were micrometer-sized columnar diamond crystalline grains in both upper layer and lower layer. The size of the columnar diamond crystalline grains was bigger in the upper layer than that in the lower layer. The orientation of the upper layer was (110), while it was (111) for the lower layer. Raman results showed that no sp{sup 3} peak shift was found in the upper layer, but it was found and blueshifted in the lower layer. This indicated that the internal stress within the film body could be tailored by this layered structure. The buffer layer with nanometer-sized diamond grains formed by secondary nucleation was necessary in order to form the layered film. Growth rate was over 10 {mu}m/h in layered self-standing diamond film fabrication.

  3. Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Cu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regmi, Murari [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rouleau, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Eastman, Jeffrey [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Eres, Gyula [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We describe a two-step approach for suppressing nucleation of graphene on Cu using chemical vapor deposition. In the first step, as received Cu foils are oxidized in air at temperatures up to 500 C to remove surface impurities and to induce the regrowth of Cu grains during subsequent annealing in H2 flow at 1040 C prior to graphene growth. In the second step, transient reactant cooling is performed by using a brief Ar pulse at the onset of growth to induce collisional deactivation of the carbon growth species. The combination of these two steps results in a three orders of magnitude reduction in the graphene nucleation density, enabling the growth of millimeter-size single crystal graphene grains. A kinetic model shows that suppressing nucleation promotes a cooperative island growth mode that favors the formation of large area single crystal graphene, and it is accompanied by a roughly 3 orders of magnitude increase in the reactive sticking probability of methane compared to that in random nucleation growth.

  4. Structural, compositional, and photoluminescence characterization of thermal chemical vapor deposition-grown Zn?N? microtips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Pai-Chun, E-mail: pcwei68@gmail.com, E-mail: tsengcm@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Chung-Chieh; Hsu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Tong, Shih-Chang; Shen, Ji-Lin [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Chuan-Ming, E-mail: pcwei68@gmail.com, E-mail: tsengcm@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Tao-Yuan 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-14

    The catalytic growth of Zn?N? using guided-stream thermal chemical vapor deposition has been investigated within the parameter range of acicular growth to obtain uniform microtips with a high crystalline quality. The cubic anti-bixbyite crystal structure of Zn?N? microtips and its related phonon mode are revealed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The surface morphologies of pure and surface-oxidized Zn?N? microtips are depicted by scanning electron microscopy and show the crack formation on the surface-oxidized Zn?N? microtips. The spatial element distribution map confirms the VLS growth mechanism for Zn?N? microtips and reveals the depth profile of zinc, nitrogen, oxygen, and nickel elements. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Zn?N? microtips show a sharp infrared band-to-band emission peak at 1.34 eV with a full width at half maximum of ~100 meV and a very broad oxygen-related defect band emission peak centered at ~0.85 eV.

  5. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H. [Institute of Nanoengineering and Microsystems (NEMS), National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30043 (China); Bhattacharyya, T. K. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India); Patel, P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Barik, T. K. [School of Applied Sciences, Haldia Institute of Technology, Haldia 721657, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal (India)

    2010-06-15

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of C-C, C-H, Si-C, and Si-H bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio I{sub D}/I{sub G}. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  6. Synthesis and Hydrogen Sorption Properties of Carborane Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synthesis and Hydrogen Sorption Properties of Carborane Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials@northwestern.edu Tailorable inorganic coordination polymers,1-7 in particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)2-7 comprise an important emerging class of materials. They are noteworthy for their structural and chemical diversity, high

  7. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

  8. Study of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the application to p-channel thin film transistor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nominanda, Helinda

    2004-01-01

    The material and process characteristics of boron doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD) have been studied. The goal is to apply the high quality films...

  9. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  10. Robust Numerical Simulation of Porosity Evolution in Chemical Vapor Infiltration I: Two Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Shi

    infiltration (CVI) process is an important approach to fabricating ceramic matrix composite(CMC's). Two. In CVI a vapor precursor of the matrix material, such as methyl­ trichlorosilane (MTS), diffuses through the inter­fiber void. As matrix growth progresses, avenues for gas transport become more tortuous and begin

  11. Real-time, in situ film thickness metrology in a 10 Torr W chemical vapor deposition process using an acoustic sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    wafer consumption.1,2 The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors3 places an emphasis on two chemical vapor deposition CVD reactor into an Inficon ComposerTM acoustic sensor for in situ chemical gas at 10 Torr from 340 to 400 °C using a H2 /WF6 gas mixture. Sampled gases were compressed through

  12. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Turner, John A. (Littleton, CO); Liu, Ping (Lakewood, CO)

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

  13. Design of a compact ultrahigh vacuum-compatible setup for the analysis of chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Theodor; Nowak, Martin; Zielasek, Volkmar Bäumer, Marcus; Mundloch, Udo; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-10-15

    Optimizing thin film deposition techniques requires contamination-free transfer from the reactor into an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for surface science analysis. A very compact, multifunctional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactor for direct attachment to any typical UHV system for thin film analysis was designed and built. Besides compactness, fast, easy, and at the same time ultimately clean sample transfer between reactor and UHV was a major goal. It was achieved by a combination of sample manipulation parts, sample heater, and a shutter mechanism designed to fit all into a NW38 Conflat six-ways cross. The present reactor design is versatile to be employed for all commonly employed variants of CVD, including Atomic Layer Deposition. A demonstration of the functionality of the system is provided. First results of the setup (attached to an Omicron Multiprobe x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system) on the temperature dependence of Pulsed Spray Evaporation-CVD of Ni films from Ni acetylacetonate as the precursor demonstrate the reactor performance and illustrate the importance of clean sample transfer without breaking vacuum in order to obtain unambiguous results on the quality of CVD-grown thin Ni films. The widely applicable design holds promise for future systematic studies of the fundamental processes during chemical vapor deposition or atomic layer deposition.

  14. Graphene chemical vapor deposition at very low pressure: The impact of substrate surface self-diffusion in domain shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, T. H. R.; Ek-Weis, J.; Lacerda, R. G.; Ferlauto, A. S., E-mail: ferlauto@fisica.ufmg.br [Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901 (Brazil)

    2014-08-18

    The initial stages of graphene chemical vapor deposition at very low pressures (<10{sup ?5?}Torr) were investigated. The growth of large graphene domains (?up to 100??m) at very high rates (up to 3??m{sup 2} s{sup ?1}) has been achieved in a cold-wall reactor using a liquid carbon precursor. For high temperature growth (>900?°C), graphene grain shape and symmetry were found to depend on the underlying symmetry of the Cu crystal, whereas for lower temperatures (<900?°C), mostly rounded grains are observed. The temperature dependence of graphene nucleation density was determined, displaying two thermally activated regimes, with activation energy values of 6?±?1?eV for temperatures ranging from 900?°C to 960?°C and 9?±?1?eV for temperatures above 960?°C. The comparison of such dependence with the temperature dependence of Cu surface self-diffusion suggests that graphene growth at high temperatures and low pressures is strongly influenced by copper surface rearrangement. We propose a model that incorporates Cu surface self-diffusion as an essential process to explain the orientation correlation between graphene and Cu crystals, and which can clarify the difference generally observed between graphene domain shapes in atmospheric-pressure and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition.

  15. Manganese-induced long-range lattice disorder and vacancy formation in metal-organic chemical vapor deposition grown and ion-implanted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    of this goal for use in spintronic devices because of their unique electri- cal and magnetic properties.1, and elements for solid state quantum computing.4,5 However, room tem- perature operation of spintronic devices spintronic devices.1,9,10,13 Hence, a better understanding of the structural properties and the lattice

  16. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  17. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  18. Effects of polymethylmethacrylate-transfer residues on the growth of organic semiconductor molecules on chemical vapor deposited graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratzer, Markus Teichert, Christian; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Gaji?, Radoš; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Hofmann, Stephan

    2015-03-09

    Scalably grown and transferred graphene is a highly promising material for organic electronic applications, but controlled interfacing of graphene thereby remains a key challenge. Here, we study the growth characteristics of the important organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenyl (6P) on chemical vapor deposited graphene that has been transferred with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) onto oxidized Si wafer supports. A particular focus is on the influence of PMMA residual contamination, which we systematically reduce by H{sub 2} annealing prior to 6P deposition. We find that 6P grows in a flat-lying needle-type morphology, surprisingly independent of the level of PMMA residue and of graphene defects. Wrinkles in the graphene typically act as preferential nucleation centers. Residual PMMA does however limit the length of the resulting 6P needles by restricting molecular diffusion/attachment. We discuss the implications for organic device fabrication, with particular regard to contamination and defect tolerance.

  19. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8555 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  20. Ultra-narrow ferromagnetic resonance in organic-based thin films grown via low temperature chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, H.; Harberts, M.; Adur, R.; Hammel, P. Chris; Johnston-Halperin, E., E-mail: ejh@physics.osu.edu, E-mail: epstein@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States); Lu, Y. [Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1173 (United States); Epstein, A. J., E-mail: ejh@physics.osu.edu, E-mail: epstein@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1173 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We present the growth of thin films of the organic-based ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]{sub x} (x???2, TCNE: tetracyanoethylene) via chemical vapor deposition. Under optimized growth conditions, we observe a significant increase in magnetic homogeneity, as evidenced by a Curie temperature above 600?K and sharp magnetization switching. Further, ferromagnetic resonance studies reveal a single resonance with full width at half maximum linewidth of 1.4?G, comparable to the narrowest lines measured in inorganic magnetic materials and in contrast to previous studies that showed multiple resonance features. These characteristics are promising for the development of high frequency electronic devices that take advantage of the unique properties of this organic-based material, such as the potential for low cost synthesis combined with low temperature and conformal deposition on a wide variety of substrates.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the chemistry involved in tin oxide film growth during chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mannie, Gilbere J. A.; Gerritsen, Gijsbert; Abbenhuis, Hendrikus C. L.; Deelen, Joop van; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.; Thuene, Peter C. [Materials innovation institute (M2i), P. O. Box 5008, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands) and Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hybrid Catalysis BV, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); TNO Science and Industry, P. O. Box 6235, 5600 HE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    The chemistry of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) processes is believed to be complex, and detailed reports on reaction mechanisms are scarce. Here, the authors investigated the reaction mechanism of monobutyl tinchloride (MBTC) and water during SnO{sub 2} thin film growth using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XPS results indicate an acid-base hydrolysis reaction mechanism, which is tested with multilayer experiments, demonstrating self-terminating growth. In-house developed TEM wafers are used to visualize nucleation during these multilayer experiments, and results are compared with TEM results of APCVD samples. Results show almost identical nucleation behavior implying that their growth mechanism is identical. Our experiments suggest that in APCVD, when using MBTC and water, SnO{sub 2} film growth occurs via a heterolytic bond splitting of the Sn-Cl bonds without the need to invoke gas-phase radical or coordination chemistry of the MBTC precursor.

  2. ZnO light-emitting diode grown by plasma-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.Z.; Ye, Z.Z.; Zeng, Y.J.; Zhu, L.P.; Zhao, B.H.; Jiang, L.; Lu, J.G.; He, H.P.; Zhang, S.B. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2006-04-24

    We report a breakthrough in fabricating ZnO homojunction light-emitting diode by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Using NO plasma, we are able to grow p-type ZnO thin films on n-type bulk ZnO substrates. The as-grown films on glass substrates show hole concentration of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and mobility of 1-10 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal nitrogen-related emissions. A typical ZnO homojunction shows rectifying behavior with a turn-on voltage of about 2.3 V. Electroluminescence at room temperature has been demonstrated with band-to-band emission at I=40 mA and defect-related emissions in the blue-yellow spectrum range.

  3. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehrl, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.woehrl@uni-due.de; Schulz, Stephan [Faculty of Chemistry and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Carl-Benz-Straße 199, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)] [Faculty of Chemistry and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Carl-Benz-Straße 199, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Ochedowski, Oliver; Gottlieb, Steven [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg Essen, Lotharstraße 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)] [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg Essen, Lotharstraße 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Shibasaki, Kosuke [Institute of Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)] [Institute of Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    A plasma enhanced vapor deposition process is used to synthesize graphene from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture on copper samples. The graphene samples were transferred onto SiO{sub 2} substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopic mapping and atomic force microscope topographical mapping. Analysis of the Raman bands shows that the deposited graphene is clearly SLG and that the sheets are deposited on large areas of several mm{sup 2}. The defect density in the graphene sheets is calculated using Raman measurements and the influence of the process pressure on the defect density is measured. Furthermore the origin of these defects is discussed with respect to the process parameters and hence the plasma environment.

  4. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 13 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 SEPTEMBER 2001 Morphology Transition during Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Transition during Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition Y.-P. Zhao, Jason T. Drotar, G.-C. Wang, and T have studied, in detail, the effect of sticking coefficient on the morphology evolution in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition processes. We have shown that the surface morphology changes from a self

  5. Broadband microwave and time-domain terahertz spectroscopy of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    graphene W. Liu, R. Valdés Aguilar, Yufeng Hao, R. S. Ruoff, and N. P. Armitage Citation: J. Appl. Phys. Related Articles Edge surface modes in magnetically biased chemically doped graphene strips Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 231902 (2011) Terahertz coherent acoustic experiments with semiconductor superlattices Appl

  6. Multiplexed mass spectrometry for real-time sensing in a spatially programmable chemical vapor deposition reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    in understanding and controlling chemical processes used in semiconductor fabrication. Given the complexity at any desired process design point, or 2 intentional nonuniformity to accelerate process optimization. This forms the basis for using real-time mass spectrometry to drive process sensing, metrology, and control

  7. Characteristics of ultra low-k nanoporous and fluorinated silica based films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi-Firouzjah, M.; Shokri, B.; Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Evin, Tehran

    2013-12-07

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) silica based films were deposited on p-type silicon and polycarbonate substrates by radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method at low temperature. A mixture of tetraethoxysilane vapor, oxygen, and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) was used for the deposition of the films in forms of two structures called as SiO{sub x}C{sub y} and SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z}. Properties of the films were controlled by amount of porosity and fluorine content in the film matrix. The influence of RF power and CF{sub 4} flow on the elemental composition, deposition rate, surface roughness, leakage current, refractive index, and dielectric constant of the films were characterized. Moreover, optical emission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the plasma process at the different parameters. Electrical characteristics of SiO{sub x}C{sub y} and SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z} films with metal-oxide-semiconductor structure were investigated using current-voltage analysis to measure the leakage current and breakdown field, as well as capacitance-voltage analysis to obtain the film's dielectric constant. The results revealed that SiO{sub x}C{sub y} films, which are deposited at lower RF power produce more leakage current, meanwhile the dielectric constant and refractive index of these films decreased mainly due to the more porosity in the film structure. By adding CF{sub 4} in the deposition process, fluorine, the most electronegative and the least polarized atom, doped into the silica film and led to decrease in the refractive index and the dielectric constant. In addition, no breakdown field was observed in the electrical characteristics of SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z} films and the leakage current of these films reduced by increment of the CF{sub 4} flow.

  8. Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Nune, Satish K.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Dang, Liem X.

    2013-09-01

    Nanofluids, dispersions of metal or oxide nanoparticles in a base working fluid, are being intensively studied due to improvements they offer in thermal properties of the working fluid. However, these benefits have been erratically demonstrated and proven impacts on thermal conductivity are modest and well described from long-established effective medium theory. In this paper, we describe a new class of metal-organic heat carrier (MOHC) nanofluid that offers potential for a larger performance boost in thermal vapor-liquid compression cycles. MOHCs are nanophase porous coordination solids designed to reversibly uptake the working fluid molecules in which the MOHCs are suspended. Additional heat can be extracted in a heat exchanger or solar collector from the endothermic enthalpy of desorption, which is then released as the nanofluid transits through a power generating device such as a turboexpander. Calculations for an R123 MOHC nanofluid indicated potential for up to 15% increase in power output. Capillary tube experiments show that liquid-vapor transitions occur without nanoparticle deposition on the tube walls provided entrance Reynolds number exceeds approximately 100.

  9. Step-edge-induced resistance anisotropy in quasi-free-standing bilayer chemical vapor deposition graphene on SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciuk, Tymoteusz [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Cakmakyapan, Semih; Ozbay, Ekmel [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Department of Physics, Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Bilkent, Ankara (Turkey); Caban, Piotr; Grodecki, Kacper; Pasternak, Iwona; Strupinski, Wlodek, E-mail: wlodek.strupinski@itme.edu.pl [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Krajewska, Aleksandra [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Szmidt, Jan [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-09-28

    The transport properties of quasi-free-standing (QFS) bilayer graphene on SiC depend on a range of scattering mechanisms. Most of them are isotropic in nature. However, the SiC substrate morphology marked by a distinctive pattern of the terraces gives rise to an anisotropy in graphene's sheet resistance, which may be considered an additional scattering mechanism. At a technological level, the growth-preceding in situ etching of the SiC surface promotes step bunching which results in macro steps ~10 nm in height. In this report, we study the qualitative and quantitative effects of SiC steps edges on the resistance of epitaxial graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. We experimentally determine the value of step edge resistivity in hydrogen-intercalated QFS-bilayer graphene to be ~190 ??m for step height hS = 10 nm and provide proof that it cannot originate from mechanical deformation of graphene but is likely to arise from lowered carrier concentration in the step area. Our results are confronted with the previously reported values of the step edge resistivity in monolayer graphene over SiC atomic steps. In our analysis, we focus on large-scale, statistical properties to foster the scalable technology of industrial graphene for electronics and sensor applications.

