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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the distribution of copper at the soil-root interface by micro x-ray fluorescence (m-XRF), and identified the new copper species as metallic nanoparticles by micro extended...

2

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

3

Nanoparticle plasma ejected directly from solid copper by localized microwaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plasma column ejected directly from solid copper by localized microwaves is studied. The effect stems from an induced hotspot that melts and emits ionized copper vapors as a confined fire column. Nanoparticles of {approx}20-120 nm size were revealed in the ejected column by in situ small-angle x-ray scattering. Optical spectroscopy confirmed the dominance of copper particles in the plasma column originating directly from the copper substrate. Nano- and macroparticles of copper were verified also by ex situ scanning electron microscopy. The direct conversion of solid metals to nanoparticles is demonstrated and various applications are proposed.

Jerby, E.; Golts, A.; Shamir, Y.; Wonde, S.; Ashkenazi, D.; Eliaz, N. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Mitchell, J. B. A.; LeGarrec, J. L. [IPR., U.M.R. No. 6251 du C.N.R.S., Universite de Rennes I, 35042 Rennes (France); Narayanan, T.; Sztucki, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Barkay, Z. [Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Evaluation of monolayer protected metal nanoparticle technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self assembling nanostructured nanoparticles represent a new class of synthesized materials with unique functionality. Such monolayer protected metal nanoparticles are capable of resisting protein adsorption, and if utilized ...

Wu, Diana J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electron Dynamics in Metallic Nanoparticles M. Aeschlimann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoparticles are discussed in the light of the results of line width measurements and femtosecond pump...............................................................................................................3 II. ADSORPTION OF LIGHT IN METALLIC NANOPARTICLES...................................4 A. General...............................................18 C. Heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the support

Bauer, Michael

8

Studies of Copper Nanoparticles Effects on Micro-organisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss about the antibacterial activities of copper nanoparticles on both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in this investigation. First time, we increase its antibacterial activities by using electrical power while on electrolysis synthesis and it is confirmed from its more antibacterial activities (For Escherichia coli bacteria). We investigate the changes of surface area to volume ratio of copper nanoparticles prepared in two different methods and its effects on antibacterial activities. We note that slight change of surface area to volume ratio results in the enhancement of its antibacterial activities.

T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aqueous heavy metal ions, including toxic metals such as lead, cadmium, and mercury, is describedLetters Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal Ions Youngjin Kim that by functionalizing metal nanoparticles with appropriate heavy-metal ion receptors, the particles might be coaxed

12

Gold, Copper, and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Senanayake, S; Barrio, L; Liu, P; Fdez. Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Gold, Copper and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Park, J.B.; Graciani, J.; Evans, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Senanayake, S.D.; Barrio, L.; Liu, P.; Sanz, J.F.; Hrbek, J.

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

Metal Nitride Diffusion Barriers for Copper Interconnects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of copper into silicon, which is primarily through grain boundaries. This dissertation reports the processing of high quality stoichiometric thin films of TiN, TaN and HfN, and studies their Cu diffusion barrier properties. Epitaxial metastable cubic TaN (B1...

Araujo, Roy A.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

Heteroepitaxial Self Assembling Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Monocrystalline Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and investigate fundamental properties. Noble metal nanoparticles made of gold or silver are grown in cavities in monocrystalline silicon formed by helium ion implantation and high temperature annealing at depth greater than 500 nm from the surface. Metals...

Martin, Michael S.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Copper has proven to be a metal of great benefit to people throughout history.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper has proven to be a metal of great benefit to people throughout history. Copper has been molded into many instru- ments such as pots, weapons and jewelry. In recent history, copper and its alloys have been fashioned into plumbing pipes and fixtures. Although these applications of copper

17

Local, Regional, and Global Implications of Elemental Mercury in Metal (Copper, Silver, Gold, and Zinc) Ores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metric tons of "stamp sand" tailings, whereas copper smelters refined five million metric tons of copperLocal, Regional, and Global Implications of Elemental Mercury in Metal (Copper, Silver, Gold, Michigan 48138 ABSTRACT. Anthropogenic inventories for copper (229 ± 89 ug/cm2, N = 30), and mercury (470

18

Enhanced thermal conductivity and viscosity of copper nanoparticles in ethylene glycol nanofluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by their very low thermal conductivity. These fluids have almost two orders of magnitude lower thermal, a significant amount of data has been gathered on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Typical materials usedEnhanced thermal conductivity and viscosity of copper nanoparticles in ethylene glycol nanofluid J

19

Copper-induced oxidative stress in three-spined stickleback : relationship with hepatic metal levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contamination of aquatic ecosystems by heavy metals. Among them, copper is a widespread pollutant found, 1999). Although this metal is a required element, high concentrations appear to be toxic to freshwater1 Copper-induced oxidative stress in three-spined stickleback : relationship with hepatic metal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Oxhide ingots, copper production, and the mediterranean trade in copper and other metals in the bronze age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

invaluable for the discussions of the physical characteristics of Bronze Age copper ingots and the vi technology involved in ancient smelting, refining, and casting of metal ingots. I am indebted to the many students and colleagues of Dr...

Jones, Michael Rice

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Route to transition metal carbide nanoparticles through cyanamide and metal oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed an efficient route to the synthesis of transition metal carbide nanoparticles starting from an organic reagent cyanamide and transition metal oxides. Four technologically important metal carbide nanoparticles such as tungsten carbide, niobium carbide, tantalum carbide and vanadium carbide were synthesized successfully at moderate temperatures. It is found that cyanamide is an efficient carburization reagent and that the metal oxides are completely transmitted into the corresponding carbide nanoparticles. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the results of the reaction between cyanamide and the metal oxides.

Li, P.G. [Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha College Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China)], E-mail: peigangiphy@yahoo.com.cn; Lei, M.; Tang, W.H. [Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronics Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha College Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Process for removing copper in a recoverable form from solid scrap metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper in a recoverable form from a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix is disclosed. The process begins by placing a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix into a reactor vessel. The atmosphere within the reactor vessel is purged with an inert gas or oxidizing while the reactor vessel is heated in the area of the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix to raise the temperature within the reactor vessel to a selected elevated temperature. Air is introduced into the reactor vessel and thereafter hydrogen chloride is introduced into the reactor vessel to obtain a desired air-hydrogen chloride mix. The air-hydrogen chloride mix is operable to form an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere which provides a protective oxide coating on the surface of the solid ferrous scrap metal in the mix and simultaneously oxidizes/chloridizes the copper in the mix to convert the copper to a copper monochloride gas for transport away from the solid ferrous scrap metal. After the copper is completely removed from the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix, the flows of air and hydrogen chloride are stopped and the copper monochloride gas is collected for conversion to a recoverable copper species.

Hartman, Alan D. (Albany, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); White, Jack C. (Albany, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A mixed-valence copper coordination polymer generated by hydrothermal metal/ligand redox reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mixed-valence copper coordination polymer generated by hydrothermal metal/ligand redox reactions A novel coordination polymer of mixed-valence copper(I,II) with 4,4A-bipyridine and in situ oxidized and crystallographically char- acterized to be a laminated structure via weak copper(II)­ oxygen interactions. Extended

Li, Jing

24

Mitochondrial matrix copper complex used in metallation of cytochrome oxidase and superoxide dismutase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mitochondrial matrix copper complex used in metallation of cytochrome oxidase and superoxide title: Mitochondrial copper transport * Address correspondence to: Dennis Winge, University of Utah.winge@hsc.utah.edu A mitochondrial matrix copper ligand (CuL) complex, conserved in mammalian cells, is shown for the first time

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

888Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluidand aserosol.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal and Silicate Particles Including Nanoparticles Areiron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (,100The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Gold-Copper Nanoparticles: Nanostructural Evolution and Bifunctional  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet AssistanceCatalytic Sites . | EMSL Copper

27

Modeling of pattern dependencies in the fabrication of multilevel copper metallization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multilevel copper metallization for Ultra-Large-Scale-Integrated (ULSI) circuits is a critical technology needed to meet performance requirements for advanced interconnect technologies with sub-micron dimensions. It is ...

Cai, Hong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

Kauffman, Douglas R.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Winter, Michael R. (Goleta, CA); Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA); Allan, Shawn M. (Henrietta, NY); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palto Alto, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Stabilization of Metal Nanoparticles in Cubic Mesostructured...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of regenerable metal-based adsorbents which can remove sulfur impurities from warm syngas stream down to less than 60 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) is described. This same...

32

Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticle films for optical sensing applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to monitor gas species selectively, sensitively, and reliably in extreme temperatures and harsh conditions is critically important for more efficient energy production using conventional fossil energy based production technologies, enabling advanced technologies for fossil based power plants of the future, and improving efficiency in domestic manufacturing industries. Optical waveguide based sensing platforms have become increasingly important but a need exists for materials that exhibit useful changes in optical properties in response to changing gas atmospheres at high temperatures. In this manuscript, the onset of a near-IR absorption associated with an increase in free carrier density in doped metal oxide nanoparticles to form so-called conducting metal oxides is discussed in the context of results obtained for undoped and Al-doped ZnO nanoparticle based films. Detailed film characterization results are presented along with measured changes in optical absorption resulting from various high temperature treatments in a range of gas atmospheres. Optical property changes are also discussed in the context of a simple model for optical absorption in conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and thin films. The combination of experimental results and theoretical modeling presented here suggests that such materials have potential for high temperature optical gas sensing applications. Simulated sensing experiments were performed at 500 C and a useful, rapid, and reproducible near-IR optical sensing response to H{sub 2} confirms that this class of materials shows great promise for optical gas sensing.

Ohodnicki, Paul R., Jr.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Multiple percolation tunneling staircase in metal-semiconductor nanoparticle composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple percolation transitions are observed in a binary system of RuO{sub 2}-CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} metal-semiconductor nanoparticle composites near percolation thresholds. Apart from a classical percolation transition, associated with the appearance of a continuous conductance path through RuO{sub 2} metal oxide nanoparticles, at least two additional tunneling percolation transitions are detected in this composite system. Such behavior is consistent with the recently emerged picture of a quantum conductivity staircase, which predicts several percolation tunneling thresholds in a system with a hierarchy of local tunneling conductance, due to various degrees of proximity of adjacent conducting particles distributed in an insulating matrix. Here, we investigate a different type of percolation tunneling staircase, associated with a more complex conductive and insulating particle microstructure of two types of non-spherical constituents. As tunneling is strongly temperature dependent, we use variable temperature measurements to emphasize the hierarchical nature of consecutive tunneling transitions. The critical exponents corresponding to specific tunneling percolation thresholds are found to be nonuniversal and temperature dependent.

Mukherjee, Rupam; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Nadgorny, Boris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

1209 Future of metal resources 1215 Gold nanoparticle and phage networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1209 Future of metal resources 1215 Gold nanoparticle and phage networks 1295 Nitric oxide role patterning SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Future of metal resources Analyses of metal cycles reported by Robert and re- place the metal in end-of-life products, which are then ei- ther recycled or enter waste streams

Mjolsness, Eric

36

Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu{sub 2}O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu{sub 2}O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu{sub 2}O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu{sub 2}O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

Jernigan, G.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials and Chemical Sciences Div.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Which resonances in small metallic nanoparticles are plasmonic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use time-dependent density functional theory to examine the character of various resonances corresponding to peaks in the optical response of small metallic nanoparticles. Each resonance has both "sloshing" and "inversion" character. The sloshing mode is an oscillation in the occupation of the shells nearest the Fermi energy, transferring charge back and forth from below the Fermi level to above it. It results in oscillation in charge density near the surface of the particle. Inversions monotonically move charge from occupied to unoccupied states, and result in oscillation in charge density in the core of the particle. We also discuss the dependence of the optical response on the size of the simulation grid, noting that the character of resonances appears stable with respect to changes in simulation size, even though the details of the spectrum change. This makes a reliable characterization possible. We consider what characteristics are important in deciding that a resonance is plasmonic.

Emily Townsend; Garnett W Bryant

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Stable Metal Isotopes Reveal Copper Accumulation and Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and metalloids into food webs (3-5). The protocols for deter- mining trace metal dynamics quantify unidirectional unidirectional fluxes. However, complicated logistics, handling, and waste issues limit the useofradioisotopestolaboratoriesthathavetrainedhandlers and can maintain permits. In addition to health hazards associated with radioactivity, the lack

39

Quantitative analysis of heavy metals emission during the combustion and baling of polyvinyl chloride insulated copper wire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was conducted and compared to the airborne dust samples collected during the baling process. From these results, occupational exposures to heavy metals during the reclamation of PVC insulated copper wire were assessed. Bulk ash and dust samples were ?aken...

Pickard, David Paul

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Surfactant Organic Molecules Restore Magnetism in Metal-Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surfactant Organic Molecules Restore Magnetism in Metal-Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces Juan Salafranca, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The properties of magnetic nanoparticles tend to be depressed by the unavoidable presence of a magnetically inactive surface layer. However

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High-throughput metal nanoparticle catalysis by pulsed laser ablation Selim Senkan a,*, Michael Kahn a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-throughput metal nanoparticle catalysis by pulsed laser ablation Selim Senkan a,*, Michael online 18 July 2006 Abstract A high-throughput pulsed laser ablation (HT-PLA) system was developed-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, respectively. The supported nanoparticles created by HT

Senkan, Selim M.

42

Thermal contact conductance of metallic coated superconductor/copper interfaces at cryogenic temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the vapor deposition process when using soft metallic coatings so that the maximum allowable enhancement for a specific coating thickness can be obtained. Also, the temperature dependence for the microhardness of copper was ex- perimentally determined...- sate for the difFerence in layer and substrate thermal conductivities. When applied, the model agreed well with the data obtained in this investigation at low coating thick- ness but overpredicted the data, as the thickness increased. In addition...

Ochterbeck, Jay Matthew

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

High-Efficiency 6?? Multicrystalline Black Solar Cells Based on Metal-Nanoparticle-Assisted Chemical Etching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) photovoltaic (PV) solar cells with nanoscale surface texturing by metal-nanoparticle-assisted etching are proposed to achieve high power efficiency. The investigation of average nanorod ...

Hsu, W. Chuck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Single Particle Spectroscopy Study of Metal-Film-Induced Tuning of Silver Nanoparticle Plasmon Resonances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupling between the nanoparticle and the metal film. When the thickness of a thin silica spacer layer and can localize visible radiation to subwavelength dimensions and thus control light-matter interactions

Kik, Pieter

45

An investigation of bulk nanocrystalline copper fabricated via severe plastic deformation and nanoparticle consolidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mechanical anisotropy in UFG wrought copper but we showed that grain morphology has a strong impact and competes with texture and grain refinement in controlling the resulting yield strength. Tension-compression asymmetry was observed in UFG wrought copper...

Haouaoui, Mohammed

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum.

Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R., E-mail: mdeinert@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78715 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO) polymers synthesized by RAFT  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surface modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a collidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as fuctionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

McCormick, III, Charles L. (Hattiesburg, MS); Lowe, Andrew B. (Hattiesburg, MS); Sumerlin, Brent S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

hal-00252040,version1-12Feb2008 Near-field induction heating of metallic nanoparticles due to infrared magnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hal-00252040,version1-12Feb2008 Near-field induction heating of metallic nanoparticles due to infrared magnetic dipole contribution Pierre-Olivier Chapuis, Marine Laroche, Sebastian Volz, and Jean.ecp.fr We revisit the electromagnetic heat transfer between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic semi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

High-Performance, Superparamagnetic, Nanoparticle-Based Heavy Metal Sorbents for Removal of Contaminants from Natural Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle based heavy metal sorbents with various surface chemistries that demonstrate an excellent affinity for the separation of heavy metals in contaminated water systems (i.e. spiked Columbia river water). The magnetic nanoparticle sorbents are prepared from an easy to synthesize iron oxide precursor, followed by a simple, one-step ligand exchange technique to introduce the organic surface functionality of interest chosen to target either specific or broader classes of heavy metals. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles are excellent sorbent materials for the extraction of heavy metal contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. These engineered magnetic nanoparticle sorbents have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g), allowing for increased binding capacity. To demonstrate the potential sorbent performance of each of the surface modified magnetic nanoparticles, river water was spiked with Hg, Pb, Cd, Ag, Co, Cu, and Tl and exposed to low concentrations of the functionalized nanoparticles. The samples were analyzed to determine the metal content before and after exposure to the magnetic nanoparticle sorbents. In almost all cases reported here the nanoparticles were found to be superior to commercially available sorbents binding a wide range of different heavy metals with extremely high affinity. Detailed characterization of the functionalized magnetic nanoparticle sorbents including FT-IR, BET surface analysis, TGA, XPS and VSM as well as the heavy metal removal experiments are presented.

Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Shane; Cinson, Anthony D.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Marvin G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

BIOMONITORING OF HEAVY METAL POLLUTION NEAR COPPER SMELTER IN BOR (SERBIA) USING ACACIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The correlations between sampling sites situated in the close vicinity of copper smelter (Bor, Serbia) based on heavy metal (Pb, Cu, Zn) content in plant parts and soil of acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) were determined. Very strong correlations (R 2>0.9) were observed between the sites Town park and Hospital in the urban-industiral zone due to high air pollution in this sampling area. The performed cluster analysis confirmed these results by grouping the sites with high metal content in plant and soil material of Robinia pseudoacacia into the same clusters. Also, strong correlations were noted between less polluted sampling sites (Bor lake and Brestovac spa) with the control site (Sumrakovac).

Ana A. Ilic; Snezana M. Serbula; Jelena V. Kalinovic; Tanja S. Kalinovic

51

Study on metal nanoparticles induced third-order optical nonlinearity in phenylhydrazone derivatives with DFWM technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third-order nonlinear optical properties of newly synthesized phenylhydrazone derivatives and the influence of noble metal nanoparticles (Ag and Au) on their nonlinear optical responses were investigated by employing Degenerate Four wave Mixing (DFWM) technique with a 7 nanosecond, 10Hz Nd: YAG laser pulses at 532nm. Metal nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation and the particle formation was confirmed using UV-Visible spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The nonlinear optical susceptibility were measured and found to be of the order 10{sup ?13}esu. The results are encouraging and conclude that the materials are promising candidate for future optical device applications.

Sudheesh, P.; Chandrasekharan, K. [Laser and Nonlinear Optics Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Calicut (India); Rao, D. Mallikharjuna [Nano Display Laboratory, School of Nanoscience and Technology, National Institute of Technology Calicut (India)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

Dash, Monika

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Laser interactions with embedded Ca metal nanoparticles in single crystal CaF{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single crystal calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) is an important material for vacuum-ultraviolet optics. Nevertheless, prolonged exposure to energetic radiation can color the material by producing calcium metal nanoparticles. We compare the effectiveness of laser conditioning treatments at wavelengths ranging from the near infrared to the deep ultraviolet in removing this coloration. Treatments at 157, 532, and 1064 nm can significantly reduce the visible coloration due to nanoparticles. In contrast, irradiation at 248 nm has little effect at fluences below the damage threshold for the material employed in this work. We present evidence that the effect of laser irradiation on coloration is principally thermal and is largely confined to the first 50 ns after each laser pulse. We attribute the wavelength dependence of the bleaching process to the wavelength dependence associated with Mie absorption by metal nanoparticles. The consequences of these observations with regard to laser conditioning processes in bulk optical materials are discussed.

Cramer, L.P.; Schubert, B.E.; Petite, P.S.; Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T. [Materials Science Program and Physics Department, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Carrier transfer from InAs quantum dots to ErAs metal nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Erbium arsenide (ErAs) is a semi-metallic material that self-assembles into nanoparticles when grown in GaAs via molecular beam epitaxy. We use steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence to examine the mechanism of carrier transfer between indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots and ErAs nanoparticles in a GaAs host. We probe the electronic structure of the ErAs metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and the optoelectronic properties of the nanocomposite and show that the carrier transfer rates are independent of pump intensity. This result suggests that the ErAs MNPs have a continuous density of states and effectively act as traps. The absence of a temperature dependence tells us that carrier transfer from the InAs quantum dots to ErAs MNPs is not phonon assisted. We show that the measured photoluminescence decay rates are consistent with a carrier tunneling model.

Haughn, C. R.; Chen, E. Y.; Zide, J. M. O.; Doty, M. F., E-mail: doty@udel.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Steenbergen, E. H.; Bissell, L. J.; Eyink, K. G. [AFRL/RXAN, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evolution of the Surface Science of Catalysis from Single Crystals to Metal Nanoparticles under Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum studies of metal single crystal surfaces using electron and molecular beam scattering revealed that the surface atoms relocate when the surface is clean (reconstruction) and when it is covered by adsorbates (adsorbate induced restructuring). It was also discovered that atomic steps and other low coordination surface sites are active for breaking chemical bonds (H-H, O=O, C-H, C=O and C-C) with high reaction probability. Investigations at high reactant pressures using sum frequency generation (SFG)--vibrational spectroscopy and high pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HPSTM) revealed bond breaking at low reaction probability sites on the adsorbate-covered metal surface, and the need for adsorbate mobility for continued turnover. Since most catalysts (heterogeneous, enzyme and homogeneous) are nanoparticles, colloid synthesis methods were developed to produce monodispersed metal nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range and controlled shapes to use them as new model catalyst systems in two-dimensional thin film form or deposited in mesoporous three-dimensional oxides. Studies of reaction selectivity in multipath reactions (hydrogenation of benzene, cyclohexene and crotonaldehyde) showed that reaction selectivity depends on both nanoparticle size and shape. The oxide-metal nanoparticle interface was found to be an important catalytic site because of the hot electron flow induced by exothermic reactions like carbon monoxide oxidation.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ultrastrong Optical Binding of Metallic Nanoparticles Vassili Demergis and Ernst-Ludwig Florin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is limited by heating and radiation damage to the sample, such as with biological material.5,12,13 Focus hasUltrastrong Optical Binding of Metallic Nanoparticles Vassili Demergis and Ernst-Ludwig Florin the optical binding force, which has been assumed to be weak compared to the optical gradient and scattering

Texas at Austin. University of

58

The fate of metal (Fe) during diesel combustion: Morphology, chemistry, and formation pathways of nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an investigation in which we used iron-doped diesel fuel to generate metal-bearing diesel particles and a subsequent analysis of the particles using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). For this study, DPM was generated by a 1.5-L diesel engine and the fuel was doped with ferrocene to enhance the level of iron in the system. The exhaust particles were collected on TEM grids and analyzed using the Philips CM12 TEM/EDS instrument. Results show that when the iron-to-carbon (soot) ratio (Fe/C) in the engine is low, the exhaust particles have morphologies similar to those for the undoped case, but at a threshold Fe/C value of 0.013 (for this engine), homogeneously nucleated metallic nanoparticles are formed and begin agglomerating. The number and size of these nanoparticles increase with level of doping. Metal-bearing particles that span a wider size range are also formed. Agglomeration of metallic and carbon particles is observed in two distinct modes: attachment of iron primary particles (5-10 nm in diameter) to carbon agglomerates, and coagulation of iron agglomerates (20-200 nm in diameter) with carbon agglomerates. Results of this work imply that as new engine technologies reduce soot levels in the engine and/or levels of trace metals in the fuel are increased, the generation of metallic nanoparticles may ensue, creating a potential health concern. (author)

Miller, Art [NIOSH/Spokane Research Lab, Spokane, WA 99208 (United States); Ahlstrand, Gib [College of Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Kittelson, David [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Zachariah, Michael [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles by INS techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this contribution we will present a detailed methodology for the elucidation of the following aspects of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles from high-resolution, low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data: (i) the isochoric heat capacity and entropy of the hydration layers both chemi- and physisorbed to the particle surface; (ii) the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of the nanoparticles. This will include the calculation of the vibrational density of states (VDOS) from the raw INS spectra, and the subsequent extraction of the thermodynamic data from the VDOS. This technique will be described in terms of a worked example namely, cobalt oxide (Co3O4 and CoO). To complement this evaluation of the physical properties of metal oxide nanoparticle systems, we will emphasise the importance of high-resolution, high-energy INS for the determination of the structure and dynamics of the water species, namely molecular (H2O) and dissociated water (OH, hydroxyl), confined to the oxide surfaces. For this component of the chapter we will focus on INS investigations of hydrated isostructural rutile (a-TiO2) and cassiterite (SnO2) nanoparticles. We will complete this discussion of nanoparticle analysis by including an appraisal of the INS instrumentation employed in such studies with particular focus on TOSCA [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), U.K.] and the newly developed spectrometer SEQUOIA [SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), U.S.A].