  10. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  11. Surface-texture evolution of different chemical-vapor-deposited zinc sulfide flats polished with various magnetorheological fluids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salzman, S.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-08-19

    The macro-structure of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) substrates is characterizedby cone-like structures that start growing at the early stages of deposition. As deposition progresses,these cones grow larger and reach centimeter size in height and millimeter size in width. It is challengingto polish out these features from the top layer, particularly for the magnetorheological finishing (MRF)process. A conventional MR fluid tends to leave submillimeter surface artifacts on the finished surface,which is a direct result of the cone-like structure. Here we describe the MRF process of polishing four CVD ZnS substrates, manufactured by four differentvendors, with conventional MR fluid at pHmore »10 and zirconia-coated-CI (carbonyl iron) MR fluids at pH 4, 5,and 6. We report on the surface–texture evolution of the substrates as they were MRF polished with thedifferent fluids. We show that performances of the zirconia-coated-CI MR fluid at pH 4 are significantlyhigher than that of the same fluid at pH levels of 5 and 6 and moderately higher than that of a conventionalMR fluid at pH 10. An improvement in surface–texture variability from part to part was also observedwith the pH 4 MR fluid.« less

  12. Crystallinity and microstructure in Si films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition: A simple atomic-scale model validated by experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, P. L.; Le Donne, A.; Cereda, S.; Miglio, Leo; Pizzini, S.; Binetti, S.; Montalenti, F. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali and L-NESS, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Rondanini, M.; Cavallotti, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali, e Ingegneria Chimica 'G. Natta', Politecnico di Milano, Via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milan (Italy); Chrastina, D.; Moiseev, T.; Kaenel, H. von; Isella, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica and L-NESS, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2009-02-02

    A joint theoretical and experimental analysis of the crystalline fraction in nanocrystalline films grown by low-energy plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is presented. The effect of key growth parameters such as temperature, silane flux, and hydrogen dilution ratio is analyzed and modeled at the atomic scale, introducing an environment-dependent crystallization probability. A very good agreement between experiments and theory is found, despite the use of a single fitting parameter.

  13. Tunable Electrical Conductivity in Metal-Organic Framework Thin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tunable Electrical Conductivity in Metal-Organic Framework Thin-Film Devices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tunable Electrical Conductivity in Metal-Organic Framework...

  14. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hart, A. John, E-mail: ajhart@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called “Robofurnace.” Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading/unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes.

  15. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that will be able to withstand a few MW proton beam and hopefully will be able to be used after possible future upgrades to the SNS to greater than a 3MW beam.

  16. Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu; Bian, Jiming; Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 ; Zhang, Dong; Miao, Lihua; Department of Computer and Mathematical Basic Teaching, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyan 110034

    2013-11-18

    ?-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown ?-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

  17. Metal-organic scintillator crystals for X-ray, gamma ray, and neutron detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A (Oak Ridge, TN); Kolopus, James A. (Clinton, TN); Neal, John S (Knoxville, TN); Ramey, Joanne Oxendine (Knoxville, TN); Wisniewski, Dariusz J (Torun, PL)

    2012-01-03

    New metal-organic materials are useful as scintillators and have the chemical formula LX.sub.3(CH.sub.3OH).sub.4 where L is Y, Sc, or a lanthanide element, and X is a halogen element. An example of the scintillator materials is CeCl.sub.3(CH.sub.3OH).sub.4.

  18. Computational characterization and prediction of metal-organic framework properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coudert, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In this introductory review, we give an overview of the computational chemistry methods commonly used in the field of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), to describe or predict the structures themselves and characterize their various properties, either at the quantum chemical level or through classical molecular simulation. We discuss the methods for the prediction of crystal structures, geometrical properties and large-scale screening of hypothetical MOFs, as well as their thermal and mechanical properties. A separate section deals with the simulation of adsorption of fluids and fluid mixtures in MOFs.

  19. Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-06

    Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

  20. Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document FumeHoods Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful hood should be used in the following situations: when handling chemicals with inhalation hazards be a hazard in themselves. Excess containers and equipment can impede airflow. If hoses or cords must

  1. Brønsted Acidity in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brnsted Acidity in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Jiang, Juncong and Yaghi, Omar, M. Bronsted Acidity in Metal-Organic Frameworks. Chem. Rev., 115, 6966-6997 (2015)....

  2. Direct growth of few-layer graphene on 6H-SiC and 3C-SiC/Si via propane chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Portail, M.; Ouerghi, A.; Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T.

    2010-10-25

    We propose to grow graphene on SiC by a direct carbon feeding through propane flow in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. X-ray photoemission and low energy electron diffraction show that propane allows to grow few-layer graphene (FLG) on 6H-SiC(0001). Surprisingly, FLG grown on (0001) face presents a rotational disorder similar to that observed for FLG obtained by annealing on (000-1) face. Thanks to a reduced growth temperature with respect to the classical SiC annealing method, we have also grown FLG/3C-SiC/Si(111) in a single growth sequence. This opens the way for large-scale production of graphene-based devices on silicon substrate.

  3. Toward epitaxially grown two-dimensional crystal hetero-structures: Single and double MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structures by chemical vapor depositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Meng-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chung-En [Department of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, Cheng-Hung [Institute of Display, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Su, Chen-Fung; Chen, Chi [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Si-Chen [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shih-Yen, E-mail: shihyen@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-18

    Uniform large-size MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structures fabricated directly on sapphire substrates are demonstrated with layer-number controllability by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images provide the direct evidences of layer numbers of MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structures. Photo-excited electron induced Fermi level shift of the graphene channel are observed on the single MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structure transistors. Furthermore, double hetero-structures of graphene/MoS{sub 2}/graphene are achieved by CVD fabrication of graphene layers on top of the MoS{sub 2}, as confirmed by the cross-sectional HRTEM. These results have paved the possibility of epitaxially grown multi-hetero-structures for practical applications.

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Silica SiO2-TiO2 Antireflective Thin Films for Glass Based Solar Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobukowski, Erik R; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; McCamy, James; Harris, Caroline; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of SiO2-TiO2 thin films employing [[(tBuO)3Si]2O-Ti(OiPr)2], which can be prepared from commercially available materials, results in antireflective thin films on float glass under industrially relevant manufacturing conditions. It was found that while the deposition temperature had an effect on the SiO2:TiO2 ratio, the thickness was dependent on the time of deposition. This study shows that it is possible to use APCVD employing a single source precursor containing titanium and silicon to produce thin films on float glass with high SiO2:TiO2 ratios.

  5. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Marcinek, M.; Hardwick, L.J.; Richardson, T.J.; Song, X.; Kostecki, R.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin-film composite Sn/C anodes for lithium batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon decorated with uniformly distributed Sn nanoparticles were synthesized from a solid organic precursor Sn(IV) tert-butoxide by a one step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The thin-film Sn/C electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half cells and produced a reversible capacity of 440 and 297 mAhg{sup -1} at C/25 and 5C discharge rates, respectively. A long term cycling of the Sn/C nanocomposite anodes showed 40% capacity loss after 500 cycles at 1C rate.

  6. Chemically sensitive polymer-mediated nanoporous alumina SAW sensors for the detection of vapor-phase analytes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Gregory Paul

    2005-08-29

    We have investigated the chemical sensitivity of nanoporous (NP) alumina-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices that have been surface-modified with polymeric mediating films. The research in this dissertation covers the refinement of the NP...

  7. Copolymerization of divinylbenzene and 4-vinylpyridine using initiated chemical vapor deposition for surface modification and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Ernesto, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates the copolymerization of divinylbenzene and 4- vinylpyridine into organic thin films that exhibit conformal, stable, and uniform surface properties. Thin films were grown using initiated chemical ...

  8. Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) for highly selective separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-09-17

    Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) have been investigated for the realization as separation media with high selectivity. These structures are held together with strong bonds, making them architecturally, chemically, and thermally stable. Therefore, employing well designed building units, it is possible to discover promising materials for gas and vapor separation. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs and ZIFs with these specific objectives: (i) to develop a strategy for producing MOFs and ZIFs that combine high surface areas with active sites for their use in gas adsorption and separation of small organic compounds, (ii) to introduce active sites in the framework by a post-synthetic modification and metalation of MOFs and ZIFs, and (iii) to design and synthesize MOFs with extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes to accommodate large amounts of guest molecules. By the systematic study, this effort demonstrated how to introduce active functional groups in the frameworks, and this is also the origin of a new strategy, which is termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. One of the solutions to overcome this challenge is an isoreticular expansion of a MOF�������¢����������������s structure. With triangular organic linker and square building units, we demonstrated that MOF-399 has a unit cell volume 17 times larger than that of the first reported material isoreticular to it, and it has the highest porosity (94%) and lowest density (0.126 g cm-3) of any MOF reported to date. MOFs are not just low density materials; the guest-free form of MOF-210 demonstrates an ultrahigh porosity, whose BET surface area was estimated to be 6240 m2 g-1 by N2 adsorption measurements.

  9. Application of a Quantum Cascade Laser for Time-Resolved, in Situ Probing of CH4/H2 and C2H2/H2 Gas Mixtures during Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    , for example, microwave (MW) or arc-jet plasmas, or the surface of a hot filament (HF). Activation leads Mixtures during Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond A. Cheesman, J. A. Smith of the chemistry prevailing in microwave plasma activated hydrocarbon/Ar/H2 gas mixtures used for diamond thin film

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes on diamond-like carbon by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Byungyou

    , scanning probes, nanoscale electronic devices, hydrogen storage, chemical sensors, and composite., 1995). These properties make CNTs good candidates for many applications such as field emission devices on a nanostructured transition metal catalyst such as Co, Ni, or Fe. The growth mechanisms of CNTs are divided

  11. Direct Growth Graphene on Cu Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Deposition as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrate for Label-Free Detection of Adenosine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shicai; Jiang, Shouzhen; Wang, Jihua; Wei, Jie; Xu, Shida; Liu, Hanping

    2015-01-01

    We present a graphene/Cu nanoparticle hybrids (G/CuNPs) system as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for adenosine detection. The Cu nanoparticles wrapped around a monolayer graphene shell were directly synthesized on flat quartz by chemical vapor deposition in a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The G/CuNPs showed an excellent SERS enhancement activity for adenosine. The minimum detected concentration of the adenosine in serum was demonstrated as low as 5 nM, and the calibration curve showed a good linear response from 5 to 500 nM. The capability of SERS detection of adenosine in real normal human urine samples based on G/CuNPs was also investigated and the characteristic peaks of adenosine were still recognizable. The reproducible and the ultrasensitive enhanced Raman signals could be due to the presence of an ultrathin graphene layer. The graphene shell was able to enrich and fix the adenosine molecules, which could also efficiently maintain chemical and optical stability of G/CuNPs. Based...

  12. Vaporization of zinc from scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The rate of zinc vaporization from galvanized scrap was measured using a thermogravimetric apparatus along with chemical analysis. It is found that the rate of zinc vaporization is very fast in nitrogen and carbon monoxide atmospheres at temperatures higher than 950 C. At lower temperature rate decreases with decreasing temperature and is controlled by the gas phase mass transport. The simultaneous oxidation and vaporization of zinc occurs when the samples were heated in carbon dioxide and air. The current experimental results indicate that almost all of the zinc from scrap vaporizes during the heating process in a very short period of time after the temperature reaches above 850 C.

  13. Study of the effects of noisy data on the determination of the enthalpy of vaporization from a vapor pressure equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casserly, Thomas Bryan

    2013-02-22

    Chemical engineers use software tools everyday to aid them in solving complex problems. Software packages simulate virtually every aspect of a chemical process, including the use of source vapor pressure data to fit empirical constants of a vapor...

  14. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  15. A simple method to deposit palladium doped SnO{sub 2} thin films using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young Soon; Wahab, Rizwan; Shin, Hyung-Shik [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ansari, S. G.; Ansari, Z. A. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This work presents a simple method to deposit palladium doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films using modified plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of deposition temperature at a radio frequency plasma power of 150 W. Stannic chloride (SnCl{sub 4}) was used as precursor and oxygen (O{sub 2}, 100 SCCM) (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) as reactant gas. Palladium hexafluroacetyleacetonate (Pd(C{sub 5}HF{sub 6}O{sub 2}){sub 2}) was used as a precursor for palladium. Fine granular morphology was observed with tetragonal rutile structure. A peak related to Pd{sub 2}Sn is observed, whose intensity increases slightly with deposition temperature. Electrical resistivity value decreased from 8.6 to 0.9 m{Omega} cm as a function of deposition temperature from 400 to 600 deg. C. Photoelectron peaks related to Sn 3d, Sn 3p3, Sn 4d, O 1s, and C 1s were detected with varying intensities as a function of deposition temperature.

  16. Growth, microstructure, and field-emission properties of synthesized diamond film on adamantane-coated silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Chang Li

    2010-05-15

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched Si surface is great importance for its growth, and detailed understanding of this process is therefore desired for many applications. The pretreatment of the substrate surface may influence the initial growth period. In this study, diamond films have been synthesized on adamantane-coated crystalline silicon {l_brace}100{r_brace} substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gaseous mixture of methane and hydrogen gases without the application of a bias voltage to the substrates. Prior to adamantane coating, the Si substrates were not pretreated such as abraded/scratched. The substrate temperature was {approx}530 deg. C during diamond deposition. The deposited films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements provide definitive evidence for high-crystalline quality diamond film, which is synthesized on a SiC rather than clean Si substrate. Characterization through atomic force microscope allows establishing fine quality criteria of the film according to the grain size of nanodiamond along with SiC. The diamond films exhibit a low-threshold (55 V/{mu}m) and high current-density (1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}) field-emission (FE) display. The possible mechanism of formation of diamond films and their FE properties have been demonstrated.

  17. Effects of pressure, temperature, and hydrogen during graphene growth on SiC(0001) using propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Roudon, E.; Lefebvre, D.; Portail, M.; Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T.

    2013-05-28

    Graphene growth from a propane flow in a hydrogen environment (propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD)) on SiC differentiates from other growth methods in that it offers the possibility to obtain various graphene structures on the Si-face depending on growth conditions. The different structures include the (6{radical}3 Multiplication-Sign 6{radical}3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstruction of the graphene/SiC interface, which is commonly observed on the Si-face, but also the rotational disorder which is generally observed on the C-face. In this work, growth mechanisms leading to the formation of the different structures are studied and discussed. For that purpose, we have grown graphene on SiC(0001) (Si-face) using propane-hydrogen CVD at various pressure and temperature and studied these samples extensively by means of low energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Pressure and temperature conditions leading to the formation of the different structures are identified and plotted in a pressure-temperature diagram. This diagram, together with other characterizations (X-ray photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy), is the basis of further discussions on the carbon supply mechanisms and on the kinetics effects. The entire work underlines the important role of hydrogen during growth and its effects on the final graphene structure.

  18. Effects of thermal annealing on the structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of hard fluorinated carbon films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maia da Costa, M.E.H.; Baumvol, I.J.R.; Radke, C.; Jacobsohn, L.G.; Zamora, R.R.M.; Freire, F.L. Jr. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 3807, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22453-970 (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, 91540-000 (Brazil); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, P. O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 3807, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22453-970 (Brazil)

    2004-11-01

    Hard amorphous fluorinated carbon films (a-C:F) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition were annealed in vacuum for 30 min in the temperature range of 200-600 deg. C. The structural and compositional modifications were followed by several analytical techniques: Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Nanoidentation measurements and lateral force microscopy experiments were carried out in order to provide the film hardness and the friction coefficient, respectively. The internal stress and contact angle were also measured. RBS, ERDA, and XPS results indicate that both fluorine and hydrogen losses occur for annealing temperatures higher than 300 deg. C. Raman spectroscopy shows a progressive graphitization upon annealing, while the surface became slightly more hydrophobic as revealed by the increase of the contact angle. Following the surface wettability reduction, a decrease of the friction coefficient was observed. These results highlight the influence of the capillary condensation on the nanoscale friction. The film hardness and the internal stress are constant up to 300 deg. C and decrease for higher annealing temperatures, showing a direct correlation with the atomic density of the films. Since the thickness variation is negligible, the mass loss upon thermal treatment results in amorphous structures with a lower degree of cross-linking, explaining the deterioration of the mechanical properties of the a-C:F films.

  19. Photoconduction efficiencies and dynamics in GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy: A comparison study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, R. S. [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H. Y. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y. S. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. T. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-10

    The normalized gains, which determines the intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiencies, have been defined and compared for the gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). By excluding the contributions of experimental parameters and under the same light intensity, the CVD-grown GaN NWs exhibit the normalized gain which is near two orders of magnitude higher than that of the MBE-ones. The temperature-dependent time-resolved photocurrent measurement further indicates that the higher photoconduction efficiency in the CVD-GaN NWs is originated from the longer carrier lifetime induced by the higher barrier height ({phi}{sub B} = 160 {+-} 30 mV) of surface band bending. In addition, the experimentally estimated barrier height at 20 {+-} 2 mV for the MBE-GaN NWs, which is much lower than the theoretical value, is inferred to be resulted from the lower density of charged surface states on the non-polar side walls.

  20. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-17

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  1. Variation of Pore Metrics in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Storage and Catalytic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jonathan Ward

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Framework . . . . . .Heck Coupling in Multivariate Metal-Organic Frame- works forof carboxylate linker and metal salt yields different SBUs

  2. Please cite this article in press as: W. Wu, et al., Wafer-scale synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition and its application in hydrogen sensing, Sens. Actuators B: Chem. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.snb.2010.06.070

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Jiming

    2010-01-01

    with a 1 nm palladium film deposited for hydrogen detection. Hydrogen in air with concentrations in 0 vapor deposition and its application in hydrogen sensing, Sens. Actuators B: Chem. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.elsevier.com/locate/snb Wafer-scale synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition and its application in hydrogen sensing

  3. A Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-Organic Framework...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian-Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang;...

  4. Piezofluorochromic Metal-Organic Framework: A Microscissor Lift...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Piezofluorochromic Metal-Organic Framework: A Microscissor Lift Previous Next List Zhang, Qiang; Su, Jie; Feng, Dawei; Wei, Zhangwen; Zou, Xiaodong; Zhou, Hong-Cai....

  5. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami UNREL DoDDLA Project) (presentation) High...

  6. The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

    2008-06-24

    The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

  7. SPIN (Version 3. 83): A Fortran program for modeling one-dimensional rotating-disk/stagnation-flow chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltrin, M.E. ); Kee, R.J.; Evans, G.H.; Meeks, E.; Rupley, F.M.; Grcar, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    In rotating-disk reactor a heated substrate spins (at typical speeds of 1000 rpm or more) in an enclosure through which the reactants flow. The rotating disk geometry has the important property that in certain operating regimes{sup 1} the species and temperature gradients normal to the disk are equal everywhere on the disk. Thus, such a configuration has great potential for highly uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD),{sup 2--5} and indeed commercial rotating-disk CVD reactors are now available. In certain operating regimes, the equations describing the complex three-dimensional spiral fluid motion can be solved by a separation-of-variables transformation{sup 5,6} that reduces the equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Strictly speaking, the transformation is only valid for an unconfined infinite-radius disk and buoyancy-free flow. Furthermore, only some boundary conditions are consistent with the transformation (e.g., temperature, gas-phase composition, and approach velocity all specified to be independent of radius at some distances above the disk). Fortunately, however, the transformed equations will provide a very good practical approximation to the flow in a finite-radius reactor over a large fraction of the disk (up to {approximately}90% of the disk radius) when the reactor operating parameters are properly chosen, i.e, high rotation rates. In the limit of zero rotation rate, the rotating disk flow reduces to a stagnation-point flow, for which a similar separation-of-variables transformation is also available. Such flow configurations ( pedestal reactors'') also find use in CVD reactors. In this report we describe a model formulation and mathematical analysis of rotating-disk and stagnation-point CVD reactors. Then we apply the analysis to a compute code called SPIN and describe its implementation and use. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Doping and electronic properties of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport from powder sources for scalable III–V photovoltaics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ritenour, Andrew J.; Boucher, Jason W.; DeLancey, Robert; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the use of a simple close-spaced vapor transport technique for the growth of high-quality epitaxial GaAs films using potentially inexpensive GaAs powders as precursors. The free carrier type and density (1016 to 1019 cm–3) of the films were adjusted by addition of Te or Zn powder to the GaAs source powder. We show using photoelectrochemical and electron beam-induced current analyses that the minority carrier diffusion lengths of the n- and p-GaAs films reached ~3 ?m and ~8 ?m, respectively. Hall mobilities approach those achieved for GaAs grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, 1000–4200 cm2 V–1 s–1 for n-GaAsmore »and 50–240 cm V–1 s–1 for p-GaAs depending on doping level. We conclude that the electronic quality of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport is similar to that of GaAs made using conventional techniques and is thus sufficient for high-performance photovoltaic applications.« less

  9. Doping and electronic properties of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport from powder sources for scalable III–V photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritenour, Andrew J.; Boucher, Jason W.; DeLancey, Robert; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the use of a simple close-spaced vapor transport technique for the growth of high-quality epitaxial GaAs films using potentially inexpensive GaAs powders as precursors. The free carrier type and density (1016 to 1019 cm–3) of the films were adjusted by addition of Te or Zn powder to the GaAs source powder. We show using photoelectrochemical and electron beam-induced current analyses that the minority carrier diffusion lengths of the n- and p-GaAs films reached ~3 ?m and ~8 ?m, respectively. Hall mobilities approach those achieved for GaAs grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, 1000–4200 cm2 V–1 s–1 for n-GaAs and 50–240 cm V–1 s–1 for p-GaAs depending on doping level. We conclude that the electronic quality of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport is similar to that of GaAs made using conventional techniques and is thus sufficient for high-performance photovoltaic applications.

  10. Towards low-cost high-efficiency GaAs photovoltaics and photoelectrodes grown via vapor transport from a solid source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucher, Jason; Ritenour, Andrew; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2013-04-29

    Towards low-cost high-efficiency GaAs photovoltaics and photoelectrodes grown via vapor transport from a solid source GaAs is an attractive material for thin-film photovoltaic applications, but is not widely used for terrestrial power generation due to the high cost of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques typically used for growth. Close space vapor transport is an alternative that allows for rapid growth rates of III-V materials, and does not rely on the toxic and pyrophoric precursors used in MOCVD. We characterize CSVT films of GaAs using photoelectrochemical current-voltage and quantum efficiency measurements. Hole diffusion lengths which exceed 1.5 um are extracted from internal quantum efficiency measurements using the Gartner model. Device physics simulations suggest that solar cells based on these films could reach efficiencies exceeding 24 %. To reach this goal, a more complete understanding of the electrical properties and characterization of defects will be necessary, including measurements on complete solid-state devices. Doping of films is achieved by using source material containing the desired impurity (e.g., Te or Zn). We discuss strategies for growing III-V materials on inexpensive substrates that are not lattice-matched to GaAs.

  11. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  12. Vapor deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C.; Pattillo, S.G.; Laia, J.R. Jr.; Sattelberger, A.P.

    1990-10-05

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl){sub 3}, iridium(allyl){sub 3}, molybdenum(allyl){sub 4}, tungsten(allyl){sub 4}, rhenium (allyl){sub 4}, platinum(allyl){sub 2}, or palladium(allyl){sub 2} are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  13. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  14. Micromechanical Resonators with Nanoporous Materials for Enhanced Vapor Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Yong Ha

    2012-01-01

    organic compounds," Analytical Chemistry, vol. 74, pp. 3084-Gas Sensor Array," Analytical Chemistry, vol. 81, pp. 595-Chemical Vapors," Analytical Chemistry, vol. 83, pp. 3448-

  15. High compressibility of a flexible metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serra-Crespo P.; Stavitski E.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2012-03-22

    The metal-organic framework NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(In) shows a very high amorphization resistance (>20 GPa) together with a large compressibility (K{sub 0} = 10.9 GPa).

  16. Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing Single-Molecule Traps...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing Single-Molecule Traps for Enzyme Encapsulation Previous Next List Dawei Feng, Tian-Fu Liu, Jie Su, Mathieu Bosch, Zhangwen Wei, Wei Wan,...

  17. Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal-Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Ying-Pin Chen, Yangyang Liu, Dahuan Liu, Mathieu Bosch, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J. Am....

  18. Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Main Group Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Based Frameworks with Open Metal Sites In previous work, weClusters Introduction Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)abundant choice of metal ions and clusters, numerous organic

  19. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks for drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orellana-Tavra, Claudia; Baxter, Emma F.; Tian, Tian; Bennett, Thomas D.; Slater, Nigel K. H.; Cheetham, Anthony K.; Fairen-Jimenez, David

    2015-07-21

    , and a decrease in toxic side effects. Finding an effective DDS for therapeutic agents has been an ongoing challenge in bioengineering. In this context, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as potential candidates owing to their distinctive...

  20. Increasing the Stability of Metal-Organic Frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bosch, Mathieu; Zhang, Muwei; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a new category of advanced porous materials undergoing study by many researchers for their vast variety of both novel structures and potentially useful properties arising from them. Their high porosities, tunable structures, and convenient process of introducing both customizable functional groups and unsaturated metal centers have afforded excellent gas sorption and separation ability, catalytic activity, luminescent properties, and more. However, the robustness and reactivity of a given framework are largely dependent on its metal-ligand interactions, where the metal-containing clusters are often vulnerable to ligand substitution by water or other nucleophiles, meaning that the frameworks may collapsemore »upon exposure even to moist air. Other frameworks may collapse upon thermal or vacuum treatment or simply over time. This instability limits the practical uses of many MOFs. In order to further enhance the stability of the framework, many different approaches, such as the utilization of high-valence metal ions or nitrogen-donor ligands, were recently investigated. This review details the efforts of both our research group and others to synthesize MOFs possessing drastically increased chemical and thermal stability, in addition to exemplary performance for catalysis, gas sorption, and separation.« less

  1. Ligand Design for Novel Metal-Organic Polyhedra and Metal-Organic Frameworks for Alternative Energy Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuppler, Ryan John

    2011-10-21

    The primary goal of this research concerns the synthesis of organic ligands in an effort to create metal-organic porous materials for the storage of gas molecules for alternative energy applications as well as other ...

  2. Variation of Pore Metrics in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Storage and Catalytic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jonathan Ward

    2015-01-01

    catalytic activity of the metal–organic framework [cu3 (btc)2](btc= benzene-1, 3, 5- tricarboxylate). Chemistry-asorption properties of cu-btc metal-organic framework. Nano

  3. Anion separation with metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A

    2007-01-01

    The application of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to anion separations with a special emphasis on anion selectivity is reviewed. The coordination frameworks are classified on the basis of the main interactions to the included anion, from weak and non-specific van der Waals forces to more specific interactions such as coordination to Lewis acid metal centers or hydrogen bonding. The importance of anion solvation phenomena to the observed anion selectivities is highlighted, and strategies for reversing the Hofmeister bias that favors large, less hydrophilic anions, and for obtaining peak selectivities based on shape recognition are delineated. Functionalization of the anion-binding sites in MOFs with strong and directional hydrogen-bonding groups that are complementary to the included anion, combined with organizational rigidity of the coordination framework, appears to be the most promising approach for achieving non-Hofmeister selectivity.

  4. Using metal-organic templates to steer the growth of Fe and Co nanoclusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brune, Harald

    Using metal-organic templates to steer the growth of Fe and Co nanoclusters R. Decker,1 U nanostructures are created using two-dimensional metal-organic honeycomb lattices as templates. They consist nucleate clusters at specific sites on top of the metal-organic lattices while leaving their hexagonal

  5. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  6. Coordination polymers, metalorganic frameworks and the need for terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Coordination polymers, metal­organic frameworks and the need for terminology guidelines Stuart R,*f Michael O'Keeffe,g Myunghyun Paik Suhh and Jan Reedijki,j DOI: 10.1039/c2ce06488j Coordination polymers converge into a self-consistent and logical result. This dual situation occurs for coordi- nation polymers

  7. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Ly? photons, since the Ly? line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ?300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  8. VAPORIZATION THERMODYNAMICS OF KCl. COMBINING VAPOR PRESSURE AND GRAVIMETRIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

    1 VAPORIZATION THERMODYNAMICS OF KCl. COMBINING VAPOR PRESSURE AND GRAVIMETRIC DATA Rudnyi E of thermodynamic properties of the vapor and the vaporization process, coupling pressure measurements. INTRODUCTION The vapor pressure of a substance is an important system property in many applications. Its value

  9. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA); McRae, Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  11. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio;...

  12. Small Molecule Adsorption in Open-Site Metal-Organic Frameworks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Molecule Adsorption in Open-Site Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Systematic Density Functional Theory Study for Rational Design Previous Next List Kyuho Lee, Joshua D. Howe,...

  13. CO2 Induced Phase Transitions in Diamine-Appended Metal-Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Induced Phase Transitions in Diamine-Appended Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schnell, Sondre K.; Dzubak, Allison; Lee,...

  14. Enabling integration of vapor-deposited polymer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petruczok, Christy D. (Christy Danielle)

    2014-01-01

    Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) is a versatile, one-step process for synthesizing conformal and functional polymer thin films on a variety of substrates. This thesis emphasizes the development of tools to further ...

  15. Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vapor retarders: Class I vapor retarders (0.1 perms or less): Glass Sheet metal Polyethylene sheet Rubber membrane Class II vapor retarders (greater than 0.1 perms and less...

  16. Enthalpies of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures of Some Deuterated Hydrocarbons. Liquid-Vapor Pressure Isotope Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Enthalpies of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures of Some Deuterated Hydrocarbons. Liquid-Vapor pressures as a function of temperature and enthalpies of vaporization of a series of both liquid and solid. The applicability of this technique is first demonstrated by reproducing the vapor pressure isotope effect

  17. Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    retarders. Materials such as rigid foam insulation, reinforced plastics, aluminum, and stainless steel are relatively resistant to water vapor diffusion. These types of vapor...

  18. A single crystalline porphyrinic titanium metal–organic framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian -Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying -Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou, Lanfang; et al

    2015-04-28

    We successfully assembled the photocatalytic titanium-oxo cluster and photosensitizing porphyrinic linker into a metal–organic framework (MOF), namely PCN-22. A preformed titanium-oxo carboxylate cluster is adopted as the starting material to judiciously control the MOF growth process to afford single crystals. This synthetic method is useful to obtain highly crystalline titanium MOFs, which has been a daunting challenge in this field. Moreover, PCN-22 demonstrated permanent porosity and photocatalytic activities toward alcohol oxidation.

  19. Evaluating metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, JA; Veenstra, M; Long, JR

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks have received significant attention as a new class of adsorbents for natural gas storage; however, inconsistencies in reporting high-pressure adsorption data and a lack of comparative studies have made it challenging to evaluate both new and existing materials. Here, we briefly discuss high-pressure adsorption measurements and review efforts to develop metal-organic frameworks with high methane storage capacities. To illustrate the most important properties for evaluating adsorbents for natural gas storage and for designing a next generation of improved materials, six metal-organic frameworks and an activated carbon, with a range of surface areas, pore structures, and surface chemistries representative of the most promising adsorbents for methane storage, are evaluated in detail. High-pressure methane adsorption isotherms are used to compare gravimetric and volumetric capacities, isosteric heats of adsorption, and usable storage capacities. Additionally, the relative importance of increasing volumetric capacity, rather than gravimetric capacity, for extending the driving range of natural gas vehicles is highlighted. Other important systems-level factors, such as thermal management, mechanical properties, and the effects of impurities, are also considered, and potential materials synthesis contributions to improving performance in a complete adsorbed natural gas system are discussed.

  20. Nanopore Structure and Sorption Properties of Cu-BTC Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Nanopore Structure and Sorption Properties of Cu-BTC Metal-Organic Framework Aleksey Vishnyakov on the copper(II) benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate metal-organic framework (Cu-BTC). We constructed a molecular structural model of Cu-BTC. The pore network of Cu-BTC has a simple cubic symmetry. It consists of main

  1. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1986-08-15

    The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process for the enrichment of uranium is evaluated. (AIP)

  2. CO2 induced phase transitions in diamine-appended metal–organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schnell, Sondre K.; Dzubak, Allison L.; Lee, Kyuho; Planas, Nora; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Gagliardi, Laura; Smit, Berend

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of density functional theory and lattice models, we study the effect of CO2 adsorption in an amine functionalized metal–organic framework. These materials exhibit a step in the adsorption isotherm indicative of a phase change. The pressure at which this step occurs is not only temperature dependent but is also metal center dependent. Likewise, the heats of adsorption vary depending on the metal center. Herein we demonstrate via quantum chemical calculations that the amines should not be considered firmly anchored to the framework and we explore the mechanism for CO2 adsorption. An ammonium carbamate species is formed via the insertion of CO2 into the M–Namine bonds. Furthermore, we translate the quantum chemical results into isotherms using a coarse grained Monte Carlo simulation technique and show that this adsorption mechanism can explain the characteristic step observed in the experimental isotherm while a previously proposed mechanism cannot. Furthermore, metal analogues have been explored and the CO2 binding energies show a strong metal dependence corresponding to the M–Namine bond strength. We show that this difference can be exploited to tune the pressure at which the step in the isotherm occurs. Additionally, the mmen–Ni2(dobpdc) framework shows Langmuir like behavior, and our simulations show how this can be explained by competitive adsorption between the new model and a previously proposed model.

  3. CO2 induced phase transitions in diamine-appended metal–organic frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schnell, Sondre K.; Dzubak, Allison L.; Lee, Kyuho; Planas, Nora; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Gagliardi, Laura; Smit, Berend

    2015-06-17

    Using a combination of density functional theory and lattice models, we study the effect of CO2 adsorption in an amine functionalized metal–organic framework. These materials exhibit a step in the adsorption isotherm indicative of a phase change. The pressure at which this step occurs is not only temperature dependent but is also metal center dependent. Likewise, the heats of adsorption vary depending on the metal center. Herein we demonstrate via quantum chemical calculations that the amines should not be considered firmly anchored to the framework and we explore the mechanism for CO2 adsorption. An ammonium carbamate species is formed viamore »the insertion of CO2 into the M–Namine bonds. Furthermore, we translate the quantum chemical results into isotherms using a coarse grained Monte Carlo simulation technique and show that this adsorption mechanism can explain the characteristic step observed in the experimental isotherm while a previously proposed mechanism cannot. Furthermore, metal analogues have been explored and the CO2 binding energies show a strong metal dependence corresponding to the M–Namine bond strength. We show that this difference can be exploited to tune the pressure at which the step in the isotherm occurs. Additionally, the mmen–Ni2(dobpdc) framework shows Langmuir like behavior, and our simulations show how this can be explained by competitive adsorption between the new model and a previously proposed model.« less

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition Enabled Synthesis of Multiferroic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Calvin Dinh-Tu

    2015-01-01

    deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on Pt/M. and et al. (1993). "Chemical vapour deposition of high-Tand J. P. Chang (2012). "Chemical Processing of Materials on

  5. An Electrically Switchable Metal-Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Martin, Paul F.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bowden, Mark E.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dang, Liem X.; Xu, Wu; Chen, Xilin; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-08-19

    Crystalline metal organic framework (MOF) materials containing interconnected porosity can be chemically modified to promote stimulus-driven (light, magnetic or electric fields) structural transformations that can be used in a number of devices. Innovative research strategies are now focused on understanding the role of chemical bond manipulation to reversibly alter the free volume in such structures of critical importance for electro-catalysis, molecular electronics, energy storage technologies, sensor devices and smart membranes. In this letter, we study the mechanism for which an electrically switchable MOF composed of Cu(TCNQ) (TCNQ 5 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) transitions from a high-resistance state to a conducting state in a reversible fashion by an applied potential. The actual mechanism for this reversible electrical switching is still not understood even though a number of reports are available describing the application of electric-field-induced switching of Cu(TCNQ) in device fabrication.