Spencer, Elinor [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Ross, Dr. Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

agcu metallic nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??This thesis mainly consists of two parts, the synthesis of several kinds of technologically interesting crystalline metal oxide...

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61

Cadmium, copper, and lead in soils and garden produce near a metal smelter at Flin Flon, Manitoba  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Towns in the vicinity of base metal smelters are subject to contamination from atmospheric fallout containing heavy metals. Many smelters have been in operation for decades, and have resulted in substantial accumulation of metals in the surrounding soils. Metal contamination of edible vegetation near mines and smelters has been the source of health concerns in a number of countries. One smelter that has operated for more than half a century is located at Flin Flon, Manitoba. Many Flin Flon residents utilize home vegetable gardens year after year. However little is known regarding heavy metal contamination of locally grown garden produce. Since food can contribute as much as 90% of total body uptake of metals it is important to identify any sources which may account for the disproportionate share. The objective of the present study was to examine concentrations of cadmium, copper and lead in soils and garden produce in the vicinity of the Flin Flon smelter.

Pip, E. (Univ. of Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling metallic nanoparticle synthesis in a magnetron-based nanocluster source by gas condensation of a sputtered vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by inert-gas condensation of a sputtered metallic vapor using a dedicated commercial reactor. By controlling the time of residence of NPs in the carrier gas phase via the tuning of the collision path length, Cu NPs were produced. They exhibit various and well controlled diameters (3-10 nm) and a relatively narrow size dispersion. On the basis of these experimental results, a detailed modeling of NP nucleation and growth based on the classical nucleation theory was developed. It takes into account the peculiar geometry and thermal profile of the NP reactor. The simulated curves, calculated by a MATLAB program developed for that purpose, exhibit a good qualitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, they highlight the role of process parameters and the strong influence of the reactor temperature profile on the NP size distribution. In the future, such calculations could be used for the optimization of the NP source design in order to increase its efficiency and reproducibility.

Quesnel, E; Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Muffato, V [CEA-G/DRT/LITEN/DTNM, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal conductivity studies of novel nanofluids based on metallic silver decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Metallic silver was decorated in mSiO{sub 2} with grafted hemiaminal functional groups. Synthesized nanoparticles were used for preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. The effect of temperature, weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} and concentration of silver nanoparticles on thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated. - Abstract: In the present study, the mesoporous structure of silica (mSiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles as well as hemiaminal grafted mSiO{sub 2} decorated by metallic silver (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) has been used for the preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. Structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized products have been carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UVvis spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption isotherms. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluids have been measured as a function of temperature for various weight fractions and silver concentrations of mSiO{sub 2} and Ag/mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids increase up to 9.24% as the weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} increases up to 4 wt%. Also, increasing the percent of the silver decorated mSiO{sub 2} (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) up to 2.98% caused an enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid up to 10.95%. Furthermore, the results show that the nanofluids have Newtonian behavior in the tested temperature range for various concentrations of nanoparticles.

Tadjarodi, Azadeh, E-mail: tajarodi@iust.ac.ir [Research Laboratory of Inorganic Materials Synthesis, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabihi, Fatemeh [Research Laboratory of Inorganic Materials Synthesis, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory, National Center for Laser Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION M. LAMAND Claudine LAB R of insoluble and non ionized form of injected copper has been shown in a previous paper (Lamand, 1978 it appeared that copper oxide was preferable to metallic copper, being slightly less caustic. Inflammation

Boyer, Edmond

66

Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Linker-Induced Anomalous Emission of Organic-Molecule Conjugated Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semiconductor nanoparticles conjugated with organic- and dye-molecules to yield high efficiency visible photoluminescence (PL) hold great potential for many future technological applications. We show that folic acid (FA)-conjugated to nanosize TiO2 and CeO2 particles demonstrates a dramatic increase of photoemission intensity at wavelengths between 500 and 700 nm when derivatized using aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) as spacer-linker molecules between the metal oxide and FA. Using density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations we demonstrate that the strong increase of the PL can be explained by electronic transitions between the titania surface oxygen vacancy (OV) states and the low-energy excited states of the FA/APTMS molecule anchored onto the surface oxygen bridge sites in close proximity to the OVs. We suggest this scenario to be a universal feature for a wide class of metal oxide nanoparticles, including nanoceria, possessing a similar band gap (3 eV) and with a large surface-vacancy-related density of electronic states. We demonstrate that the molecule-nanoparticle linker can play a crucial role in tuning the electronic and optical properties of nanosystems by bringing optically active parts of the molecule and of the surface close to each other.

Turkowski, Volodymyr; Babu, Suresh; Le, Duy; Kumar, Amit; Haldar, Manas K.; Wagh, Anil V.; Hu, Zhongjian; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Gesquiere, Andre J.; Law, Benedict; Mallik, Sanku; Rahman, Talat S.; Leuenberger, Michael N.; Seal, Sudipta

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

Supercapacitors Based on Metal Electrodes Prepared from Nanoparticle Mixtures at Room Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Films comprising Au and Ag nanoparticles are transformed into porous metal electrodes by desorption of weak organic ligands followed by wet chemical etching of silver. Thus prepared electrodes provide the basis for supercapacitors whose specific capacitances approach 70 F/g. Cyclic voltammetry measurement yield rectangular I?V curves even at high scan rates, indicating that the supercapacitors have low internal resistance. Owing to this property, the supercapacitors have a high power density ?12 kW/kg, comparable with that of the state-of-the-art carbon-based devices. The entire assembly protocol does not require high-temperature processing or the use of organic binders.

Nakanishi, Hideyuki [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Grzybowski, Bartosz A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The distribution of copper, manganese, zinc, and iron in antarctic waters and the relation of the concentrations of these metals to biological primary productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER, MANGANESE, ZINC, AND IRON IN ANTARCTIC WATERS AND THE RELATION OF THE CONCENTRATIONS OF THESE METALS TO BIOLOGICAL PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis By MARTIN EDWARD ARHELGER Submitted to the Graduate College... of the Texas A& 1 University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August I967 Major Subj ect: CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY THE DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER, MANGANESE, ZINC, AND IRON IN ANTARCTIC WATERS AND THE RELATION...

Arhelger, Martin Edward

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Simultaneous deposition of Ni nanoparticles and wires on a tubular halloysite template: A novel metallized ceramic microstructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tubular halloysite can be used as a template to fabricate a novel metallized ceramic microstructure through electroless plating. Reduction of Pd ions by methanol is conducted to initiate Ni plating. There is a simultaneous deposition of Ni nanoparticles on the outer surface and discontinuous wires in the lumen site of the halloysite template obtained. The different deposition could be caused by the different composition distribution of ferric oxide impurity in the wall due to the isomorphic substitution during the formation of halloysite template. Its magnetic property is mainly attributed to the Ni nanoparticles, not the wires. The metallized ceramic microstructure has the potential to be utilized as a novel magnetic material.

Fu Yubin [Institute of Solid State Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China) and Luoyang Ship Material Research Institute, Luoyang 471039 (China)]. E-mail: ffyybb725@vip.sina.com; Zhang Lide [Institute of Solid State Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Strengthening porous metal skeletons by metal deposition from a nanoparticle dispersion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The accuracy of solid freeform fabrication processes such as three-dimensional printing (3DP) and selective laser sintering (SLS) must be improved for them to achieve wide application in direct production of metal parts. ...

Crane, Nathan B., 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Design of Optical Metamaterial Mirror with Metallic Nanoparticles for Broadband Light Absorption in Graphene Optoelectronic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general metallic mirror (i.e., a flat metallic surface) has been a popular optical component that can contribute broadband light absorption to thin-film optoelectronic devices; nonetheless, such electric mirror with a reversal of reflection phase inevitably causes the problem of minimized electric field near at the mirror surface (maximized electric field at one quarter of wavelength from mirror). This problem becomes more elucidated, when the deep-subwavelength-scaled two-dimensional (2D) material (e.g., graphene and molybdenum disulfide) is implemented into optoelectronic device as an active channel layer. The purpose of this work was to conceive the idea for using a charge storage layer (spherical Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), embedded into dielectric matrix) of the floating-gate graphene photodetector as a magnetic mirror, which allows the device to harness the increase in broadband light absorption. In particular, we systematically examined whether the versatile assembly of spherical AuNP monolayer within ...

Lee, Seungwoo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Surface effects and phase stability in metal oxides nanoparticles under visible irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light induced phase transformation between stable phases of metal oxides nanoparticles is analyzed. The surrounding atmosphere as well as the defect density at the surface play a fundamental role. It has been found that in oxygen poor chamber atmosphere the phase transformation is favored, while the phase transition cannot be achieved if the defects at the surface are properly passivated. The phase transition is activated by intragap irradiation, able to activate the F- center at the surface connected to oxygen vacancies, and promoting the activation of the surface and the nucleation of neighboring crystallites. The phase transition was studied in Titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and in Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}): Maghemite is subjected to a phase transformation to ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite), Anatase nanoparticles converts to Rutile. The general mechanism of the phase transition and, more in general, the possibility to optically control the surface activity of metal oxides is discussed.

Ricci, Pier Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it; Carbonaro, C. M., E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it; Corpino, R., E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it; Chiriu, D., E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it; Stagi, L., E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit degli Studi di Cagliari, S.P. Monserrato-Sestu Km 0,700, 09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give form to theBatteries. |

78

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give form to theBatteries. |Formation

79

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give form to theBatteries.

80

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give form to theBatteries.Formation of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give form to theBatteries.Formation

82

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: SincePlant Name: (MM)) (YYYY) Plant

83

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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84

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: SincePlant Name: (MM)) (YYYY)

85

Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: SincePlant Name: (MM)) (YYYY)Formation of

86

Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a doped oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the doped oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The doped metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.18/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at a temperature of 25.degree. C. The optical response of the doped oxide materials results from the high carrier concentration of the doped metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration. These changes in effective carrier densities of conducting metal oxide nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary doped metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Electronically conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a conducting oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the conducting oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The conducting metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.17/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.-1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at the gas stream temperature. The optical response of the conducting oxide materials is proposed to result from the high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity of the conducting metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity. These changes in effective carrier densities and electronic conductivity of conducting metal oxide films and nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary conducting metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Deproto-metallation using mixed lithium-zinc and lithium-copper bases and computed CH acidity of 2-substituted quinolines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deproto-metallation using mixed lithium-zinc and lithium-copper bases and computed CH acidity of 2 corresponding iodo derivatives or 2-chlorophenyl ketones using the lithium-zinc or the lithium using the lithium-zinc base. With 3-pyridyl, 2-furyl and 2-thienyl substituents, the reaction took place

Boyer, Edmond

89

Electrodepositionof Metal Alloyand Mixed Oxide Films Usinga Single-PrecursorTetranuclearCopper-NickelComplex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compositionally uniform mixed metals, metal oxides, and alloys are used extensively as corrosion protective and catalysts. I-~For example, nickel-containing oxides and alloys are used for oxidative protection of very. Although Cu-Ni alloy deposition has been stud- ied for many years, none of the previous approaches has led

Kounaves, Samuel P.

90

Investigation of the ligand shells of homo-ligand and mixed-ligand monolayer protected metal nanoparticles : a scanning tunneling microscopy study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monolayer Protected Metal Nanoparticles have recently found widespread use in and are the focus of intensive study in many areas of scientific research ranging from biology to physics to medicine. Consisting of a nanoscale, ...

Jackson, Alicia M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Double-strand DNA-templated formation of copper nanoparticles as fluorescent probe for label free nuclease enzyme detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cleavage activity. Thus, a label-free strategy for sensitive detection of nuclease has been developed B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction As promising substitutes for organic dyes and quantum dots epithelial cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) using fluorescent gold nanoparticles which emitted a stable

Tan, Weihong

92

Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha, E-mail: abha@isu.iisc.ernet.in [Departments of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)] [Departments of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Ramamurty, Upadrasta [Departments of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India) [Departments of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

Appy, David [Ames Laboratory; Lei, Huaping [Ames Laboratory; Han, Yong [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Tringides, Michael C [Ames Laboratory; Shao, Dahai [Ames Laboratory; Kwolek, Emma J [Iowa State University; Evans, J W [Ames Laboratory; Thiel, P A [Ames Laboratory

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

In Situ Studies of the Active Sites for the Water Gas Shift Reaction over Cu-CeO2 Catalysts: Complex Interaction Between Metallic Copper and Oxygen Vacancies of Ceria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New information about the active sites for the water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Cu-CeO{sub 2} systems was obtained using in-situ, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TR-XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS, Cu K and Ce L3 edges), and infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Cu-CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by a novel reversed microemulsion method (doped Ce1-xCuxO2 sample) and an impregnation method (impregnated CuO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} sample) were studied. The results from all of the samples indicate that both metallic copper and oxygen vacancies in ceria were involved in the generation of active sites for the WGS reaction. Evidence was found for a synergistic Cu-O vacancy interaction. This interaction enhances the chemical activity of Cu, and the presence of Cu facilitates the formation of O vacancies in ceria under reaction conditions. Water dissociation occurred on the O vacancy sites or the Cu-O vacancy interface. No significant amounts of formate were formed on the catalysts during the WGS reaction. The presence of strongly bound carbonates is an important factor for the deactivation of the catalysts at high temperatures. This work identifies for the first time the active sites for the WGS reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts and illustrates the importance of in situ structural studies for heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Uniformly Embedded Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Forests as Pseudocapacitor Electrodes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications. A vacuum-assisted, in situ electrodeposition process has been used to achieve the three-dimensional functionalization of CNT forests with inserted nickel nanoparticles as pseudocapacitor electrodes. Experimental CNT forest samples, and the oxidized nickel nanoparticle/CNT supercapacitor retained 94.2% of its

Lin, Liwei

96

Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha, E-mail: s.kulkarni@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Sarkar, Indranil [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Shirolkar, Mandar M. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Science Park, Hsinchu 3007-6, Taiwan (China)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Converting Homogeneous to Heterogeneous in Electrophilic Catalysis using Monodisperse Metal Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A continuing goal in catalysis is the transformation of processes from homogeneous to heterogeneous. To this end, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in heterogeneous catalysis, where this conversion is supplemented by the ability to obtain new or divergent reactivity and selectivity. We report a novel method for applying heterogeneous catalysts to known homogeneous catalytic reactions through the design and synthesis of electrophilic platinum nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are selectively oxidized by the hypervalent iodine species PhICl{sub 2}, and catalyze a range of {pi}-bond activation reactions previously only homogeneously catalyzed. Multiple experimental methods are utilized to unambiguously verify the heterogeneity of the catalytic process. The discovery of treatments for nanoparticles that induce the desired homogeneous catalytic activity should lead to the further development of reactions previously inaccessible in heterogeneous catalysis. Furthermore, our size and capping agent study revealed that Pt PAMAM dendrimer-capped nanoparticles demonstrate superior activity and recyclability compared to larger, polymer-capped analogues.

Witham, Cole A.; Huang, Wenyu; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Toste, F. Dean

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

Strasser, Peter (Houston, TX); Koh, Shirlaine (Houston, TX); Mani, Prasanna (Houston, TX); Ratndeep, Srivastava (Houston, TX)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of a copper filler metal on the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welded titanium-stainless steel joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking in an electron beam weld of titanium to stainless steel occurred during the cooling process because of internal thermal stress. Using a copper filler metal, a crack free joint was obtained, which had a tensile strength of 310 MPa. To determine the reasons for cracking in the Ti/Fe joint and the function of the copper filler metal on the improvement of the cracking resistance of the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, the microstructures of the joints were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The cracking susceptibilities of the joints were evaluated with microhardness tests on the cross-sections. In addition, microindentation tests were used to compare the brittleness of the intermetallics in the welds. The results showed that the Ti/Fe joint was characterized by continuously distributed brittle intermetallics such as TiFe and TiFe(Cr){sub 2} with high hardness ({approx} 1200 HV). For the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, most of the weld consisted of a soft solid solution of copper with dispersed TiFe intermetallics. The transition region between the weld and the titanium alloy was made up of a relatively soft Ti-Cu intermetallic layer with a lower hardness ({approx} 500 HV). The formation of soft phases reduced the cracking susceptibility of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Fe joint cracked for the brittleness and residual stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Cu/Fe joint with tensile strength of 310 MPa was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu diluted Ti and Fe contents in weld and separated the TiFe{sub 2} into individual blocks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial hard Ti-Fe compounds were replaced by soft Ti-Cu compounds in the weld. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of solid solution of copper formed in the weld.

Wang, Ting, E-mail: fgwangting@163.com [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); Zhang, Binggang, E-mail: zhang_bg@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Feng, Jicai, E-mail: fengjc@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China) [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Tang, Qi, E-mail: tangqi@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microwave-assisted synthesis and photovoltaic measurements of CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by using metalorganic precursors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared using complexes via a microwave-assisted method. ? The effect of preparation parameters on the morphology of CuInS{sub 2} was investigated. ? The as-deposited CdS/CuInS{sub 2} films were used for the photovoltaic measurements. -- Abstract: In this work, CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles have been synthesized with the aid of (1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctan)copper(II) sulfate ([Cu(DADO)]SO{sub 4}) and bis(propylenediamine)copper(II) sulfate ([Cu(pn){sub 2}]SO{sub 4}) complexes as copper precursor in the presence of microwave irradiation. Besides, L-cystine, InCl{sub 3}, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were applied as sulfur source, indium precursor, and capping agent, respectively. To investigate the effect of preparation parameters like microwave power and irradiation time on the morphology and particle size of CuInS{sub 2}, the experiment was carried out at different conditions. The as-synthesized CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, PL, SEM, TEM, and EDS. The XRD results showed that pure tetragonal CuInS{sub 2} could be only obtained after annealing at 400 C for 2 h. The SEM images indicated that with decreasing the microwave power and irradiation time, particle size of CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles decreased. To fabricate a solar cell, CdS film was directly deposited on top of the CIS film prepared by Doctor's blade method through chemical bath deposition. The as-deposited CdS/CuInS{sub 2} films were used for the photovoltaic measurements.

Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India)] [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Venkateswara-Rao, K. [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India)] [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mssbauer study of metallic iron and iron oxide nanoparticles having environmental purifying ability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A relationship between local structure and methylene blue (MB) decomposing ability of nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic iron (Fe{sup 0}) and maghemite (??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy. ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were successfully prepared by mixing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}?6H{sub 2}O (Mohr's salt) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}?3H{sub 2}O aqueous solution at 30 C for 1 h, while those of Fe{sup 0} were obtained by the reduction of Mohr's salt with NaBH{sub 4}. From the Scherrer's equation, the smallest crystallite sizes of ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs and Fe{sup 0} NPs were determined to be 9.7 and 1.5 nm, respectively. {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectrum of ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs consists of a relaxed sextet with isomer shift (?) of 0.33{sub 0.01} mm s{sup ?1}, internal magnetic field (H{sub int}) of 25.8{sub 0.5} T, and linewidth (?) of 0.62{sub 0.04} mm s{sup ?1}. {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectrum of Fe{sup 0} NP is mainly composed of a sextet having ?, ?, and H{sub int} of 0.00{sub 0.01} mm s{sup ?1} 0.45{sub 0.01} mm s{sup ?1}, and 22.8{sub 0.1} T, respectively. A bleaching test of the mixture of Fe{sup 0} and ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (3:7 ratio, 100 mg) in MB aqueous solution (20 mL) for 6 h showed a remarkable decrease of MB concentration with the first-order rate constant (k{sub MB}) of 6.7 10{sup ?1} h{sup ?1}. This value is larger than that obtained for the bleaching test using bulk Fe{sup 0}+??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (3:7) mixture (k{sub MB}?=?6.510{sup ?3}h{sup ?1}). These results prove that MB decomposing ability is enhanced by the NPs mixture of Fe{sub 0} and ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Watanabe, Yuka, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Akiyama, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Risti?, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ru?er Bokovi? Institute, P. O. Box 180, Zagreb 10002 (Croatia); Homonnay, Zoltn; Kuzmann, Ern? [Institute of Chemistry, Etvs Lornd University, P.O. Box 32, 1512 Budapest (Hungary); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

103

Reliability of copper interconnects in integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As dimensions shrink and current densities increase, the reliability of metal interconnects becomes a serious concern. In copper interconnects, the dominant diffusion path is along the interface between the copper and the ...

Choi, Zung-Sun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Copper studies for alternative salt disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine, as functions of total copper loading and iron REDOX in glass, any dependence of the leaching behavior of borosilicate glass on metallic copper.

Brown, K.G.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Metallic nanoparticles grown in the core of femtosecond laser micromachined waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3D-waveguides containing silver nanoparticles have been fabricated in tungsten leadpyrophosphate glass by femtosecond laser micromachining. Nucleation and growth of nanoparticles occur in a single step process when high repetition rate laser (MHz) is employed, while an additional annealing is required for the irradiation using kHz laser system. The presence of nanoparticles locally changes the refractive index, and, therefore, the elliptical structures produced by direct laser writing were able to guide light. By increasing the pulse energy applied during the micromachining, the waveguide size increased from 2 to 30??m, while their propagation loss decrease from 1.4 to 0.5?dB/mm at 632.8?nm.

Almeida, J. M. P.; Ferreira, P. H. D.; Mendona, C. R., E-mail: crmendon@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Fsica de So Carlos, Universidade de So PauloUSP, CP 369, So Carlos, Sao Paulo 13560-970 Brazil (Brazil); Manzani, D.; Napoli, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L. [Institute of ChemistrySo Paulo State UniversityUNESP, CP 355, Araraquara, Sao Paulo 14801-970 (Brazil)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO); Davis, John W. (Ballwin, MO)

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Controlled, Defect-Guided, Metal-Nanoparticle Incorporation onto MoS2 via Chemical and Microwave Routes: Electrical, Thermal, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

show that MoS2 can be applied effectively in sensing,6,7 energy harvesting,8 and photoelectronicControlled, Defect-Guided, Metal-Nanoparticle Incorporation onto MoS2 via Chemical and Microwave via both diffusion limited aggregation and instantaneous reaction arresting (using microwaves

Berry, Vikas

108

Enhancing H[subscript 2] Uptake by 'Close-Packing' Alignment of Open Copper Sites in Metal-Organic Frameworks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inspired by close-packing of spheres, to strengthen the framework-H{sub 2} interaction in MOFs (metal-organic frameworks), a strategy is devised to increase the number of nearest neighboring open metal sites ofe ach H{sub 2}-hosting cage, and to align the open metal sites toward the H{sub 2} molecules. Two MOF polymorphs were made, one exhibiting a record high hydrogen uptake of 3.0 wt% at 1 bar and 77 k.

Wang, Xi-Sen; Ma, Shengqian; Forster, Paul M.; Yuan, Daqiang; Eckert, Juergen; Lpez, Joseph J.; Murphy, Brandon J.; Parise, John B.; Zhou, Hong-Cai (TAM); (SBU); (UCSB)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electrospun carbon nanofiber electrodes decorated with palladium metal nanoparticles : fabrication and characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method was investigated to produce a novel oxygen reduction electrode comprised of carbon nanofibers for use in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells and metal-air batteries. The process involved electrospinning ...

Kurpiewski, John Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Copper-free click chemistry as an emerging tool for the programmed ligation of DNA-functionalised gold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper-free click chemistry as an emerging tool for the programmed ligation of DNA-modified gold nanoparticles using copper-free click chemistry. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with a discrete of the copper-free, `click-ligation' method allows for its universal applicability and opens up new avenues

Zheludev, Nikolay

111

A Heavy Metal Atmospheric Deposition Study Around the Lead and Copper-Zinc Smelters in Baia Mare, Romania, Employing the Moss Biomonitoring Technique, ENAA and FAAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mosses Pleurozium schreberi, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus were used as biomonitors to study the atmospheric deposition of metals around the lead and copper-zinc smelters in Baia Mare. Samples representing the last three years' growth of moss or its green part, collected on the ground at 28 sites located 2-20 km from the source area, were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) and by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). A total of 30 elements were determined, including most of the heavy metals known to be released into the air from this kind of industry. Obtained concentrations for As and Cu are comparable with those observed in Karabash, South Ural Mountains, one of the most polluted regions in Europe. Besides, these two elements correlate very well with each other. The mean values for Zn (136 ppm) and Pb (41 ppm) are substantially higher than those normally found in the literature. The highest value for Pb (175 ppm) was obs...

Culicov, O A; Steinnes, E; Okina, O S; Santa, Z; Todoran, R

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Experimental and Computational Evidence of MetalO2 Activation and Rate-Limiting Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Copper Amine Oxidase Yi Liu, Arnab Mukherjee, Nadav Nahumi, Mehmet Ozbil,§ Doreen 33146, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The mechanism of O2 reduction by copper amine of copper amine oxidases, O2 reduction to H2O2 is physiologically significant,17 serving diverse functions

Roth, Justine P.

113

Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO)

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

Electroless copper plating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optimized electroless copper plating technique suitable for plating electroless copper upon ceramics.

McHenry, Michael R. (Lee's Summit, MO)

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

Nenoff, Tina M. (Sandia Park, NM); Powers, Dana A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zhang, Zhenyuan (Durham, NC)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bell beaker copper use in central Europe: a distinctive tradition? A re-evaluation of the composition of copper artefacts and its effects on the properties of the metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the manufacture of copper artefacts by the users of Bell Beaker pottery in the Eastern Bell Beaker group in central Europe, and addresses the question: did these metalworkers have distinct ...

Merkl, Matthias Bernd

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

Waldrop, Forrest B. (Powell, TN); Jones, Edward (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Use of the Extraordinary Infrared Transmission of Metallic Subwavelength Arrays To Study the Catalyzed Reaction of Methanol to Formaldehyde on Copper Oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scattered out of an incident beam. Commercial nickel mesh has been coated with copper to reduce the hole of IR photons by surface molecular species. Very uniform electrodeposits of copper are applied to the finest commercially available, biperiodic nickel mesh in order to narrow the transmission resonances

123

Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of copper-rich precipitates in silicon: Chemical state, gettering, and impact on multicrystalline silicon solar cell material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermodynamic considerations that unlike certain metal species, copper tends to form a silicide pathways. In all samples, copper silicide Cu3Si is the only phase of copper identified. It is noted from

125

Copper clusters built on bulky amidinate ligands: spin delocalization via superexchange rather than direct metalmetal bonding{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper clusters built on bulky amidinate ligands: spin delocalization via superexchange rather than metal­metal interaction is a prerequisite for spin delocalization in copper dimers that lack single tetra- and dicopper amidinate complexes. A copper(I) dimer having two- coordinate metal centers

Baik, Mu-Hyun

126

Perovskite Sr0.95Ce0.05CoO3d loaded with copper nanoparticles as a bifunctional catalyst for lithium-air batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for lithium-air batteries Wei Yang,ab Jason Salim,c Shuai Li,ab Chunwen Sun,*ab Liquan Chen,ab John B could be used in a metal/air battery or a PEM fuel cell as an efficient and stable bifunctional catalyst electrolyte. More challenging is the requirement for the Li/air rechargeable battery, viz. an inexpensive

127

METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Initiation of electroless nickel plating on copper, palladium-activated copper, gold, and platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The catalytic activity of copper, palladium-activated copper, gold, and platinum for electro-oxidation of hypophosphite and electroless nickel plating was investigated in an ammoniacal solution of pH 8.8 at 50/sup 0/C by potential measurements and linear sweep voltammetry from -0.3 to -0.92V vs. SCE. Early stages of nickel plating on copper-palladium substrates were studied by scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with EDAX. It was found that palladium-activated copper and gold were catalytically active in the entire range of potentials examined; copper was active below -0.6 platinum was not active at all. Small amounts of electrolytically deposited nickel considerably increased the electro-oxidation rate of hypophosphite on copper, gold, and palladium. TEM examinations showed that activation of copper in a PdCl/sub 2//HCl solution resulted in the deposition of palladium in the form of separate patches. Electroless nickel deposition on copper substrates with separate palladium spots took place on copper and palladium independently of each other. The deposition on palladium was faster than that on copper. It was concluded that the activation of copper substrates around palladium spots occurred solely through a spontaneous potential shift, induced by electro-oxidation of hypophosphite on the palladium spots. It was suggested that small amounts of one metal synergistically enhanced the catalytic activity of the other metals.

Flis, J.; Duquette, D.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electroless copper plating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optimized electroless copper plating technique is described suitable for plating electroless copper upon ceramics. 12 figs.

McHenry, M.R.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Effect of a heavy metal on ecto- and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: The physiology, ultrastructure, and ecology of copper stress and tolerance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first chapter examines the enzyme tyrosinase in several ectomycorrhizal fungi and shows that its activity is altered in these fungi in response to copper. Polyamines are also examined, and it is shown that their levels are altered in some ectomycorrhizal fungi due to copper stress but not in others. The second chapter uses transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that copper is bound to the hyphae of ectomycorrhizal fungi grown on solid media, but the location of the binding varies between fungal species. In vitro copper tolerances of a number of ectomycorrhizal species are compared and differences in tolerance are evident between species and between different isolates of the same species. In the third chapter, four ectomycorrhizal fungi and one nonmycorrhizal fungus are evaluated for their ability to improve the growth of Japanese Red Pine under conditions of copper stress. Improvement of pine seedling growth is not correlated with in vitro copper tolerance of the fungus, but is related to the degree of compatibility between host and fungus. Despite differences in in vitro tolerance between three isolates of the same species, there are no differences in the effect of the isolates on the tree host under conditions of copper stress. Ectomycorrhizal fungi were also inoculated in pairs on pine seedlings and the competitive abilities of the fungi are compared under stressed and nonstressed conditions. The fourth chapter discusses the results of inoculation of pine with a nonhost fungus which stimulates dichotomous branching of the root system. The compound responsible for the branching is demonstrated to be indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a plant growth hormone. The final two chapters deal with endomycorrhizal fungi.

Gruhn, C.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Copper Stress Causes an in Vivo Requirement for the Escherichia coli Disulfide Isomerase DsbC*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper Stress Causes an in Vivo Requirement for the Escherichia coli Disulfide Isomerase Dsb an increased sensitiv- ity to the redox-active metal copper. We find that copper catalyzes periplasmic disulfide bond formation under aerobic conditions and that copper catalyzes the formation of disulfide

Bardwell, James

132

Copper fertilization in citrus seedlings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field (Boaventura, 2003). Copper deficiency is frequent inThe major association of copper with organic matter is instable complexes with copper. In citrus seedlings, copper

Almeida, Tatiana Rezende Pires; Leonel, Sarita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Analytical modeling of localized surface plasmon resonance in heterostructure copper sulfide nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor nanocrystals is a relatively new field of investigation that promises greater tunability of plasmonic properties compared to metal nanoparticles. A novel process by which the LSPR in semiconductor nanocrystals can be altered is through heterostructure formation arising from solution-based cation exchange. Herein, we describe the development of an analytical model of LSPR in heterostructure copper sulfide-zinc sulfide nanocrystals synthesized via a cation exchange reaction between copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.81}S) nanocrystals and Zn ions. The cation exchange reaction produces dual-interface, heterostructure nanocrystals in which the geometry of the copper sulfide phase can be tuned from a sphere to a thin disk separating symmetrically-grown sulfide (ZnS) grains. Drude model electronic conduction and Mie-Gans theory are applied to describe how the LSPR wavelength changes during cation exchange, taking into account the morphology evolution and changes to the local permittivity. The results of the modeling indicate that the presence of the ZnS grains has a significant effect on the out-of-plane LSPR mode. By comparing the results of the model to previous studies on solid-solid phase transformations of copper sulfide in these nanocrystals during cation exchange, we show that the carrier concentration is independent of the copper vacancy concentration dictated by its atomic phase. The evolution of the effective carrier concentration calculated from the model suggests that the out-of-plane resonance mode is dominant. The classical model was compared to a simplified quantum mechanical model which suggested that quantum mechanical effects become significant when the characteristic size is less than ?8 nm. Overall, we find that the analytical models are not accurate for these heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals, indicating the need for new model development for this emerging field.

Caldwell, Andrew H.; Ha, Don-Hyung; Robinson, Richard D., E-mail: rdr82@cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ding, Xiaoyue [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

nanoparticles | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles nanoparticles Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

136

Electrochromism in copper oxide thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent thin films of copper(I) oxide prepared on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by anodic oxidation of sputtered copper films or by direct electrodeposition of Cu2O transformed reversibly to opaque metallic copper films when reduced in alkaline electrolyte. In addition, the same Cu2O films transform reversibly to black copper(II) oxide when cycled at more anodic potentials. Copper oxide-to-copper switching covered a large dynamic range, from 85% and 10% photopic transmittance, with a coloration efficiency of about 32 cm2/C. Gradual deterioration of the switching range occurred over 20 to 100 cycles. This is tentatively ascribed to coarsening of the film and contact degradation caused by the 65% volume change on conversion of Cu to Cu2O. Switching between the two copper oxides (which have similar volumes) was more stable and more efficient (CE = 60 cm2/C), but covered a smaller transmittance range (60% to 44% T). Due to their large electrochemical storage capacity and tolerance for alkaline electrolytes, these cathodically coloring films may be useful as counter electrodes for anodically coloring electrode films such as nickel oxide or metal hydrides.

Richardson, T.J.; Slack, J.L.; Rubin, M.D.

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 18, NO. 2, MAY 2005 297 Dishing-Radius Model of Copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Copper CMP Dishing Effects Runzi Chang, Member, IEEE, and Costas J. Spanos, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Copper, a metric that assumes cylin- drically shaped post-CMP copper surface and directly captures the extent the interlayer dielectric (ILD) and metal surface. It has been the enabling technology for the copper damascene

California at Berkeley, University of

138

Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-Ceria Systems for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction: In Situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeO{sub x} nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

Barrio, L.; Estrella, M; Zhou, G; Wen, W; Hanson, J; Hungria, A; Hornes, A; Fernandez-Garcia, M; Martinez-Arias, A; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-ceria Systems for the Water Gas Shift Reaction: In-situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeOx nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Barrio, L.; Estrella, M.; Zhou, G.; Wen, W.; Hanson, J.C.; Hungra, A.B.; Horns, A.; Fernndez-Garca, M.; Arturo Martnez-Arias, A.

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

140

EFFECTS OF CHRONIC COPPER EXPOSURE ON DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL IN THE SOUTHERN LEOPARD FROG (LITHOBATES [RANA] SPHENOCEPHALUS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF CHRONIC COPPER EXPOSURE ON DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL IN THE SOUTHERN LEOPARD FROG, substantially less is known concerning the potential effects of metals on amphibian populations. Copper (Cu;31:1587­1594. # 2012 SETAC Keywords--Lithobates (Rana) sphenocephalus Copper Amphibian Ecotoxicology Metal toxicity

Georgia, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute copper toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with additional metals analyses. Because copper concentrations were within the range toxic to bivalves and sample... -six hour acute toxicity tests were conducted using...

142

Scalable production of microbially-mediated ZnS nanoparticles and application to functional thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of semiconducting zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles were scalably, reproducibly, controllably, and economically synthesized with anaerobic metal-reducing Thermoanaerobacter species. They reduced partially oxidized sulfur sources to sulfides that extracellularly and thermodynamically incorporated with zinc ions to produce sparingly soluble ZnS nanoparticles with ~5 nm crystallites at yields of ~5 g l 1 month 1. A predominant sphalerite formation was facilitated by rapid precipitation kinetics, low cation/anion ratio, higher zinc concentration, water stabilization, or some combination of the four. The sphalerite ZnS nanoparticles exhibited narrow size distribution, high emission intensity, and few native defects. Scale-up and emission tunability using copper-doping were confirmed spectroscopically. Surface characterization was determined using Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, which confirmed amine and carboxylic acid not only maintaining a nano-dimensional average crystallite size, but also increasing aggregation. Application of ZnS nanoparticle ink to a functional thin film was successfully tested for potential future applications.

Moon, Ji Won [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Joshi, Pooran C [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Jung, Hyunsung [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Jang, Gyoung Gug [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal...

144

Magnesium and Copper (II) Chloride: A Curious Redox Reaction .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The focus of this research is to follow the oxidation-reduction reaction of solid magnesium metal and an aqueous solution of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2), both (more)

Mannard, Moira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electron beam skull melting and refining of secondary copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron Beam Melting is the most efficient technology for metals and alloys refining. For secondary metals processing the Electron Beam Skull Melting (EBSM) with the electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of melt in the crucible was shown to be the most appropriate. The copper produced by EBSM with EMS possesses higher density and electric conductivity in comparison with other refining methods. The details for high power electrical machines were cast of the copper waste refined by EBSM technology.

Bychkov, Y.; Ladokhin, S. [Donetskvtortsvetmet, Donetsk (Ukraine)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prevalent approach to developing new nanomaterials is a trial-and-error process of iteratively altering synthesis procedures and then characterizing the resulting nanostructures. This is fundamentally limited in that the growth processes that occur during synthesis can be inferred only from the final synthetic structure. Directly observing real-time nanomaterial growth provides unprecedented insight into the relationship between synthesis conditions and product evolution and facilitates a mechanistic approach to nanomaterial development. Here, we use in situ liquid-stage scanning transmission electron microscopy to observe the growth of mesoporous palladium in a solvated block copolymer (BCP) template under various synthesis conditions, and we ultimately determined a refined synthesis procedure that yields extended structures with ordered pores. We found that after sufficient drying time of the casting solvent (tetrahydrofuran, THF), the BCP assembles into a rigid, cylindrical micelle array with a high degree of short-range order but poor long-range order. Upon slowing the THF evaporation rate using a solvent-vapor anneal step, the long-range order was greatly improved. The electron beam induces nucleation of small particles in the aqueous phase around the micelles. The small particles then flocculate and grow into denser structures that surround, but do not overgrow, the micelles, forming an ordered mesoporous structure. The microscope observations revealed that pore disorder can be addressed prior to metal reduction and is not invariably induced by the Pd growth process itself, allowing for more rapid optimization of the synthetic method.

Parent, Lucas R.; Robinson, David B.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Hartnett, Ryan J.; Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Arslan, Ilke

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

amorphous silica nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arrays of metal nanoparticles hold great promise for many applications.1 The successful synthesis Kim, Sehun 6 PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 144303 (2014) Thermal conductivity...

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic transition metals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

liquids, chlorates, nitrites, sulfur, finely... hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium Chlorates Ammonium salts, acids, powdered metals... , copper,...

149

Effects of copper deposition on boiler waterside surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative importance of metal oxide corrosion products in waterside deposits, as opposed to traditional scale-forming constituents, is discussed, and the sources of copper and copper oxide boiler deposits are reviewed. Also reviewed are explanations of some of the problems associated with the presence of deposits and especially, copper-containing deposits. These include those due to a reduction in heat transfer and tube metal overheating, as well as various corrosion mechanisms. Case histories, which illustrate certain deleterious mechanisms due to the presence of such deposition, are also presented.

Wangerin, M.C.; Rondum, K.D. [Ashland Chemical Co., Boonton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Preliminary Characterisation of Low-Temperature Bonded Copper Interconnects for 3-D Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three dimensional (3-D) integrated circuits can be fabricated by bonding previously processed device layers using metal-metal bonds that also serve as layer-to-layer interconnects. Bonded copper interconnects test structures ...

Leong, Hoi Liong

151

Thermodynamically Tuned Nanophase Materials for Reversible Hydrogen Storage: Structure and Kinetics of Nanoparticle and Model System Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of our program on hydrogen storage in thin film and nanoparticle metal hydrides.

Bruce M. Clemens

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kozhevin, V. M. [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

HEALTH MATTERS Copper T IUD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH MATTERS Copper T IUD What is the Copper T IUD? The Copper T IUD is one of two types of intrauterine devices available in the United States. The Copper T IUD is a small, flexible device made of soft plastic and copper. It is easily and quickly inserted into the uterus by a health care provider to prevent

Yener, Aylin

155

Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

Zhou, Dong

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nanoporus Silicate Frameworks Nanoporous Copper Silicates with One-Dimen-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoporus Silicate Frameworks Nanoporous Copper Silicates with One-Dimen- sional 12-Ring Channel, and their potential use as components in advanced nanocomposites.[1­4] Nanoporous transition-metal silicates for the synthesis of transition-metal-silicate open-framework and microporous compounds that uses a common building

Wang, Xiqu

157

EMSL - nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles en Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslweb...

158

High adherence copper plating process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

Nignardot, Henry (Tesuque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

Vieth, Gabriel M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Copper-containing zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Copper-containing zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

Price, Geoffrey L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Kanazirev, Vladislav (Sofia, BG)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Detecting Hazardous Gas Analytes Using Porous Silicon Sensors Coated with Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Eddie Goude, University of Florida Georgia Tech SURF 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Sulfur Dioxide (SO2), Phosphine (PH3), and Carbon Monoxide (CO) while the resistance across the sensors of ethanol etched the sample. Then the electron beam process places a layer of titanium then a layer of gold (Au), Nickel (Ni) and Titanium (Ti) nanoparticles. However, the Tin and Gold are the main focus

Li, Mo

163

Nanoparticles as Reactive Precursors: Synthesis of Alloys, Intermetallic Compounds, and Multi-Metal Oxides Through Low-Temperature Annealing and Conversion Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L of diethylene glycol with sonication. NaOH (1 mL, 0.1 M) was added and the solution was heated to 140 ?C for 1 h followed by raising the temperature to 180 ?C for 2 h. The solution was cooled to room temperature, and the Bi 2 O 3 nanoparticles were...

Bauer, John C.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Critical heat flux enhancement via surface modification using colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles (Nanofluids)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluids are engineered colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles (1-100nm) in common fluids (water, refrigerants, or ethanol...). Materials used for nanoparticles include chemically stable metals (e.g., gold, silver, ...

Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ordered porous mesostructured materials from nanoparticle-block copolymer self-assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides mesostructured materials and methods of preparing mesostructured materials including metal-rich mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrids, porous metal-nonmetal nanocomposite mesostructures, and ordered metal mesostructures with uniform pores. The nanoparticles can be metal, metal alloy, metal mixture, intermetallic, metal-carbon, metal-ceramic, semiconductor-carbon, semiconductor-ceramic, insulator-carbon or insulator-ceramic nanoparticles, or combinations thereof. A block copolymer/ligand-stabilized nanoparticle solution is cast, resulting in the formation of a metal-rich (or semiconductor-rich or insulator-rich) mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrid. The hybrid is heated to an elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of an ordered porous nanocomposite mesostructure. A nonmetal component (e.g., carbon or ceramic) is then removed to produce an ordered mesostructure with ordered and large uniform pores.

Warren, Scott; Wiesner, Ulrich; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 7 Determination of Copper in Copper Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 7 Determination of Copper in Copper Alloys Two procedures for Cu Determination of Copper in Alloy A convenient example of an electrogravimetric method of analysis is the determination of copper in a sample of an alloy. Discussion This procedure is based on the deposition

Nazarenko, Alexander

168

Kinetic method for the determination of iridium in copper and copper-nickel alloys and in industrial solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the kinetic determination of iridium in copper and copper-nickel alloys, in ores and ore processing products containing down to 10/sup -8/%, and in waste solutions down to 0.01 mg/liter. The procedure for the kinetic determination of iridium based on the oxidation of mercury(I) and cerium(IV) is described. The applications of the schemes presented allows one to widen significantly the range of products to be analyzed, to determine iridium at a concentration of 10/sup -8/% in the presence of copper and noble metals, and to shorten the time required for the analysis.

Danilova, F.I.; Fedotova, I.A.; Ustinova, N.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ?590 nm.

Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Precision Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

John Hemminger

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

Precision Nanoparticles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

John Hemminger

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Metal deposition using seed layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE-sponsored research on copper indium gallium diselenide [Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2], or CIGS, solar cells focuses on developing better film qualities, and thus, higher efficiencies. A list of current...

174

Tribo-Chemical Modeling of Copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRIBO-CHEMICAL MODELING OF COPPER CMP Shantanu Tripathi 1 ,Technical Area: CMP (Copper) Abstract We are developing antribo-chemical model of copper CMP that considers abrasive

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, Fiona; Dornfeld, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

Coble, Inger M

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atomistic insights into aqueous corrosion of copper.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion is a fundamental problem in electrochemistry and represents a mode of failure of technologically important materials. Understanding the basic mechanism of aqueous corrosion of metals such as Cu in presence of halide ions is hence essential. Using molecular dynamics simulations incorporating reactive force-field (ReaxFF), the interaction of copper substrates and chlorine under aqueous conditions has been investigated. These simulations incorporate effects of proton transfer in the aqueous media and are suitable for modeling the bond formation and bond breakage phenomenon that is associated with complex aqueous corrosion phenomena. Systematic investigation of the corrosion process has been carried out by simulating different chlorine concentration and solution states. The structural and morphological differences associated with metal dissolution in the presence of chloride ions are evaluated using dynamical correlation functions. The simulated atomic trajectories are used to analyze the charged states, molecular structure and ion density distribution which are utilized to understand the atomic scale mechanism of corrosion of copper substrates under aqueous conditions. Increased concentration of chlorine and higher ambient temperature were found to expedite the corrosion of copper. In order to study the effect of solution states on the corrosion resistance of Cu, partial fractions of proton or hydroxide in water were configured, and higher corrosion rate at partial fraction hydroxide environment was observed. When the Cl{sup -} concentration is low, oxygen or hydroxide ion adsorption onto Cu surface has been confirmed in partial fraction hydroxide environment. Our study provides new atomic scale insights into the early stages of aqueous corrosion of metals such as copper.

Jeon, B.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Ramanathan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); (Harvard Univ.); (Penn State Univ.)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Zhang, Chuanlun (Columbia, MO); Roh, Yul (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Morphology and properties of a hybrid organic-inorganic system: Al nanoparticles embedded into CuPc thin film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the morphology and the electronic structure of the hybrid organic-inorganic system composed of aluminum nanoparticles (NPs) distributed in an organic semiconductor matrixcopper phthalocyanine (CuPc)as a function of nominal aluminum content was studied by transmission electron microscopy and by photoemission spectroscopy methods. The aluminum atoms deposited onto the CuPc surface diffuse into the organic matrix and self-assemble to NPs in a well-defined manner with a narrow diameter distribution, which depends on the amount of aluminum that is evaporated onto the CuPc film. We find clear evidence of a charge transfer from Al to CuPc and we have been able to determine the lattice sites where Al ions sit. The finally at high coverage about 64? the formation of metallic aluminum overlayer on CuPc thin film takes place.

Molodtsova, O. V.; Babenkov, S. V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrae 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Aristova, I. M. [Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Vilkov, O. V. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) fr Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Strae 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Aristov, V. Yu., E-mail: aristov@issp.ac.ru [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrae 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Hamburg, Jungiusstrae 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions, which frequently contaminate ground water at DOE and other government and industrial sites. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of these nanoparticles to select specific reaction pathways, potentially facilitating the formation of the most environmentally acceptable reaction products.

Baer, Donald R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Wick for metal vapor laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effect of the Support on the Electronic Structure of Au Nanoparticles Supported on Transition Metal Carbides: Choice of the Best Substrate for Au Activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodic density functional theory calculations on large supercells have been carried out to investigate the atomic and electronic structure of small gold particles (Au{sub 2}, Au{sub 4}, Au{sub 9}, Au{sub 13}, and Au{sub 14}) supported on the (001) surface of various transition metal carbides (TiC, ZrC, VC, and {delta}-MoC). All the supported Au particles exhibited strong interactions with the C sites of the metal-carbide surfaces. Nevertheless, the interactions between adsorbed Au atoms were attractive, thus ultimately facilitating nucleation of two- or three-dimensional metal particles. The presence of the underlying carbide strongly modified the electronic structure and charge density of the supported metal particles resulting in the experimentally proven improved catalytic performance of the resulting systems as compared with cases where the support is an oxide. The electronic perturbations were quite strong for two-dimensional gold particles directly in contact with the carbide substrates and gradually decreased for two-layer and three-layer thick supported particles. While all the metal carbides examined induced a qualitatively similar perturbation on the supported Au particles, the effect is significantly larger for ZrC thus suggesting that the resulting model catalyst would perform even better than the already tried Au/TiC system.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Florez, E.; Feria, L.; Vies, F.; Illas, F.

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

Effect of the Support on the Electronic Structure of Au Nanoparticles Supported on Transition Metal Carbides: Choice of the Best Substrate for Au Activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodic density functional theory calculations on large supercells have been carried out to investigate the atomic and electronic structure of small gold particles (Au{sub 2}, Au{sub 4}, Au{sub 9}, Au{sub 13}, and Au{sub 14}) supported on the (001) surface of various transition metal carbides (TiC, ZrC, VC, and {delta}-MoC). All the supported Au particles exhibited strong interactions with the C sites of the metal-carbide surfaces. Nevertheless, the interactions between adsorbed Au atoms were attractive, thus ultimately facilitating nucleation of two- or three-dimensional metal particles. The presence of the underlying carbide strongly modified the electronic structure and charge density of the supported metal particles resulting in the experimentally proven improved catalytic performance of the resulting systems as compared with cases where the support is an oxide. The electronic perturbations were quite strong for two-dimensional gold particles directly in contact with the carbide substrates and gradually decreased for two-layer and three-layer thick supported particles. While all the metal carbides examined induced a qualitatively similar perturbation on the supported Au particles, the effect is significantly larger for ZrC thus suggesting that the resulting model catalyst would perform even better than the already tried Au/TiC system.