  6. An Electrically Switchable Metal-Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, CA; Martin, PC; Schaef, T; Bowden, ME; Thallapally, PK; Dang, L; Xu, W; Chen, XL; McGrail, BP

    2014-08-19

    Crystalline metal organic framework (MOF) materials containing interconnected porosity can be chemically modified to promote stimulus-driven (light, magnetic or electric fields) structural transformations that can be used in a number of devices. Innovative research strategies are now focused on understanding the role of chemical bond manipulation to reversibly alter the free volume in such structures of critical importance for electro-catalysis, molecular electronics, energy storage technologies, sensor devices and smart membranes. In this letter, we study the mechanism for which an electrically switchable MOF composed of Cu(TCNQ) (TCNQ = 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) transitions from a high-resistance state to a conducting state in a reversible fashion by an applied potential. The actual mechanism for this reversible electrical switching is still not understood even though a number of reports are available describing the application of electric-field-induced switching of Cu(TCNQ) in device fabrication.

  7. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} interconversion in hydrocarbon/H{sub 2} gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-08-01

    CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H{sub 2} gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm{sup -1} using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H{sub 2} plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400CH{sub 4} is favored in the more distant regions where T{sub gas}<1400 K. Analysis of the multistep interconversion mechanism reveals substantial net consumption of H atoms accompanying the CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion, whereas the reverse C{sub 2}H{sub 2}->CH{sub 4} process only requires H atoms to drive the reactions; H atoms are not consumed by the overall conversion.

  8. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Highly Selective Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2009-09-28

    This grant was focused on the study of metal-organic frameworks with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the use of MOFs with well-defined open metal sites for binding of gases and small organics. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs that combine large pore size with high surface area for their use in gas adsorption and separation of polycyclic organic compounds. (3) To functionalize MOFs for the storage of inert gases such as methane. A brief outline of our progress towards these objectives is presented here as it forms part of the basis for the ideas to be developed under the present proposal.

  9. Safety Topic Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Topic ­ Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical vapors and gases. A face velocity of 100 feet per minute (fpm) provides efficient vapor capture the better. (T) (F) A chemical hood can be used for storage of volatile, flammable, or odiferous materials

  10. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sederquist, Richard A. (Newington, CT); Szydlowski, Donald F. (East Hartford, CT); Sawyer, Richard D. (Canton, CT)

    1983-01-01

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

  11. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  12. Immobilizing Highly Catalytically Active Pt Nanoparticles inside the Pores of Metal-Organic Framework: A Double Solvents Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aijaz, Arshad; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Choi, Young Joon; Tsumori, Nobuko; Ronnebro, Ewa; Autrey, Thomas; Shioyama, Hiroshi; Xu, Qiang

    2012-08-29

    Ultrafine Pt nanoparticles were successfully immobilized inside the pores of a metal-organic framework MIL-101 without deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the external surfaces of framework by using a 'double solvents' method. The resulting Pt@MIL-101 composites with different Pt loadings represent the first highly active MOF-immobilized metal nanocatalysts for catalytic reactions in all three phases: liquid-phase ammonia borane hydrolysis; solid-phase ammonia borane thermal dehy-drogenation and gas-phase CO oxidation. The observed excellent catalytic performances are at-tributed to the small Pt nanoparticles within the pores of MIL-101. 'We are thankful to AIST and METI for financial support. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. PNNL is operated by Battelle.'

  13. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  14. High Charge Mobility in a Tetrathiafulvalene-Based Microporous Metal–Organic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Tarun Chandru

    The tetratopic ligand tetrathiafulvalene-tetrabenzoate (H[subscript 4]TTFTB) is used to synthesize Zn[subscript 2](TTFTB), a new metal–organic framework that contains columnar stacks of tetrathiafulvalene and benzoate-lined ...

  15. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-09-11

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  16. Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-06-25

    Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

  17. Water Adsorption in Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open-Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Adsorption in Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open-Metal Sites Previous Next List Xuan Peng, Li-Chiang Lin, Weizhen Sun and Berend Smit, AIChe J. 6, 677-687 (2015) DOI:...

  18. Rapidly assessing the activation conditions and porosity of metal-organic frameworks using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, TM; Bloch, ED; Long, JR

    2015-01-01

    A methodology utilizing a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor propane uptake following incremental increases of the temperature is demonstrated as a means of rapidly identifying porous materials and determining the optimum activation conditions of metal-organic frameworks.

  19. Industrially challenging separations via adsorption in metal-organic frameworks : a computational exploration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennox, Matthew James

    2015-06-29

    In recent years, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been identified as promising adsorbents in a number of industrially relevant, yet challenging, separations, including the removal of propane from propane/propylene ...

  20. Computational Evaluation of Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jiamei

    2013-03-20

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of porous solids comprised of metal-containing nodes linked by organic ligands, have become promising materials for gas separations. In particular, their flexible chemistry makes them attractive for CO2...

  1. High-Throughput Methodology for Discovery of Metal-Organic Frameworks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Throughput Methodology for Discovery of Metal-Organic Frameworks with a High Binding Energy (New Joint UC-BerkeleySymyx DoDDLA Project) (presentation) High-Throughput...

  2. Cooperative Insertion of CO2 in Diamine-Appended Metal-Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooperative Insertion of CO2 in Diamine-Appended Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Thomas M. McDonald, Jarad A. Mason, Xueqian Kong, Eric D. Bloch, David Gygi, Alessandro...

  3. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  4. Anion Coordination in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-12-15

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups have been designed, synthesized, and structurally analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion binding within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea???urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolelcular CH???O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N?-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N?-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded chains compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO4)2, ZnSO4, Cu(NO3)2, Cu(CF3SO3)2, AgNO3 and AgSO3CH3. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion binding by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate. This research was sponsored by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (managed by UT-Battelle, LLC), and performed at Oak Ridge National laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830). This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal–Organic Framework-74 Containing 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 Different Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lisa J.; Deng, Hexiang; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Gándara, Felipe; Cordova, Kyle E.; Peri, Dani; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2014-06-16

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) containing more than two types of metal ions mixed within one secondary building unit are studied.

  6. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyman alpha photons, since the Lyman alpha line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more ...

  7. Stratified vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, Vahab (Golden, CO)

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  8. Graphene Electronic Device Based Biosensors and Chemical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Shan

    2014-01-01

    116] Perkins, F.K. et al. Chemical Vapor Sensing with Monoof Monolayer MoS 2 via Chemical Doping, Nano Letters 13,of axial ligands on the surface chemical bonds of adsorbed

  9. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  10. Investigation of microcantilever array with ordered nanoporous coatings for selective chemical detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Thornberg, Steven Michael (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Lee, J. -H. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Houk, Ronald J. T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the potential for novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Detection of chemical weapons of mass destruction (CWMD), explosives, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices, such as microcantilevers and surface acoustic wave sensors, requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Traditional organic polymers are dense, impeding analyte uptake and slowing sensor response. The nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM enhance transport into and out of the NFM layer, improving response times, and their ordered structure enables structural tuning to impart selectivity. Here we describe experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and VOCs, and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Force field models show that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, using a suite of MOFs it should be possible to select for explosives vs. CWMD, VM vs. GA (nerve agents), and anthracene vs. naphthalene (VOCs). We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM with the surfaces of MEMS devices and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of VFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response times, selectivity, and sensitivity.

  11. Metal-organic frameworks for Xe/Kr separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Patrick J.; Farha, Omar K.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2013-08-27

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are provided and are selectively adsorbent to xenon (Xe) over another noble gas such as krypton (Kr) and/or argon (Ar) as a result of having framework voids (pores) sized to this end. MOF materials having pores that are capable of accommodating a Xe atom but have a small enough pore size to receive no more than one Xe atom are desired to preferentially adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component (Xe--Kr mixture) adsorption method. The MOF material has 20% or more, preferably 40% or more, of the total pore volume in a pore size range of 0.45-0.75 nm which can selectively adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component Xe--Kr mixture over a pressure range of 0.01 to 1.0 MPa.

  12. Metal-organic frameworks for Xe/Kr separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Patrick J.; Farha, Omar K.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2014-07-22

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are provided and are selectively adsorbent to xenon (Xe) over another noble gas such as krypton (Kr) and/or argon (Ar) as a result of having framework voids (pores) sized to this end. MOF materials having pores that are capable of accommodating a Xe atom but have a small enough pore size to receive no more than one Xe atom are desired to preferentially adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component (Xe--Kr mixture) adsorption method. The MOF material has 20% or more, preferably 40% or more, of the total pore volume in a pore size range of 0.45-0.75 nm which can selectively adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component Xe--Kr mixture over a pressure range of 0.01 to 1.0 MPa.

  13. Research Update: A hafnium-based metal-organic framework as a catalyst for regioselective ring-opening of epoxides with a mild hydride source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hydrogen storage capacity of metal-organic and covalent-organic frameworks by spillover J. Chem. Phys. 131

  14. Synthesis, Structure, and Metalation of Two New Highly Porous Zirconium Metal?Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, William; Volosskiy, Boris; Demir, Selcuk; Gándara, Felipe; McGrier, Psaras L.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Cascio, Duilio; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Yaghi, Omar M. (UCLA); (NWU)

    2012-10-24

    Three new metal-organic frameworks [MOF-525, Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(TCPP-H{sub 2}){sub 3}; MOF-535, Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(XF){sub 3}; MOF-545, Zr{sub 6}O{sub 8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}(TCPP-H{sub 2}){sub 2}, where porphyrin H{sub 4}-TCPP-H{sub 2} = (C{sub 48}H{sub 24}O{sub 8}N{sub 4}) and cruciform H{sub 4}-XF = (C{sub 42}O{sub 8}H{sub 22})] based on two new topologies, ftw and csq, have been synthesized and structurally characterized. MOF-525 and -535 are composed of Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4} cuboctahedral units linked by either porphyrin (MOF-525) or cruciform (MOF-535). Another zirconium-containing unit, Zr{sub 6}O{sub 8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, is linked by porphyrin to give the MOF-545 structure. The structure of MOF-525 was obtained by analysis of powder X-ray diffraction data. The structures of MOF-535 and -545 were resolved from synchrotron single-crystal data. MOF-525, -535, and -545 have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas of 2620, 1120, and 2260 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. In addition to their large surface areas, both porphyrin-containing MOFs are exceptionally chemically stable, maintaining their structures under aqueous and organic conditions. MOF-525 and -545 were metalated with iron(III) and copper(II) to yield the metalated analogues without losing their high surface area and chemical stability.

  15. Economic and Technical Tradeoffs Between Open and Closed Cycle Vapor Compression Evaporators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    AND TECHNICAL TRADEOFFS BETWEEN OPEN AND CLOSED CYCLE VAPOR COM~RESSION EVAPORATORS Martin L. Timm, P.E. Bassett Inc. Appleton, WI ABSTRACT Evaporators are used extensively in the chemical, pulp Bnd paper, food and beverage, and related industries.... Mechanical vapor recompression (MVR) evaporators are a type using an open heat pump cycle with steam as the working fluid. The tech nology is widely used and time-proven. Closed cycle vapor compression is an emerging technology. A secondary working fluid...

  16. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  17. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  18. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of a Series of Dialkyl Phthalates by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of a Series of Dialkyl Phthalates by Correlation Gas: Experimental vapor pressures, vaporization, fusion and sublimation enthalpies of a number of dialkyl, dibutyl phthalate, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. New vaporization enthalpies and liquid vapor pressure

  19. The Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Some Primary Amines of Pharmaceutical Importance by Correlation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    The Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Some Primary Amines of Pharmaceutical Importance Information ABSTRACT: Vapor pressures, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies of several pharmaceuticals.5 ± 2.1); p(cr)/Pa = 0.12 ± 0.04]. Vapor pressure equations also derived from vapor pressureretention

  20. Multirate delivery of multiple therapeutic agents from metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McKinlay, Alistair C.; Allan, Phoebe K.; Renouf, Catherine L.; Duncan, Morven J.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Warrender, Stewart J.; Dawson, Daniel; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Gil, Barbara; Marszalek, Bartosz; et al

    2014-12-01

    The highly porous nature of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers great potential for the delivery of therapeutic agents. Here, we show that highly porous metal-organic frameworks can be used to deliver multiple therapeutic agents—a biologically active gas, an antibiotic drug molecule, and an active metal ion—simultaneously but at different rates. The possibilities offered by delivery of multiple agents with different mechanisms of action and, in particular, variable timescales may allow new therapy approaches. Here, we show that the loaded MOFs are highly active against various strains of bacteria.

  1. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  2. Highly efficient separation of carbon dioxide by a metal-organic framework replete with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    media. carbon dioxide capture dynamic adsorption reticular chemistry Selective removal of CO2 fromHighly efficient separation of carbon dioxide by a metal-organic framework replete with open metal capture of CO2, which is essential for natural gas purifi- cation and CO2 sequestration, has been reported

  3. MetalOrganic Frameworks Hot Paper DOI: 10.1002/anie.201404265

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    of their various potential applica- tions such as hydrogen storage,[1] carbon dioxide capture,[2] gas separation,[3Metal­Organic Frameworks Hot Paper DOI: 10.1002/anie.201404265 Hydrogen Storage in a Potassium) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected

  4. A Multifunctional 3D Ferroelectric and NLO-Active Porous Metal-Organic Zhengang Guo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    A Multifunctional 3D Ferroelectric and NLO-Active Porous Metal-Organic Framework Zhengang Guo, Rong, second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) materials have also undergone rapid development owing of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences

  5. Carborane-based metalorganic frameworks as highly selective sorbents for CO2 over methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PSA) are attractive due to their low cost and high energy efficiency.1 High CO2 selectivityCarborane-based metal­organic frameworks as highly selective sorbents for CO2 over methane Youn Article on the web 15th July 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b805785k Separation of CO2/CH4 mixtures was studied

  6. Anthraquinone with Tailored Structure for Nonaqueous Metal-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-06-08

    A nonaqueous, hybrid metal-organic redox flow battery based on tailored anthraquinone structure is demonstrated to have an energy efficiency of {approx}82% and a specific discharge energy density similar to aqueous redox flow batteries, which is due to the significantly improved solubility of anthraquinone in supporting electrolytes.

  7. Enhancement of CO2/N2 selectivity in a metal-organic framework by cavity modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are a strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial processes. Burning of fossil fuel to generate electricity is a major source of CO2 in the atmosphere, but the capture and sequestration of CO2 from flue gasEnhancement of CO2/N2 selectivity in a metal-organic framework by cavity modification Youn-Sang Bae

  8. Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering The steady rising level of atmospheric carbon dioxide resulting to the economy that is heavily relied on fossil fuels. Although the transition of the existing carbon

  9. Surface functionalization of metal?organic polyhedron for homogeneous cyclopropanation catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Yakovenko, Andrey; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2012-03-13

    A super-paddlewheel (comprised of two paddlewheels) metal-organic polyhedron (MOP) containing surface hydroxyl groups was synthesized and characterized. Condensation reactions with linear alkyl anhydrides lead to new MOPs with enhanced solubility. As a result, the surface-modified MOP 4 was demonstrated as a homogeneous Lewis-acid catalyst.

  10. Introduction of Functionality, Selection of Topology, and Enhancement of Gas Adsorption in Multivariate Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    in Multivariate Metal-Organic Framework-177 Yue-Biao Zhang, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Nakeun Ko, Weixuan Nie, Hye Jeong National Laboratory, and Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute, Berkeley, California 94720, United States on the qom topology. This topology violates a long-standing thesis where highly symmetric building units

  11. A nanotubular metal-organic framework with permanent porosity : structure analysis and gas sorption studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, S.; Simmons, J. M.; Li, J. R.; Yuan, D.; Weng, W.; Liu, D. J.; Zhou, H. C.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Texas A&M Univ.; NIST

    2009-01-01

    A nanotubular metal-organic framework, PCN-19, was constructed based on a micro3-oxo-trinickel basic carboxylate secondary building unit (SBU) and the 9,10-anthracenedicarboxylate ligand; its permanent porosity was confirmed by N2 adsorption isotherms, and its H2 storage performances were evaluated under both low and high pressures at 77 K.