Florez, E.; Feria, L; Vines, F; Rodriguez, J; Illas, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I. Tudosa,SpreadingStability of

185

Copper deposition on TiO{sub 2} from copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have studied the adsorption of Cu{sup II}(hfac){sub 2} on the surface of a model oxide system, TiO{sub 2}(110), and probed the molecular stability with respect to thermal cycling, using atomic scale imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy supported by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. They find that at 473 K, the adsorbed metal-organic molecules begin to dissociate and release Cu atoms which aggregate and form Cu nanoparticles. These Cu nanoparticles ripen over time and the size (height) distribution develops into a bimodal distribution. Unlike other organometallic systems, which show a bimodal distribution due to enhanced nucleation or growth at surface step edges, the nanoparticles do not preferentially form at steps. The reduced mobility of the Cu islands may be related to the co-adsorbed ligands that remain in very small clusters on the surface.

Rayner, David G.; Mulley, James S.; Bennett, Roger A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Reading, Reading RG66AD (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Further reduction of efficiency droop effect by adding a lower-index dielectric interlayer in a surface plasmon coupled blue light-emitting diode with surface metal nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further reduction of the efficiency droop effect and further enhancements of internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and output intensity of a surface plasmon coupled, blue-emitting light-emitting diode (LED) by inserting a dielectric interlayer (DI) of a lower refractive index between p-GaN and surface Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated. The insertion of a DI leads to a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance spectrum and increases the LSP coupling strength at the quantum well emitting wavelength in the blue range. With SiO{sub 2} as the DI, a thinner DI leads to a stronger LSP coupling effect, when compared with the case of a thicker DI. By using GaZnO, which is a dielectric in the optical range and a good conductor under direct-current operation, as the DI, the LSP coupling results in the highest IQE, highest LED output intensity, and weakest droop effect.

Lin, Chun-Han; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hui; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shih, Pei-Ying; Chen, Horng-Shyang; Hsieh, Chieh; Kiang, Yean-Woei, E-mail: ywkiang@ntu.edu.tw; Yang, C. C., E-mail: ccycc@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Yang [Department of Energy and Refrigerating Air-Conditioning Engineering, Tung Nan University, 152 Beishen Road, Section 3, New Taipei City, 22202 Taiwan (China)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Coated metal articles and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

High adherence copper plating process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

Mignardot, H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

High adherence copper plating process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

Nignardot, H.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

December 200 Copper Acquisition by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 200 Copper Acquisition by Methanotrophic Bacteria 7 Term Paper HS2007 Major. One is soluble in the cytoplasm and the other is bound to the membrane. Since the expression of copper containing pMMO depends on copper availability it is supposed that some methanotrophs have developed

Fischlin, Andreas

192

Nanosensors based on functionalized nanoparticles and surface enhanced raman scattering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that utilizes metal surfaces to provide enhanced signals of several orders of magnitude. When molecules of interest are attached to designed metal nanoparticles, a SERS signal is attainable with single molecule detection limits. This provides an ultrasensitive means of detecting the presence of molecules. By using selective chemistries, metal nanoparticles can be functionalized to provide a unique signal upon analyte binding. Moreover, by using measurement techniques, such as, ratiometric received SERS spectra, such metal nanoparticles can be used to monitor dynamic processes in addition to static binding events. Accordingly, such nanoparticles can be used as nanosensors for a wide range of chemicals in fluid, gaseous and solid form, environmental sensors for pH, ion concentration, temperature, etc., and biological sensors for proteins, DNA, RNA, etc.

Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA); Huser, Thomas R. (Livermore, CA); Hollars, Christopher W. (Brentwood, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Laurence, Ted A. (Livermore, CA)

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

SELF-ASSEMBLY AND CONTROLLED ASSEMBLY OF NANOPARTICLES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes an exploration of interactions between metal nanoparticles and new techniques for their assembly. In Chapter 2, the self-assembly of 300-nm diameter Au, (more)

Dillenback, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Filtration for Metals Removal from Stormwater Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste ­ Peat-Sand Mix ­ Kudzu ­ Peanut Hull Pellets MetalsMetals Copper,Cadmium, Chromium, Zinc, Lead CAPACITIES FOR COPPER #12;2 Capacity of Media for Zn 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 TP 207*Com post Kudzu-Sand M ix Cotton W aste Sand gZn/kgmedia 14 16 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Compost Kudzu PeanutHulls St

Clark, Shirley E.

195

Arabidopsis Adapts to Copper Deficient Conditions via SPL7, a Master Regulator for Copper Homeostasis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systemic down-regulation of copper protein expression inresponse to low copper availability in Arabidopsis. J. Biol.A regulator of nutritional copper signaling in Chlamydomonas

Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Shikanai, Toshiharu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP Passivation Kinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribochemical Mechanisms of Copper Chemical MechanicalE06-02 Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP PassivationKinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents Shantanu

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, F M; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

198

JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 13, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2004 791 Electroplated Metal Microstructures Embedded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of multiwafer, MEMS devices. [1276] Index Terms--Copper, encapsulation, micromachining, nickel alloys, permalloy metallization of electroplated materials in polymer micromolds [9]. Electrodeposition has proven

199

Thermal Performance of Poly Alpha Olefin Nanofluid with Spherical and Non-spherical Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nanoparticles can be metallic or non-metallic and also can have different shapes. In this study, Poly-Alpha-Olefin (PAO) has been used as a base fluid with Alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles. Poly-Alpha-Olefin is commonly used for engine lubrication in military...

Park, Chan Hyun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Synthesis, structure, and superconducting properties of tantalum carbide nanorods and nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with transition metals and yield inter- esting transition metal carbides.8­11 In a recent study12 it was reportedSynthesis, structure, and superconducting properties of tantalum carbide nanorods and nanoparticles 1997) Tantalum carbide nanorods and nanoparticles have been synthesized using a vapor-solid reaction

McHenry, Michael E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

McSweeney, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

METALLIC AND HYBRID NANOSTRUCTURES: FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book chapter presents an overview of research conducted in our laboratory on preparation, optical and physico-chemical properties of metallic and nanohybrid materials. Metallic nanoparticles, particularly gold, silver, platinum or a combination of those are the main focus of this review manuscript. These metallic nanoparticles were further functionalized and used as templates for creation of complex and ordered nanomaterials with tailored and tunable structural, optical, catalytic and surface properties. Controlling the surface chemistry on/off metallic nanoparticles allows production of advanced nanoarchitectures. This includes coupled or encapsulated core-shell geometries, nano-peapods, solid or hollow, monometallic/bimetallic, hybrid nanoparticles. Rational assemblies of these nanostructures into one-, two- and tridimensional nano-architectures is described and analyzed. Their sensing, environmental and energy related applications are reviewed.

Murph, S.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

205

INTRACELLULAR COPPER ACCUMULATION ENHANCES THE GROWTH OF KINEOCOCCUS RADIOTOLERANS DURING CHRONIC IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The actinobacteria Kineococcus radiotolerans is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, desiccation, and oxidative stress; though the underlying biochemical mechanisms are unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore a possible linkage between the uptake of transition metals and extreme resistance to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress. The effects of 6 different divalent cationic metals on growth were examined in the absence of ionizing radiation. None of the metals tested were stimulatory, though cobalt was inhibitory to growth. In contrast, copper supplementation dramatically increased cell growth during chronic irradiation. K. radiotolerans exhibited specific uptake and intracellular accumulation of copper compared to only a weak response to both iron and manganese supplementation. Copper accumulation sensitized cells to hydrogen peroxide. Acute irradiation induced DNA damage was similar between the copper-loaded culture as the age-synchronized no copper control culture, though low molecular weight DNA was more persistent during post-irradiation recovery in the Cu-loaded culture. Still, the estimated times for genome restoration differed by only 1 hr between treatments. While we cannot discount the possibility that copper fulfills an unexpectedly important biochemical role in a radioactive environment; K. radiotolerans has a high capacity for intracellular copper sequestration, and presumably efficiently coordinated oxidative stress defenses and detoxification systems, which confers cross-protection from the damaging affects ionizing radiation.

Bagwell, C; Charles Milliken, C

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of Eutrophication on Concentrations and Speciation of Copper, Zinc, and Lead in West Falmouth Harbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Eutrophication on Concentrations and Speciation of Copper, Zinc, and Lead in West anoxic conditions and high carbon content favor relatively stable forms of heavy metals, eutrophication suggest that conditions associated with eutrophication do increase heavy metal retention in West Falmouth

Vallino, Joseph J.

207

Carboxylato compounds of chromium, copper, rhodium and molybdenum and new advances in the chemistry of V2(NXN)4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated the triisopropylbenzoato complexes of some metals which are known for their ability to form a vast array of tetracarboxylato complexes, namely chromium, copper, molybdenum, and rhodium, and have found that these novel compounds display some...

Hillard, Elizabeth Anne

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Copper stress response in marine Synechococcus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum yield (cells/ml) of copper-treated and no-Cu control2.6. Growth assays after copper treatments in both wild typefold changes over control no-copper treatment. 75

Stuart, Rhona Kayra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Metal articles having ultrafine particles dispersed therein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a metal article of manufacture. It comprises: a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, silver, gold, lead, tin, nickel, zinc, cobalt, antimony, bismuth, iron, cadmium, chromium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, mercury, tungsten arsenic, manganese, iridium, indium, ruthenium, rhenium, rhodium, molybdenum, palladium, osmium and platinum; and a plurality of ultrafine particles.

Alexander, G.B.; Nadkarni, R.A.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

van Hest, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

How and why electrostatic charge of combustible nanoparticles can radically change the mechanism and rate of their oxidation in humid atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrostatically charged aerosol nanoparticles strongly attract surrounding polar gas molecules due to a charge-dipole interaction. In humid air, the substantial electrostatic attraction and acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by accelerated water vapor molecules rather than non-polar oxygen molecules. In particular, electrostatic acceleration, acquired by surrounding water vapour molecules at a distance of their mean free path from the minimally charged iron metal nanoparticle can increase an oxidative activity of these polar molecules with respect to the nanoparticle by a factor of one million. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged metal nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide based shells into the hydroxide based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into metal/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intra-particl...

Meshcheryakov, Oleg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Size and Shape of Rhenium Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the results from a detailed XAFS characterization of supported rhenium nanoparticles are presented. The Re nanoparticles are formed by the reduction of dispersed supported rhenium oxide in the presence of moist hydrogen. The shape of the wet--reduced Re clusters is determined by comparing the EXAFS spectra of Re-metal to the Re-wet-reduced clusters to 6 A. A decrease in the signal from the 4th and 7th Re shells is an indication of sheet-like rather than spherical-like particles.

Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL, 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States); Vila, F. D.; Kas, J.; Rehr, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Methods for making a supported iron-copper catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst is described for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO+H.sub.2 utilizing a porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support impregnated with iron and copper and optionally promoted with an alkali metal. The use of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support results in the suppression of heavy waxes (C.sub.26 + hydrocarbons), particularly in slurry phase operation, when compared to unsupported or co-precipitated catalysts.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Synthesis of silver particles on copper substrates using ethanol-based solution for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The displacement reaction of AgNO{sub 3} and copper metal is an effective and economical way to fabricate Ag-Cu surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. Aqueous solutions of AgNO{sub 3} are usually used for substrate preparation. In this work, a new method for Ag-Cu SERS substrate preparation is proposed, which uses an ethanol solution rather than an aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution. Analysis of the surface morphologies of sample substrates by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) showed that the silver nanoparticles prepared by this new method were more regular than those prepared in the traditional aqueous solution. The SERS spectra of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on these Ag-Cu substrates were then investigated and compared. It was found that the Ag-Cu substrates prepared by this method provide significant improvements in Raman signal sensitivity and large-area uniformity. The enhancement factor of this new substrate is about 330 times higher than that prepared using an aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution under identical experimental conditions. It was also found that 70% of the original sensitivity of the substrate remains after 15 days of exposure to air.

Chen, Li, E-mail: CL2009@cqu.edu.cn; Zhang, Zuojun; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Hui [Defense Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-nano Devices and System Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)] [Defense Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-nano Devices and System Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Lai, Chunhong [Defense Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-nano Devices and System Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China) [Defense Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-nano Devices and System Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Information, China West Normal University, NanChong 637002 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Precipitates Suppress Mobility Of Metals in Soil and Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water with hazardous metals ­ such as cadmium, copper, lead, and nickel ­ is a national environ- mental increased over time. This increase may be due to activi- ties at industries like tanneries and smelters

Sparks, Donald L.

216

Electroless plating of graphite with copper and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning in the European Union of gas-cooled nuclear reactors using graphite as the moderator will generate a large amount of irradiated graphite as waste. Graphite is a radioactive waste of relatively low activity and consequently the options considered for the management of the waste may include: (i) incineration, (ii) ocean bed disposal, (iii) deep geological disposal, and (iv) shallow land burial. In case the last is the selected mode, an appropriate conditioning procedure is necessary before final disposal, by covering the graphite with a material avoiding or reducing the emission of radionuclides to its surrounding. This work analyses the possibility of conditioning graphite pieces (with a large proportion of pores of different sizes up to 100 {micro}m) with a metal coating of copper or nickel produced by electroless plating, with the aim of completely isolating the graphite from its surrounding. Electroless plating with copper results in a very large proportion of pores filled or covered, but a fraction of the pores remain in the graphite, which decreases with increasing thickness of metal deposit. Furthermore, the copper plating is permeable to liquids and consequently the graphite does not become completely isolated from the surrounding. The percentage of porosity filled or covered by nickel deposits is similar to copper, but they are not permeable to liquids, at least when the thickness is relatively high, and consequently the access of the liquids to the graphite is rather limited. However, when electroless plating with copper is followed by nickel deposition the graphite becomes isolated from the exterior.

Caturla, F.; Molina, F.; Molina-Sabio, M.; Rodriguez-Reinoso, F. [Univ. de Alicante (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica; Esteban, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Simple Chemical Routes for Changing Composition or Morphology in Metal Chalcogenide Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal chalcogenide nanomaterials are interesting due to their size dependent properties and potential use in numerous types of devices or applications. The synthetic methods of binary phase metal chalcogenide nanoparticles are well established...

Wark, Stacey Elaine

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Majorana Electroformed Copper Mechanical Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize ultra high purity electroformed copper for a variety of detector components and shielding. A preliminary mechanical evaluation was performed on the Majorana prototype electroformed copper material. Several samples were removed from a variety of positions on the mandrel. Tensile testing, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness testing were conducted to evaluate mechanical response. Analyses carried out on the Majorana prototype copper to this point show consistent mechanical response from a variety of test locations. Evaluation shows the copper meets or exceeds the design specifications.

Overman, Nicole R.; Overman, Cory T.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hoppe, Eric W.

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Integrated Tribo-Chemical Modeling of Copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribochemical Mechanisms of Copper Chemical MechanicalEli, D. Starosvetsky, "Review on copper chemicalmechanicalY. Li, "Investigation of Copper Removal Mechanisms d uring

Shantanu Tripathi; Choi, Seungchoun; Doyle, Fiona M; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Copper Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay-Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing the toxicity of copper that continues to leach fromothers to characterize copper bioaccumulation from distinctreview of total dissolved copper and its chemical speciation

Buck, Kristen N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Chronic Copper Poisoning in Sheep.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN SHEEP LIBRARY A~ricufl~ml& Hechanicnl Colleqe ol Texas , Texas. AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President 3erk tant sl Asst. --------. - ---- - '31 Administration : Veterinary Science : A. B. Conner, M. S.. Director... of copper sulphate caused chronic copper poisoning among flocks of range sheep on several West Texas ranches during the past year. The salt licks were placed before the sheep as a means of preventing or controlling stomach worm infestation despite a...

Boughton, I. B. (Ivan Bertrand); Hardy, W. T. (William Tyree)

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Field effect on digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles under simultaneous action of electric field and reflux heating in a silicone oil bath at 130?C, using transmission electron microscopy. Observation revealed that a polydispersed gold nanoparticle system reached the state of nearly monodispersity under the action of an electric field and the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles carried negative charges. The electric field caused the increase of the particle size for the nearly monodispersed gold nanoparticle system. The self-assembly of the nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles under the action of an electric field of a high field intensity was observed. The gold nanoparticles tended to form self-assembled nanostructures of six-fold symmetry. This study provides a new route for system engineering to control the particle size of metallic nanoparticles by electric field and digestive ripening.

Lin, Meng-Lin; Peng, J. S.; Lee, Sanboh, E-mail: sblee@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Yang, Fuqian [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Fate of Heavy Metals in Highway Stormwater Runoff: The Characterization of a Bioretention Basin in the Midwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The usual wear of automobiles and road surfaces deposits numerous environmental pollutants on roadways and parking lots, including heavy metals such as copper, zinc, lead, nickel and cadmium. During rainfall and snow events, these metals are washed...

Lacy, Sarah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); Van Hest, Maikel (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Nekuda, Jennifer A. (Lakewood, CO)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Core-Shell Assisted Bimetallic Assembly of Pt and Ru Nanoparticles by DNA Hybridization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have discovered that the current protocols to assemble Au nanoparticles based on DNA hybridization do not work well with the small metal nanoparticles (e.g. 5 nm Au, 3.6 nm Pt and 3.2 nm Ru particles). Further investigations ...

Lee, Jim Yang

226

Nanoparticle growth Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle growth Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium Titanate Nanocubes nanoparticles platinum strontium titanate X-ray analysis 750 ? 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

227

Human Sco1 and Sco2 Function as Copper-binding Proteins* Received for publication, June 22, 2005, and in revised form, July 29, 2005 Published, JBC Papers in Press, August 9, 2005, DOI 10.1074/jbc.M506801200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Sco1 and Sco2 Function as Copper-binding Proteins* Received for publication, June 22, 2005 on copper ion binding. Expression of soluble domains of human Sco1 and Sco2 either in bacteria or the yeast cytoplasm resulted in the recovery of copper-containing proteins. The metallation of human Sco1, but not Sco

Shoubridge, Eric

228

Optical Frequency Mixing at Coupled Gold Nanoparticles Matthias Danckwerts and Lukas Novotny*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

redistribution imposed by the formation of a conductive bridge. The 4-wave mixing signal provides such as nanoparticle aggregates [6], metal- semiconductor hybrid structures [7], and for particle syn- thesis

Novotny, Lukas

229

Laboratory-Scale Burning and Characterizing of Composite Solid Propellant for Studying Novel Nanoparticle Synthesis Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the effects of nanoparticle, metal-oxide additives on the burning rate of composite solid propellants. Recent advancements in chemical synthesis techniques have allowed for the production of improved solid rocket propellant nano...

Allen, Tyler Winston

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - au nanoparticles embedded Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and a metal (e.g. Ag or Au) can... through a near-field interaction. With a light-emitting diode (LED) embedded in a plasmonic structure, SPs... nanoparticles have distinctly...

231

An investigation of the mechanical and physical properties of copper-silver alloys and the use of these alloys in Pre-Columbian America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In both the Andean zone of South America and in Mesoamerica, copper-silver alloys were important in the production of thin, silver-colored sheet metal artifacts. This thesis examines the mechanical and physical properties ...

Taylor, Shannon L., S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Surface Oxidation and Dissolution of Metal Nanocatalysts in Acid Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to study the degradation and dealloying in nanocatalysts. The results on the degradation of Pt nanoparticles under different potential regimes demonstrate that the dissolution depends on the potential path to which the nanocatalyst is exposed. Metal atoms...

Callejas-Tovar, Juan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO), Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO)

1998-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

EFFECTIVENESS OF COPPER AND BRONZE FOR ZINC CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non?adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350?450C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.

Korinko, P. S.

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ris0-R-991(EN) Fatigue Performance of Copper and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ris0-R-991(EN) inn DK9700117 Fatigue Performance of Copper and Copper alloys before and after ARE MISSING IN THE ORIGINAL DOCUMENT #12;Fatigue Performance of Copper and Copper alloys before and after performance of pure copper of the oxygen free, high conductivity (OFHC) grade and two copper alloys (Cu

236

Exploration Into Copper Catalyzed and Copper-less Click Reactions with Re(CO)3 Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploration Into Copper Catalyzed and Copper-less Click Reactions with Re(CO)3 Complexes Nicholas that combines a alkyne and an oxime to generate a isoxazole cycloaddtion product. Compared to the copper and then proceeding with the typical copper(I) catalyzed "click" reaction procedure, while the other approach involves

Collins, Gary S.

237

Copper-mediated LDL oxidation by homocysteine and related compounds depends largely on copper ligation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper-mediated LDL oxidation by homocysteine and related compounds depends largely on copper of copper-mediated LDL oxidation (initiation, conjugated diene formation and aldehyde formation), whereas at high concentration, it acts as an antioxidant. The affinity for copper of homocysteine and related

Williamson, Mike P.

238

Copper doped polycrystalline silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photovoltaic cells having improved performance are fabricated from polycrystalline silicon containing copper segregated at the grain boundaries.

Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (La Canada, CA); Koliwad, Krishna M. (La Canada, CA); Daud, Taher (La Crescenta, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comparative analysis of the secondary electron yield from carbon nanoparticles and pure water medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of secondary electrons generated by carbon nanoparticles and pure water medium irradiated by fast protons is studied by means of model approaches and Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that due to a prominent collective response to an external field, the nanoparticles embedded in the medium enhance the yield of low-energy electrons. The maximal enhancement is observed for electrons in the energy range where plasmons, which are excited in the nanoparticles, play the dominant role. Electron yield from a solid carbon nanoparticle composed of fullerite, a crystalline form of C60 fullerene, is demonstrated to be several times higher than that from liquid water. Decay of plasmon excitations in carbon-based nanosystems thus represents a mechanism of increase of the low-energy electron yield, similar to the case of sensitizing metal nanoparticles. This observation gives a hint for investigation of novel types of sensitizers to be composed of metallic and organic parts.

Verkhovtsev, Alexey; de Vera, Pablo; Surdutovich, Eugene; Guatelli, Susanna; Korol, Andrei V; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Solov'yov, Andrey V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Hunt, Fred H. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Workington, GB); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

Brus, Louis E

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

Practical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: PolyethylenimPractical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: Polyethyleniminesines tailored onto The Surface oftailored onto The Surface of Porous SilicaPorous Silica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: PolyethylenimPractical Materials for Heavy Metal *presenting author INTRODUCTION As a result of heavy metal ion release from industrial wastewater, water pollution has become a serious problem. Waste streams contain solutions of metal ions, such as copper

Taralp, Alpay

248

Tetraphenylphosphonium copper(I) dicyanamide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the title compound, {l_brace}(C{sub 24}H{sub 20}P)[Cu(C{sub 2}N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}, the copper(I) dicyanamide anion forms a distorted three-dimensional single diamondoid network. Templating tetraphenylphosphonium cations reside within the cavities of the polymeric anion.

Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Materials Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Activation of Noble Metals on Metal-Carbide Surfaces: Novel Catalysts for CO Oxidation, Desulfurization and Hydrogenation Reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This perspective article focuses on the physical and chemical properties of highly active catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions generated by depositing noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces. To rationalize structure-reactivity relationships for these novel catalysts, well-defined systems are required. High-resolution photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles periodic density-functional (DF) calculations have been used to study the interaction of metals of Groups 9, 10 and 11 with MC(001) (M = Ti, Zr, V, Mo) surfaces. DF calculations give adsorption energies that range from 2 eV (Cu, Ag, Au) to 6 eV (Co, Rh, Ir). STM images show that Au, Cu, Ni and Pt grow on the carbide substrates forming two-dimensional islands at very low coverage, and three-dimensional islands at medium and large coverages. In many systems, the results of DF calculations point to the preferential formation of admetal-C bonds with significant electronic perturbations in the admetal. TiC(001) and ZrC(001) transfer some electron density to the admetals facilitating bonding of the adatom with electron-acceptor molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, thiophene, etc.). For example, the Cu/TiC(001) and Au/TiC(001) systems are able to cleave both S-O bonds of SO{sub 2} at a temperature as low as 150 K, displaying a reactivity much larger than that of TiC(001) or extended surfaces of bulk copper and gold. At temperatures below 200 K, Au/TiC is able to dissociate O{sub 2} and perform the 2CO + O{sub 2} {yields} 2CO{sub 2} reaction. Furthermore, in spite of the very poor hydrodesulfurization performance of TiC(001) or Au(111), a Au/TiC(001) surface displays an activity for the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS{sub x} catalysts. In general, the Au/TiC system is more chemically active than systems generated by depositing Au nanoparticles on oxide surfaces. Thus, metal carbides are excellent supports for enhancing the chemical reactivity of noble metals.

Rodriguez J. A.; Illas, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Identification of copper-copper and copper-hydrogen complexes in silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The centers formed in silicon as a result of interaction between the substitutional copper impurity (Cu{sub s}) and interstitial copper (Cu{sub i}) or hydrogen (H) atoms, which are mobile at room temperature, are investigated in this study using the deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. It is shown that a well-known photoluminescence center, which includes four copper atoms, is formed from Cu{sub s} via the subsequent addition of Cu{sub i}. Both intermediate complexes (Cu{sub s}-Cu{sub i} and Cu{sub s}-2Cu{sub i}) are identified by their deep levels in the lower half of the band gap. It is found that Cu{sub s} atoms form complexes with one, two, and three hydrogen atoms, with Cu{sub s}-H and Cu{sub s}-2H being electrically active. It is noted that the addition of either hydrogen or copper has a similar effect on the deep-level structure of Cu{sub s}.

Yarykin, N. A., E-mail: NAY@iptm.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology (Russian Federation); Weber, J. [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Trace metal concentration in blood of the Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characterized the level of five trace metals in Kemp's ridleys and compared these levels in headstart and wild cohorts as well as between the sexes. Overall, copper, lead, mercury, silver and zinc levels in the blood of Kemp's ridleys were: copper (range = 215...

Orvik, Lisa Marie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Solgel synthesis of SnO{sub 2}MgO nanoparticles and their photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue degradation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: A simple solgel method for the synthesis of SnO{sub 2}MgO nanoparticles is reported. Band gap of SnO{sub 2} can be tuned by varying the magnesium content in SnO{sub 2}MgO. SnO{sub 2}MgO shows good photocatalytic activity towards degradation of methylene blue. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2}MgO mixed metal oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a simple solgel method. The nanoparticles were characterized by power X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The XRD results indicate the formation of mixed metal oxide nanoparticles and also a decrease of SnO{sub 2} crystallite size in the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles with increasing magnesium oxide content. The reflectance spectroscopy results show a blue shift of the band gap of SnO{sub 2} in the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles. The photocatalytic activity of the SnO{sub 2}MgO nanoparticles was tested using the photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue in the presence of sunlight. The results indicate that the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles possess higher efficiency for the photodegradation of methylene blue compared to pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

Bayal, Nisha; Jeevanandam, P., E-mail: jeevafcy@iitr.ernet.in

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Structural Dependence of Grain Boundary Resistance in Copper Nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current choice of the interconnect metal in integrated circuits is copper due to its higher electrical conductivity and improved electromigration reliability in comparison with aluminum. However, with reducing feature sizes, the resistance of copper interconnects (lines) increases dramatically. Greater resistance will result in higher energy use, more heat generation, more failure due to electromigration, and slower switching speeds. To keep pace with the projected planar transistor density, the first challenge is to identify the dominant factors that contribute to the high interconnect resistance. Here we directly measure individual grain boundary (GB) resistances in copper nanowires with a one-to-one correspondence to the GB structure. The specific resistivities of particular GBs are measured using four-probe scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to establish a direct link between GB structure and the resistance. High-angle random GBs contribute to a specific resistivity of about 25 10-12 cm2 for each boundary, while coincidence boundaries are significantly less-resistive than random boundaries. Thus, replacing random boundaries with coincidence ones would be a route to suppress the GB impact to the resistivity of polycrystalline conductors. Acknowledgement: The research was supported by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, U. S. Department of Energy.

Kim, Tae Hwan [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Bala [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Li, An-Ping [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Behavior of palladium-copper catalysts for CO and NO elimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of a series of palladium and palladium-copper catalysts supported on ceria/alumina for the CO + NO + O{sub 2} reaction has been analyzed by a combination of electron transmission microscopy, infrared, and electron paramagnetic spectroscopies and catalytic test studies. In both systems, the catalytic behavior is dominated by the properties of the metal-ceria interface. The addition of copper to a palladium system leads to beneficial effects related to alloy formation in which both CO and NO elimination are enhanced. The chemical consequences and catalytic implications of Pd-Cu alloying are discussed.

Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Belver, C.; Anderson, J.A.; Conesa, J.C.; Soria, J.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Growth and characterization of copper nanoclusters embedded in SiCmatrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline copper clusters embedded in silicon carbidewere made by island growth during sputter deposition. The distributionand morphology of metal clusters were observed by high-resolutiontransmission electron microscopy. To investigate chemical bonding at thecopper silicon carbide interface, we studied the electronic states ofcopper and silicon using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It wasfound that the formation of copper silicide was suppressed in this systemand that small shifts in binding energy were observed for different sizesof clusters, which was different from the chemical shift for coppersilicide formation.

Shin, Dong-Woon; Wang, Shan, X.; Marshall, Ann F.; Kimura,Wataru; Dong, Chungli; Augustsson, A.; Guo, Jinghua

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The {alpha}-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal were investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The selectivity for the hydrogenation of the C=C bond was found to depend on the number of methyl groups added to the bond. The adsorption modes of the three aldehydes were determined. The hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde was found to be nearly structure insensitive as the TOF and selectivity were very close to the same over Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG-VS indicated identical surface intermediates over the two crystal faces during crotonaldehyde hydrogenation.

Kliewer, Christopher J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Title of the article MODELLING OF METAL POLLUTANT LEACHING THROUGH A SMECTITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as heavy metals, in soil constitutes a potential source of groundwater pollution. In the literature, some1 Title of the article MODELLING OF METAL POLLUTANT LEACHING THROUGH A SMECTITE Authors Chantal as the clay CEC. Keywords Leaching; metals; clay; copper; kinetic; modelling; CEC insu-00665250,version1-9May

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Heavy Metal Stress. Activation of Distinct Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2003; Polle and Schu¨tzendu¨bel, 2003). Heavy metal toxicity comprises inactivation of biomole- culesHeavy Metal Stress. Activation of Distinct Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways by Copper, Vienna Biocenter, A­1030 Vienna, Austria Excessive amounts of heavy metals adversely affect plant growth

Hirt, Heribert

259

Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

Krauter, Paula A. W. (Livermore, CA); Krauter, Gordon W. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Local investigation of the electronic properties of size-selected Au nanoparticles by scanning tunneling spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Transition metal carbides such as TiC have shown great potential as catalytic supports due to their hardness the electronic, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties displayed by small metallic nanopar- ticles have been- tronic properties of size-selected Au nanoparticles supported on ultrathin titanium carbide films

Kik, Pieter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

COPPER--2000 23.1 By Daniel L. Edelstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discovered copper resource in the United States was estimated to be 350 Mt. U.S. copper smelter and refineryCOPPER--2000 23.1 COPPER By Daniel L. Edelstein Domestic survey data and tables were prepared. In 2000, mine production of recoverable copper in the United States continued its downward slide

262

COPPER--1998 22.1 By Daniel L. Edelstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial demand. Lower copper prices and closure of a secondary copper smelter during the year led to lowerCOPPER--1998 22.1 COPPER By Daniel L. Edelstein Domestic survey data and tables were prepared of recoverable copper in the United States reversed its decade-long upward trend, declining by about 80

263

Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Abstract: Nanocomposite...

264

Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen...

265

The evaluation of the corrosion resistance of metallic substrates protected by a hydrophobic coating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performance of hydrophobic materials in corrosion service, metallic substrates of aluminum, copper, and steel were coated with a hydrophobic coating termed conformal and subjected to a variety of intensive analytical examinations including Electrochemical...

Lee, Daniel G

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Transport of metal salts by zwitterionic ligands; simple but highly efficient salicylaldoxime extractants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attaching dialkylaminomethyl arms to commercial phenolic oxime copper extractants yields reagents which transport base metal salts very efficiently by forming neutral 1 : 1 or 1 : 2 complexes with zwitterionic forms of the ligands....

Parsons, S.; Tasker, Peter; White, Fraser J; Henderson, D.K.; Galbraith, S.G.; Davidson, J.E.; Forgan, Ross Stewart

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Investigation of the Fundamental Reliability Unit for Cu Dual-Damascene Metallization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation has been carried out to determine the fundamental reliability unit of copper dual-damascene metallization. Electromigration experiments have been carried out on straight via-to-via interconnects in the ...

Gan, C.L.

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum gas metal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about 10 ppm aluminum. The basis for inclusion of aluminum and other trace metals (e.g.. copper. manga... energy-intensive products such as am- monia or ... Source: NOAA Marine...

269

Evidence for metabolic imbalance of vitamin A2 in wild fish chronically exposed to metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) have greatly increased in water, sediment and biota (Klee regulations on smelter emis- sions. As a result, a decrease in metal releases to the environment has been

Bernatchez, Louis

270

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 PLATINUM-GROUP METALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or copper. The major PGM mining countries are, in converters of automobiles and light trucks, where average price for unfabricated platinum commissioning of a base metal refinery adjacent to the smelter

271

Interaction of copper with cavities in silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper in Si was shown to be strongly bound at cavities formed by He ion implantation and annealing. Evolution of this system during heating was observed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Results were mathematically modeled to characterize quantitatively the binding of Cu in the cavities and, for comparison, in precipitates of the equilibrium silicide, {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si. Binding of Cu to cavities occurred by chemisorption on the walls, and the binding energy was determined to be 2.2{plus_minus}0.2 eV relative to solution in Si. The heat of solution from the silicide was found to be 1.7 eV, consistent with the published phase diagram. These findings suggest the use of cavities for metal-impurity gettering in Si devices. Hydrogen in solution in equilibrium with external H{sub 2} gas displaced Cu atoms from cavity walls, a mechanistically illuminating effect that is also of practical concern for gettering applications.

Myers, S.M.; Follstaedt, D.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1056 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1056 (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Trace metals in tap water from Tehran, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 272 tap water samples were collected from 68 homes throughout the city of Tehran. Analysis for cadmium, zinc, lead, copper, arsenic, iron and manganese showed some accumulation of these metals in household piping overnight. However, the concentration of all metals was in the parts per billion (ug/l) range and well below international standards. Heavy metals in Tehran's drinking water therefore, do not pose a significant acute health hazard. 19 references, 2 tables.

Shariatpanahi, M.; Anderson, A.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thermally Polymerized Rylene Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rylene dyes functionalized with varying numbers of phenyl trifluorovinyl ether (TFVE) moieties were subjected to a thermal emulsion polymerization to yield shape-persistent, water-soluble chromophore nanoparticles. Perylene ...

Andrew, Trisha Lionel

274

The Fission Yeast Copper-sensing Transcription Factor Cuf1 Regulates the Copper Transporter Gene Expression through an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Fission Yeast Copper-sensing Transcription Factor Cuf1 Regulates the Copper Transporter Gene of copper transport is essential for copper homeostasis and growth in yeast. Analysis of regulatory regions in the promoter of the ctr4 copper transporter gene in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe re- veals

Labbé, Simon

275

MicroRNA-mediated Systemic Down-regulation of Copper Protein Expression in Response to Low Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroRNA-mediated Systemic Down-regulation of Copper Protein Expression in Response to Low Copper 44519, Egypt In plants, copper is an essential micronutrient required for photosynthesis. Two of the most abundant copper proteins, plastocyanin and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, are found

276

Environmental assessment for the recycling of slightly activated copper coil windings from the 184-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed action is to recycle slightly activated copper that is currently stored in a warehouse leased by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to a scrap metal dealer. Subsequent reutilization of the copper would be unrestricted. This document addresses the potential environmental effects of recycling and reutilizing the activated copper. In addition, the potential environmental effects of possible future uses by the dealer are addressed. Direct environmental effects from the proposed action are assessed, such as air emissions from reprocessing the activated copper, as well as indirect beneficial effects, such as averting air emissions that would result from mining and smelting an equivalent quantity of copper ore. Evaluation of the human health impacts of the proposed action focuses on the pertinent issues of radiological doses and protection of workers and the public. Five alternatives to the proposed action are considered, and their associated potential impacts are addressed. The no-action alternative is the continued storage of the activated copper at the LBL warehouse. Two recycling alternatives are considered: recycling the activated copper at the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) facility for re-use at a DOE facility and selling or giving the activated copper to a foreign government. In addition, two disposal alternatives evaluate the impacts attributable to disposing of the activated copper either at a local sanitary landfill or at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Site. The proposed project and alternatives include no new construction or development of new industry.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

Copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of an ethylene cross-bridged cyclam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of an ethylene cross-bridged cyclam Timothy J. Hubin,a Nathaniel and crystal structures of (4,11-dibenzyl- 1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane- 4 N)copper(I) hexa)- copper(II) bis(hexa¯uorophosphate), [Cu(C2H3N)(C26H38- N4)](PF6)2, are described. The CuI ion

Hubin, Tim

278

Heavy metals in Antarctic organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate levels of essential (zinc and copper) and non-essential (mercury and cadmium) heavy metals, 34 species of organisms from different areas close to the Antarctic Peninsula were analysed. These included algae, filter-feeders, omnivorous invertebrates and vertebrates. Mercury was not detected, while cadmium was found in the majority of organisms analysed (detection limit was 0.05 ppm for both metals). The highest cadmium concentration was observed in the starfish Odontaster validus. Anthozoans, sipunculids and nudibranchs showed maximum levels of zinc, while the highest copper level was found in the gastropod Trophon brevispira. Mercury and cadmium levels in fishes were below the detection limit. Concentrations of essential and non-essential metals in birds were highest in liver followed by muscle and eggs. Cadmium and mercury levels in muscle of southern elephant seals were above the detection limit, whereas in Antarctic fur seals they were below it. The objective of the study was to gather baseline information for metals in Antarctic Ocean biota that may be needed to detect, measure and monitor future environmental changes. 46 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Moreno, J.E.A. de; Moreno, V.J. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Gerpe, M.S.; Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of copper-rich precipitates in silicon: chemical state,gettering, and impact on multicrystalline silicon solar cellmaterial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, synchrotron-based x-ray absorption microspectroscopy (mu-XAS) is applied to identifying the chemical states of copper-rich clusters within a variety of silicon materials, including as-grown cast multicrystalline silicon solar cell material with high oxygen concentration and other silicon materials with varying degrees of oxygen concentration and copper contamination pathways. In all samples, copper silicide (Cu3Si) is the only phase of copper identified. It is noted from thermodynamic considerations that unlike certain metal species, copper tends to form a silicide and not an oxidized compound because of the strong silicon-oxygen bonding energy; consequently the likelihood of encountering an oxidized copper particle in silicon is small, in agreement with experimental data. In light of these results, the effectiveness of aluminum gettering for the removal of copper from bulk silicon is quantified via x-ray fluorescence microscopy (mu-XRF),and a segregation coefficient is determined from experimental data to beat least (1-2)'103. Additionally, mu-XAS data directly demonstrates that the segregation mechanism of Cu in Al is the higher solubility of Cu in the liquid phase. In light of these results, possible limitations for the complete removal of Cu from bulk mc-Si are discussed.

Buonassisi, Tonio; Marcus, Matthew A.; Istratov, Andrei A.; Heuer, Matthias; Ciszek, Theodore F.; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Weber,Eicke R.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

Adsorption of hydrogen on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper catalysts display a high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of various carbonyl compounds, and copper is a component of the complex catalysts for the synthesis of methanol from CO and H/sub 2/. The adsorption of H/sub 2/ on copper catalysts has been studied by means of thermal desorption. The molecular form of adsorption of H/sub 2/ has been established, the thermal desorption parameters calculated, and the heat of adsorption of H/sub 2/ on a copper surface estimated.

Pavlenko, N.V.; Tripol'skii, A.I.; Golodets, G.I.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Institution of Infrastructure and the Development of Port-Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Primary Smelter Copper & Copper Alloys, Refined, 103Metals Primary 3321 Smelter Copper & Copper Alloys, 3322

Hall, Peter V.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nanograin Copper Deposition Using an Impinging Jet Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. ; Ong, C. K. ; Chew, J. Copper Interconnections for HighT. ; Ong, C. K. ; Chew, J. Copper Interconnections for Highof NanoCrystalline Copper. Nanostructured Materials 1993, 2,

Swingle, Karen Diane

284

The Copper Creek Clovis Point from Hells Canyon, Northeastern Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. 1 (2008) | pp. 75-84 The Copper Creek Clovis Point fromside of the Snake River to the Copper Creek point discovery1 (2008) 5 cm Figure 4. The Copper Creek Clovis point (tick

Reid, Kenneth C.; Root, Matthew J.; Hughes, Richard E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Metal aminoboranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

Title. ATP7B copper-regulated traffic and association with the tight junctions: copper excretion into Short title. ATP7B and copper excretion by liver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Title. ATP7B copper-regulated traffic and association with the tight junctions: copper excretion into the bile Short title. ATP7B and copper excretion by liver Authors. Sonia Hernandez*§ , Yo Tsuchiya manuscript Gastroenterology 2008;134(4):1215-23 #12;2 Abstract The copper transporter ATP7B plays a central

Boyer, Edmond

287

Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Copper- and silver-zirconia aerogels: Preparation, structural properties and catalytic behavior in methanol synthesis from carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper- and silver-zirconia aerogels containing 10 at% IB metal were prepared from tetra-n-butoxy zirconium(IV) and IB metal acetates using the solution sol-gel method and ensuring high-temperature (HT) and low-temperature (LT) supercritical drying, respectively. The influence of preparation parameters and calcination on the structural and catalytic properties of the aerogels for the synthesis of methanol from carbon dioxide and hydrogen was investigated. After calcination in air at 573 K, the catalysts had BET surface areas in the range of 100--143 m{sup 2}/g (Cu/ZrO{sub 2}) and 77--125 m{sup 2}/g (Ag/ZrO{sub 2}), respectively. Due to the reductive alcoholic atmosphere during high-temperature supercritical drying, metallic copper and silver existed in all raw HT-aerogels. The mean size of the copper crystallites wa/s 30 nm. The silver crystallite size for the HT-aerogel prepared with nitric acid was 10 nm, whereas for samples prepared with acetic acid it was 5--7 nm. Calcination in air at 573 K led to the formation of highly dispersed amorphous copper oxide and silver. Comparing the catalytic behavior of the calcined copper-zirconia aerogels with corresponding xerogels prepared by coprecipitation revealed highest activity for the LT-aerogel, whereas the HT-aerogels were least active. In contrast, similar catalytic behavior was observed for the differently dried silver-zirconia samples. Generally, CO{sub 2}-conversion of the copper-zirconia samples. Generally, CO{sub 2}-conversion of the copper-zirconia aerogels was markedly higher than that of the corresponding silver-zirconia aerogels, whereas methanol selectivity was similar.

Koeppel, R.A.; Stoecker, C.; Baiker, A. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry

1998-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

289

Coordination of Copper to the Membrane-Bound Form of ?...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

environmental copper exposure. Citation: Dudzik CG, ED Walter, BS Abrams, MS Jurica, and GL Millhauser.2013."Coordination of Copper to the Membrane-Bound Form of...

290

Enhanced Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium Halide/Copper...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium HalideCopper Photocathode. Enhanced Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium HalideCopper Photocathode. Abstract: The quantum efficiency of Cu...

291

Reversibleirreversible plasticity transition in twinned copper nanopillars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversibleirreversible plasticity transition in twinned copper nanopillars J.A. Brown, N 31 October 2009 Abstract Through computer simulations, we show that plasticity in twinned copper nanopillar under compression, plastic deformation can be totally reversed when rR is in the range 0:5 6 rR 6

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

292

Fetal polyol metabolism in copper deficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since pregnant rats consuming fructose, copper deficient diets fail to give birth, the relationship between maternal copper deficiency, polyol metabolism and fetal mortality was investigated. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were fed from conception one of the following diets: fructose, copper deficient; fructose, copper adequate; starch, copper deficient or starch, copper adequate. The deficient diets contained 0.6 ug Cu and the adequate 6.0 ug Cu/g diet. Pregnancy was terminated at day 19 of gestation. Glucose, sorbitol and fructose were measured in maternal blood, placenta and fetal liver. Fructose consumption during pregnancy resulted in higher levels of fructose and sorbitol in maternal blood when compared to starch. In the fructose dietary groups, the placenta and fetal liver contained extremely high levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol compared to the corresponding metabolites from the starch dietary groups. Copper deficiency further elevated fructose and sorbitol concentrations in the placenta and fetal liver respectively. Since high tissue levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol have been shown to have deleterious effects on cellular metabolism, these data suggest that when fructose was fed during pregnancy the combination of an aberration of carbohydrate metabolism with copper deficiency could be responsible for the pathology and mortality of the developing fetus.

Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.; Beal, T. (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

1989-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Facile fabrication of spherical nanoparticle-tipped AFM probes for plasmonic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reliably producing metallic spherical nanoparticle tips using only a simple electrochemical cell. Fabrication of Au spherical nanoparticle (AuNP) tips onto commercial AFM probes is achieved using single-pulse high- fi eld electrochemical growth... is employed for growth since both the cell geometry and electrodeposition solution are kept the same between fabrications. AFM probes are attached to fl u- orine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conductive glass, used as a working DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201400104 Facile...

Sanders, Alan; Zhang, Liwu; Bowman, Richard W.; Herrmann, Lars O.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Effect of laser irradiation on the structure and valence states of copper in Cu-phosphate glass by XPS studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of laser irradiation on the structure and valence states of copper in Cu-phosphate glass, electrical threshold, and optical switching devices [6­8]. The general condition for semiconducting behavior a polaron. It is well known that laser irradiation could modify the surface chemistry of transition metal

Mekki, Abdelkarim

296

Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

Santillan, J. M. J. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata - CIC) (Argentina); Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata - CIC) (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNLP (Argentina); Fernandez van Raap, M. B. [Departamento de Fisica-IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata-CONICET, L. B. Scaffardi: CIOp CC3 (1897) Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Institute of Powder Metallurgy and Advanced Ceramics, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111, 1st Section, Northern 2nd Ring Road, Chengdu (China); Yan, Qingzhi, E-mail: qzyan@ustb.edu.cn; Lang, Shaoting [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Metalization of lipid vesicles via electroless plating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The encapsulation of metallic particles and metallic oxides within lipid vesicles has recently been of interest for applications such as catalysis, water splitting, and magnetic control of spin coupling. In this communication the authors introduce the concept and practice of the deposition of metal on vesicles by using electroless plating techniques. Coordination of low valent transition metals to organic functional groups on the surface of the bilayer membrane provides a means of binding metal atoms to vesicles. Chemical reduction produced zero valent atoms which serve as sites for further metal deposition by the chemical reduction techniques of electroless plating. Specifically, this procedure involved the binding of a small amount of tetrachloropalladate to the vesicle bilayer, reduction of the palladium(II) to palladium(0), followed by the deposition of much larger amounts of metal from an electroless plating solution. Electroless plating solutions were used for the deposition of palladium, nickel, cobalt, or copper metal onto the catalytic palladium centers. Since the metallic particles were associated with the vesicles, colloids were formed that were stable in water for much longer periods than the control metal particles formed in water alone. If the vesicles were composed in part of unsaturated lipids, with the olefinic groups on the hydrocarbon chains, the initial evidence suggests the transition metal was directed into the bilayer, rather than staying on the surface.

Ferrar, W.T.; O'Brien, D.F.; Warshawsky, A.; Voycheck, C.L.

1988-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

299

Probing Hot Electron Flow Generated on Pt Nanoparticles with Au/TiO2 Schottky Diodes during Catalytic CO Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot electron flow generated on colloid platinum nanoparticles during exothermic catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation was directly detected with Au/TiO{sub 2} diodes. Although Au/TiO{sub 2} diodes are not catalytically active, platinum nanoparticles on Au/TiO{sub 2} exhibit both chemicurrent and catalytic turnover rate. Hot electrons are generated on the surface of the metal nanoparticles and go over the Schottky energy barrier between Au and TiO{sub 2}. The continuous Au layer ensures that the metal nanoparticles are electrically connected to the device. The overall thickness of the metal assembly (nanoparticles and Au thin film) is comparable to the mean free path of hot electrons, resulting in ballistic transport through the metal. The chemicurrent and chemical reactivity of nanoparticles with citrate, hexadecylamine, hexadecylthiol, and TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide) capping agents were measured during catalytic CO oxidation at pressures of 100 Torr O{sub 2} and 40 Torr CO at 373-513 K. We found that chemicurrent yield varies with each capping agent, but always decreases with increasing temperature. We suggest that this inverse temperature dependence is associated with the influence of charging effects due to the organic capping layer during hot electron transport through the metal-oxide interface.