  12. De novo synthesis of a metalorganic framework material featuring ultrahigh surface area and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Among the many potential applications that can be extrapolated from these properties are gas storage4 high gas storage capacities and one of the highest reported surface areas to date. ResultsDe novo synthesis of a metal­organic framework material featuring ultrahigh surface area and gas

  13. Comprehensive study of carbon dioxide adsorption in the metalorganic frameworks M2(dobdc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive study of carbon dioxide adsorption in the metal­organic frameworks M2(dobdc) (M ¼ Mg and Craig M. Brown*bl Analysis of the CO2 adsorption properties of a well-known series of metal and single crystal X-ray di raction experiments are used to unveil the site-speci c binding properties of CO2

  14. Hydrogen Storage in New Metal-Organic Frameworks David J. Tranchemontagne,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Hydrogen Storage in New Metal-Organic Frameworks David J. Tranchemontagne, Kyo Sung Park, Hiroyasu show that smaller pores and polarized linkers in MOFs are indeed advantageous for hydrogen storage has been given to utilization of cleaner energy sources, such as methane and hydrogen.1 The storage

  15. 3D Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Elongated Tetracarboxylate Building Blocks for Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    3D Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Elongated Tetracarboxylate Building Blocks for Hydrogen Storage Liqing Ma, Jeong Yong Lee, Jing Li, and Wenbin Lin*, Department of Chemistry, CB#3290, Uni. The porosity and hydrogen uptake of the frameworks were determined by gas adsorption experiments. A wide range

  16. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities Robert DSTP/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays

  17. Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were excess H2 uptake and surface area, we predict the theoretical total hydrogen storage capacity

  18. Synthesis, Structure, and Metalation of Two New Highly Porous Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Synthesis, Structure, and Metalation of Two New Highly Porous Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks cuboctahedral units linked by either porphyrin (MOF-525) or cruciform (MOF-535). Another zirconium) based on the zirconium(IV) cuboctahedral secondary building unit (SBU), Zr6O4(OH)4(CO2)12 (Figure 1A

  19. Letters to Analytical Chemistry Metal-Organic Framework Thin Film for Enhanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letters to Analytical Chemistry Metal-Organic Framework Thin Film for Enhanced Localized Surface of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 Despite its high refractive to large biological analytes. Sensing of smaller molecules is a compelling target for this technique

  20. Fe-porphyrin-based metal–organic framework films as high-surface concentration, heterogeneous catalysts for electrochemical reduction of CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hod, Idan; Sampson, Matthew D.; Deria, Pravas; Kubiak, Clifford P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-18

    Realization of heterogeneous electrochemical CO2-to-fuel conversion via molecular catalysis under high-flux conditions requires the assembly of large quantities of reactant-accessible catalysts on conductive surfaces. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that electrophoretic deposition of thin films of an appropriately chosen metal–organic framework (MOF) material is an effective method for immobilizing the needed quantity of catalyst. For electrocatalytic CO2 reduction, we used a material that contains functionalized Fe-porphyrins as catalytically competent, redox-conductive linkers. The approach yields a high effective surface coverage of electrochemically addressable catalytic sites (~1015 sites/cm2). The chemical products of the reduction, obtained with ~100% Faradaic efficiency, aremore »mixtures of CO and H2. The results validate the strategy of using MOF chemistry to obtain porous, electrode-immobilized, networks of molecular catalysts having competency for energy-relevant electrochemical reactions.« less

  1. Selective Host-Guest Interaction between Metal Ions and Metal-Organic Frameworks using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Goh, Tian Wei; Xiao, Chaoxian; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Johnson, Duane D; Pruski, Marek; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-08

    The host–guest interaction between metal ions (Pt2+ and Cu2+) and a zirconium metal–organic framework (UiO-66-NH2) was explored using dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 15N{1H} CPMAS NMR spectroscopy supported by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The combined experimental results conclude that each Pt2+ coordinates with two NH2 groups from the MOF and two Cl? from the metal precursor, whereas Cu2+ do not form chemical bonds with the NH2 groups of the MOF framework. Density functional calculations reveal that Pt2+ prefers a square-planar structure with the four ligands and resides in the octahedral cage of the MOF in either cis or trans configurations.

  2. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Polyaromatic Heterocycles and Related Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures The vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of the liqiud phase from T ) 298.15 K to T ) 500 K of a series in the literature was measured on a hydrated form. Vapor pressures and normal boiling temperatures for the liquid

  3. Vaporization Enthalpy and Vapor Pressure of Valproic Acid by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vaporization Enthalpy and Vapor Pressure of Valproic Acid by Correlation Gas Chromatography Joe A-propylpentanoic acid) is reported, and the vapor pressures of a series on aliphatic carboxylic acids are used to evaluate its vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vaporization enthalpy was derived

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Films and Membranes of Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) for Gas Separation Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Miral Naresh 1987-

    2012-12-12

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are nanoporous framework materials with tunable pore size and functionality, and hence attractive for gas separation membrane applications. Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs), a subclass of MOFs, are known...

  5. Turn-on fluorescence in tetraphenylethylene-based metal-organic frameworks: An alternative to aggregation-induced emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shustova, Natalia B.

    Coordinative immobilization of functionalized tetraphenylethylene within rigid porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) turns on fluorescence in the typically non-emissive tetraphenylethylene core. The matrix coordination-induced ...

  6. Pendant Functional Groups in Metal-Organic Frameworks - Effects on Crystal Structure, Stability, and Gas Sorption Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makal, Trevor Arnold

    2013-03-14

    The primary goal of this research concerns the synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) grafted with pendant alkyl substituents to enhance stability and gas sorption properties for use in clean-energy related technologies...

  7. Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Two Insecticide Components, Muscalure and Empenthrin, by Correlation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Two Insecticide Components, Muscalure and Empenthrin: The vaporization enthalpies at T/K = 298.15 and vapor pressures from T/K = (298.15 to Tnb (normal boiling. Vaporization enthalpies of [(114.4 ± 1.0) and (114.5 ± 1.0)] kJ·mol-1 and vapor pressures, p/Pa = [(1.2 ± 0

  8. pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 10/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48, 99719973 9971

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 10/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48 dioxide from methane with high selectivity. Over the past decade, microporous metal-organic frame- work employ simple carbon-based spacer ele- ments (struts) that primarily serve to distance the metal nodes

  9. Image Storage in Hot Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zhao; T. Wang; Y. Xiao; S. F. Yelin

    2007-10-22

    We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

  10. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  11. Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, Joseph D. (Boulder, CO)

    1985-01-01

    A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  12. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  13. SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURE OF A METAL-ORGANIC SOLID HAVING THE CADMIUM(II) SULFATE NET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURE OF A METAL-ORGANIC SOLID HAVING THE CADMIUM(II) SULFATE NET 0. MKYAGHI(I) nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) gives crystals of Ag2(HMTA)(N0 3)2, which was formulated that is topologically related to CdSO 4. 9 EXPERIMENTAL A 70 mL aqueous solution of silver nitrate (0.280 g, 1.65 mmol

  14. Separation of polar compounds using a flexible metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Nune, Satish K.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    A flexible metal-organic framework constructed from a flexible linker is shown to possess the capability of separating mixtures of polar compounds by exploiting the differences in the saturation capacities of the constituents. The separation possibilities with the flexible MOF include mixtures of propanol isomers, and various azeotropes. Transient breakthrough simulations show that these sorption-based separations are in favor of the component with higher saturation capacity.

  15. Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks for Energy Storage Applications: Design, Synthesis and Mechanism Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yangyang

    2014-05-05

    CsF Cesium Fluoride DEF N,N-Diethylformamide DMA N,N-Dimethylacetylamide DME 1,2-dimethoxyethane DMF N,N-Dimethylformamide DMSO Dimethyl Sulfoxide DOE Department of Energy FT-IR Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy G Guest molecule IAST... Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory IUPAC International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry LNG Liquefied Natural Gas vii MeOH Methanol MIL Materials from Institut Lavoisier MOF Metal-Organic Framework NG Natural Gas NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance...

  16. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

    1991-01-01

    Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  17. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization, Sublimation, and Fusion Enthalpies of Some Fatty Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization, Sublimation, and Fusion Enthalpies of Some Fatty Acids Joe A vapor pressures of both the subcooled liquid and solid state for those materials that are solids at T/K = 298.15. Equations for the prediction of vapor pressure from T/K = 298.15 to the boiling temperature

  18. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  19. Imparting functionality to a metalorganic framework material by controlled nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    promising for a variety of applications, including gas storage4,5 , chemical separation6 , catalysis7 and their applications (mainly focused on heterogeneous cata- lysis and gas storage), this emerging area is characterized also offer the opportunity to develop new types of composite materials that display enhanced (gas

  20. Journal of Crystal Growth 307 (2007) 302308 Equilibrium analysis of zirconium carbide CVD growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Crystal Growth 307 (2007) 302­308 Equilibrium analysis of zirconium carbide CVD growth analysis; A3. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition; A3. Zirconium carbide 1. Introduction Zirconium, is not straightforward particularly by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Although atmospheric halide CVD using zirconium

  1. Heats of vaporization of room temperature ionic liquids by tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; To, Albert; Koh, Christine; Strasser, Daniel; Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-11-25

    The heats of vaporization of the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide, N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide are determined using a heated effusive vapor source in conjunction with single photon ionization by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron source. The relative gas phase ionic liquid vapor densities in the effusive beam are monitored by clearly distinguished dissociative photoionization processes via a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at a tunable vacuum ultraviolet beamline 9.0.2.3 (Chemical Dynamics Beamline) at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. Resulting in relatively few assumptions, through the analysis of both parent cations and fragment cations, the heat of vaporization of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide is determined to be Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 195+-19 kJ mol-1. The observed heats of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 174+-12 kJ mol-1) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 171+-12 kJ mol-1) are consistent with reported experimental values using electron impact ionization. The tunable vacuum ultraviolet source has enabled accurate measurement of photoion appearance energies. These appearance energies are in good agreement with MP2 calculations for dissociative photoionization of the ion pair. These experimental heats of vaporization, photoion appearance energies, and ab initio calculations corroborate vaporization of these RTILs as intact cation-anion ion pairs.

  2. Organic lateral heterojunction devices for vapor-phase chemical detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, John C., 1980-

    2009-01-01

    As the U.S. is engaged in battle overseas, there is an urgent need for the development of sensors for early warning and protection of military forces against potential attacks. On the battlefields, improvised explosive ...

  3. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    including flexible electronics. In the application toet al. , "Flexible nanotube electronics," Nano Letters, vol.Electronics Based on Transfer Printed Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Rigid and Flexible

  4. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    Liwei Lin, Chair MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems)been demonstrated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems)

  5. Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

    2014-04-29

    A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

  6. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    0.001 ??cm. A wet thermal oxide layer with a thickness of 2Figure 2.20(a). This oxide layer serves both as an etchingto remove the exposed oxide layer with RF power of 400 W,

  7. Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Iron Pyrite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FeSsub 2) is a promising candidate absorber material for earth-abundant thin-film solar cells. In this report, single-phase, large-grain, and uniform polycrystalline pyrite...

  8. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    Journal of MicroElectroMechanical Systems, vol. 20, pp. 9-Chair MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technologiesby MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technologies many

  9. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    nanotubes on temperature sensitive substrate via µCVD (Chapter 4). (d) Synthesis of graphene with nickel

  10. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    Deposition," Journal of MicroElectroMechanical Systems, vol.Chair MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technologiesby MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technologies many

  11. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    processes, the gas velocity near the reaction surface isreaction surface, where flow streams with higher velocityhigher velocity are drawn closer to the reaction surface. A

  12. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01

    Therefore a temperature monitoring and control system isthe construction of the temperature monitoring and control28 2.4.2 Temperature Monitoring

  13. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  14. Graphene growth with giant domains using chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    N. Martensson, Controlling graphene corrugation on lattice-in patterned epitaxial graphene, Science, 2006, 312(5777), 92009, 4(6), 17 A. K. Geim, Graphene: Status and Prospects,

  15. Zirconium Nitride Coating Fabrication via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudderth, Laura

    2015-04-30

    heated to 60-75 °C. Coatings were qualitatively characterized using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray distribution mapping. Zirconium-based coatings up to 2.2 ± 0.3 ?m thick after 2 days...

  16. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  17. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  18. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) technologies - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighlandWorkshop-Summer 2014 HotPortal

  19. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Mountain View, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  20. Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers at theAugust 1, 2013theEnergyThe1984 StartVapor

  1. A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutov, Oleksii V.; Bury, Wojciech; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K.

    2014-08-14

    : 10.1002/chem.201xxxxxx ? Metal-organic frameworks A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities Oleksii V. Gutov,†[a] Wojciech Bury,†[a,b] Diego A. Gomez-Gualdron,[c] Vaiva... these parameters is crucial for constructing materials with high-capacity gas uptake, as well as stability. However, most known MOFs are not sufficiently stable to allow their application for gas storage in the presence of water or acid.10 To overcome...

  2. Solution-gated graphene transistors for chemical and biological sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailly, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Various fabrication processes were developed in order to make graphene-based chemical and biological sensors on different substrates. Single-layer graphene is grown by chemical vapor deposition and then transferred to ...

  3. Molecules and materials for the optical detection of explosives and toxic chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Samuel William, III

    2006-01-01

    Optical chemosensing, especially using amplifying fluorescent polymers, can allow for the highly sensitive and selective vapor-phase detection of both explosives and highly toxic chemicals, including chemical warfare agents. ...

  4. Control of flow through a vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2005-11-08

    In a Rankine cycle system wherein a vapor generator receives heat from exhaust gases, provision is made to avoid overheating of the refrigerant during ORC system shut down while at the same time preventing condensation of those gases within the vapor generator when its temperature drops below a threshold temperature by diverting the flow of hot gases to ambient and to thereby draw ambient air through the vapor generator in the process. In one embodiment, a bistable ejector is adjustable between one position, in which the hot gases flow through the vapor generator, to another position wherein the gases are diverted away from the vapor generator. Another embodiment provides for a fixed valve ejector with a bias towards discharging to ambient, but with a fan on the downstream side of said vapor generator for overcoming this bias.

  5. Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville MtMedical Area Total Egy PltMercuriusVapor Jump to:

  6. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, D.G.; Miller, J.L.

    1993-02-23

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  7. Tuning metal–carboxylate coordination in crystalline metal–organic frameworks through surfactant media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Junkuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); He, Mi [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Xiong, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wenfang; Lee, Zhi Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Tom [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Huo, Fengwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaogang [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-10-15

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that surfactants can efficiently control the size, shape and surface properties of micro/nanocrystals of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) due to the strong interactions between surfactants and crystal facets of MOFs, the use of surfactants as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals is unprecedented. In addition, compared with ionic liquids, surfactants are much cheaper and can have multifunctional properties such as acidic, basic, neutral, cationic, anionic, or even block. These factors strongly motivate us to develop a new synthetic strategy: growing crystalline MOFs in surfactants. In this report, eight new two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) MOFs have been successfully synthesized in an industrially-abundant and environmentally-friendly surfactant: polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Eight different coordination modes of carboxylates, ranging from monodentate ?{sup 1} mode to tetra-donor coordination µ{sub 3}-?{sup 1}:?{sup 2}:?{sup 1} mode, have been founded in our research. The magnetic properties of Co-based MOFs were investigated and MOF NTU-Z6b showed a phase transition with a Curie temperature (T{sub c}) at 5 K. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. - Graphical abstract: Surfactants have been used as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals for the first time. Eight new two-dimensional or three-dimensional MOFs were successfully synthesized in surfactant polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Coordination modes of carboxylates up to eight were founded. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal–organic frameworks. • Eight new 2-D or 3-D metal–organic frameworks. • Eight different metal–carboxylate coordination modes.

  8. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17

    Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  9. FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    give a higher lower limit value than the completely vaporized sample. Conversely, the heavy fractions or residue give a smaller lower limit value. For this reason, there is...

  10. Zeolite-like metal–organic frameworks (ZMOFs): Design, synthesis, and properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Sava, Dorina F.; Eubank, Jarrod F.; Adil, Karim; Guillerm, Vincent

    2015-10-24

    This study highlights various design and synthesis approaches toward the construction of ZMOFs, which are metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with topologies and, in some cases, features akin to traditional inorganic zeolites. The interest in this unique subset of MOFs is correlated with their exceptional characteristics arising from the periodic pore systems and distinctive cage-like cavities, in conjunction with modular intra- and/or extra-framework components, which ultimately allow for tailoring of the pore size, pore shape, and properties towards specific applications.

  11. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Removal of Xe and Kr from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2012-08-07

    Removal of Xenon (Xe) and Krypton (Kr) from in parts per million (ppm) levels were demonstrated for the first time using two well known metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and Ni/DOBDC. Results of an activated carbon were also included for comparison. Ni/DOBDC has higher Xe/Kr selectivities than those of the activated carbon. Moreover, results show that the Ni/DOBDC and HKUST-1 can selectively adsorb Xe and Kr from air even at 1000 ppm concentration. This shows a promising future for MOFs in a radioactive nuclides separation from spent fuel.

  12. Sandia Energy - Sandia Metal-Organic Framework LDRD Research Published in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput AnalysisSinkhole Officials TurnScience Metal-Organic Framework

  13. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1987-07-14

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

  14. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (625 Gulfwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

    1987-01-01

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of the Reaction of Thin Films of Solid-State Benzene with Vapor-Deposited Ag, Mg, and Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalnat, Matthew C.; Hawkridge, Adam M.; Pemberton, Jeanne E.

    2011-07-21

    Thin films of solid-state benzene at 30 K were reacted with small quantities of vapor-deposited Ag, Mg, and Al under ultrahigh vacuum, and products were monitored using surface Raman spectroscopy. Although Ag and Mg produce small amounts of metal–benzene adduct products, the resulting Raman spectra are dominated by surface enhancement of the normal benzene modes from metallic nanoparticles suggesting rapid Ag or Mg metallization of the film. In contrast, large quantities of Al adduct products are observed. Vibrational modes of the products in all three systems suggest adducts that are formed through a pathway initiated by an electron transfer reaction. The difference in reactivity between these metals is ascribed to differences in ionization potential of the metal atoms; ionization potential values for Ag and Mg are similar but larger than that for Al. These studies demonstrate the importance of atomic parameters, such as ionization potential, in solid-state metal–organic reaction chemistry.

  16. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  17. Program plan for the resolution of tank vapor issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, J.W.; Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Since 1987, workers at the Hanford Site waste tank farms in Richland, Washington, have reported strong odors emanating from the large, underground high-level radioactive waste storage tanks. Some of these workers have complained of symptoms (e.g., headaches, nausea) related to the odors. In 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy, which manages the Hanford Site, and Westinghouse Hanford Company determined that the vapor emissions coming from the tanks had not been adequately characterized and represented a potential health risk to workers in the immediate vicinity of the tanks. At that time, workers in certain areas of the tank farms were required to use full-face, supplied-breathing-air masks to reduce their exposure to the fugitive emissions. While use of supplied breathing air reduced the health risks associated with the fugitive emissions, it introduced other health and safety risks (e.g., reduced field of vision, air-line tripping hazards, and heat stress). In 1992, an aggressive program was established to assure proper worker protection while reducing the use of supplied breathing air. This program focuses on characterization of vapors inside the tanks and industrial hygiene monitoring in the tank farms. If chemical filtration systems for mitigation of fugitive emissions are deemed necessary, the program will also oversee their design and installation. This document presents the plans for and approach to resolving the Hanford Site high-level waste tank vapor concerns. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management.

  18. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

    2012-12-05

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

  19. Unique gas and hydrocarbon adsorption in a highly porous metal-organic framework made of extended aliphatic ligandsw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Unique gas and hydrocarbon adsorption in a highly porous metal-organic framework made of extended as an Advance Article on the web 15th October 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b814498b High and unique gas and hydrocarbon the corresponding carboxylates). Due to the aliphatic nature of these ligands, the gas and hydrocarbon adsorption

  20. Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Couds over Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, J.; Read, William G.; Massie, Steven T.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Colarco, Peter; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2011-06-01

    Aerosols can affect cloud particle size and lifetime, which impacts precipitation, radiation and climate. Previous studies1-4 suggested that reduced ice cloud particle size and fall speed due to the influence of aerosols may increase evaporation of ice crystals and/or cloud radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), leading to higher water vapor abundance in air entering the stratosphere. Observational substantiation of such processes is still lacking. Here, we analyze new observations from multiple NASA satellites to show the imprint of pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. We focus our analysis on the highly-polluted South and East Asia region during boreal summer. We find that "polluted" ice clouds have smaller ice effective radius than "clean" clouds. In the TTL, the polluted clouds are associated with warmer temperature and higher specific humidity than the clean clouds. The water vapor difference between the polluted and clean clouds cannot be explained by other meteorological factors, such as updraft and detrainment strength. Therefore, the observed higher water vapor entry value into the stratosphere in the polluted clouds than in the clean clouds is likely a manifestation of aerosol pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. Given the radiative and chemical importance of stratospheric water vapor, the increasing emission of aerosols over Asia may have profound impacts on stratospheric chemistry and global energy balance and water cycle.

  1. Reductive Dehalogenation of Trichloroethene Vapors in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to treat trichloroethene (TCE) from waste gases generated by soil vapor extraction or dual-phase extraction and groundwater include soil vapor extraction (SVE) in combination with air sparging and dual-phase extraction methods such as incineration, catalytic oxidation, and adsorption onto activated carbon are currently

  2. Environmental Chemistry at Vapor/Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Chemistry at Vapor/Water Interfaces: Insights from Vibrational Sum Frequency for manyyearsowingtoitscomplexityandimportanceindescribingawiderange of physical phenomena. The vapor/water interface is particularly interesting from an environmental for these systems is highlighted. A future perspective toward the application of VSFG to the study of environmental

  3. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

    1998-01-01

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  4. Chemical leukoderma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

    2011-01-01

    the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

  5. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  6. Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  7. After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears Completion After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears...

  8. VAPOR PRESSURES OF THE RUBIDIUM FLUORIDE-ZIRCONIUM FLUORIDE AND...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VAPOR PRESSURES OF THE RUBIDIUM FLUORIDE-ZIRCONIUM FLUORIDE AND LITHIUM FLUORIDE-ZIRCONIUM FLUORIDE SYSTEMS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES OF THE...

  9. The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of...

  10. Molecular-Flow Properties of RIB Type Vapor-Transport Systems Using a Fast-Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alton, Gerald D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Liu, Yuan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the fast-valve device, described previously, permits measurement of molecular-flow times of chemically active or inactive gaseous species through radioactive ion beam (RIB) target ion source systems, independent of size, geometry and materials of construction. Thus, decay losses of short-half-life RIBs can be determined for a given target/vapor-transport system in advance of on-line operation, thereby ascertaining the feasibility of the system design for successful processing of a given isotope. In this article, molecular-flow-time theory and experimentally measured molecular-flow time data are given for serial- and parallel-coupled Ta metal RIB vapor-transport systems similar to those used at ISOL based RIB facilities. In addition, the effect of source type on the molecular-flow time properties of a given system is addressed, and a chemical passivation method for negating surface adsorption enthalpies for chemically active gaseous species on Ta surfaces is demonstrated.

  11. Recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirza, Zia I. (La Verne, CA); Knell, Everett W. (Los Alamitos, CA); Winter, Bruce L. (Danville, CA)

    1980-09-30

    Values are recovered from a hydrocarbon-containing vapor by contacting the vapor with quench liquid consisting essentially of hydrocarbons to form a condensate and a vapor residue, the condensate and quench fluid forming a combined liquid stream. The combined liquid stream is mixed with a viscosity-lowering liquid to form a mixed liquid having a viscosity lower than the viscosity of the combined liquid stream to permit easy handling of the combined liquid stream. The quench liquid is a cooled portion of the mixed liquid. Viscosity-lowering liquid is separated from a portion of the mixed liquid and cycled to form additional mixed liquid.

  12. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  13. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  14. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  15. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1981-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  16. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  17. A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Factorovich, Matías H.; Scherlis, Damián A.

    2014-02-14

    In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

  18. The EPRI Laboratory experiments at ANL. [Vaporization of core-concrete mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, M.F.; Settle, J.L.; Leibowitz, L.; Johnson, C.E.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-10-28

    The vaporization of core-concrete mixtures is being measured using a transpiration method. Mixtures of stainless steel, concrete (limestone or basaltic) and urania (doped with La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO, BaO, and ZrO/sub 2/) are vaporized at 2150 - 2400 K from a zirconia crucible into flowing He - 6% H/sub 2/ gas. Up to 600 ppM H/sub 2/O is added to the gas to fix the partial molar free energy of oxygen in the range -420 kJ to -550 kJ. The fraction of the sample that is vaporized is determined by weight change and by chemical analyses on the condensates that are collected in an Mo condenser tube. The results are being used to test the thermodynemic data base and the underlying assumptions of computer codes used for prediction of release during the severe accident. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Modeling of LNG Pool Spreading and Vaporization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basha, Omar 1988-

    2012-11-20

    In this work, a source term model for estimating the rate of spreading and vaporization of LNG on land and sea is introduced. The model takes into account the composition changes of the boiling mixture, the varying thermodynamic properties due...

  20. An advanced vapor-compression desalination system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lara Ruiz, Jorge Horacio Juan

    2006-04-12

    Currently, the two dominant desalination methods are reverse osmosis (RO) and multi-stage flash (MSF). RO requires large capital investment and maintenance, whereas MSF is too energy intensive. An innovative vapor-compression desalination system...

  1. Vapor Retarder Classification - Building America Top Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    vapor retarder classification. Air-tight and well-insulated homes have little or no tolerance for drying if they get wet; moisture control is critical. This Top Innovation profile...

  2. New metal-organic nanomaterials synthesized by laser irradiation of organic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmin, Stanislav L.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Duley, Walter W.

    2014-03-31

    A new type of metal-organic composition consisting of clusters of nanoparticles has been synthesised by laser irradiation of metallocene/benzene solutions. The metallocene molecules in this reaction become the source of the metal. Exposure to high-energy femtosecond laser pulses dehydrogenate benzene molecules and initiate the high-temperature high-pressure conditions that results in the synthesis of new materials. Irradiation experiments have been carried out on ferrocene/benzene and on other solutions. With ferrocene the synthesis of a new compound has been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction as the peaks detected do not correspond to any known substance in the Crystallography Open Database. Theoretical simulation of the periodic structure of this new carbide predicts that it has hexagonal symmetry and a unit cell with a = 3.2A and c =2.8A. The exact structure is still uncertain but may be determined from scanning tunneling microscope (STM) studies.

  3. System and method for generating and/or screening potential metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Snurr, Randall Q; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-04-21

    A system and method for systematically generating potential metal-organic framework (MOFs) structures given an input library of building blocks is provided herein. One or more material properties of the potential MOFs are evaluated using computational simulations. A range of material properties (surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, powder x-ray diffraction pattern, methane adsorption capability, and the like) can be estimated, and in doing so, illuminate unidentified structure-property relationships that may only have been recognized by taking a global view of MOF structures. In addition to identifying structure-property relationships, this systematic approach to identify the MOFs of interest is used to identify one or more MOFs that may be useful for high pressure methane storage.

  4. System and method for generating and/or screening potential metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Snurr, Randall Q; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2014-12-02

    A system and method for systematically generating potential metal-organic framework (MOFs) structures given an input library of building blocks is provided herein. One or more material properties of the potential MOFs are evaluated using computational simulations. A range of material properties (surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, powder x-ray diffraction pattern, methane adsorption capability, and the like) can be estimated, and in doing so, illuminate unidentified structure-property relationships that may only have been recognized by taking a global view of MOF structures. In addition to identifying structure-property relationships, this systematic approach to identify the MOFs of interest is used to identify one or more MOFs that may be useful for high pressure methane storage.

  5. Thermodynamics of the Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musho, Terence; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) provide a versatile and tailorable material platform that embody many desirable attributes for photocatalytic water-splitting. The approach taken in this study was to use Density Functional Theory (DFT) to predict the thermodynamic energy barriers of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) for three MOF functionalizations. A Zr-MIL-125 MOF design was selected for this study that incorporates three linker designs, a 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate (BDC), BDC functionalized with an amino group (BDC+NH2), and BDC functionalized with nitro group (BDC+NO2). The study found several key differences between homogeneous planar catalyst thermodynamics and MOF based thermodynamics, the most significant being the non-unique or heterogeneity of reaction sites. Additionally, the funcationalization of the MOF was found to significantly influence the hydroperoxyl binding energy, which proves to be the largest hurdle for both oxide and MOF based catalyst. Both of these findings provide evidance that many ...

  6. Investigating the chemical and morphological evolution of GaAs capped InAs/InP quantum dots emitting at 1.5 mm using aberration-corrected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    s t r a c t The emission wavelength of InAs quantum dots grown on InP has been shown to shiftInvestigating the chemical and morphological evolution of GaAs capped InAs/InP quantum dots microscopy A3. Metalorganic vapour-phase epitaxy A3. Quantum dots B2. Semiconducting III/V materials a b

  7. Anion Binding in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2006-01-01

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups has been synthesized and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion coordination by urea within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea{hor_ellipsis}urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolecular CH{hor_ellipsis}O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N'-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N'-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded tapes compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, ZnSO{sub 4}, Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Cu(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, AgNO{sub 3}, and AgSO{sub 3}CH{sub 3}. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion coordination by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate.

  8. Formation mechanism of the secondary building unit in a chromium terephthalate metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantu Cantu, David; McGrail, B. Peter; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2014-11-25

    Based on density functional theory calculations and simulation, a detailed mechanism is presented on the formation of the secondary building unit (SBU) of MIL-101, a chromium terephthalate metal-organic framework (MOF). SBU formation is key to MOF nucleation, the rate-limiting step in the formation process of many MOFs. A series of reactions that lead to the formation of the SBU of MIL-101 is proposed in this work. Initial rate-limiting reactions form the metal cluster with three chromium (III) atoms linked to a central bridging oxygen. Terephthalate linkers play a key role as chromium (III) atoms are joined to linker carboxylate groups prior to the placement of the central bridging oxygen. Multiple linker addition reactions, which follow in different paths due to structural isomers, are limited by the removal of water molecules in the first chromium coordination shell. The least energy path is identified were all linkers on one face of the metal center plane are added first. A simple kinetic model based on transition state theory shows the rate of secondary building unit formation similar to the rate metal-organic framework nucleation. The authors are thankful to Dr. R. Rousseau for a critical reading of the manuscript. This research would not have been possible without the support of the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  9. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

  10. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, P.

    1998-06-02

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

  11. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC 1 Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    to the vapor pressure: Tdp = Tsat@ Pv Sling Psychrometer: a rotating set of thermometers one of which measuresM. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC 1 Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC Atmospheric air normally contains some water vapor (moisture). The dry-air contains no water. Although the amount

  12. High H2 Storage of Hexagonal Metal-Organic Frameworks from First-Principles-Based Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    High H2 Storage of Hexagonal Metal-Organic Frameworks from First-Principles-Based Grand Canonical IRMOF-2-60, which we calculate to bind 9.7 wt % H2 storage at 77 K and 70 bar, the highest known value even at ambient temperatures. For example, IRMOF-2-96-Li leads to 6.0 wt % H2 storage at 273 K and 100

  13. A coordinatively saturated sulfate encapsulated in a metal-organic framework functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-10-14

    A functional coordination polymer decorated with urea hydrogen-bonding donor groups has been designed for optional binding of sulfate; self-assembly of a tripodal tri-urea linker with Ag2SO4 resulted in the formation of a 1D metal-organic framework that encapsulated SO42- anions via twelve complementary hydrogen bonds, which represents the highest coordination number observed for sulfate in a natural or synthetic host.

  14. Improving the mechanical stability of zirconium-based metal-organic frameworks by incorporation of acidic modulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Voorde, Ben; Stassen, Ivo; Bueken, Bart; Vermoortele, Frederik; De Vos, Dirk; Ameloot, Rob; Tan, Jin-Chong; Bennett, Thomas D.

    2014-12-01

    processing conditions. Introduction Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are microporous materials incorporating both organic and inorganic moieties connected in 20 a three-dimensional crystal lattice.1 Extensive research has been performed on the synthesis... to other MOFs and play a key role in synthesizing structures which are 25 capable of withstanding the mechanical processing necessary for their use in industrial applications. Experimental Materials selection and synthesis The four isoreticular...

  15. Electronic structure of porphyrin-based metal-organic frameworks and their suitability for solar fuel production photocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamad, Said; Aziz, Alex G; Ruiz-Salvador, A Rabdel; Calero, Sofia; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be exceptionally good catalytic materials thanks to the presence of active metal centres and a porous structure that is advantageous for molecular adsorption and confinement. We present here a first-principles investigation of the electronic structure of a family of MOFs based on porphyrins connected through phenyl-carboxyl ligands and AlOH species, in order to assess their suitability for the photocatalysis of fuel production reactions using sunlight.

  16. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    of a thermochemical cycle, and agreement is within the combined experimental uncertainties. Vapor pressures pressures. Vaporization enthalpies of crystalline materials are also quite useful. Combined with fusion combined with fusion enthalpies have been used to provide independent confirmation of the magnitude

  17. 1066 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 15, NO. 4, JULY/AUGUST 2009 Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy of III-Nitride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    substrate exhibited a 24% improvement in output power as compared to LEDs on GaN templates grown using the conventional method. The increase in output power of the LEDs is attributed to improved internal quantum-emitting diode (LED) de- vices grown on patterned sapphire and planar substrates were compared. The nanopatterned

  18. InAs quantum dot growth on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy for intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakomin, R.; Kawabata, R. M. S.; Souza, P. L.; Mourão, R. T.; Pires, M. P.; Micha, D. N.

    2014-09-07

    InAs quantum dot multilayers have been grown using Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As spacers with dimensions and compositions near the theoretical values for optimized efficiencies in intermediate band photovoltaic cells. Using an aluminium composition of x?=?0.3 and InAs dot vertical dimensions of 5?nm, transitions to an intermediate band with energy close to the ideal theoretical value have been obtained. Optimum size uniformity and density have been achieved by capping the quantum dots with GaAs following the indium-flush method. This approach has also resulted in minimization of crystalline defects in the epilayer structure.

  19. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties: Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the Even n-Alkanes from C40 to C76 at T ) 298.15 K by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties: Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the Even n in combination with earlier work to evaluate the vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of these n-alkanes from T ) (298.15 to 540) K. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy results obtained are compared

  20. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C31 to C38 at T ) 298.15 K by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C31 to C38 at T ) 298.15 K with other literature values to evaluate the vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of these n-alkanes from T ) 298.15 to 575 K. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy results obtained are compared

  1. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C21 to C30 at T ) 298.15 K by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C21 to C30 at T ) 298.15 K pressures of these n-alkanes from T ) 298.15 to 575 K. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy results-alkanes exhibit very low vapor pressures at ambient temperatures, vapor pressure measurement for most

  2. Tribology Letters Vol. 10, No. 3, 2001 179 Activation of the SiC surface for vapor phase lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA E-mail: ag4b(ad), which then decompose by -hydride elimination resulting in H2, CO, H2CO, and CH3OH desorption phase lubrication in high temperature engines. KEY WORDS: lubrication; vapor phase lubrication; SiC; Fe

  3. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-11-24

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  4. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-06-23

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  5. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, Arnold R. (6006 Allentown Dr., Spring, TX 77379)

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  6. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vobach, Arnold R. (6006 Allentown Dr., Spring, TX 77389)

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    2008-10-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

  8. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Dawson, Jay W. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  9. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Dawson, Jay W. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  10. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.