Park, Jeong Y.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Renzas, J. Russell; Zhang, Yawen; Somorjai, G.A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interaction of CO molecules with evaporated silver, gold, and copper films: an infrared spectroscopic investigation using a thermal detection technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used infrared absorption spectroscopy to study the adsorption of CO at low temperatures on evaporated films of silver, gold, and copper as a function of the coverage of CO and the deposition temperature of the metal. For all three metals we observe two distinct adsorption regimes when the cold metal is exposed to CO gas. These regimes arise depending on whether the deposition temperature of the metal (or the highest temperature at which the metal has been annealed) is above or below a threshold temperature. For all three metals, the shift of the vibrational frequency with CO coverage has been analyzed, and the static and dynamic contributions separated. An analysis of infrared intensities and vibrational polarizabilities shows no evidence for any special infrared enhancement analogous to the large enhancement in Raman cross section peculiar to adsorption on rough noble metal films deposited at low temperatures.

Dumas, P.; Tobin, R.G.; Richards, P.L.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component containing at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji Won; Rondinone, Adam J.; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nanoparticle shuttle memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

Zettl, Alex Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of trace metals on diatom export products from the euphotic zone and significance for biogeochemical cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal are also reported (Cu from Coale and Bruland, 1988;Zn from Bruland, 1989; Cd from Lane et al. , 2008). Free52:843855. Buck, K. N. and Bruland, K. W. (2005). Copper

Richter, Daniel J.

306

Direct Assembly of Hydrophobic Nanoparticles to Multifunctional Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a general process that allows convenient production of multifunctional composite particles by direct self-assembly of hydrophobic nanoparticles on host nanostructures containing high-density surface thiol groups. Hydrophobic nanoparticles of various compositions and combinations can be directly assembled onto the host surface through the strong coordination interactions between metal cations and thiol groups. The resulting structures can be further conveniently overcoated with a layer of normal silica to stabilize the assemblies and render them highly dispersible in water for biomedical applications. As the entire fabrication process does not involve complicated surface modification procedures, the hydrophobic ligands on the nanoparticles are not disturbed significantly so that they retain their original properties such as highly efficient luminescence. Many complex composite nanostructures with tailored functions can be efficiently produced by using this versatile approach. For example, multifunctional nonspherical nanostructures can be efficiently produced by using mercapto-silica coated nano-objects of arbitrary shapes as hosts for immobilizing functional nanoparticles. Multilayer structures can also be achieved by repeating the mercapto-silica coating and nanoparticle immobilization processes. Such assembly approach will provide the research community a highly versatile, configurable, scalable, and reproducible process for the preparation of various multifunctional structures.

Lu, Zhenda [University of California, Riverside; Yin, Yadong [University of California, Riverside; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The interactions between transition metal nanoparticles and their metal-oxide supports are often critical for heterogeneous metal nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for selective hydrogenations (2, 3), oxidations (3­5), and the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (3, 6). Several to saturation kinetics, with added water affecting the kinetics of the RDS. We explored potential mechanistic oxygen from the support (21, 27). Perhaps most importantly, as Fig. 1A shows, water dramatically

Napp, Nils

308

COPPER--2003 21.1 By Daniel L. Edelstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of primary refined copper production. The United States was fifth in world smelter production and fellCOPPER--2003 21.1 COPPER By Daniel L. Edelstein Domestic survey data and tables were prepared copper products; one of the refineries operated for only a portion of the year. Scrap was also consumed

309

Metal inks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Influence of pulsed laser irradiation on precipitation of silver nanoparticles Jean-Philippe Blondeau a,, Stephane Pellerin b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the distribution of the metallic nanoaggregates which are formed under the laser irradiation. Optical absorption:YAG laser irradiation concern metal polymer nanostructures, photochromic glasses, optical waveguides whichInfluence of pulsed laser irradiation on precipitation of silver nanoparticles in glass Jean

312

Highly Reversible Li-Ion Intercalating MoP2 Nanoparticle Cluster Anode for Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly Reversible Li-Ion Intercalating MoP2 Nanoparticle Cluster Anode for Lithium Rechargeable, metal phosphides MPn, M = transition metal ions as attractive Li-ion anode materials have received lithium reactions, i MPn LixMPn simple Li-ion interca- lation and ii MPn M LixM + LixP alloying followed

Cho, Jaephil

313

X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Copper Nanopowder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper nanopowder preparation and its X-Ray diffraction studies are reported in this paper. Electrolytic cathode deposition method is simple and cheapest process for its preparation. Copper nanopowder has been prepared from aqueous copper sulphate solution. Wide range of experimental conditions has been adopted in this process and its X-Ray diffraction characterizations have been studied. The results confirming copper nanopowder with size below 30 nm. Uniformed size Copper nanopowder preparation, in normal room temperature is importance of this study.

T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Polycrystalline Copper Electrodeposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-fidelity kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation method (T. Treeratanaphitak, M. Pritzker, N. M. Abukhdeir, Electrochim. Acta 121 (2014) 407--414) using the semi-empirical multi-body embedded-atom method (EAM) potential has been extended to model polycrystalline metal electrodeposition. The presented KMC-EAM method enables true three-dimensional atomistic simulations of electrodeposition over experimentally relevant timescales. Simulations using KMC-EAM are performed over a range of overpotentials to predict the effect on deposit texture evolution. Results show strong agreement with past experimental results both with respect to deposition rates on various copper surfaces and roughness-time power law behaviour. It is found that roughness scales with time $\\propto t^\\beta$ where $\\beta=0.62 \\pm 0.12$, which is in good agreement with past experimental results. Furthermore, the simulations provide insights into sub-surface deposit morphologies which are not directly accessible from experimental measurements.

Treeratanaphitak, Tanyakarn; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The role of copper transporter 1 (CTR1) in the cellular accumulation of platinum drugs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract #3260. 2009- AACR. Copper transporter 2 regulatesof bortezomib on the human copper transporter 1. Clin CancerChemotherapeutics 4 Copper Transporter

Larson, Christopher Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A molecular dynamics study of void initiation and growth in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Nanocrystal Copper . . . . . . . 5.4.1 Base Crystallinebetween two crystals of copper undergoes uniaxial expansion.potentials used for copper. . . . . . . . . . . 62 Table of

Traiviratana, Sirirat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Contribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (Glomus Intraradices) Fungus with Tomato Plants grown under Copper Toxicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the toxic effect of copper. Therefore additionalpotassium, calcium, iron and copper from soil particles, anddifferent concentration of copper. Total protein content

Malekzadeh, Parviz; Khara, Jalil; Farshian, Shadi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An experimental and computational investigation of shock effects in monocrystalline copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monocrystalline Copper: Experiments and Simulation, Buin Monocrystalline Copper, Bu Yang Cao, David H. Lassila,Substructure in Single Crystal Copper, Bu Yang Cao, David

Cao, Buyang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

EFFECT OF GRAIN SIZE ON THE ACOUSTIC EMISSION GENERATED DURING PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COPPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COPPER J, Baram Materials Engineeringfrom plastically deformed copper specimens were analyzedrelated to the behavior of copper while undergoing plastic

Baram, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000. Characterization of copper interactions with AlzheimerJ. , Flodman, T. , 1999. Copper in drinking water, Nebraska,the oxidative stress of copper-mediated melanin formation.

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A model of material removal and post process surface topography for copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DA. Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP - PassivationKinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents. Mater. Res.the Passivated Additives in Copper CMP. J. Electrochem. Sci.

Choi, Seungchoun; Doyle, Fiona M.; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Arsenic and chromium partitioning in a podzolic soil contaminated by chromated copper arsenate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. Leaching of chromated copper arsenate wood preservatives:EXAFS study of chromated copper arsenate timber preservative5) U.S. -EPA. Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA). http://

Hopp, Luisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 ?M of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1?, TNF-?, COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE{sub 2} occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence of neutrophil migration), increased expression of genes involved in inflammatory events (IL-1? and TNF-?) and, reduction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 at 4 h. At 24 h, the copper concentration is found highly increased, what is coincident with oxidative stress. Regarding the purinergic system, it is possible to observe an inhibition of ecto-5?-NT and ADA, with the consequent increase of AMP and ADA, respectively, at 24 h. The expression of enzyme-related genes shows a decrease in the expression of ecto-5?-NT and variable expressions of ADA subfamily enzymes. - Highlights: Copper led to increased oxidative stress, and decreased the antioxidants' defenses. Copper induced time-related changes of IL-1?, TNF-?, IL-10 and PGE{sub 2} levels. ADA activity controls the levels of adenosine in copper-induced inflammation. ADA 2 is the main ADA subfamily involved. The purinergic system seems to be involved in the resolution of inflammation.

Leite, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: carlos.leite@pucrs.br [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Programa de Ps-Graduao em Medicina: Cincias Mdicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90035-003 (Brazil); Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Biocincias, Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Farmcia, Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Rosemberg, Denis Broock [Programa de Ps-graduao em Cincias Ambientais, Universidade Comunitria da Regio de Chapec, Chapec, CEP 89809-000 (Brazil); and others

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Abstract: The reduction of...

328

Optically detected, single nanoparticle mass spectrometer with pre-filtered electrospray nanoparticle source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An instrument designed for non-destructive mass analysis of single trapped nanoparticles is described. The heart of the instrument is a 3D quadrupole (Paul) trap constructed to give optical access to the trap center along ten directions, allowing passage of lasers for particle heating and detection, particle injection, collection of scattered or fluorescent photons for particle detection and mass analysis, and collection of particles on TEM grids for analysis, as needed. Nanoparticles are injected using an electrospray ionization (ESI) source, and conditions are described for spraying and trapping polymer particles, bare metal particles, and ligand stabilized particles with masses ranging from 200 kDa to >3 GDa. Conditions appropriate to ESI and injection of different types of particles are described. The instrument is equipped with two ion guides separating the ESI source and nanoparticle trap. The first ion guide is mostly to allow desolvation and differential pumping before the particles enter the trap section of the instrument. The second is a linear quadrupole guide, which can be operated in mass selective or mass band-pass modes to limit transmission to species with mass-to-charge ratios in the range of interest. With a little experience, the design allows injection of single particles into the trap upon demand.

Howder, Collin R.; Bell, David M.; Anderson, Scott L. [Chemistry Department, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Distribution of copper, nickel, and cadmium in the surface waters of the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of copper, nickel, and cadmium have been determined for about 250 surface water samples. Nonupwelling open-ocean concentrations of these metals are Cu, 0.5-1.4 nmol/kg: Ni, 1-2 nmol/kg; and Cd, less than 10 pmol/kg. In the equatorial Pacific upwelling zone, concentrations of Ni (3 nmol/kg) and Cd (80 pmol/kg) are higher than in the open ocean, but Cu (0.9 nmol/kg) is not significantly enriched. Metal concentrations are higher in cool, nutrient-rich eastern boundary currents: Cu, 1.5 nmol/kg: Ni, 3.5 nmol/kg and Cd, 30-50 pmol/kg. Copper is distinctly higher in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Panama (3--4 nmol/kg) and also higher in the shelf waters north of the Gulf Stream (2.5 nmol/kg): these copper enrichments may be caused by copper remobilized from mildly reducing shelf sediments and maintained by a coastal nutrient trap. In the open ocean, events of high-Cu water (1.5--3.5 nmol/kg) are seen on scales up to 60 km; presumably, these are due to the advection of coastal water into the ocean interior. The lowest copper concentrations in the North Pacific central gyre (0.5 nmol/kg: (Bruland, 1980) are lower than in the Sargasso Sea (1.3 nmol/kg), while for nickel the lowest concentrations are 2 nmol/kg in both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Nickel and cadmium, while generally correlated with the nutrients in surface waters, show distinct regional changes in their element-nutrient correlations. The residual concentrations of trace metals in the surface waters of the ocean can be explained if biological discrimination against trace metals relative to phosphorus increases as productivity decreases.

Boyle, E.A.; Huested, S.S.; Jones, S.P.

1981-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

anisotropic nanoparticles synthesis characterization: Topics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lithium Battery Anode Material Chemistry Websites Summary: Template Synthesis of Hollow Sb Nanoparticles as a High-Performance Lithium Battery Anode Material the graphite...

331

(Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have attempted to hydrogenate adsorbed formate species on copper catalysts to probe the importance of this postulated mechanistic step in methanol synthesis. Surface formate coverages up to 0.25 were produced at temperatures between 413K and 453K on supported (Cu/SiO2) copper and unsupported copper catalysts. The adlayers were produced by various methods including (1) steady state catalytic conditions in CO2-H2 (3:1, 6 bar) atmospheres, and (2) by exposure of the catalysts to formic acid. As reported in earlier work, the catalytic surface at steady state contains bidentate formate species with coverages up to saturation levels of ~ 0.25 at the low temperatures of this study. The reactivity of these formate adlayers was investigated at relevant reaction temperatures in atmospheres containing up to 6 bar H2 partial pressure by simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy measurements. The yield of methanol during the attempted hydrogenation (titration) of these adlayers was insignificant (<0.2 mol % of the formate adlayer) even in dry hydrogen partial pressures up to 6 bar. Hydrogen titration of formate species produced from formic acid also failed to produce significant quantities of methanol, and attempted titration in gases consisting of CO-hydrogen mixtures or dry CO2 were also unproductive. The formate decomposition kinetics, measured by IR, were also unaffected by these changes in the gas composition. Similar experiments on unsupported copper also failed to show any methanol. From these results, we conclude that methanol synthesis on copper cannot result from the direct hydrogenation of (bidentate) formate species in simple steps involving adsorbed H species alone. Furthermore, experiments performed on both supported (Cu/SiO2) and unsupported copper catalysts gave similar results implying that the methanol synthesis reaction mechanism only involves metal surface chemistry. Pre-exposure of the bidentate formate adlayer to oxidation by O2 or N2O produces a change to a monodentate configuration. Attempted titration of this monodentate formate/O coadsorbed layer in dry hydrogen produces significant quantities of methanol, although decomposition of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen remains the dominant reaction pathway. Simultaneous production of water is also observed during this titration as the copper surface is re-reduced. These results indicate that co-adsorbates related to surface oxygen or water-derived species may be critical to methanol production on copper, perhaps assisting in the hydrogenation of adsorbed formate to adsorbed methoxyl.

Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Pyrogenic Remobilization And Transport Of Toxic Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vicinity of the Nkana copper smelter, Copperbelt province,vicinity of the Nkana copper smelter, Copperbelt province,the topsoil near the Nkana copper smelter in the Copperbelt

Odigie, Kingsley O.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Size Characterization of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticles by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been utilized to characterize colloidal platinum nanoparticles synthesized in the 1-4 nm size range. The nanoparticles were prepared via a solution-based method in which the size could be controlled by varying reaction conditions, such as the alcohol used as the reductant. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone), or PVP, (MW = 29,000 g/mol) was employed as a capping agent to stabilize the synthesized nanoparticles in solution. A model for determining the size of the metallic nanoparticle core from MALDI-TOF mass spectra has been developed and verified through correlation with particle sizes from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In this model it was assumed that 1.85 nm nanoparticles are capped by one PVP chain, which was verified through experiments performed with capped and uncapped nanoparticles. Larger nanoparticles are capped by either two (2.60 and 2.94 nm) or three (3.69 nm) PVP chains. These findings clearly indicate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a technique for fully characterizing nanoscale materials in order to elucidate structure-property relationships.

Navin, Jason K.; Grass, Michael E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Marsh, Anderson L.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized CuFe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Portugaliae Electrochimica Acta (2006), 24(3), 367-376 Portuguese Electrochemical A Modified Electrodialytic Cell to Recover Heavy Metals from Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A Modified Electrodialytic Cell to Recover Heavy Metals from Wastewater Abo-Ghander, N. S.; Rahman, S. U electrodialysis and redn. of metal ions. The cell is able to recover metallic copper from wastewater contg. 1000 of several parameters, namely, width of wastewater compartment, applied potential and concn. of anolyte

Zaidi, S. M. Javaid

336

Anisotropy enhancement of the Casimir-Polder force between a nanoparticle and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the analytical expressions for the thermal Casimir-Polder energy and force between a spheroidal nanoparticle above a semi-infinite material and a graphene covered interface. We analyze in detail the Casimir-Polder force between a gold nanoparticle and a single sheet of pristine graphene focusing on the impact of anisotropy. We show that the effect of anisotropy, i.e. the shape and orientation of the spheroidal nanoparticle, has a much larger influence on the force than the tunability of graphene. The effect of tuning and anisotropy both add up such that we observe a force which is between 20-50% of that in the ideal metal case which is much larger than the results found for the Casimir force between a metal halfspace and a layer of graphene.

Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Anisotropy enhancement of the Casimir-Polder force between a nanoparticle and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the analytical expressions for the thermal Casimir-Polder energy and force between a spheroidal nanoparticle above a semi-infinite material and a graphene covered interface. We analyze in detail the Casimir-Polder force between a gold nanoparticle and a single sheet of pristine graphene focusing on the impact of anisotropy. We show that the effect of anisotropy, i.e. the shape and orientation of the spheroidal nanoparticle, has a much larger influence on the force than the tunability of graphene. The effect of tuning and anisotropy both add up such that we observe a force which is between 20-50% of that in the ideal metal case which is much larger than the results found for the Casimir force between a metal halfspace and a layer of graphene.

Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colfoque Cl, supplkrnent au no 4, Tome 38, Auril 1977, page Cl-333 METAL-OXIDES COMPOSITES FOR BaFe,,Ol PERMANENT MAGNETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the possibility of producing composites of Ba ferrite with various metals such as cobalt, nickel, iron, copper of a CO deposit with preferential orientation obtained by chemical reduction and electrodeposition. 2. CO

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

340

Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

Branz, Howard (Boulder, CO); Duda, Anna (Denver, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Yost, Vernon (Littleton, CO); Meier, Daniel (Atlanta, GA); Ward, James S. (Golden, CO)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Synthesis of gold nano-particles in a microfluidic platform for water quality monitoring applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for in-situ synthesis of gold nano-particles was developed. The long term goal is to develop a portable hand-held diagnostic platform for monitoring water quality (e.g., detecting metal ion pollutants...

Datta, Sayak

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Distribution of blood lead, blood cadmium, urinary cadmium, and urinary arsenic levels in employees of a copper smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cross-sectional medical examination of a copper smelter work force included determination of blood lead (Pb-B), zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), blood cadmium (Cd-B), urinary cadmium (Cd-U), and urinary arsenic (As-U), since it was known that such metal impurities were present in the copper concentrate. A total of 776 copper smelter employees (680 active and 96 retirees and ex-employees) were examined. Another 144 men, never employed in the smelter, but who had worked in copper mines (and sometimes in gold mines) were also examined. Mean Pb-B, ZPP, Cd-B, and As-U were significantly higher in active copper smelter employees than in retirees or miners, indicating exposure and absorption in the copper smelter. Significant correlations between Pb-B and Cd-B, and Cd-U and As-U were present, confirming the common source of absorption. Although there was evidence for an increased lead absorption, this was very moderate, with practically no Pb-B levels in excess of 60 ..mu..g/dl. A marked effect of smoking on blood cadmium levels was present; nevertheless, for all smoking categories Cd-B levels were significantly higher in active employees, indicating the independent contribution of exposure to cadmium in the smelter. Cd-U did not exceed 10 ..mu..g/g creatinine, the generally accepted critical level for the kidney, but was higher than 2 ..mu..g/g cretinine, a level very rarely exceeded in the general population, in a sizable proportion of those examined. The highest Cd-U levels were found in retired copper smelter employees; age might have been a contributing factor, besides a longer duration of exposure in the smelter.

Lilis, R.; Valciukas, J.A.; Weber, J.P.; Fischbein, A.; Nicholson, W.J.; Campbell, C.; Malkin, J.; Selikoff, I.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effect of the composition of polypyrrole substrate on the electrodeposition of copper and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposition of copper and nickel on a variety of substrates including conductive polymer films with two different compositions has been studied. The enhancement of the copper and nickel electrodeposition rate was observed for composite polypyrrole films with cation-exchange properties in comparison to undoped polypyrrole films with anion-exchange properties. Significant enhancement of the nickel electrodeposition rate on both types of conductive polymer vs. the bare gold electrode was also found. An explanation of these effects is presented. An electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) with 10 MHz AT-cut piezoelectrodes was used in this study. Use of the EQCM technique allowed for simultaneous monitoring of voltamperometric and resonance frequency vs. potential or time characteristics. The thickness of electropolymerized polypyrrole films as well as the amounts of electrodeposited metals were controlled by monitoring the EQCM resonant frequency. The nucleation density has been determined from scanning electron microscope experiments.

Hepel, M.; Chen, Y.M.; Stephenson, R. [State Univ. of New York, Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns Yun Liu a,b,*, Craig nanoparticles can assist in enhanced hydrogen storage on high-surface area supports are still under debate. Experimental mea- surements of metal-assisted hydrogen storage have been hampered by inaccurate estima- tion

Geohegan, David B.

345

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES COPPER COUNTRY HISTORICAL COLLECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES AND COPPER COUNTRY HISTORICAL COLLECTION GENEALOGICAL & Copper Country Historical Collection J. Robert Van Pelt Library Michigan Technological University local high schools and Michigan Technological University, centennial books, and local history titles

346

CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

Spencer, Elinor [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Huang, Baiyu [Brigham Young University, Provo] [Brigham Young University, Provo; Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL] [ORNL; Ross, Dr. Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young University, Provo] [Brigham Young University, Provo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geothermal energy for copper dump leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the possibility of using geothermal energy to heat a sulfuric acid leaching solution for the purpose of faster and more efficient copper recovery from copper-containing minerals. Experimental studies reported in the literature have shown that this technique can be economically feasible for the extraction of copper from low-grade dump ores. Its main advantage appears to be the considerable reduction in long-term leaching periods; it could also be less expensive than other conventional processing operations if an economical geothermal resource were provided. However, this process has some pitfalls which might restrict the extent of geothermal energy use. Nevertheless, the process is still technologically sound, especially if groundwaters are used directly in the leaching operation.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Metal melting for volume reduction and recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the experiences with melting contaminated steel materials for volume reduction and melting uranium-contaminated copper and aluminum for possible recycle. In the past there has not been an economic incentive to reduce the volume of low-level beta-gamma contaminated metallic scrap materials in the United States. With the rising cost of transportation and burial facility fees new interest in volume reduction is being generated. This new interest has been primarily focused at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) where the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was established to demonstrate both metal melting and incineration of combustible material for volume reduction. Other demonstration programs involving melting for volume reduction and recycle of aluminum and copper, as well as ferrous scrap, were related to the Cascade Improvement and Cascade Upgrade Programs (CIP/CUP) at the Paducah, Kentucky facility. While the melting demonstrations for the CIP/CUP material were not primarily based on economic incentives, several observations recorded during the programs are of interest with regard to melting of copper and aluminum. (4 refs., 8 tabs.)

Miller, R.L.

1987-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Parameters affecting the fate of metals in various soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At Different Mixed Spike Concentrations 200 150 a Cadmium p Copper Lead Q Nickel 0 Zinc L. O LI 1 00 O O O 50 10 Mixed Spike Concentration 100 FIGURE 12. Per Cent Of Metal Accounted For In Bastrop Soil At Different Mixed Spike Concentrations..., copper, lead, nickel, and zinc along with four soils native to Texas . The following questions The citations on the following pages follow the style of the Jo 1 fthE loentt~Eai i Diplo, A icS sty of Civil Engineers. directed the course of the study...

Covar, Andrew Prescott

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticle Research

352

Characterizations of severely deformed and annealed copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . 63 24. 90 min isochronal recrystallization curve for copper 101 given 2A/R+2A ECAE passes at room temperature. . . . . 64 25. 90 min isochronal recrystallization curve for copper 101 given 2C/R*2C ECAE passes at room temperature . . . 65 FIGURE... plane). The initial texture is 2C*2C/R. . . . . 93 48. Pole fiytres for Cu 101 given two ECAE passes via route C (Flow plane). The initial texture is 4A/R. 94 49. Pole figures for Cu 101 given four ECAE passes via route A after recrystaliization...

Haouaoui, Mohammed

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

6,000 years of copper smelting : Center for the Study of Copper Smelting in Ancient Societies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1959 professor of archeology Beno Rothenberg began investigating the production of copper in the Sinai desert and Aravah region of southern Israel. He discovered over 650 previously unknown ancient copper mining and ...

Steinberg, Marc J. (Marc Jonathan), 1969-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Laser Copper Plasma X-ray Source Debris Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Copper Plasma X-ray Source Debris Characterization A Thesis Presented by David Hurley 3, 2007 Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate studies #12;Abstract Laser copper plasma for x-ray lithography. Copper debris in the form of vapor, ions, dust, and high-speed particles

Huston, Dryver R.

355

COPPER SENSITIVITY OF PACIFIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS PALLASI,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER SENSITIVITY OF PACIFIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS PALLASI, DURING ITS EARLY LIFE HISTORY D. W pallasi, were exposed to copper, using a flow-through bioassay system. Herring embryos were exposed until yolk sac absorption. Embryos were also exposed to 36-h duration pulses of copper in order

356

THE LEAD AND COPPER RULE Anne Sandvig, HDR-EES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE LEAD AND COPPER RULE Anne Sandvig, HDR-EES 2008 Historical Background The 1986 Safe Drinking districts and was not mandated. In 1991, the USEPA finalized the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) in response components and by August 1998 manufacturers were required to comply. The Lead and Copper Rule #12;The USEPA

Maynard, J. Barry

357

LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 7 The Iodometric Determination of Copper in Brass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 7 The Iodometric Determination of Copper in Brass Discussion The method. To perform it, a sample of pure copper foil (100% Cu with uncertainty lees than 0.2%) is treated as described above, simultaneously with your sample. From titration of pure copper standard you calculate the precise

Nazarenko, Alexander

358

Short communication Influence of molybdenum and sulfur on copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short communication Influence of molybdenum and sulfur on copper metabolism in sheep: comparison of molybdenum able to trigger the copper sulfur molybdenum interference in sheep was measured with either only) and 4 increasing molybdenum doses. The sulfur-molybdenum-copper interference was quantified

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

359

COPPER AND ZINC DEFICIENCIES TREATMENT BY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS IN SHEEP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER AND ZINC DEFICIENCIES TREATMENT BY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS IN SHEEP M. LAMAND Claudine LAB in the injection site. Copper per os dosing is efficient for treating deficient animals (Lamand et al., 1969 consuming. Therefore we tried to per- fect a copper and zinc deficiency treatment allowing the injection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length in multicrystalline silicon using synchrotron-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length diffusion length of individual transition metal species in multicrystalline silicon. SR-XBIC, -XRF, and -XAS correlation between local concentrations of copper and nickel silicide precipitates and a decrease of minority

365

Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide. Abstract: Many...

367

Effect of Interface energy and electron transfer on shape, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of supported surfactant-free gold nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For device integration purposes plasmonic metal nanoparticles must be supported/deposited on substrates. Therefore, it is important to understand the interaction between surfactant-free plasmonic metal nanoparticles and different substrates, as well as to identify factors that drive nanoparticles nucleation and formation. Here we show that for nanoparticles grown directly on supports, the substrate/nanoparticle interfacial energy affects the equilibrium shape of nanoparticles. Therefore, oblate, spherical and prolate Au nanoparticles (NPs) with different shapes have been deposited by radiofrequency sputtering on substrates with different characteristics, namely a dielectric oxide Al2O3 (0001), a narrow bandgap semiconductor Si (100), and a polar piezoelectric wide bandgap semiconductor 4HSiC (0001). We demonstrate that the higher the substrate surface energy, the higher the interaction with the substrate, resulting in flat prolate Au nanoparticles. The resulting localized surface plasmon resonance characteristics of Au NPs/Al2O3, Au NPs/Si and Au NPs/SiC have been determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and correlated with their structure and shape studied by transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we have demonstrated the diverse response of the tailored plasmonic substrates as ultrasensitive SERS chemical sensors. Flat oblates Au NPs on SiC result in an enhanced and more stable SERS response. The experimental findings are validated by numerical simulations of electromagnetic fields.

Giangregorio, Maria M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, CNR-IMIP; Dastmalchi, Babak [Ames Laboratory; Suvorova, Alexandra [University of Western Australia; Bianco, Giuseppe V. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, CNR-IMIP; Hingerl, Kurt [Johannes Kepler University Linz; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, CNR-IMIP; Losurdo, Maria [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, CNR-IMIP

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Mathematical model of copper corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new partial differential model for monitoring and detecting copper corrosion products (mainly brochantite and cuprite) is proposed to provide predictive tools suitable for describing the evolution of damage induced on bronze specimens by sulfur dioxide (SO_2) pollution. This model is characterized by the movement of a double free boundary. Numerical simulations show a nice agreement with experimental result.

Fabrizio Clarelli; Barbara De Filippo; Roberto Natalini

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Mathematical model of copper corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new partial differential model for monitoring and detecting copper corrosion products (mainly brochantite and cuprite) is proposed to provide predictive tools suitable for describing the evolution of damage induced on bronze specimens by sulfur dioxide (SO_2) pollution. This model is characterized by the movement of a double free boundary. Numerical simulations show a nice agreement with experimental result.

Clarelli, Fabrizio; Natalini, Roberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Alternative Anode Reaction for Copper Electrowinning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a project funded by the Department of Energy, with additional funding from Bechtel National, to develop a copper electrowinning process with lower costs and lower emissions than the current process. This new process also includes more energy efficient production by using catalytic-surfaced anodes and a different electrochemical couple in the electrolyte, providing an alternative oxidation reaction that requires up to 50% less energy than is currently required to electrowin the same quantity of copper. This alternative anode reaction, which oxidizes ferric ions to ferrous, with subsequent reduction back to ferric using sulfur dioxide, was demonstrated to be technically and operationally feasible. However, pure sulfur dioxide was determined to be prohibitively expensive and use of a sulfur burner, producing 12% SO{sub 2}, was deemed a viable alternative. This alternate, sulfur-burning process requires a sulfur burner, waste heat boiler, quench tower, and reaction towers. The electrolyte containing absorbed SO{sub 2} passes through activated carbon to regenerate the ferrous ion. Because this reaction produces sulfuric acid, excess acid removal by ion exchange is necessary and produces a low concentration acid suitable for leaching oxide copper minerals. If sulfide minerals are to be leached or the acid unneeded on site, hydrogen was demonstrated to be a potential reductant. Preliminary economics indicate that the process would only be viable if significant credits could be realized for electrical power produced by the sulfur burner and for acid if used for leaching of oxidized copper minerals on site.

Not Available

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nanoscale Growth Twins in Sputtered Copper Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................. 7 I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) .................................... 8 I.2. Fabrication of copper thin films .................................................... 12... to the exposure of the film growth surface to the solution, impurities may be introduced. I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) CVD is a chemical process used to produce high-purity, high-performance thin films and often used in the semiconductor industry...

Anderoglu, Osman

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fluidized bed electrowinning of copper. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to: design and construct a 10,000- amp fluidized bed electrowinning cell for the recovery of copper from acidic sulfate solutions; demonstrate the technical feasibility of continuous particle recirculation from the electrowinning cell with the ultimate goal of continuous particle removal; and measure cell efficiency as a function of operating conditions.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Metals 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dendritic metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

All-optical control in metal nanocomposites due to a reversible transition between the local-field-enhancement and a local-field-depression upon irradiation by ultrashort control-pulses of light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically study on non-perturbative effective nonlinear responses of metal nanocomposites based on the intrinsic third-order nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles. The large intrinsic third-order nonlinear susceptibility of metal nanoparticles and an irradiation by ultrashort control pulse of light with a sufficiently high peak intensity and moderate fluence can induce a local-field-depression and a saturated plasmon-bleaching in metal nanoparticles. If the control pulse is on, the metal nanocomposites can behave like a dielectric due to the local-field-depression, while if the control pulse is off, the metal nanocomposites can behave like a metal showing a high absorption due to the local-field-enhancement at the plasmon-resonance. This phenomenon can be applied to an ultrafast and remote control of light in metal nanocomposites.

Im, Song-Jin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Surface engineered nanoparticles for improved surface enhanced Raman scattering applications and method for preparing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing metal nanoparticles that when associated with an analyte material will generate an amplified SERS spectrum when the analyte material is illuminated by a light source and a spectrum is recorded. The method for preparing the metal nanoparticles comprises the steps of (i) forming a water-in-oil microemulsion comprising a bulk oil phase, a dilute water phase, and one or more surfactants, wherein the water phase comprises a transition metal ion; (ii) adding an aqueous solution comprising a mild reducing agent to the water-in-oil microemulsion; (iii) stirring the water-in-oil microemulsion and aqueous solution to initiate a reduction reaction resulting in the formation of a fine precipitate dispersed in the water-in-oil microemulsion; and (iv) separating the precipitate from the water-in-oil microemulsion.

Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA)

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effects of gamma and mixed gamma-neutron fields on copper-constantan thermocouples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

group at 200, 400, aud 600 F before irradiation was compared to that generated after irradiation, and it was i'ound that 3 . $8 x 10 R of 1 . 17 MeV gsssna rays, 1 x 10 nvt of high energy (-20 MeV) neutrons, and $. 5 x 10 nvt of reactor neutrons had... of metals are changed through their irradiation, the effects often go unnoticed because of the annealing that occurs below room temperature. For example, copper irradiated at 10 K exhibited changes in the lattice constant which were 55$ reversed at 42 K...

Forbes, Jerre Lynn

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

Ellis, T.W.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Behavior of Aqueous Electrolytes in Steam Cycles - The Final Report on the Solubility and Volatility of copper(I) and Copper(II) Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements were completed on the solubility of cupric and cuprous oxides in liquid water and steam at controlled pH conditions from 25 to 400 C (77 to 752 F). The results of this study have been combined with those reported from this laboratory in two previous EPRI reports to provide a complete description of the solubility of these oxides and the speciation of copper dissolved in liquid water and steam as a function of oxidation state, temperature, pH, and in the case of steam, pressure. These constitute the first set of reliable data for cuprous oxide solubility over this range of conditions. For the more intensively studied CuO case, agreement was found between our results and those of previous studies of its solubility in steam, whereas only partial agreement was evident for its solubility in liquid water. For both oxides this disagreement often amounted to orders of magnitude. The solubility of cuprous oxide is somewhat lower than that of CuO at ambient conditions, except as very high pH. However, by 350 C (662 F), Cu{sub 2}O is the more soluble phase. At 100 C (212 F) and above, the logarithm of the solubility of both phases decreases linearly with increasing pH to a minimum value then sharply increases linearly with pH. In other words, above 100 C the solubility of both oxides become highly pH dependent. In fact at constant pH during startup, very high copper concentrations can be reached in the boiler water, more than an order of magnitude above those at ambient or operating temperatures. The enhancing effect of added ammonia on the solubility of both oxides is most significant at low temperatures and is much greater for cuprous oxide. Consequently, the mobility of copper is affected significantly under AVT startup conditions. The oxidation of copper metal and presumably cuprous oxide by addition of air-saturated makeup water can lead to much higher copper concentrations than equilibrium with cupric oxide would allow, but the presence of both copper metal and cuprous oxide provides an effective scavenger for oxygen, even at room temperature, with copper levels consistent with those in equilibrium with cuprous oxide. The solubilities of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO in steam are quite similar and are virtually temperature independent at the 1 to 2 ppb level, respectively, although at supercritical conditions, both solubilities increase with increasing pressure and temperature. The species that partition to the vapor are believed to be the neutrally charged molecules, Cu(OH){sup 0} and Cu(OH){sub 2}{sup 0}, for the reduced and oxidized forms, respectively, and their concentrations in the vapor are therefore independent of the pH of the liquid water phase from which they originate.

Palmer, Donald [ORNL; Benezeth, Pascale [Laboratoire des Mecanismes et Transferts en Geologie, Toulouse, France; Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Solder for oxide layer-building metals and alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low temperature solder and method for soldering an oxide layer-building metal such as aluminum, titanium, tantalum or stainless steel. The comosition comprises tin and zinc; germanium as a wetting agent; preferably small amounts of copper and antimony; and a grit, such as silicon carbide. The grit abrades any oxide layer formed on the surface of the metal as the germanium penetrates beneath and loosens the oxide layer to provide good metal-to-metal contact. The germanium comprises less than aproximatley 10% by weight of the solder composition so that it provides sufficient wetting action but does not result in a melting temperature above approximately 300.degree. C. The method comprises the steps rubbing the solder against the metal surface so the grit in the solder abrades the surface while heating the surface until the solder begins to melt and the germanium penetrates the oxide layer, then brushing aside any oxide layer loosened by the solder.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Solder for oxide layer-building metals and alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low temperature solder and method for soldering an oxide layer-building metal such as aluminum, titanium, tantalum or stainless steel is disclosed. The composition comprises tin and zinc; germanium as a wetting agent; preferably small amounts of copper and antimony; and a grit, such as silicon carbide. The grit abrades any oxide layer formed on the surface of the metal as the germanium penetrates beneath and loosens the oxide layer to provide good metal-to-metal contact. The germanium comprises less than approximately 10% by weight of the solder composition so that it provides sufficient wetting action but does not result in a melting temperature above approximately 300 C. The method comprises the steps rubbing the solder against the metal surface so the grit in the solder abrades the surface while heating the surface until the solder begins to melt and the germanium penetrates the oxide layer, then brushing aside any oxide layer loosened by the solder.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Targeted polymeric nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, IMS Room 20 A variety of organic and inorganic materials have been utilized to generate nanoparticles drugs for combination therapy. The surface engineering of these nanoparticles may yield them "stealth

Alpay, S. Pamir

384

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Professor David B. Kittelson Department Meeting Ultra Fine Particles in the Atmosphere 15 March 2000 Engine Exhaust Particle Emissions: Some Perkins Engine Company #12;Emissions of Ultrafine and Nanoparticles from Engines Current emission

Minnesota, University of

385

Nanoparticle Measurements and Standards for Biomedical and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Measurements and Standards for Biomedical and Health Applications NANOMATERIALS Our consensus standards for characterization of biomedical nanoparticles are currently under development within for the biomedical and EHS sectors. Approach Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory Taking therapeutic

Magee, Joseph W.

386

DEVELOPMENT OF PROCESS CONTROL EQUATIONS TO SUPPORT DETOXIFICATION OF COPPER USING NATURAL HUMATE AMENDMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent scientific research and changes in regulatory policies have led to reductions in the allowable discharges of several contaminant metals, including copper, into surface water. Low target concentrations and variable outfall conditions challenge the efficacy of traditional treatment technologies such as ion exchange. In reviewing various treatment options, scientists and engineers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) developed a treatment strategy focusing on toxicity reduction (rather than the removal of the copper) and demonstrated that the method is viable and promising for mitigating copper toxicity. The resulting outfall chemistry protects the ecosystem in the receiving stream in a manner that is equal to, or better than, technologies that remove copper to the emerging regulatory levels. Further, the proposed toxicity reduction strategy results in collateral beneficial changes in outfall water chemistry such that the outfall more closely matches the chemistry of natural streams for key parameters such as the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The detoxification process is based on the EPA BLM. Specifically, modeling indicates that copper toxicity can be mitigated by modest additions of natural organic carbon and that the amount of amendment needed can be determined based on pH and stream flow. The organic carbon amendments proposed for the treatment/detoxification process are extracts of natural materials that are produced for use in organic agriculture. These extracts are known by several common names such as potassium humate, soluble humic acid, and a variety of brand trademarks. When used to reduce ecosystem toxicity in surface water, these amendments bind copper and compete with the biological receptor sites, resulting in a reduction of impacts to key food chain organisms such as the Daphnia ('water flea'). Design and implementation of the process is straightforward. The core equipment consists of storage tank(s), pH sensor(s), outfall flow monitor(s), variable speed pump(s), and a programmable logic controller (PLC). The PLC collects information on pH and outfall flow, and modulates the pump flow rate to meter the correct amount of amendment into the outfall. A mathematical relationship, or control equation, is programmed into the PLC and serves as the basis of the operation. A summary of the development of, and key documentation for, the process control equation is provided.

Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Halverson, N.; Nichols, R.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Delivery Vehicles for Zerovalent Metal Nanoparticles in Soil and Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- surface remediation methods include soil vapor extrac- tion, pump-and-treat methods, heat treatment, biore liquids migrate though the unsaturated zone, they are retained by capillary forces and by adsorption

388

Selective metal ion-capturing by striped nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanomaterials have attracted lots of attention due to their tremendous potential in extensive fields, ranging from biology, physics, and chemistry to electronics, and also already proven their superior functionality to ...

Cho, Eun Seon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Metal-Insulating-Semi-Incorporation of Silicon Nanoparticles into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells Introduction Photovoltaic Cells Conclusions Acknowledgements PIN junctions · P and N type doped photovoltaic cells diode-like behavior and ideally allow for unidirectional current flow. · Two way current flow allows for carrier recombination and reduces cell efficiency. In this project, silicon based solar

390

In situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Free Standing Multifunctional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) for light emitting diodes[5] and iron-poly(methyl methacrylate) for electromagnetic appli- cations.[9] Gao

Alvarez, Pedro J.

391

Structure-function relationships in dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of TiO2-supported Pd, Au and PdAu nanocomposites from DEN precursors is shown to be a viable route for the synthesis of catalytically active, reasonably monodisperse heterogeneous catalysts. Using the dendrimer-templating synthesis, tight control over...

Wilson, Orla Mary

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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393

Bacterial Production of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanoparticles - Energy Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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394

High-Performance, Superparamagnetic, Nanoparticle-Based Heavy Metal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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395

Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New Medical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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396

Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Pave the Way for Medical Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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397

Stabilization of Metal Nanoparticles in Cubic Mesostructured Silica and Its  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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398

Apoferritin Templated Synthesis of Metal Phosphate Nanoparticle Labels for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRedAndreasAnodedemonstratesOmcAElectrochemical

399

Apoferritin-Templated Synthesis of Encoded Metallic Phosphate Nanoparticle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail

400

Segregation of copper to (100) and (111) silicon surfaces from internal Cu{sub 3}Si precipitates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Segregation of transition metal impurities to surfaces or interfaces can have detrimental or beneficial effects in silicon-based microelectronic devices. Controlled segregation of impurities to regions remote from device structures, i.e. gettering is routinely used to prevent uncontrolled segregation to critical regions which may cause failure. Internal gettering is a widely used process in which oxide precipitates and associated lattice defects provide sites for precipitation of metal-silicide phases. Segregation of impurities onto surfaces of internal microcavities has also been examined as a potential gettering process. It was observed that gettering to cavities can dissolve pre-existing internal metal silicide precipitates of Cu, Au and Ni. The energetics of copper segregation to silicon surfaces were examined by measuring the Cu coverage after equilibration between Cu on the surface and internal Cu{sub 3}Si, for which the Cu chemical potential is known. For oxide-free surfaces the Cu coverage was close to one monolayer on (111) surfaces but was much smaller on (100) surfaces. The Cu coverage was greatly reduced by oxide passivation of the surface. LEED showed the 7 x 7 structure of the clean (111) silicon surface converted to a quasiperiodic 5 x 5 structure after equilibrating with Cu{sub 3}Si. The 2 x 1 LEED patterns for (100) surfaces indicated no change in surface structure due to the Cu{sub 3}Si. These results show that the free energy of copper in Cu{sub 3}Si is higher than that of copper on (111) surfaces but lower than that of copper on (100) surfaces.

Wampler, W.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Influence of Vacancies on the Nanoparticle Pulsation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer modeling of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional nanoparticles with Van-der-Waals interaction was performed. The arrangement of atoms was defined on the grounds of an energy minimum. The calculations have shown that in the presence of vacancies in a nanoparticle and the account of a relaxation and oscillations the nanoparticle will pulse. This pulsation on distance between atoms of a nanoparticle is observed in both one-dimensional and a three-dimensional cases.

M. A. Korshunov

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Leaching of metals from ores. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the extraction of metals from ores by leaching. Topics include leaching of metals from ore heaps, mine tailings, smelter wastes, and sea nodules. Metals covered include gold, uranium, copper, nickel, silver, manganese, and cobalt. Bacterio-electric, biological-acid, and hydrogen peroxide leaching are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

405

World copper smelter sulfur balance-1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989, the US Bureau of Mines initiated a contract to gather engineering, operating, and environmental cost data for 1988 for 30 major foreign primary copper smelters in market economy countries. Data were collected for 29 of the designated smelters together with information on applicable environmental regulations. Materials balance data obtained were used with available data for the eight US smelters to determine the approximate extent of copper smelter sulfur emission control in 1988. A broad characterization of the status of sulfur emission control regulation was made. The 37 US and foreign smelters represented roughly 73.2% of world and 89.3% of market economy primary copper production in 1988. The 29 non-US smelters attained 55.3% control of their input sulfur in 1988. Combined with the 90.4% control of US smelters, an aggregate 63.4% sulfur control existed. Roughly 1,951,100 mt of sulfur was emitted from the 37 market economy smelters in 1988. Identifiable SO[sub 2] control regulations covered 72.4% of the 29 foreign smelters, representing 65.5% of smelting capacity. Including US smelters, 78.4% of the major market economy smelters were regulated, representing 73.1% of smelting capacity. Significant changes since 1988 that may increase sulfur emission control are noted.

Towle, S.W. (Bureau of Mines, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

407

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry (Palos Hts., IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles with a 5-15 nm diameter size range can be synthesized by hydrogen reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate in methanol modified supercritical carbon dioxide. XPS and XRD spectra indicate that the carbon nanotubes contain zero-valent platinum metal and high-resolution TEM images show that the visible lattice fringes of the Pt particles are crystallites. Carbon nanotubes synthesized with 25% by weight of Pt nanoparticles exhibit a higher activity for hydrogenation of benzene compared with a commercial carbon black platinum catalyst. The carbon nanotube-supported Pt nanocatalyst can be reused at least six times for the hydrogenation reaction without losing activity. The carbon nanotube-supported Pt nanoparticles are also highly active for electrochemical oxidation of methanol and for reduction of oxygen suggesting their potential use as a new electrocatalyst for polymer electrode fuel cell applications.

Yen, Clive; Cui, Xiaoli; Pan, H. B.; Wang, S.; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, Chien M.

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Li, Shari; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Bonding Low-density Nanoporous Metal Foams Using Sputtered Solder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed for bonding low-density nanoporous metal foam components to a substrate using solder that is sputtered onto the surfaces. Metal foams have unusual properties that make them excellent choices for many applications, and as technologies for processing these materials are evolving, their use in industry is increasing dramatically. Metal foams are lightweight and have advantageous dynamic properties, which make them excellent choices for many structural applications. They also provide good acoustic damping, low thermal conductivity, and excellent energy absorption characteristics. Therefore, these materials are commonly used in the automotive, aerospace, construction, and biomedical industries. The synthesis of nanoporous metal foams with a cell size of less then 1 {micro}m is an emerging technology that is expected to lead to widespread application of metal foams in microdevices, such as sensors and actuators. One of the challenges to manufacturing components from metal foams is that they can be difficult to attach to other structures without degrading their properties. For example, traditional liquid adhesives cannot be used because they are absorbed into foams. The problem of bonding or joining can be particularly difficult for small-scale devices made from nanoporous foam, due to the requirement for a thin bond layer. The current study addresses this problem and develops a method of soldering a nanoporous metal foam to a substrate with a bond thickness of less than 2 {micro}m. There are many applications that require micro-scale metal foams precisely bonded to substrates. This study was motivated by a physics experiment that used a laser to drive a shock wave through an aluminum foil and into a copper foam, in order to determine the speed of the shock in the copper foam. To avoid disturbing the shock, the interface between the copper foam and the aluminum substrate had to be as thin as possible. There are many other applications that could benefit from the bonding technology developed in this study, such as small-scale lightweight structural members, high-strength thermal insulating layers for electronics, and micro-scale mechanical dampers, to name but a few. Each of these applications requires one or more small metal foam components precisely bonded to a substrate. Several methods for bonding metal foam components have been developed by previous researchers. Macroscopic metal foam parts have been successfully bonded by laser welding to create T-sections and butt joints. Ultrasonic welding has been used to join aluminum sheet metal to aluminum foam for structural applications. These methods work well for bonding large foam components, but reducing these methods to a smaller length scale would be challenging. One method that has shown great potential for bonding layers of metal foams to substrates is a brazing process that uses a sputter-deposited interface material. Shirzadi et al.[9] have demonstrated bonds between stainless steel foam and a stainless steel substrate using a layer of copper-titanium filler metal that is sputtered onto the interface surfaces. The foam pieces that they bonded were approximately 10 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with a cell size of approximately 200 {micro}m. After depositing the filler material, pressing the materials together, and heating them with an induction heater, bonds were achieved without causing significant damage to the foam. The current study also uses a sputter-deposited interface material to bond foam to a substrate. However, in contrast to previous work, the current study examines bonding microscale pieces of fragile nanoporous metal foam. In this study, a method is developed to bond a thin sheet of fragile, low-density nanoporous copper foam to an aluminum foil substrate of thickness 40 {micro}m. By sputter depositing an indium-silver alloy onto the foam and the substrate, a solder joint with a thickness of less than 2 {micro}m was achieved.