    1988-03-15

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

  11. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    pressure and entropy, pressure and vapor quality, andfluid at the high pressure vapor turbine exit. In the nexthigh pressure and low pressure vapor turbines. The increase

  12. THE KINETICS OF LASER PULSE VAPORIZATION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE BY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chuen-horng

    2012-01-01

    resulting low vapor pressure and low heat of vaporizationresulting low vapor pressure and low heat of vaporizationyields the partial vapor pressure and the composition in the

  13. Interpenetrating metal-organic frameworks formed by self-assembly of tetrahedral and octahedral building blocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Yongming; Lan Yaqian; Xu Yanhong; Su Zhongmin; Li Shunli; Zang Hongying; Xu Guangjuan

    2009-11-15

    To investigate the relationship between topological types and molecular building blocks (MBBs), we have designed and synthesized a series of three-dimensional (3D) interpenetrating metal-organic frameworks based on different polygons or polyhedra under hydrothermal conditions, namely [Cd(bpib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 1})] (1), [Cd(bpib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 2})].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(bpib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 3})] (3) and [Cd(bib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 1})] (4), where bpib=1,4-bis(2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)butane, bib=1,4-bis(1H-imidazol-1-yl)butane, H{sub 2}L{sup 1}=4-(4-carboxybenzyloxy)benzoic acid, H{sub 2}L{sup 2}=4,4'-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))dibenzoic acid and H{sub 2}L{sup 3}=4,4'-(1,4-phenylenebis(methylene))bis(oxy)dibenzoic acid, respectively. Their structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. Compounds 1-3 display alpha-Po topological nets with different degrees of interpenetration based on the similar octahedral [Cd{sub 2}(-COO){sub 4}] building blocks. Compound 4 is a six-fold interpenetrating diamondoid net based on tetrahedral MBBs. By careful inspection of these structures, we find that various carboxylic ligands and N-donor ligands with different coordination modes and conformations, and metal centers with different geometries are important for the formation of the different MBBs. It is believed that different topological types lie on different MBBs with various polygons or polyhedra. Such as four- and six-connected topologies are formed by tetrahedral and octahedral building blocks. In addition, with the increase of carboxylic ligands' length, the degrees of interpenetration have been changed in the alpha-Po topological nets. And the luminescent properties of these compounds have been investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: A series of three-dimensional interpenetrating metal-organic frameworks based on different polygons or polyhedra has been synthesized. The crystal structures and topological analysis of these compounds, along with a systematic investigation of the relationship between topological types and molecular building blocks, will be discussed.

  14. Fabrication of optical structures using SU-8 photoresist and chemically assisted ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    transferred into an chemical vapor deposition CVD grown SiO2 layer, evaporated or electroplated metal layers in a SU-8 layer spin coated onto the surface of GaAs substrate is performed using a contact print

  15. A FIRST ORDER PROJECTION-BASED TIME-SPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A FIRST ORDER PROJECTION-BASED TIME-SPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process ANDREAS PROHL1 Abstract. The simulation of chemically reacting ows in speci#12;c situations is a basic

  16. A FIRST ORDER PROJECTIONBASED TIMESPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A FIRST ORDER PROJECTION­BASED TIME­SPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling ANDREAS PROHL 1 Abstract. The simulation of chemically reacting flows in specific situations is a basic

  17. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  18. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  19. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  20. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  1. The Effect of vapor subcooling on film condensation of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedorovich, Eugene D.

    1968-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the interfacial "vapor-condensate" temperature distribution, which includes the effect of subcooling (supersaturation) in the vapor. Experimental data from previous investigators for ...

  2. Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

    2014-01-01

    Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

  3. Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on June 7, 2005, in TA-48, Building RC-1 Room 402 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on...

  4. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  5. MULTIPLY STRIPPED ION GENERATION IN THE METAL VAPOR VACUUM ARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.

    2010-01-01

    the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A new kind offrom a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma has been used to obtaindrives the vacuum arc plasma is created. The fundamental

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS CONSIDERING ADSORPTION governing the behavior of vapor- dominated geothermal reservoirs. These mechanisms affect both was to determine the most effective injection strategy once these two effects are considered. Geothermal reservoir

  7. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radha, B., E-mail: radha.boya@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U., E-mail: radha.boya@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and DST Unit on Nanoscience, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-08-25

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  8. Crystal engineering, structure–function relationships, and the future of metal–organic frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2014-10-15

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are a rapidly expanding class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials that can be rationally designed and assembled through crystal engineering. The explosion of interest in this subclass of coordination polymers results from their outstanding properties and myriad possible applications that include traditional uses of microporous materials, such as gas storage, separations, and catalysis, to new realms in biomedicine, electronic devices, and and information storage. The objective of this Highlight article is to provide the reader with a sense of where the field stands after roughly fifteen years of research. Remarkable progress has been made, but the barriers tomore »practical and commercial advances are also illuminated. We discuss the basic elements of MOF assembly and present a conceptual hierarchy of structural elements that assists in understanding how unique properties in these materials can be achieved. Structure-function relationships are then discussed; several are now well understood as a result of the focused efforts of many research groups over the past decade. Prospects for practical applications of MOFs in membranes, catalysis, biomedicine, and as active components in electronic and photonic devices are also discussed. Finally, we list key challenges that, in our view, must be addressed for these materials to realize their full potential in the marketplace.« less

  9. Design and Synthesis of Novel Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) Toward High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, Eddaoudi; Zaworotko, Michael; Space, Brian; Eckert, Juergen

    2013-05-08

    Statement of Objectives: 1. Synthesize viable porous MOFs for high H2 storage at ambient conditions to be assessed by measuring H2 uptake. 2. Develop a better understanding of the operative interactions of the sorbed H2 with the organic and inorganic constituents of the sorbent MOF by means of inelastic neutron scattering (INS, to characterize the H2-MOF interactions) and computational studies (to interpret the data and predict novel materials suitable for high H2 uptake at moderate temperatures and relatively low pressures). 3. Synergistically combine the outcomes of objectives 1 and 2 to construct a made-to-order inexpensive MOF that is suitable for super H2 storage and meets the DOE targets - 6% H2 per weight (2kWh/kg) by 2010 and 9% H2 per weight (3kWh/kg) by 2015. The ongoing research is a collaborative experimental and computational effort focused on assessing H2 storage and interactions with pre-selected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolite-like MOFs (ZMOFs), with the eventual goal of synthesizing made-to-order high H2 storage materials to achieve the DOE targets for mobile applications. We proposed in this funded research to increase the amount of H2 uptake, as well as tune the interactions (i.e. isosteric heats of adsorption), by targeting readily tunable MOFs:

  10. Heat Recovery in Distillation by Mechanical Vapor Recompression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, F. E.; Zakak, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    IN DISTILLATION BY MECHANICAL VAPOR RECOMPRESSION Frederick E. Becker and Alexandra I. Zakak Tecogen, Inc., A Subsidiary of Thermo Electron Corporation Waltham, Massachusetts ABSTRACT A significant reduction in distillation tower energy requirements can..., and then recompressing the low-pressure bottom vapors and injecting them directly into the column bottom. The choice of either scheme is a function of the physical properties of the vapors; i.e., the specific volume of the top or bottom vapors may dictate the most...

  11. Laboratory testing of the in-well vapor-stripping system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, T.J.; Francois, O.

    1996-03-01

    The Volatile organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) was implemented by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Technology Development to develop and test new technologies for the remediation of organic chemicals in the subsurface. One of the technologies being tested under the VOC-Arid ID is the in-well vapor-stripping system. The in-well vapor-stripping concept was initially proposed by researchers at Stanford University and is currently under development through a collaboration between workers at Stanford University and DOE`s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The project to demonstrate the in-well vapor-stripping technology is divided into three phases: (1) conceptual model and computer simulation, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) field demonstration. This report provides the methods and results of the laboratory testing in which a full-scale replica was constructed and tested above ground in a test facility located at DOE`s Hanford Site, Washington. The system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase.

  12. MODELLING AND SIMULATION OF LIQUID-VAPOR PHASE TRANSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faccanoni, Gloria

    . (,) P pressure law. G. Faccanoni DNS OF LIQUIDE-VAPOR PHASE TRANSITION 6 / 23 #12;Model Numerical Method. (,) P pressure law. G. Faccanoni DNS OF LIQUIDE-VAPOR PHASE TRANSITION 6 / 23 #12;Model Numerical Method Vapor = 0 x = 0 = 1Fictive fluid 0 pressure law

  13. Modeling engine oil vaporization and transport of the oil vapor in the piston ring pack on internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yeunwoo, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption that the multi-grade oil can be modeled as a compound of several ...

  14. THE KINETICS OF LASER PULSE VAPORIZATION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE BY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, C-h.

    2010-01-01

    The results of the vapor pressure and the vapor compositionyielded the partial vapor pressure of each species and therecommer.ded limits of total vapor pressure This work fitted

  15. Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study covering Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. and its membrane vapor processor that recovers fuel vapors from gasoline refueling.

  16. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties: Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the Even n-Alkanes from C78 to C92 at T ) 298.15 K by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties: Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the Even n and vapor pressures of the n-alkanes from T ) (298.15 to 540) K for heneicosane to dononacontane. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy results obtained are compared with estimated data from Morgan's "PERT2

  17. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  18. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.

  19. Apparatus and method for photochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott C. (Wilmington, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

    1987-03-31

    A photochemical vapor deposition apparatus includes a reactor housing having a window in one wall above a reaction chamber in the housing. A transparent curtain divides the reaction chamber into a reaction zone and a flush zone. At least one substrate is mounted in the reaction zone in light communication with the window so that ultraviolet radiation may penetrate through the window into the reaction zone. The window is kept clear by a gas flowing through the flush zone.

  20. High volume fuel vapor release valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimby, D.R.

    1991-09-03

    This patent describes a fuel vapor release valve for use in a vehicle fuel system. It comprises a valve housing 10 placed in a specific longitudinal orientation, the valve housing 10 defining an interior cavity 22 having an inlet 20 for admitting fuel vapor and an outlet 14 for discharging such fuel vapor; a valve member 24 positioned in the cavity 22 for movement between an outlet 14 opening position and an outlet 14 closing position, the valve member 24 including a cap member 34 having a seat surface 36 for mating with the outlet 14 and an orifice 42 extending through the cap member 34 providing a passageway from the outlet 14 to the cavity 22, the orifice 42 extending through the cap member 34 providing a passageway from the outlet 14 to the cavity 22, the orifice 42 having a lesser radius than the outlet 14; the valve member 24 further including a plug member 30 engaged with the cap member 34 for movement between an orifice 42 opening position and an orifice 42 closing position; and, a valve housing tilt responsive means for moving the valve member 24 to an outlet 14 and orifice 42 closing position in response to tilting of the valve 10 about its longitudinal axis whereby, upon the return of the valve 10 to its specified longitudinal orientation, the plug member 30 first moves to an orifice 42 opening position and the cap member 34 subsequently moves to an outlet 14 opening position.

  1. Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2005-04-19

    An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

  2. Two Large-Pore Metal-Organic Frameworks Derived from a Single Polytopic Strut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decade, in part due to their potential for application to problems ranging from gas storage,4-6 chemical

  3. Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Edward C. (Woodinville, WA); Huxtable, Douglas D. (Bothell, WA)

    1985-08-06

    A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

  4. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

  5. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  6. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caddeau, MP

    2010-06-23

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

  7. Method and apparatus for concentrating vapors for analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    2012-06-05

    A pre-concentration device and a method are disclosed for concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the pre-concentration device are thermally desorbed, achieving at least partial separation of the vapor mixtures. The pre-concentration device is suitable, e.g., for pre-concentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable.

  8. Calculation of the Dimer Equilibrium Constant of Heavy Water Saturated Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulavin, L A; Makhlaichuk, V N

    2015-01-01

    Water is the most common substance on Earth.The discovery of heavy water and its further study have shown that the change of hydrogen for deuterium leads to the significant differences in their properties.The triple point temperature of heavy water is higher,at the same time the critical temperature is lower.Experimental values of the second virial coefficient of the EOS for the vapor of normal and heavy water differ at all temperatures.This fact can influence the values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor.The equilibrium properties of the dimerization process are described with the methods of chemical thermodynamics.The chemical potentials for monomers (m) and dimers (d)are the functions of their concentrations.The interactions of monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer types are taken into account within the solution of equation for chemical potentials.The obtained expression for the dimerization constant contains the contributions of these types.The averaged potentials are modeled by the Sutherlan...

  9. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  10. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  11. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galkowski, Joseph J. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  12. Category:Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,Ground GravityListsMercury Vapor Jump to:

  13. Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

  14. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  15. Calculation of the Dimer Equilibrium Constant of Heavy Water Saturated Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Bulavin; S. V. Khrapatiy; V. N. Makhlaichuk

    2015-03-13

    Water is the most common substance on Earth.The discovery of heavy water and its further study have shown that the change of hydrogen for deuterium leads to the significant differences in their properties.The triple point temperature of heavy water is higher,at the same time the critical temperature is lower.Experimental values of the second virial coefficient of the EOS for the vapor of normal and heavy water differ at all temperatures.This fact can influence the values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor.The equilibrium properties of the dimerization process are described with the methods of chemical thermodynamics.The chemical potentials for monomers (m) and dimers (d)are the functions of their concentrations.The interactions of monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer types are taken into account within the solution of equation for chemical potentials.The obtained expression for the dimerization constant contains the contributions of these types.The averaged potentials are modeled by the Sutherland potential.Theoretical values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor at different temperatures are compared to those for normal water.We see the exceeding of the values for the heavy water at all temperatures.This fact is in good agreement with all experimental data that is available.The excess is related to the differences in the character of the heat excitations of the dimers of normal and heavy water,their rotational constants and energy of their vibrational excitations.Significant role is also played by the monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer interactions.

  16. 14 January 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 316 2000 211216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    plasma-arc, laser ablation, and chemical vapor-phase synthesis have been employed to Z .produce bulk are low. We describe a new high-yield plasma-arc method that easily and reliably produces macroscopic bulk amounts of such non-carbon nanotubes. w xSeveral techniques including plasma-arc 6­9 , laser w

  17. Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area by passing the exhaust air through a filter and/or adsorbent, such as an activated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    I. Policy Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories); 5154.1 (Ventilation Requirements for Laboratory-Type Hood Operations require use of fume hoods to control exposure to hazardous or odorous chemicals. IV. Definitions Activated

  18. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Vapor Power Cycles 1 Vapor Power Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    is not a suitable model for steam power cycle since: The turbine has to handle steam with low quality which will cause erosion and wear in turbine blades. It is impractical to design a compressor that handles two vapor expands isentropically in turbine and produces work. 4-1: Const P heat rejection High quality

  19. Variation of Pore Metrics in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Storage and Catalytic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jonathan Ward

    2015-01-01

    shown. This article details a zirconium MOF with manganeseand chemical stability of the zirconium secondary buildinghave been introduced in zirconium based MOFs [160, 161] but

  20. Thermodynamic and transport properties of sodium liquid and vapor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sodium liquid and vapor. Recently published Russian recommendations and results of equation of state calculations on thermophysical properties of sodium have been included in...

  1. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  2. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)...

  3. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  4. Thermochemistry of Silicon-Hydrogen Compounds Generalized from Quantum Chemical Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Engineering, Northwestern UniVersity, 2145 Sheridan Road, EVanston, Illinois 60208, and Department of Chemical Engineering, UniVersity at Buffalo, 907 Furnas Hall, Buffalo, New York 14260 ReceiVed: June 10, 2003; In Final hydrides within silicon chemical vapor deposition processes is an important source of yield loss during

  5. Pt-coated InN nanorods for selective detection of hydrogen at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    . Park, H. T. Wang, B. S. Kang, T. J. Anderson, and F. Ren Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 S. J. Peartona Department of Materials Science and Engineering August 2005 Single crystal InN nanorods were successfully grown on c-Al2O3 by hydride-metalorganic vapor

  6. Ultralong minority-carrier lifetime epitaxial GaAs by photon recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.; Dunlavy, D.J.; Keyes, B. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado 80401 (US)); Vernon, S.M.; Dixon, T.M.; Tobin, S.P. (Spire Corporation, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730); Miller, K.L.; Hayes, R.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303)

    1989-09-11

    The minority-carrier lifetime has been measured by time-resolved photoluminescence in epitaxial films of GaAs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The measured lifetimes in thicker devices are 4 to 6 times the theoretical or radiative lifetime. These long lifetimes are the result of photon recycling or self-generation of the self-absorbed radiation.

  7. Any correspondence concerning this service should be sent to the repository administrator: staff-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    in methods for separation and purification of hydrogen from gas mixtures in many sectors such as petroleum, especially in clean fuel for fuel cells and vehicles. Efficient hydrogen separation membrane alloys. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition A3. Polycrystalline deposition B1. Metals B3 Pd-alloy membranes a b

  8. Effects of Mg composition on open circuit voltage of Cu2OMgxZn1xO heterojunction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    (ZnO) Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) Solar cells Electrodeposition MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor solar cells, where Ag and FTO are used as top and bottom electrodes, respectively. An enhancement on the MgxZn1ÀxO (x¼10%) based solar cell. & 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Zn

  9. Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprio, G.S.

    1995-11-01

    This document presents sampling data resulting from the June 8, 1995, sampling of SST 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System.

  10. Rational Design, Synthesis, Purification, and Activation of Metal-Organic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these unusual properties in applica- tions such as hydrogen and methane storage, chemical separa- tions, and selective chemical catalysis. In principle, one of the most attractive features of MOFs is the simplicity separation of desired MOFs from crystalline and amorphous contaminants cogenerated during synthesis based

  11. Chemical reactivity of CVC and CVD SiC with UO2 at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, Chinthaka M; Katoh, Yutai; Voit, Stewart L; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Two types of silicon carbide (SiC) synthesized using two different vapor deposition processes were embedded in UO2 pellets and evaluated for their potential chemical reaction with UO2. While minor reactivity between chemical-vapor-composited (CVC) SiC and UO2 was observed at comparatively low temperatures of 1100 and 1300 C, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC did not show any such reactivity, according to microstructural investigations. However, both CVD and CVC SiCs showed some reaction with UO2 at a higher temperature (1500 C). Elemental maps supported by phase maps obtained using electron backscatter diffraction indicated that CVC SiC was more reactive than CVD SiC at 1500 C. Furthermore, this investigation indicated the formation of uranium carbides and uranium silicide chemical phases such as UC, USi2, and U3Si2 as a result of SiC reaction with UO2.