Bono, M; Cervantes, O; Akaba, C; Hamza, A; Foreman, R; Teslich, N

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

413

High Variability of the Metal Content of Tree Growth Rings as Measured by Synchrotron Micro X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation analysis was used to investigate the metal content of tree rings collected from paper birch, Betula papyrifera Marsh, on transects downwind from two metal smelters (nickel and copper). Individual trees reflected changes in ring metal content with time, which may be presumed to represent changes in local metal bioavailability. However, between-tree variations were large and no statistically significant differences in metal content as a function of time were found within or between sites. Although concentrations of both total and exchangeable copper and nickel in the soil increased with proximity to the respective smelter, this pattern was reflected only in the nickel content of rings near the nickel smelter; copper content did not vary with distance from either smelter. The sites did differ with respect to lead, manganese and zinc content of the rings, which may be related to pH. In conclusion, the variability between trees at each site suggests that dendroanalysis is a poor method for evaluating metal exposure at a large (site) scale. Tree ring metal content may be used to evaluate the metal uptake by individual trees but metal mobility in the stem makes it difficult to establish a reliable chronology.

Martin,R.; Naftel, S.; Macfie, S.; Jones, K.; Feng, H.; Trembley, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

Rama Govindarajan; Manikandan Mathur; Ratul DasGupta; N. R. Selvi; Neena Susan John; G. U. Kulkarni

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

One-Step Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles with Tunable Size Min Chen,, J. P. Liu, and Shouheng Sun*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-Step Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles with Tunable Size Min Chen,, J. P. Liu, and Shouheng SunPt is coated over the seeds. Although size distribution of the particles prepared from all these methods can of the stabilizers and metal precursors, heating rate, heating temperature, and heating duration. Further, core

Liu, J. Ping

416

Copper Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay-Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. R. Flegal, and K. W. Bruland. 2007. A review of totalBuck, K. N. , and K. W. Bruland. 2005. Copper speciation in

Buck, Kristen N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Method of imaging the heart using copper-64 citrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of imaging the heart to provide a distinct image using positron emission tomography comprises administering copper-64 citrate and a compatible carrier.

Crook, James E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

1/f noise in semiconductor and metal nanocrystal solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrical 1/f noise is measured in thin films of CdSe, CdSe/CdS, ZnO, HgTe quantum dots and Au nanocrystals. The 1/f noise, normalized per nanoparticle, shows no systematic dependence on the nanoparticle material and the coupling material. However, over 10 orders of magnitude, it correlates well with the nearest neighbor conductance suggesting some universal magnitude of the 1/f noise in these granular conductors. In the hopping regime, the main mechanism of 1/f noise is determined to be mobility fluctuated. In the metallic regime obtained with gold nanoparticle films, the noise drops to a similar level as bulk gold films and with a similar temperature dependence.

Liu, Heng, E-mail: leophy@gmail.com; Lhuillier, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.lhuillier@espci.fr; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ag and Au atoms intercalated in bilayer heterostructures of transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusive motion of metal nanoparticles Au and Ag on monolayer and between bilayer heterostructures of transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. We found that the minimum energy barriers for diffusion and the possibility of cluster formation depend strongly on both the type of nanoparticle and the type of monolayers and bilayers. Moreover, the tendency to form clusters of Ag and Au can be tuned by creating various bilayers. Tunability of the diffusion characteristics of adatoms in van der Waals heterostructures holds promise for controllable growth of nanostructures.

Iyikanat, F., E-mail: fadiliyikanat@iyte.edu.tr; Senger, R. T. [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, 35430 Izmir (Turkey); Sahin, H., E-mail: hasan.sahin@uantwerpen.be; Peeters, F. M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, 2610 Antwerp (Belgium)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Enantioselective copper-catalysed reductive Michael cyclisations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrometalation of ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl compounds provides access to reactive metal enolates, which can then be trapped by a suitable electrophile. The coppercatalysed reductive aldol reaction involves hydrometalation ...

Oswald, Claire Louise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.3 Corrosion of Copper Films in Aqueous2.3.1 Cu 2p XAS of Copper Films in Various2.3.2 Cu 2p RIXS of Copper Film in Groundwater

Kvashnina, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Copper Transporter 2 (CTR2) as a regulator of cisplatin accumulation and sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1997). "hCTR1: A human gene for copper uptake identified byKlomp, et al. (1997). "The copper chaperone for superoxidecharacterization of a copper transport protein in S.

Blair, Brian G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Products of High-Energy Deuteron and Helium Ion Bombardments of Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND HELIUM ION BOHBARDMENTS OF COPPER D. R. Miller, R. C.observations made when natural copper (stable mass numbersof the Bombardment of Natural Copper with 190 Mev Deuterons

Miller, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Development of a Scanning Probe Microscope and Studies of Graphene Grown on Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Graphene Grown on Copper (100) Single Crystals, JournalGraphene on Polycrystalline Copper, Nano Letters 11, 251 (5 GRAPHENE GROWTH ON COPPER (100) SINGLE CRYSTALS 5.1

Rasool, Haider Imad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

STRUCTURAL CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION WITHIN THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION WITHIN THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT, NORTHERN CHILE the Chuquicamata Porphyry Copper Deposit, northern Chile DEPARTMENT OR SCHOOL: Department of Earth Sciences DEGREE

Beaumont, Christopher

427

TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE THRESHOLD ENERGY FOR FRENKEL PAIR PRODUCTION IN COPPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRENKEL PAIR PRODUCTION IN COPPER R. Drosd, T. Kosel, and J.FRENKEL PAIR PRODUCTION IN COPPER R. Drosd, T. Kosel and J.110) foils of high purity copper in the HVEM. At 575K loops

Drosd, jR.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana Air Pollution, and the Courts, 1890-1920  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Pollution from Copper Smelters of the Far West, 1885-the struggle to abate copper smelter air pollution consistedCopper Mining Company). Chapter 8, "The Roosevelt Men Versus the Smelters,"

Stirling, Dale A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Technology and social process : oscillations in Iron Age copper production and power in Southern Jordan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1976. Slag from an ancient copper smelter at Timna, Israel.The discovery of a copper mine and smelter from the end ofN. , 2008. The Copper Revolution: Smelters from Canaan and

Ben-Yosef, Erez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

10GBASE10GBASE--T:T: 10Gbit/s Ethernet over copper10Gbit/s Ethernet over copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 10GBASE10GBASE--T:T: 10Gbit/s Ethernet over copper10Gbit/s Ethernet over copper NEWCOM realization Start-up procedure Status and outlook #12;3 Ethernet over UTP copper is ubiquitousEthernet over UTP copper is ubiquitous 4-pair UTP cable + RJ-45 connector: fast, secure, cheap 4 Ethernet over UTP

Chen, Sheng

431

Reaction of Elemental Sulfur with a Copper(I) Complex Forming a trans--1,2 End-On Disulfide Complex: New Directions in Copper-Sulfur Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reaction of Elemental Sulfur with a Copper(I) Complex Forming a trans-µ-1,2 End-On Disulfide Complex: New Directions in Copper-Sulfur Chemistry Matthew E. Helton, Peng Chen, Partha P. Paul, Zolta, investigations into copper-sulfur interactions have been of marked interest in the research fields of copper

Chen, Peng

432

Spatial distribution of average charge state and deposition rate in high power impulse magnetron sputtering of copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was inch (6. 25 mm) thick copper disk. The diameter of thevery high power de nsity. Copper was selected for this studythe high stability of HIPIMS copper discharges ( copper can

Horwat, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

High-pressure ion-thermal properties of metals from ab initio interatomic potentials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has recently become possible for the first time to calculate ab initio two-ion and three-ion interatomic potentials in d-electron transition metals. The nature of these potentials for the 3d series metals is discussed. In the case of copper, where three-ion contributions may be neglected, application is made to the ion-thermal component of the equation of state and to the calculation of melting on the shock Hugoniot. 13 refs., 3 figs.

Moriarty, J.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Metal Hydrides  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |Charles Page -toMetabolic PathwaysMetal

438

Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Micellar enhanced ultrafiltration of heavy metals using lecithin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, zinc, silver, copper, and mercury are reported to be above 98%. Chaufer and Deratiani presented complexation-ultrafiltration as a means of removing metal ions with water soluble macromolecules (13). Polymers which are known to bind to metals... from each of the seven characteristic wastewaters and the average percentage of plants that generate such wastes. Table 4. Wastewater Distribution (2). Percentage of plants ihthi wa ew t 100. 0 6. 3 n/a 24. 1 13. 9 12. 9 n/a Percentage...

Ahmadi, Saman Nameghi

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Pollution prevention and waste minimization in metal finishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was done to identify pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities in the general plating department and the printed circuit board processing department. Recommendations for certain recycle and recovery technologies were mad in order to reduce usage of acids and the volume of heavy metal sludge that is formed at the industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility (IWPF). Some of these technologies discussed were acid purification, electrowinning, and ion exchange. Specific technologies are prescribed for specific processes. Those plating processes where the metals can be recovered are copper, nickel, gold, cadmium, tin, lead, and rhodium.

Stimetz, C.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (North Augusta, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Interfacial plasticity governs strain rate sensitivity and ductility in nanostructured metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interfacial plasticity governs strain rate sensitivity and ductility in nanostructured metals Ting-controlling mechanisms of plastic flow. We attribute the relatively high ductility of nano- twinned copper to the hardening of twin boundaries as they gradually lose coherency during plastic deformation. These find- ings

Suresh, Subra

444

National Student Conference in Metallic Materials Halifax Hall, Endcliffe Village, University of Sheffield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stir Welding Sam Gascoyne1 , BP Wynne1 , PB Prangnell2 , 1 Advanced Metallic Systems CDT, University;Linear friction welding of aluminium to copper Imran Bhamji, RJ Moat, M Preuss, PL Threadgill, AC Addison Session B1 Joining, Ennis Room Chair Alexandra Panteli, The University of Manchester Corner Friction

Cambridge, University of

445

THz Sommerfeld wave propagation on a single metal wire Tae-In Jeon,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THz Sommerfeld wave propagation on a single metal wire Tae-In Jeon,a Jiangquan Zhang, and D an experimental and theoretical study of THz Sommerfeld wave propagation on a single copper wire. THz pulses increasing interest on the guided wave propagation of THz pulses, and much effort and progress on THz

446

Synthesis, characterization, and application of surface-functionalized ordered mesoporous nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissertation begins with Chapter 1, which is a general introduction of the fundamental synthesis of mesoporous silica materials, the selective functionlization of mesoporous silica materials, and the synthesis of nanostructured porous materials via nanocasting. In Chapter 2, the thermo-responsive polymer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) was synthesized via surface-initated polymerization and exhibited unique partition activities in a biphasic solution with the thermally induced change. In Chapter 3, the monodispersed spherical MSN with different mesoporous structure (MCM-48) was developed and employed as a template for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCN) via nanocasting. MCN was demonstrated for the delivery of membrane impermeable chemical agents inside the cells. The cellular uptake efficiency and biocompabtibility of MCN with human cervical cancer cells were also investigated. In addition to the biocompabtibility of MCN, MCN was demonstrated to support Rh-Mn nanoparticles for catalytic reaction in Chapter 4. Owing to the unique mesoporosity, Rh-Mn nanoparticles can be well distributed inside the mesoporous structure and exhibited interesting catalytic performance on CO hydrogenation. In Chapter 5, the synthesis route of the aforementioned MCM-48 MSN was discussed and investigated in details and other metal oxide nanoparticles were also developed via nanocasting by using MCM-48 MSN as a template. At last, there is a general conclusion summarized in Chapter 6.

Chung, Po-Wen

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean porphyry copper Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Utah have recorded overKEY WORDS: alkaline magma; Bingham; porphyry copper... Bingham Canyon porphyry copper deposit range in may also have effectively removed magmatic...

448

Multiple metals predict prolactin and thyrotropin (TSH) levels in men  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to a number of metals can affect neuroendocrine and thyroid signaling, which can result in adverse effects on development, behavior, metabolism, reproduction, and other functions. The present study assessed the relationship between metal concentrations in blood and serum prolactin (PRL) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels, markers of dopaminergic, and thyroid function, respectively, among men participating in a study of environmental influences on male reproductive health. Blood samples from 219 men were analyzed for concentrations of 11 metals and serum levels of PRL and TSH. In multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI and smoking, PRL was inversely associated with arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc, but positively associated with chromium. Several of these associations (Cd, Pb, Mo) are consistent with limited studies in humans or animals, and a number of the relationships (Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo) remained when additionally considering multiple metals in the model. Lead and copper were associated with non-monotonic decrease in TSH, while arsenic was associated with a dose-dependent increase in TSH. For arsenic these findings were consistent with recent experimental studies where arsenic inhibited enzymes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and signaling. More research is needed for a better understanding of the role of metals in neuroendocrine and thyroid function and related health implications.

Meeker, John D., E-mail: meekerj@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 6635 SPH Tower, 109 S. Observatory St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Rossano, Mary G. [Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Protas, Bridget [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Diamond, Michael P.; Puscheck, Elizabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Daly, Douglas [Grand Rapids Fertility and IVF, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)] [Grand Rapids Fertility and IVF, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Paneth, Nigel [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Wirth, Julia J. [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States) [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

A comprehensive review on the hydro metallurgical process for the production of nickel and copper powders by hydrogen reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of nickel and copper powders from leach solutions and other aqueous streams by hydrogen reduction under pressure has been reviewed in the present paper. By optimising the optimum process condition, powders or composite materials of required specification could be produced from different types of acidic and alkaline solutions by coating nickel or copper powders on the secondary materials such as graphite, tungsten carbide and aluminium. The paper also highlights the kinetics of reduction and the use of various inorganic and organic additives to improve the quality of the powder on bench and commercial scale. Effect of various experimental factors such as pH of the solution, concentration of metals, particle size and nature of additives, operating condition of autoclave, etc. on the rate of reduction and quality of powder are also discussed.

Agrawal, A. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)]. E-mail: archana@nmlindia.com; Kumar, V. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Pandey, B.D. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Sahu, K.K. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL); Bartholme, Louis G. (Joliet, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

Rozhkova, Elena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

Rozhkova, Elena

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

454

Zinc ferrite nanoparticles as MRI contrast agentsw Carlos Ba rcena,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zinc ferrite nanoparticles as MRI contrast agentsw Carlos Ba´ rcena,a Amandeep K. Sra,a Girija S, a series of spinel-structured ferrites, MFe2O4 (M = Mn2+ , Fe2+ , Co2+ , Ni2+ ), were reported as novel MRI.e., Mn2+ occupies both A and B sites), whereas the other metal ferrites have an inverse spinel structure

Gao, Jinming

455

Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

Rothman, Albert J. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Atomic Absorption Method Guide Zn in Copper Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic Absorption Method Guide Zn in Copper Alloys Principle The sample is digested in nitric/hydrochloric acid, and zinc is determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using an air-acetylene flame · Copper Alloys · Zinc · Flame · Atomic Absorption Method Guide: 40158 #12;©2008 Thermo Fisher Scientific

Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

457

NANO-INDENTATION OF COPPER THIN FILMS ON SILICON SUBSTRATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANO-INDENTATION OF COPPER THIN FILMS ON SILICON SUBSTRATES S. Suresh1 , T.-G. Nieh2 and B.W. Choi2: Mechanical properties; Nano-indentation; Thin films; Copper; Dislocations Introduction Indentation methods films on substrates (e.g., [2,3]) using instrumented indentation. Nano-indentation studies of thin films

Suresh, Subra

458

Etching of Copper Coated Mylar Tubes With CF-4 Gas  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Using 5 mm diameter copper coated mylar straw tubes at a potential of 2.30 KV relative to a concentric 20 (mu)m diameter gold-plated tungsten anode, it has been observed that with very low flow rates of CF4-based gases the conductive copper cathode material may be removed entirely from the mylar surface.

Ecklund, Karl M.; Hartman, Keith W.; Hebert, Michael J.; Wojcicki, Stanley G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H., E-mail: msheikhi@shirazu.ac.ir [School of Electrical and Computer Eng, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Institute, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Copper-triazole interaction and coolant inhibitor depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To a large extent, the depletion of tolyltriazole (TTZ) observed in several field tests may be attributed to the formation of a protective copper-triazole layer. Laboratory aging studies, shown to correlate with field experience, reveal that copper-TTZ layer formation depletes coolant TTZ levels in a fashion analogous to changes observed in the field. XPS and TPD-MS characterization of the complex formed indicates a strong chemical bond between copper and the adsorbed TTZ which can be desorbed thermally only at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical polarization experiments indicate that the layer provides good copper protection even when TTZ is absent from the coolant phase. Examination of copper cooling system components obtained after extensive field use reveals the presence of a similar protective layer.

Bartley, L.S.; Fritz, P.O.; Pellet, R.J.; Taylor, S.A.; Van de Ven, P. [Texaco Fuels and Lubricants Technology Dept., Beacon, NY (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

X-ray spectroscopy study of electronic structure of laser-irradiated Au nanoparticles in a silica film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of gold nanoparticles embedded in a silica film is studied, both before and after irradiation at 355 nm by a laser. The Au 5d occupied valence states are observed by x-ray emission spectroscopy. They show that before irradiation the gold atoms are in metallic states within the nanoparticles. After irradiation with a fluence of 0.5 J/cm{sup 2}, it is found that gold valence states are close to those of a metal-poor gold silicide; thanks to a comparison of the experimental Au 5d states with the calculated ones for gold silicides using the density-functional theory. The formation of such a compound is driven by the diffusion of the gold atoms into the silica film upon the laser irradiation. At higher fluence, 1 J/cm{sup 2}, we find a higher percentage of metallic gold that could be attributed to annealing in the silica matrix.

Jonnard, P.; Bercegol, H.; Lamaignere, L.; Morreeuw, J.-P.; Rullier, J.-L.; Cottancin, E.; Pellarin, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unite Mixte de Recherche (CNRS UMR) 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique/Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d'Aquitaine (CEA/CESTA), BP 2, F-33114, Le Barp (France); Centre Agregat Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire (LASIM) et Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures (LPMCN), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon I, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

464

Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

465

Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

466

Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

Emrick, Todd S. (South Deerfield, MA); Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA); Dinsmore, Anthony (Amherst, MA); Skaff, Habib (Amherst, MA); Lin, Yao (Amherst, MA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Toward multifunctional nanoparticle-based therapeutics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity. In order to lendcoating to minimize heavy metal toxicity in biologicalheavy metals 49, . Additionally, a relevant model for in vivo toxicity

Derfus, Austin Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic...

469

Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

470

Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Abstract: Previous experiments have demonstrated that...

471

Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries....

472

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

473

Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly active oxygen reduction Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...

474

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercriti...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method. Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method....

475

Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into nanowires in aqueous glucose solutions. Green approach for self-assembly of platinum nanoparticles into nanowires in...

476

Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

477

Fluorescent Multiblock ?-Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles for In Vivo Tumor Targeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly fluorescent multiblock conjugated polymer nanoparticles with folic acid surface ligands are highly effective for bioimaging and in vivo tumor targeting. The targeted nanoparticles were preferentially localized in ...

Ahmed, Eilaf

478

Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of...

479

Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and...

480

Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation. Abstract:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metallic copper nanoparticles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

482

Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application for formic acid oxidation. Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application...

483

Three-dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles using Atom Probe Tomography. Three-dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles using Atom Probe Tomography....

484

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

485

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

487

Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

Fang, I-Ju

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

488

With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

molecular structures. And thanks to their promise of tunability, nanoparticle-based composites are also of great commercial interest for applications ranging from medicine and...

489

Mercury Sensing with Optically Responsive Gold Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assume that the mass of mercury adsorbed at saturation istactics, nanoparticle based mercury sensing should advancemost sensitive method for mercury sensing. References "1!

James, Jay Zachary

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Silica Supported Ceria Nanoparticles: A Hybrid Nanostructure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The surface chemical and vibrational spectroscopy analysis revealed ceriumsilicate (Ce-O-Si) covalent bond linkage between silica and cerium oxide nanoparticles. The...

491

Survey of physical property data for several alloys. [Nitronic 33; copper C10400; copper C17510  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an examination of physical property data available in the literature for six alloys of potential interest to the Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment in the Fusion Energy Program. The properties of thermal expansion, density, specific heat, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity were compiled for six alloys: Nitronic 33, a low-nickel, high manganese stainless steel; nickel-base Inconnel Alloys 625, 718, and X-750; and copper alloys C10400 and C17510. The temperatures of interest were 4-500 K for the Nitronic 33 and the Inconels, and 250-400 K for the copper alloys. Where data were lacking, estimates were made based on theory or comparisons with similar materials.

Pawel, R.E.; Williams, R.K.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

T. Park, et al. 1 MIT-MTL Multi-level Pattern Effects in Copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. Park, et al. 1 MIT-MTL Multi-level Pattern Effects in Copper CMP Multi-level Pattern Effects in Copper CMP T. Park, T. Tugbawa, D. Boning Massachusetts Institute of Technology http Effects in Copper CMP Copper CMP Process and Problems: Single Level I Non-Uniformity on a Single Layer

Boning, Duane S.

493

PROOF COPY 019605JAP Effect of pulsing parameters on laser ablative cleaning of copper oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of copper oxides Jie Zhang,a Youneng Wang, Peng Cheng, and Y. Lawrence Yao Department of Mechanical; accepted 23 January 2006 The characteristics of copper oxide removal are comparably investigated under. Experiments are carried out on copper samples having different oxide layer thicknesses. The copper oxide layer

Yao, Y. Lawrence

494

Efficient and Regioselective Halogenations of 2-Amino-1,3-thiazoles with Copper Salts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient and Regioselective Halogenations of 2-Amino-1,3-thiazoles with Copper Salts Fabrice G. Halogenations proceed easily in the presence of copper(I) or copper(II) chlorides, bromides, or iodides directly in solution or with supported copper halides. 1,3-Thiazole rings appear in many compounds that exhibit

Shen, Jun

495

EFFECTS OF COPPER ON EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES OF NORTHERN ANCHOVY, ENGRAULIS MORDAX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF COPPER ON EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES OF NORTHERN ANCHOVY, ENGRAULIS MORDAX D. W. RICE, JR.,l F. L. HARRISON,l AND A. JEARLD, JR.2 ABSTRACT The sensitivity to copper of embryonic and larval total copper concentrations and the percent copper in labile forms were determined. From the cumulative

496

Authorized limits for Fernald copper ingots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This development document contains data and analysis to support the approval of authorized limits for the unrestricted release of 59 t of copper ingots containing residual radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The analysis presented in this document comply with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,{close_quotes} as well as the requirements of the proposed promulgation of this order as 10 CFR Part 834. The document was developed following the step-by-step process described in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material.

Frink, N.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Chen, S.Y.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Kullberg, Marc L. (Lisle, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal ZrO[sub 2] particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K[sub IC]). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5] (211) on the ZrO[sub 2] particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO[sub 2] coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K[sub IC] of 4.5 MPa(m)[sup 0.5].

Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

Metal-phosphate binders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

500

Determining the Heavy Metal Pollution in Mascara (Algeria) by Using Casuarina equisetifolia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. In this study, Casuarina equisetifolia needles were evaluated as the possible biomonitors of heavy metal air pollution in Mascara (Algeria). The needles were sampled from seven locations with different degrees of metal pollution (near roads) and from a control site. The concentrations of lead, zinc, copper and nickel were measured by using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The maximal values of these four metals were found in the samples collected near the roads and the minimal values were found in the control site. Furthermore, sites with high traffic density and frequency of cars stoppage showed high heavy metal concentrations. However, the comparison of concentrations of all metals showed that the zinc one had the highest concentration of all. The cluster analysis divided the selected sampling sites in three distinct clusters. With regard to the results of this study, Casuarina equisetifolia can be successfully applied in biomonitoring of air pollution. Key words: Casuarina equisetifolia, Mascara, biomonitors, pollution, heavy metals.

Lakhdari Aissa; Benabdeli Kloufi