  12. Laboratory test plan in-well vapor stripping system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J

    1994-07-01

    This test plan describes the activities that will be conducted as a part of the laboratory testing of a full-scale mockup of the Stanford in-well vapor stripping system. These tests will be conducted to delineate design parameters for the in-well vapor stripping unit and to identify and quantify variables that are sensitive to the dynamic hydraulic effects induced by operation of the system. No radioactive materials are involved in this test. In-well vapor stripping has been used successfully as an alternative to conventional pump-and-treat technology for remediation of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated groundwater in Europe and more recently in the United States. In-well vapor stripping permits in situ remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater by combining an in-well vapor stripping system with a treatment well is used to extract and discharge groundwater simultaneously, resulting in the establishment of a vertical circulation groundwater flow cell in the aquifer. Groundwater extracted from the aquifer via the lower screened interval is treated for VOCs by in-well vapor stripping within the treatment well. This stripping causes aqueous phase VOCs to partition preferentially into a vapor phase. Treated groundwater is discharged back to the aquifer via the upper screened interval of the treatment well, while the vapor phase VOCs are simultaneously removed from the well bore and contained at the surface with a vacuum extraction system. Groundwater entrained into the vertical circulation flow cell becomes sequentially cleaned of VOC contamination in an efficient manner without the need for surface treatment and handling of contaminated groundwater. An added benefit of in-well vapor stripping is the ability to perform vadose zone vapor extraction concurrently with groundwater remediation. This uses the vacuum extraction capabilities of the in-well vapor stripping configured with the upper screened interval placed into the vadose zone above the water table.

  13. Isoreticular Series of (3,24)-Connected Metal-Organic Frameworks: Facile Synthesis and High Methane Uptake Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barin, G; Krungleviciute, V; Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK

    2014-03-11

    We have successfully used a highly efficient copper-catalyzed "click" reaction for the synthesis of a new series of hexacarboxylic acid linkers with varying sizes for the construction of isoreticular (3,24)-connected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-namely, NU-138, NU-139, and NU-140. One of these MOFs, NU-140, exhibits a gravimetric methane uptake of 0.34 g/g at 65 bar and 298 K, corresponding to almost 70% of the DOE target (0.5 g/g), and has a working capacity (deliverable amount between 65 and 5 bar) of 0.29 g/g, which translates into a volumetric working capacity of 170 cc(STP)/cc. These values demonstrate that NU-140 performs well for methane storage purposes, from both a gravimetric and a volumetric point of view. Adsorption of CO2 and H-2 along with simulated isotherms are also reported.

  14. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, ZW; Gu, ZY; Arvapally, RK; Chen, YP; McDougald, RN; Ivy, JF; Yakovenko, AA; Feng, DW; Omary, MA; Zhou, HC

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 +/- 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm(-1) blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  15. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal–Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 ± 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm?¹ blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  16. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Please cite this article in press as: D. Lipkind et al., The vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of a series of unsaturated fatty acids methyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    enthalpies and vapor pressures of a series of unsaturated fatty acids methyl esters by correlation gas­8 Thermochimica Acta xxx (2007) xxx­xxx The vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of a series of unsaturated- vonate (methyl Z 15-tetracosenoate) are evaluated at T = 298.15 and vapor pressures are evaluated over

  17. 1-Dimensional Numerical Model of Thermal Conduction and Vapor Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    developed by Samar Khatiwala, 2001 extended to variable thermal properties and irregular grid by Norbert Sch for c. Upper boundary condition: a) Radiation Q + k T z z=0 = T4 z=0 Q is the incoming solar flux of Water Vapor with Phase Transitions developed by Norbert Sch¨orghofer, 2003­2004 3 phases: vapor, free

  18. Recuperative Vapor Recompression Heat Pumps for Cryogenic Air Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    Air N2 CW MAC MHE LP HP CW N2 O2 Recuperative Vapor Recompression Heat Pumps for Cryogenic Air · The compression of O2 in the air feed is avoided by applying recuperative vapor recompression heat pumps) heat pump The compression of B can be avoided 77 79 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 -5000 5000 15000 25000 35000

  19. ADHESION FORCES BETWEEN MICA SURFACES IN UNDERSATURATED VAPORS OF HYDROCARBONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuoka, Hiroshige

    ADHESION FORCES BETWEEN MICA SURFACES IN UNDERSATURATED VAPORS OF HYDROCARBONS H. MATSUOKA1 , T] or meniscus force [3], which have been neglected in the conventional and relatively large mechani- cal systems forces between mica surfaces in under- saturated vapors of several kind of hydrocarbon liquids are mea

  20. RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Alex D.

    RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR By SCOTT RUSSELL WAITUKAITIS A Thesis Submitted: #12;Abstract I describe a study of Faraday rotation in a hot lithium vapor. I begin by dis- cussing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 The Lithium Oven and Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Theoretical Framework

  1. Environmentally focused patterning and processing of polymer thin films by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) and oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Nathan J. (Nathan Jeffrey)

    2010-01-01

    The new millennium has brought fourth many technological innovations made possible by the advancement of high speed integrated circuits. The materials and energy requirements for a microchip is orders of magnitude higher ...

  2. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  3. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  4. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    s equation, which expresses vapor pressure as a function ofT+ 273.15 ) ( is the vapor pressure lowering (VPL) factor.P sat is the saturated vapor pressure of bulk aqueous phase,

  5. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2003-06-03

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

  6. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-04

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  7. Determining the exchange parameters of spin-1 metal-organic molecular magnets in pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Singleton, John; Lancaster, Tom; Goddard, Paul; Manson, Jamie

    2011-01-14

    We nave measured the high-field magnetization of a number of Ni-based metal-organic molecular magnets. These materials are self-assembly coordination polymers formed from transition metal ions and organic ligands. The chemistry of the compounds is versatile allowing many structures with different magnetic properties to be formed. These studies follow on from previous measurements of the Cu-based analogues in which we showed it was possible to extract the exchange parameters of low-dimensional magnets using pulsed magnetic fields. In our recent experiments we have investigated the compound (Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2})PF{sub 6}, where pyz = pyrazine, and the Ni-ions are linked in a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) square lattice via the pyrazine molecules, with the layers held together by HF{sub 2} ligands. We also investigated Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2}, where pyzdo = pyrazine dioxide. The samples are grown at Eastern Washington University using techniques described elsewhere. Measurements are performed at the pulsed magnetic field laboratory in Los Alamos. The magnetization of powdered samples is determined using a compensated coil magnetometer in a 65 T short pulse magnet. Temperatures as low as 500 mK are achievable using a {sup 3}He cryostat. The main figure shows the magnetization of the spin-1 [Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} compound at 1.43 K. The magnetization rises slowly at first, achieving a rounded saturation whose midpoint is around 19 T. A small anomaly is also seen in the susceptibility at low fields ({approx}3 T), which might be attributed to a spin-flop transition. In contrast, the spin-1/2 [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} measured previously has a saturation magnetization of 35.5 T and a strongly concave form of M(B) below this field. This latter compound was shown to be a good example of a Q2D Heisenberg antiferromagnet with the strong exchange coupling (J{sub 2D} = 12.4 K, J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 2D} {approx} 10{sup -2}) directed along the Cu-pyz-Cu directions. The structure of the two compounds is similar, but in the case of the Cu-compound the Cu-Cu pathways are linear, whereas in the Ni-compound they are kinked. The pulsed-field data combined with information from temperature-dependent susceptibility, muon-spin rotation, electron-spin resonance and ligand-field calculations suggest that, far from being magnetically Q2D, the Ni-compound is fairly one-dimensional with the dominant exchange (J{sub 1D} = 3.1 K and J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 1D} = 0.63) directed along the Ni-FHF-Ni direction. Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2} was also investigated. Previous ultra-high field measurements using the 100 T magnet have shown that this compound has a saturation field close to 80 T. The purpose of the present studies is to map out the phase diagram of this material at mid-range fields. The data are shown in the inset to the figure. This continuing project probes the ability of organic ligands to mediate magnetic exchange, the link between structure, dimensionality and bulk magnetic properties, as well as the role of spin number in quantum magnets. Ultimately the investigations aim to determine to what extent it is possible to produce self-assembly molecular materials with tailor-made magnetic characteristics.

  8. Isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, process for forming the same, and systematic design of pore size and functionality therein, with application for gas storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Li, Hailian; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel

    2005-08-16

    An isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) and method for systematically forming the same. The method comprises the steps of dissolving at least one source of metal cations and at least one organic linking compound in a solvent to form a solution; and crystallizing the solution under predetermined conditions to form a predetermined IRMOF. At least one of functionality, dimension, pore size and free volume of the IRMOF is substantially determined by the organic linking compound.

  9. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  10. Chemical Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci

    2007-04-05

    In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

  11. Solid source MOCVD system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubert, Brian N. (Yakima, WA); Wu, Xin Di (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A system for MOCVD fabrication of superconducting and non-superconducting oxide films provides a delivery system for the feeding of metalorganic precursors for multi-component chemical vapor deposition. The delivery system can include multiple cartridges containing tightly packed precursor materials. The contents of each cartridge can be ground at a desired rate and fed together with precursor materials from other cartridges to a vaporization zone and then to a reaction zone within a deposition chamber for thin film deposition.

  12. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  13. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  14. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

  15. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

    1988-01-01

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled.

  16. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1988-05-24

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled. 2 figs.

  17. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  18. Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helfritch, Dennis J. (Baltimore, MD)

    1998-07-28

    A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

  19. Water Vapor around Sgr B2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cernicharo; J. R. Goicoechea; J. R. Pardo; A. Asensio Ramos

    2006-01-16

    We have conducted a study combining H2O lines in two spectral regions. First, Infrared Space Observatory observations of several H2O thermal lines seen in absorption toward Sgr B2(M) at a spectral resolution of 35 kms^-1 have been analyzed. Second, an IRAM-30m telescope map of the para-H2O 3_13-2_20 line at 183.31 GHz, seen in emission, has also been obtained and analyzed. The H2O lines seen in absorption are optically thick and are formed in the outermost gas of the condensations in front of the far-IR continuum sources. They probe a maximum visual extinction of ~5 to 10 mag. Radiative transfer models indicate that these lines are quite insensitive to temperature and gas density, and that IR photons from the dust play a dominant role in the excitation of the involved H2O rotational levels. The water vapor abundance in the region is (1-2)x10^-5. The relatively low H2O/OH abundance ratio in the region, 2-4, is a signature of UV photon dominated surface layers traced by far-IR observations.

  20. Optimization of Xenon Difluoride Vapor Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Joseph; Marganski, Paul; Kaim, Robert; Wodjenski, Mike; Gregg, John; Yedave, Sharad; Sergi, Steve; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Zou Peng [ATMI, Inc., Danbury, Connecticut 06810 (United States)

    2008-11-03

    Xenon difluoride (XeF{sub 2}) has been shown to provide many process benefits when used as a daily maintenance recipe for ion implant. Regularly flowing XeF{sub 2} into the ion source cleans the deposits generated by ion source operation. As a result, significant increases in productivity have been demonstrated. However, XeF{sub 2} is a toxic oxidizer that must be handled appropriately. Furthermore, it is a low vapor pressure solid under standard conditions ({approx}4.5 torr at 25 deg. C). These aspects present unique challenges for designing a package for delivering the chemistry to an ion implanter. To address these challenges, ATMI designed a high-performance, re-usable cylinder for dispensing XeF{sub 2} in an efficient and reliable manner. Data are presented showing specific attributes of the cylinder, such as the importance of internal heat transfer media and the cylinder valve size. The impact of mass flow controller (MFC) selection and ion source tube design on the flow rate of XeF{sub 2} are also discussed. Finally, cylinder release rate data are provided.

  1. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the finding and recommendations on the audit of the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program. The status of the program was assessed to determine whether the Department was achieving objectives stated in its January 1990 Plan for the Demonstration, Transition and Deployment of AVLIS Technology. Through Fiscal Year 1991, the Department had spent about $1.1 billion to develop AVLIS technology. The January 1990 plan provided for AVLIS to be far enough along by September to enable the Department to make a determination of the technical and economic feasibility of deployment. However, the milestones needed to support that determination were not met. An estimated $550 million would be needed to complete AVLIS engineering development and related testing prior to deployment. The earliest possible deployment date has slipped to beyond the year 2000. It is recommended that the Department reassess the requirement for AVLIS in light of program delays and changes that have taken place in the enrichment market since January 1990. Following the reassessment, a decision should be made to either fully support and promote the actions needed to complete AVLIS development or discontinue support for the program entirely. Management`s position is that the Department will successfully complete the AVLIS technology demonstration and that the program should continue until it can be transferred to a Government corporation. Although the auditors recognize that AVLIS may be transferred, there are enough technical and financial uncertainties that a thorough assessment is warranted.

  2. Aromatizing Olefin Metathesis by Ligand Isolation inside a Metal-Organic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alternative synthetic protocols have emerged: they are (i) postsynthesis modification9 (PSM) and (ii) solvent-assisted linker exchange10 (SALE). PSM refers to chemical modifications of the organic struts in MOFs to either. It is worthy of note that few reports13 describe C-C bond-forming reactions by PSM. By contrast, SALE allows

  3. Ultraporous, Water Stable, and Breathing Zirconium-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks with ftw Topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    *,, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois-1105 occurs at a propane pressure of 3 bar. At 1 bar, NU-1105 is in its cp form and adsorbs less propane than it would in its op form, highlighting improved working capacity. In situ powder X

  4. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films Composed of Free-Standing Acicular Nanorods Exhibiting Reversible Electrochromism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they can be used as smart windows, display devices, vehicle sunroofs, and antiglare mirrors for cars.2-14 Their high permanent porosity,15 nanostructured pores, and tunable pore compositions have led to their consideration for a remarkably broad range of applications, including gas storage,16 chemical separations,17

  5. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  6. Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroger, Detlev Gustav

    1966-01-01

    The object of this work is to investigate theoretically and experimentally the following two phases of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapore, a. Heat transfer during film condensation of pure saturated ...

  7. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  8. Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Tapio

    Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus ...

  9. Fatigue Resistance of Asphalt Mixtures Affected by Water Vapor Movement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Yunwei

    2013-11-08

    This dissertation has two key objectives: the first objective is to develop a method of predicting and quantifying the amount of water that can enter into a pavement system by vapor transport; the second objective is to ...

  10. Low Level Heat Recovery Through Heat Pumps and Vapor Recompression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J.

    1980-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to examine the methods and economics of recovering low level heat through heat pumps and vapor recompression. Actual commercially available equipment is considered to determine the near-term and future economic viability...

  11. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  12. Use Vapor Recompression to Recover Low-Pressure Waste Steam,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that it can be reused. Vapor recompression relies upon a mechanical compressor or steam jet ejector to increase the temperature of the latent heat in steam to render it usable for...

  13. Effect of furnace operating conditions on alkali vaporization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on alkali vaporization, batch carryover, and the formation of SO2 and NO in an oxy-fuel fired container glass furnace. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of...

  14. Numerical analysis of vapor flow in a micro heat pipe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaoqin

    1996-01-01

    The vapor flow in a flat plate micro heat pipe with both uniform and linear heat flux boundary conditions has been numerically analyzed. For both types of boundary conditions, the Navier-Stokes equations with steady incompressible two...

  15. Continuous ultra-thin MoS{sub 2} films grown by low-temperature physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratore, C. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Hu, J. J.; Bultman, J. E.; Jespersen, M. L. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Wang, B.; Haque, M. A. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, College Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shamberger, P. J.; McConney, M. E.; Naguy, R. D.; Voevodin, A. A. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    Uniform growth of pristine two dimensional (2D) materials over large areas at lower temperatures without sacrifice of their unique physical properties is a critical pre-requisite for seamless integration of next-generation van der Waals heterostructures into functional devices. This Letter describes a vapor phase growth technique for precisely controlled synthesis of continuous, uniform molecular layers of MoS{sub 2} on silicon dioxide and highly oriented pyrolitic graphite substrates of over several square centimeters at 350?°C. Synthesis of few-layer MoS{sub 2} in this ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition process yields materials with key optical and electronic properties identical to exfoliated layers. The films are composed of nano-scale domains with strong chemical binding between domain boundaries, allowing lift-off from the substrate and electronic transport measurements from contacts with separation on the order of centimeters.

  16. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-05-01

    Distillation is perhaps the separation process most widely used in the chemical processing industry. The correct design of distillation columns requires the availability of accurate and, if possible, thermodynamically consistent vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) data. The present work is part of a project studying the effect of pressure on the behavior of the azeotropic point in mixtures in which at least one component is an alcohol. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were obtained for the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent by the methods of Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak. The data were correlated with five liquid phase activity coefficient models (Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC).

  17. Screw Type Steam Compressors for Mechanical Vapor Recompression (MVR) Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawamura, K.; Apaloo, Thomas-L.

    1986-01-01

    hand, is not affected by such problem. No special mist separator is required and, at the same time, the wet or saturated vapor compression is possible, and does not affect the efficiency of the SSHP. (3) Stability of performance for a wide... COMPRESSORS FOR MECHANICAL VAPOR RECOMPRESSION (MVR) SYSTEMS K. KAWAMURA AND THOMAS-L. APALOO MYCOM CORPORATION, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA MATSUDA, MAYEKAWA MFG. CO., TOKYO, JAPAN ABSTRACT In processes of evaporation, distillation or drying, steam...

  18. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  19. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecoveryplanning CareerNationalCNMSTHEmaterials |Chemical

  20. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    2004-02-19

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals