National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for metallic copper nanoparticles

  1. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the

  2. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  3. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  4. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  5. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  6. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  7. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  8. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  9. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  10. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exposure to natural climate variations, including a period of an exceptional heat wave. Images show compartmentalization of metallic copper within roots and along fungal hyphae...

  11. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujan, G.K. Haseeb, A.S.M.A. Afifi, A.B.M.

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping of flux with appropriate metallic nanoparticles can be successfully used to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers at the solder/substrate interface which is expected to lead to better reliability of electronic devices. - Highlights: • A novel nanodoped flux method has been developed to control the growth of IMCs. • Ni doped flux improves the wettability, but Co, Mo and Ti deteriorate it. • Ni and Co doped flux gives planer IMC morphology through in-situ alloying effect. • 0.1 wt.% Ni and Co addition into flux gives the lowest interfacial IMC thickness. • Mo and Ti doped flux does not have any influence at the interfacial reaction.

  12. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  13. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  14. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  15. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  16. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  17. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  18. Metal nanoparticle inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Ahn, Bok Yeop; Duoss, Eric B.

    2011-04-12

    Stabilized silver particles comprise particles comprising silver, a short-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles, and a long-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles. The short-chain capping agent is a first anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at most 10,000, and the long-chain capping agent is a second anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at least 25,000. The stabilized silver particles have a solid loading of metallic silver of at least 50 wt %.

  19. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Mendoza, Daniel; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  20. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  1. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1987-10-23

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  2. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A.; McDowell, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  3. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Data Explorer Search Results Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing

  4. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable

  5. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise:

  6. Solid-State Combustion of Metallic Nanoparticles: New Possibilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    examined the combustion of nanostructured metal particles assembled into metal clusters. Clusters containing iron nanoparticles (50 nm in diameter) were found to combust ...

  7. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang; Poudel, Bed; Kumar, Shankar; Wang, Wenzhong; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2009-09-08

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  8. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rondinone, Adam J.; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J.; Yeary, Lucas W.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable for sustaining said metal-reducing microbes, an effective concentration of one or more surfactants, a reducible metal oxide component containing one or more reducible metal species, and one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said metal-reducing microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said metal-reducing microbes; and (ii) isolating said metal oxide nanoparticles, which contain a reduced form of said reducible metal oxide component. The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method.

  9. Size tunable elemental copper nanoparticles: extracellular synthesis by thermoanaerobic bacteria and capping molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B; Gresback, Ryan G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Meyer III, Harry M; Kidder, Michelle; Joshi, Pooran C; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal sized elemental copper (Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from inexpensive oxidized copper salts by an extracellular metal-reduction process using anaerobic Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 bacteria in aqueous solution. The bacteria nucleate NPs outside of the cell, and they control the Cu2+ reduction rate to form uniform crystallites with an average diameter of 1.75 0.46 m after 3-day incubation. To control the size and enhance air stability of Cu NPs, the reaction mixtures were supplemented with nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelator, and the surfactant capping agents oleic acid, oleylamine, ascorbic acid, or L-cysteine. Time-dependent UV-visible absorption measurements and XPS studies indicated well-suspended, bimodal colloidal Cu NPs (70 150 and 5 10 nm) with extended air-stability up to 300 min and stable Cu NP films surfaces with 14% oxidation after 20 days. FTIR spectroscopy suggested that these capping agents were effectively adsorbed on the NP surface providing oxidation resistance in aqueous and dry conditions. Compared to previously reported Cu NP syntheses, this biological process substantially reduced the requirement for hazardous organic solvents and chemical reducing agents, while reducing the levels of Cu oxide impurities in the product. This process was highly reproducible and scalable from 0.01 to 1-L batches.

  10. Size tunable elemental copper nanoparticles: extracellular synthesis by thermoanaerobic bacteria and capping molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Ivanov, Ilia N; Meyer III, Harry M; Kidder, Michelle; Joshi, Pooran C; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal sized elemental copper (Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from inexpensive oxidized copper salts by an extracellular metal-reduction process using anaerobic Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 bacteria in aqueous solution. The bacteria nucleate NPs outside of the cell, and they control the Cu2+ reduction rate to form uniform crystallites with an average diameter of 1.75 0.46 m after 3-day incubation. To control the size and enhance air stability of Cu NPs, the reaction mixtures were supplemented with nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelator, and the surfactant capping agents oleic acid, oleylamine, ascorbic acid, or L-cysteine. Time-dependent UV-visible absorption measurements and XPS studies indicatedmore » well-suspended, bimodal colloidal Cu NPs (70 150 and 5 10 nm) with extended air-stability up to 300 min and stable Cu NP films surfaces with 14% oxidation after 20 days. FTIR spectroscopy suggested that these capping agents were effectively adsorbed on the NP surface providing oxidation resistance in aqueous and dry conditions. Compared to previously reported Cu NP syntheses, this biological process substantially reduced the requirement for hazardous organic solvents and chemical reducing agents, while reducing the levels of Cu oxide impurities in the product. This process was highly reproducible and scalable from 0.01 to 1-L batches.« less

  11. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method. Authors: Rondinone, Adam J. ; Moon, Ji Won ; Love, Lonnie J. ; Yeary, ...

  12. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method. Inventors: Rondinone, Adam J. ; Moon, Ji Won ; Love, Lonnie J. ; Yeary, ...

  13. Process for removing copper in a recoverable form from solid scrap metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, Alan D.; Oden, Laurance L.; White, Jack C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for removing copper in a recoverable form from a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix is disclosed. The process begins by placing a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix into a reactor vessel. The atmosphere within the reactor vessel is purged with an inert gas or oxidizing while the reactor vessel is heated in the area of the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix to raise the temperature within the reactor vessel to a selected elevated temperature. Air is introduced into the reactor vessel and thereafter hydrogen chloride is introduced into the reactor vessel to obtain a desired air-hydrogen chloride mix. The air-hydrogen chloride mix is operable to form an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere which provides a protective oxide coating on the surface of the solid ferrous scrap metal in the mix and simultaneously oxidizes/chloridizes the copper in the mix to convert the copper to a copper monochloride gas for transport away from the solid ferrous scrap metal. After the copper is completely removed from the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix, the flows of air and hydrogen chloride are stopped and the copper monochloride gas is collected for conversion to a recoverable copper species.

  14. Bacterial Production of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanoparticles - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Bacterial Production of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryResearchers at ORNL have developed a method for producing mixed metal oxide nanoparticles using anaerobic bacteria with an electron donor to reduce a metal oxide composition from a higher to a lower oxidation

  15. New Way to Probe Noble Metal Nanoparticles | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Way to Probe Noble Metal Nanoparticles For the first time researchers have found a way to study highly-dispersed metal nanoparticles and their reactions using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SENS). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a researcher's equivalent to a physician's MRI, only in this case the patient is not a person but a material. Now researchers have demonstrated new DNP-based measurements that extend

  16. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Trispyrazolate Linker | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio; Masciocchi, Norberto; McDonald, Thomas M.; and Long, Jeffrey R. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker. Cryst. Eng. Comm., 17,

  17. Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weihs, Timothy P.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  18. Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into wood substrate and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rector, Kirk D; Lucas, Marcel

    2015-11-04

    Metal nanoparticles were incorporated into wood. Ionic liquids were used to expand the wood cell wall structure for nanoparticle incorporation into the cell wall structure. Nanoparticles of elemental gold or silver were found to be effective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging contrast or sensing agents. Nanoparticles of elemental iron were found to be efficient microwave absorbers and caused localized heating for disrupting the integrity of the lignocellulosic matrix. Controls suggest that the localized heating around the iron nanoparticles reduces losses of cellulose in the form of water, volatiles and CO.sub.2. The ionic liquid is needed during the incorporation process at room temperature. The use of small amounts of ionic liquid combined with the absence of an ionic liquid purification step and a lower energy and water use are expected to reduce costs in an up-scaled pretreatment process.

  19. Metal nanoparticles as a conductive catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N.

    2010-08-03

    A metal nanocluster composite material for use as a conductive catalyst. The metal nanocluster composite material has metal nanoclusters on a carbon substrate formed within a porous zeolitic material, forming stable metal nanoclusters with a size distribution between 0.6-10 nm and, more particularly, nanoclusters with a size distribution in a range as low as 0.6-0.9 nm.

  20. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1988-04-05

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  1. Copper-silver-titanium filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 atomic percent copper, 15 to 50 atomic percent silver and 10 to 45 atomic percent titanium. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  2. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Jing; Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 ; Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. {yields} The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. {yields} The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 {sup o}C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  3. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, Douglas R.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  4. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New Medical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovations | Argonne National Laboratory Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New Medical Innovations Technology available for licensing: novel nanometer-sized metal oxide semiconductors that allow targeting, initiating and control of in vitro and in vivo chemical reactions in biological molecules, such as DNA, proteins, and antibodies. Allows for targeting, initiation and control of in vitro and in vivo chemical reactions in biological molecules Commercial applications

  5. Mineralization and optical characterization of copper oxide nanoparticles using a high aspect ratio bio-template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaman, Mohammed Shahriar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Haberer, Elaine D., E-mail: haberer@ucr.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Organized chains of copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, without palladium (Pd) activation, using the M13 filamentous virus as a biological template. The interaction of Cu precursor ions with the negatively charged viral coat proteins were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Discrete nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.5 nm and narrow size distribution were closely spaced along the length of the high aspect ratio templates. The synthesized material was identified as a mixture of cubic Cu?O and monoclinic CuO. UV/Vis absorption measurements were completed and a direct optical band gap of 2.87 eV was determined using Tauc's method. This value was slightly larger than bulk, signaling quantum confinement effects within the templated materials.

  6. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  7. Dynamics of laser induced metal nanoparticle and pattern formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peláez, R. J. Kuhn, T.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2015-02-09

    Discontinuous metal films are converted into either almost round, isolated, and randomly distributed nanoparticles (NPs) or fringed patterns of alternate non transformed film and NPs by exposure to single pulses (20 ns pulse duration and 193 nm wavelength) of homogeneous or modulated laser beam intensity. The dynamics of NPs and pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the transmission and reflectivity of the sample upon homogeneous beam exposure and the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 in transmission configuration upon modulated beam exposure. The results show that laser irradiation induces melting of the metal either completely or at regions around intensity maxima sites for homogeneous and modulated beam exposure, respectively, within ≤10 ns. The aggregation and/or coalescence of the initially irregular metal nanostructures is triggered upon melting and continues after solidification (estimated to occur at ≤80 ns) for more than 1 μs. The present results demonstrate that real time transmission rather than reflectivity measurements is a valuable and easy-to-use tool for following the dynamics of NPs and pattern formation. They provide insights on the heat-driven processes occurring both in liquid and solid phases and allow controlling in-situ the process through the fluence. They also evidence that there is negligible lateral heat release in discontinuous films upon laser irradiation.

  8. Directed liquid phase assembly of highly ordered metallic nanoparticle arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Yueying; Dong, Nanyi; Fu, Shaofang; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Kondic, Lou; Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    Directed assembly of nanomaterials is a promising route for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices. We demonstrate the directed-assembly of highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of hierarchical nanostructures with tunable size, spacing and composition. The directed assembly is achieved on lithographically patterned metal films that are subsequently pulse-laser melted; during the brief liquid lifetime, the pattened nanostructures assemble into highly ordered primary and secondary nanoparticles, with sizes below that which was originally patterned. Complementary fluid-dynamics simulations emulate the resultant patterns and show how the competition of capillary forces and liquid metal–solid substrate interaction potential drives the directed assembly. Lastly, asmore » an example of the enhanced functionality, a full-wave electromagnetic analysis has been performed to identify the nature of the supported plasmonic resonances.« less

  9. Directed liquid phase assembly of highly ordered metallic nanoparticle arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yueying; Dong, Nanyi; Fu, Shaofang; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Kondic, Lou; Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    Directed assembly of nanomaterials is a promising route for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices. We demonstrate the directed-assembly of highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of hierarchical nanostructures with tunable size, spacing and composition. The directed assembly is achieved on lithographically patterned metal films that are subsequently pulse-laser melted; during the brief liquid lifetime, the pattened nanostructures assemble into highly ordered primary and secondary nanoparticles, with sizes below that which was originally patterned. Complementary fluid-dynamics simulations emulate the resultant patterns and show how the competition of capillary forces and liquid metal–solid substrate interaction potential drives the directed assembly. Lastly, as an example of the enhanced functionality, a full-wave electromagnetic analysis has been performed to identify the nature of the supported plasmonic resonances.

  10. Solution synthesis of mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and spray deposition of precursor films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A colloidal suspension comprising metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is made by reacting a metal salt with a chalcogenide salt in an organic solvent to precipitate a metal chalcogenide, recovering the metal chalcogenide, and admixing the metal chalcogenide with a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is spray deposited onto a substrate to produce a semiconductor precursor film which is substantially free of impurities.

  11. Metal nanoparticle deposited inorganic nanostructure hybrids, uses thereof and processes for their preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tenne, Reshef; Tsverin, Yulia; Burghaus, Uwe; Komarneni, Mallikharjuna Rao

    2016-01-26

    This invention relates to a hybrid component comprising at least one nanoparticle of inorganic layered compound (in the form of fullerene-like structure or nanotube), and at least one metal nanoparticle, uses thereof as a catalyst, (e.g. photocatalysis) and processes for its preparation.

  12. Solid-State Combustion of Metallic Nanoparticles: New Possibilities for an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Alternative Energy Carrier (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Solid-State Combustion of Metallic Nanoparticles: New Possibilities for an Alternative Energy Carrier Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solid-State Combustion of Metallic Nanoparticles: New Possibilities for an Alternative Energy Carrier As an alternative to conventional methods of conveying and delivering energy in mobile applications or to remote locations, we have examined the combustion of

  13. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2011-12-27

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  14. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO) polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-10-25

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surface modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a collidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as fuctionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  15. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III., Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-11-21

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thio-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the stops of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  16. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  17. Metallicity of Ca2Cu6P5 with single and double copper-pnictide layers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Li; Parker, David; Chi, Miaofang; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2016-02-16

    Here, we report thermodynamic and transport properties, and also theoretical calculations, for Cu-based compound Ca2Cu6P5 and compare with CaCu2-dP2. Both materials have layers of edge-sharing copper pnictide tetrahedral CuP4, similar to Fe–As and Fe–Se layers (with FeAs4, FeSe4) in the iron-based superconductors. Despite the presence of this similar transition-metal pnictide layer, we find that both Ca2Cu6P5 and CaCu2-δP2 have temperature-independent magnetic susceptibility and show metallic behavior with no evidence of either magnetic ordering or superconductivity down to 1.8 K CaCu2-δP2 is slightly off-stoichiometric, with δ = 0.14. Theoretical calculations suggest that unlike Fe 3d-based magnetic materials with a large densitymore » of states (DOS) at the Fermi surface, Cu have comparatively low DOS, with the majority of the 3d spectral weight located well below Fermi level. The room-temperature resistivity value of Ca2Cu6P5 is only 9 μΩ-cm, due to a substantial plasma frequency and an inferred electron-phonon coupling λ of 0.073 (significantly smaller than that of metallic Cu). Also, microscopy result shows that Cu–Cu distance along the c-axis within the double layers can be very short (2.5 Å), even shorter than metallic elemental copper bond (2.56 Å). The value of dρ/dT for CaCu2-δP2 at 300 K is approximately three times larger than in Ca2Cu6P5, which suggests the likelihood of stronger electron-phonon coupling. This study shows that the details of Cu-P layers and bonding are important for their transport characteristics. In addition, it emphasizes the remarkable character of the DOS of ‘122’ iron-based materials, despite much structural similarities.« less

  18. Electrochemical synthesis of elongated noble metal nanoparticles, such as nanowires and nanorods, on high-surface area carbon supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Blyznakov, Stoyan; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-08-04

    Elongated noble-metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. The method involves the formation of a plurality of elongated noble-metal nanoparticles by electrochemical deposition of the noble metal on a high surface area carbon support, such as carbon nanoparticles. Prior to electrochemical deposition, the carbon support may be functionalized by oxidation, thus making the manufacturing process simple and cost-effective. The generated elongated nanoparticles are covalently bound to the carbon support and can be used directly in electrocatalysis. The process provides elongated noble-metal nanoparticles with high catalytic activities and improved durability in combination with high catalyst utilization since the nanoparticles are deposited and covalently bound to the carbon support in their final position and will not change in forming an electrode assembly.

  19. Associations between iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticle growth and metal adsorption/structural incorporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.S.; Lentini, C.J.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2008-09-15

    The interaction of metal ions and oxyanions with nanoscale mineral phases has not yet been extensively studied despite the increased recognition of their prevalence in natural systems as a significant component of geomedia. A combination of macroscopic uptake studies to investigate the adsorption behavior of As(V), Cu(II), Hg(II), and Zn(II) onto nanoparticulate goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) as a function of aging time at elevated temperature (75 C) and synchrotron-based X-ray studies to track changes in both the sorption mode and the rate of nanoparticle growth reveal the effects that uptake has on particle growth. Metal(loid) species which sorb quickly to the iron oxyhydroxide particles (As(V), Cu(II)) appear to passivate the particle surface, impeding the growth of the nanoparticles with progressive aging; in contrast, species that sorb more slowly (Hg(II), Zn(II)) have considerably less impact on particle growth. Progressive changes in the speciation of these particular metals with time suggest shifts in the mode of metal uptake with time, possibly indicating structural incorporation of the metal(loid) into the nanoparticle; this is supported by the continued increase in uptake concomitant with particle growth, implying that metal species may transform from surface-sorbed species to more structurally incorporated forms. This type of incorporation would have implications for the long-term fate and mobility of metals in contaminated regions, and affect the strategy for potential remediation/modeling efforts.

  20. Preparation of metallic nanoparticles by irradiation in starch aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemţanu, Monica R. Braşoveanu, Mirela Iacob, Nicuşor

    2014-11-24

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized in a single step by electron beam irradiation reduction of silver ions in aqueous solution containing starch. The nanoparticles were characterized by spectrophotocolorimetry and compared with those obtained by chemical (thermal) reduction method. The results showed that the smaller sizes of AgNPs were prepared with higher yields as the irradiation dose increased. The broadening of particle size distribution occurred by increasing of irradiation dose and dose rate. Chromatic parameters such as b* (yellow-blue coordinate), C* (chroma) and ΔE{sub ab} (total color difference) could characterize the nanoparticles with respect of their concentration. Hue angle h{sup o} was correlated to the particle size distribution. Experimental data of the irradiated samples were also subjected to factor analysis using principal component extraction and varimax rotation in order to reveal the relation between dependent variables and independent variables and to reduce their number. The radiation-based method provided silver nanoparticles with higher concentration and narrower size distribution than those produced by chemical reduction method. Therefore, the electron beam irradiation is effective for preparation of silver nanoparticles using starch aqueous solution as dispersion medium.

  1. Electrical and gas sensing properties of self-aligned copper-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonawane, Yogesh S.; Kanade, K.G.; Kale, B.B. Aiyer, R.C.

    2008-10-02

    Electrical and gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline ZnO:Cu, having Cu X wt% (X = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) in ZnO, in the form of pellet were investigated. Copper chloride and zinc acetate were used as precursors along with oxalic acid as a precipitating reagent in methanol. Material characterization was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and inductive coupled plasma with optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). FE-SEM showed the self-aligned Cu-doped ZnO nano-clusters with particles in the range of 40-45 nm. The doping of 0.5% of copper changes the electrical conductivity by an order of magnitude whereas the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) reduces with increase in copper wt% in ZnO. The material has shown an excellent sensitivity for the H{sub 2}, LPG and CO gases with limited temperature selectivity through the optimized operating temperature of 130, 190 and 220 deg. C for H{sub 2}, LPG and CO gases, respectively at 625 ppm gas concentration. The %SF was observed to be 1460 for H{sub 2} at 1% Cu doping whereas the 0.5% Cu doping offered %SF of 950 and 520 for CO and LPG, respectively. The response and recovery time was found to be 6 to 8 s and 16 s, respectively.

  2. Modifying the chemistry of graphene with substrate selection: A study of gold nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaniewski, Anna M.; Trimble, Christie J.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-03-23

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow gold nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include diamond, p-type silicon, aluminum oxide, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. On insulators, nanoparticles preferentially form on folds and edges. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis is used to confirm the nanoparticle elemental makeup.

  3. Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

    2012-09-01

    This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

  4. Evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles by INS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we will present a detailed methodology for the elucidation of the following aspects of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles from high-resolution, low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data: (i) the isochoric heat capacity and entropy of the hydration layers both chemi- and physisorbed to the particle surface; (ii) the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of the nanoparticles. This will include the calculation of the vibrational density of states (VDOS) from the raw INS spectra, and the subsequent extraction of the thermodynamic data from the VDOS. This technique will be described in terms of a worked example namely, cobalt oxide (Co3O4 and CoO). To complement this evaluation of the physical properties of metal oxide nanoparticle systems, we will emphasise the importance of high-resolution, high-energy INS for the determination of the structure and dynamics of the water species, namely molecular (H2O) and dissociated water (OH, hydroxyl), confined to the oxide surfaces. For this component of the chapter we will focus on INS investigations of hydrated isostructural rutile (a-TiO2) and cassiterite (SnO2) nanoparticles. We will complete this discussion of nanoparticle analysis by including an appraisal of the INS instrumentation employed in such studies with particular focus on TOSCA [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), U.K.] and the newly developed spectrometer SEQUOIA [SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), U.S.A].

  5. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muetn; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Luca B.

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ?{sub P}?? and the damping constant ?{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ?{sub p} (0.5%1.6%) and for ?{sub free} (3%8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ?{sub p} and ?{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ?{sub p} and ?{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  6. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In addition, Pt-mesoporous silica core-shell structured NPs (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}) were prepared, where the individual Pt NP is encapsulated by the mesoporous silica layer. The Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} catalysts showed promising catalytic activity in high temperature CO oxidation. The design of catalytic structures with tunable parameters by rational synthetic methods presents a major advance in the field of catalyst synthesis, which would lead to uncover the structure-function relationships in heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

  7. Evidence for the formation of nitrogen-rich precious metal nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Baggetto, Loic; Browning, Jim; Keum, Jong Kahk; Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura; Papandrew, Alexander B; Goenaga Jimenez, Gabriel A; Mullins, David R; et al

    2014-01-01

    We report evidence for the formation of nitrogen-rich precious metal nanoparticles (Pt, Pd) prepared by reactive sputtering of the pure metal in a N2 plasma. The composition of the nanoparticles varies as a function of particle size and growth conditions. For the smallest particles the nitrogen content appears to be as high as 6.7 N atoms for each Pd atom or 5.9 N atoms for each Pt atom whereas bulk films have nominal compositions of Pt7.3N and Pd2.5N. The nanoparticles are metastable in air and moisture, slowly decomposing over several years. This paper describes the synthesis of these materials alongmore » with experimental evidence of the composition, oxidation state, and growth modes. The catalytic properties of these N-rich nanoparticles were accessed by rotating disk electrode electrochemical studies, the liquid phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol and gas phase CO oxidation and support the experimental evidence for the materials composition.« less

  8. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J.; El-Sayed, Hany A.

    2015-05-18

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HF solution. Pt thin films (3–5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6–9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  9. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  10. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  11. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  12. Thermal conductivity studies of novel nanofluids based on metallic silver decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Zabihi, Fatemeh

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Metallic silver was decorated in mSiO{sub 2} with grafted hemiaminal functional groups. Synthesized nanoparticles were used for preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. The effect of temperature, weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} and concentration of silver nanoparticles on thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated. - Abstract: In the present study, the mesoporous structure of silica (mSiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles as well as hemiaminal grafted mSiO{sub 2} decorated by metallic silver (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) has been used for the preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. Structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized products have been carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UVvis spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption isotherms. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluids have been measured as a function of temperature for various weight fractions and silver concentrations of mSiO{sub 2} and Ag/mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids increase up to 9.24% as the weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} increases up to 4 wt%. Also, increasing the percent of the silver decorated mSiO{sub 2} (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) up to 2.98% caused an enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid up to 10.95%. Furthermore, the results show that the nanofluids have Newtonian behavior in the tested temperature range for various concentrations of nanoparticles.

  13. Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2012-02-28

    A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

  14. Nanoparticle-based immunosensor with apoferritin templated metallic phosphate label for quantification of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Dan; Chen, Aiqiong; Xie, Yunying; Zhang, Aidong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-15

    A new sandwich-like electrochemical immunosensor has been developed for quantification of organophosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (OP-AChE), an exposure biomarker of organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents. Zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were anchored on a screen printed electrode (SPE) to preferably capture OP-AChE adducts by metal chelation with phospho-moieties, which was selectively recognized by lead phosphate-apoferritin labeled anti-AChE antibody (LPA-anti-AChE). The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among ZrO2 NPs, OP-AChE and LPA-anti-AChE to form ZrO2/OP-AChE/LPA-anti-AChE complex and the released lead ions were detected on a disposable SPE. The binding affinity was investigated by both square wave voltammetry (SWV) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. The proposed immunosensor yielded a linear response current over a broad OP-AChE concentrations range from 0.05 nM to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM, which has enough sensitivity for monitoring of low-dose exposure to OPs. This method avoids the drawback of unavailability of commercial OP-specific antibody as well as amplifies detection signal by using apoferritin encoded metallic phosphate nanoparticle tags. This nanoparticle-based immunosensor offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive quantification of phosphorylated adducts for monitoring of OP pesticides and nerve agents exposures.

  15. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  16. Supercapacitors Based on Metal Electrodes Prepared from Nanoparticle Mixtures at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-01-01

    Films comprising Au and Ag nanoparticles are transformed into porous metal electrodes by desorption of weak organic ligands followed by wet chemical etching of silver. Thus prepared electrodes provide the basis for supercapacitors whose specific capacitances approach 70 F/g. Cyclic voltammetry measurement yield rectangular I-V curves even at high scan rates, indicating that the supercapacitors have low internal resistance. Owing to this property, the supercapacitors have a high power density ~12 kW/kg, comparable with that of the state-of-the-art carbon-based devices. The entire assembly protocol does not require high-temperature processing or the use of organic binders.

  17. Electrodeposited porous metal oxide films with interconnected nanoparticles applied as anode of lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Anguo Zhou, Shibiao; Zuo, Chenggang; Zhuan, Yongbing; Ding, Xiang

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: Highly porous NiO film is prepared by a co-electrodeposition method. Porous NiO film is composed of interconnected nanoparticles. Porous structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. Porous NiO film shows good lithium ion storage properties. - Abstract: Controllable synthesis of porous metal oxide films is highly desirable for high-performance electrochemical devices. In this work, a highly porous NiO film composed of interconnected nanoparticles is prepared by a simple co-electrodeposition method. The nanoparticles in the NiO film have a size ranging from 30 to 100 nm and construct large-quantity pores of 20120 nm. As an anode material for lithium ion batteries, the highly porous NiO film electrode delivers a high discharge capacity of 700 mA h g{sup ?1} at 0.2 C, as well as good high-rate performance. After 100 cycles at 0.2 C, a specific capacitance of 517 mA h g{sup ?1} is attained. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to the interconnected porous structure, which facilitates the diffusion of ion and electron, and provides large reaction surface area leading to improved performance.

  18. Synthesis and anti-bacterial activity of Cu, Ag and Cu-Ag alloy nanoparticles: A green approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valodkar, Mayur; Modi, Shefaly; Pal, Angshuman; Thakore, Sonal

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of novel nanosized copper-silver alloys of different compositions. {yields} Completely green approach for synthesis of water soluble bimetallic nanoparticle. {yields} Interesting anti-bacterial activity of as synthesized metal and alloy nanoparticle. -- Abstract: Metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of copper and silver in various proportions were prepared by microwave assisted chemical reduction in aqueous medium using the biopolymer, starch as a stabilizing agent. Ascorbic acid was used as the reducing agent. The silver and copper nanoparticles exhibited surface plasmon absorption resonance maxima (SPR) at 416 and 584 nm, respectively; while SPR for the Cu-Ag alloys appeared in between depending on the alloy composition. The SPR maxima for bimetallic nanoparticles changes linearly with increasing copper content in the alloy. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) showed monodispersed particles in the range of 20 {+-} 5 nm size. Both silver and copper nanoparticles exhibited emission band at 485 and 645 nm, respectively. The starch-stabilized nanoparticles exhibited interesting antibacterial activity with both gram positive and gram negative bacteria at micromolar concentrations.

  19. Nanocarbon-copper thin film as transparent electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, R. A.; Zhu, H.; Preston, Colin; LeMieux, M.; Jaim, H. M. Iftekhar; Hu, L. Salamanca-Riba, L. G.; Mansour, A.; Zavalij, P. Y.; Rabin, O.

    2015-05-11

    Researchers seeking to enhance the properties of metals have long pursued incorporating carbon in the metallic host lattice in order to combine the strongly bonded electrons in the metal lattice that yield high ampacity and the free electrons available in carbon nanostructures that give rise to high conductivity. The incorporation of carbon nanostructures into the copper lattice has the potential to improve the current density of copper to meet the ever-increasing demands of nanoelectronic devices. We report on the structure and properties of carbon incorporated in concentrations up to 5 wt. % (∼22 at. %) into the crystal structure of copper. Carbon nanoparticles of 5 nm–200 nm in diameter in an interconnecting carbon matrix are formed within the bulk Cu samples. The carbon does not phase separate after subsequent melting and re-solidification despite the absence of a predicted solid solution at such concentrations in the C-Cu binary phase diagram. This material, so-called, Cu covetic, makes deposition of Cu films containing carbon with similar microstructure to the metal possible. Copper covetic films exhibit greater transparency, higher conductivity, and resistance to oxidation than pure copper films of the same thickness, making them a suitable choice for transparent conductors.

  20. Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

    2014-01-28

    The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a doped oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the doped oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The doped metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.18/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at a temperature of 25.degree. C. The optical response of the doped oxide materials results from the high carrier concentration of the doped metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration. These changes in effective carrier densities of conducting metal oxide nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary doped metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

  1. Electronically conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

    2014-09-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a conducting oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the conducting oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The conducting metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.17/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.-1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at the gas stream temperature. The optical response of the conducting oxide materials is proposed to result from the high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity of the conducting metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity. These changes in effective carrier densities and electronic conductivity of conducting metal oxide films and nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary conducting metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

  2. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; et al

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate bymore » pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.« less

  3. Immobilizing Highly Catalytically Active Pt Nanoparticles inside the Pores of Metal-Organic Framework: A Double Solvents Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aijaz, Arshad; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Choi, Young Joon; Tsumori, Nobuko; Ronnebro, Ewa; Autrey, Thomas; Shioyama, Hiroshi; Xu, Qiang

    2012-08-29

    Ultrafine Pt nanoparticles were successfully immobilized inside the pores of a metal-organic framework MIL-101 without deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the external surfaces of framework by using a 'double solvents' method. The resulting Pt@MIL-101 composites with different Pt loadings represent the first highly active MOF-immobilized metal nanocatalysts for catalytic reactions in all three phases: liquid-phase ammonia borane hydrolysis; solid-phase ammonia borane thermal dehy-drogenation and gas-phase CO oxidation. The observed excellent catalytic performances are at-tributed to the small Pt nanoparticles within the pores of MIL-101. 'We are thankful to AIST and METI for financial support. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. PNNL is operated by Battelle.'

  4. Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T.; Gundiler, I.H.

    1995-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support the Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials in discrete sub-components. SNL developed and demonstrated a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The remaining components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. The New Mexico Bureau of Mines & Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies and in the development of a conceptual design for a mechanical separation system.

  5. Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundiler, I.H.; Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T.

    1994-03-03

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support The Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials. SNL developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies.

  6. High Temperature Strength of YSZ Joints Brazed with Palladium Silver Copper Oxide Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2010-06-09

    The Ag-CuOx system is being investigated as potential filler metals for use in air brazing high-temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells and gas concentrators. The current study examines the effects of palladium addition on the high temperature joint strength of specimens prepared from yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) bars brazed with the binary Ag-CuOx, and 15Pd-Ag-CuO. It was found that while the binary Ag-CuOx system exhibits stronger room temperature strength than the 15Pd system the strength is reduced to values equivalent of the 15Pd system at 800C. The 15Pd system exhibits a lower ambient temperature strength that is retained at 800C. In both systems the failure mechanism at high temperature appears to be peeling of the noble metal component from the oxide phases and tearing through the noble metal phase whereas sufficient adhesion is retained at lower temperatures to cause fracture of the YSZ substrate.

  7. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J.; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  8. Strongly modified four-wave mixing in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanoparticle system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paspalakis, Emmanuel; Evangelou, Sofia; Kosionis, Spyridon G.; Terzis, Andreas F.

    2014-02-28

    We study the four-wave mixing effect in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-spherical metal nanoparticle structure. Depending on the values of the pump field intensity and frequency, we find that there is a critical distance that changes the form of the spectrum. Above this distance, the four-wave mixing spectrum shows an ordinary three-peaked form and the effect of controlling its magnitude by changing the interparticle distance can be obtained. Below this critical distance, the four-wave mixing spectrum becomes single-peaked; and as the interparticle distance decreases, the spectrum is strongly suppressed. The behavior of the system is explained using the effective Rabi frequency that creates plasmonic metaresonances in the hybrid structure. In addition, the behavior of the effective Rabi frequency is explained via an analytical solution of the density matrix equations.

  9. Scuffing initiation in metals sliding against copper under non-lubricated conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalchenko, A M; Blau, Peter Julian; Qu, Jun; Danyluk, S

    2011-01-01

    Metallic components in sliding contact are sometimes subjected to high-loads with little or no lubrication. Such starved conditions can lead to a phenomenon called scuffing. Various definitions exist for this term, but in the present case, three criteria were used to signal its onset: changes in friction, vibrations, and noise, coupled with surface examination. On this basis, scuffing initiation was determined for seven technically pure metals (Al, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, Cu) and stainless steel, all rubbing against Cu. A flat-ended pin-on-disk test configuration was used with normal loads of 1-3 N, and with step-wise increases in sliding speed from 0.16 to 2.56 m/s. Al was only weakly resistant to scuffing, presumably due to its solubility in Cu, its high ductility and its relatively low elastic modulus. Niobium provided satisfactory sliding behavior at low speeds and loads, presumably due to protective oxides; however, it scuffed at higher loads when the oxide broke through. Stainless steel, Mo, and Ta had higher friction coefficients than Al and Nb, presumably because the relatively high strengths of the former prevented severe wear even when their oxide films failed. Like Al, Ti scuffs on Cu, probably because of its high relative solubility; however, Ti's higher elastic modulus resists the more severe forms of surface damage than does Al. Of all the materials slid against Cu, W displayed the least scuffing, even under maximum speed and load. Tungsten's negligible solubility in Cu may have reduced its adhesion, and W's high elastic modulus resisted shear-deformation, even at high frictional heating. Self-mated Cu couple scuffed when the speed was increased. The oxides on the Cu surface serve as solid lubricant avoiding scuffing at lower speeds.

  10. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  11. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2015-11-20

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  12. Effect of a copper filler metal on the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welded titanium-stainless steel joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ting, E-mail: fgwangting@163.com [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); Zhang, Binggang, E-mail: zhang_bg@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Feng, Jicai, E-mail: fengjc@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China) [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Tang, Qi, E-mail: tangqi@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Cracking in an electron beam weld of titanium to stainless steel occurred during the cooling process because of internal thermal stress. Using a copper filler metal, a crack free joint was obtained, which had a tensile strength of 310 MPa. To determine the reasons for cracking in the Ti/Fe joint and the function of the copper filler metal on the improvement of the cracking resistance of the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, the microstructures of the joints were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The cracking susceptibilities of the joints were evaluated with microhardness tests on the cross-sections. In addition, microindentation tests were used to compare the brittleness of the intermetallics in the welds. The results showed that the Ti/Fe joint was characterized by continuously distributed brittle intermetallics such as TiFe and TiFe(Cr){sub 2} with high hardness ({approx} 1200 HV). For the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, most of the weld consisted of a soft solid solution of copper with dispersed TiFe intermetallics. The transition region between the weld and the titanium alloy was made up of a relatively soft Ti-Cu intermetallic layer with a lower hardness ({approx} 500 HV). The formation of soft phases reduced the cracking susceptibility of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Fe joint cracked for the brittleness and residual stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Cu/Fe joint with tensile strength of 310 MPa was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu diluted Ti and Fe contents in weld and separated the TiFe{sub 2} into individual blocks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial hard Ti-Fe compounds were replaced by soft Ti-Cu compounds in the weld. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of solid solution of copper formed in the weld.

  13. Collective photonic-plasmonic resonances in noble metal - dielectric nanoparticle hybrid arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hong, Yan; Reinhard, Bjrn M.

    2014-10-27

    Coherent scattering of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) in regular arrays can generate Surface Lattice Resonances (SLRs) with characteristically sharp spectral features. Herein, we investigate collective resonances in compositionally more complex arrays comprising NP clusters and NPs with different chemical compositions at pre-defined lattice sites. We first characterize the impact of NP clustering by exchanging individual gold NPs in the array through dimers of electromagnetically strongly coupled gold NPs. Then, we analyze hybrid arrays that contain both gold metal NP dimers and high refractive index dielectric NPs as building blocks. We demonstrate that the integration of gold NP clusters andmoredielectric NPs into one array enhances E-field intensities not only in the vicinity of the NPs but also in the ambient medium of the entire array. In addition, this work shows that the ability to integrate multiple building blocks with different resonance conditions in one array provides new degrees of freedom for engineering optical fields in the array plane with variable amplitude and phase.less

  14. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keates, Adam C.; Wang, Qianlong; Weller, Mark T.

    2014-02-15

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42{sub 1}m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?} with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO{sub 4} tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 4?} diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO{sub 8} square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the JahnTeller (JT) effect for the high spin d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d{sup 9} Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?}, formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO{sub 4} tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of JahnTeller (JT) effects for high spin, d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d{sup 9} Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. New layered phosphate structure. JahnTeller and d{sup 10} distorted coordinations.

  15. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; Slowing, Igor I.

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic form and thereby activates hydrogen.

  16. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; Slowing, Igor I.

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic formmore » and thereby activates hydrogen.« less

  17. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Davis, John W.

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  18. Identifying low-coverage surface species on noble metal nanoparticles by DNP-NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frdric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on ?-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  19. Converting Homogeneous to Heterogeneous in Electrophilic Catalysis using Monodisperse Metal Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witham, Cole A.; Huang, Wenyu; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Toste, F. Dean

    2009-10-15

    A continuing goal in catalysis is the transformation of processes from homogeneous to heterogeneous. To this end, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in heterogeneous catalysis, where this conversion is supplemented by the ability to obtain new or divergent reactivity and selectivity. We report a novel method for applying heterogeneous catalysts to known homogeneous catalytic reactions through the design and synthesis of electrophilic platinum nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are selectively oxidized by the hypervalent iodine species PhICl{sub 2}, and catalyze a range of {pi}-bond activation reactions previously only homogeneously catalyzed. Multiple experimental methods are utilized to unambiguously verify the heterogeneity of the catalytic process. The discovery of treatments for nanoparticles that induce the desired homogeneous catalytic activity should lead to the further development of reactions previously inaccessible in heterogeneous catalysis. Furthermore, our size and capping agent study revealed that Pt PAMAM dendrimer-capped nanoparticles demonstrate superior activity and recyclability compared to larger, polymer-capped analogues.

  20. Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589

    2014-03-10

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

  1. Plasma stabilisation of metallic nanoparticles on silicon for the growth of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esconjauregui, S.; Fouquet, M.; Bayer, B. C.; Gamalski, A. D.; Chen Bingan; Xie Rongsi; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J.; Cepek, C.; Bhardwaj, S.; Ducati, C.

    2012-08-01

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) plasma pretreatment is used to form and temporarily reduce the mobility of Ni, Co, or Fe nanoparticles on boron-doped mono- and poly-crystalline silicon. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy proves that NH{sub 3} plasma nitrides the Si supports during nanoparticle formation which prevents excessive nanoparticle sintering/diffusion into the bulk of Si during carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapour deposition. The nitridation of Si thus leads to nanotube vertical alignment and the growth of nanotube forests by root growth mechanism.

  2. Microwave-assisted synthesis and photovoltaic measurements of CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by using metalorganic precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa; Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran ; Venkateswara-Rao, K.

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared using complexes via a microwave-assisted method. ? The effect of preparation parameters on the morphology of CuInS{sub 2} was investigated. ? The as-deposited CdS/CuInS{sub 2} films were used for the photovoltaic measurements. -- Abstract: In this work, CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles have been synthesized with the aid of (1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctan)copper(II) sulfate ([Cu(DADO)]SO{sub 4}) and bis(propylenediamine)copper(II) sulfate ([Cu(pn){sub 2}]SO{sub 4}) complexes as copper precursor in the presence of microwave irradiation. Besides, L-cystine, InCl{sub 3}, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were applied as sulfur source, indium precursor, and capping agent, respectively. To investigate the effect of preparation parameters like microwave power and irradiation time on the morphology and particle size of CuInS{sub 2}, the experiment was carried out at different conditions. The as-synthesized CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, PL, SEM, TEM, and EDS. The XRD results showed that pure tetragonal CuInS{sub 2} could be only obtained after annealing at 400 C for 2 h. The SEM images indicated that with decreasing the microwave power and irradiation time, particle size of CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles decreased. To fabricate a solar cell, CdS film was directly deposited on top of the CIS film prepared by Doctor's blade method through chemical bath deposition. The as-deposited CdS/CuInS{sub 2} films were used for the photovoltaic measurements.

  3. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  4. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frdric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on ?-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  5. Mssbauer study of metallic iron and iron oxide nanoparticles having environmental purifying ability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubuki, Shiro Watanabe, Yuka Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Risti?, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko; Homonnay, Zoltn; Kuzmann, Ern?; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2014-10-27

    A relationship between local structure and methylene blue (MB) decomposing ability of nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic iron (Fe{sup 0}) and maghemite (??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy. ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were successfully prepared by mixing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}?6H{sub 2}O (Mohr's salt) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}?3H{sub 2}O aqueous solution at 30 C for 1 h, while those of Fe{sup 0} were obtained by the reduction of Mohr's salt with NaBH{sub 4}. From the Scherrer's equation, the smallest crystallite sizes of ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs and Fe{sup 0} NPs were determined to be 9.7 and 1.5 nm, respectively. {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectrum of ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs consists of a relaxed sextet with isomer shift (?) of 0.33{sub 0.01} mm s{sup ?1}, internal magnetic field (H{sub int}) of 25.8{sub 0.5} T, and linewidth (?) of 0.62{sub 0.04} mm s{sup ?1}. {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectrum of Fe{sup 0} NP is mainly composed of a sextet having ?, ?, and H{sub int} of 0.00{sub 0.01} mm s{sup ?1} 0.45{sub 0.01} mm s{sup ?1}, and 22.8{sub 0.1} T, respectively. A bleaching test of the mixture of Fe{sup 0} and ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (3:7 ratio, 100 mg) in MB aqueous solution (20 mL) for 6 h showed a remarkable decrease of MB concentration with the first-order rate constant (k{sub MB}) of 6.7 10{sup ?1} h{sup ?1}. This value is larger than that obtained for the bleaching test using bulk Fe{sup 0}+??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (3:7) mixture (k{sub MB}?=?6.510{sup ?3}h{sup ?1}). These results prove that MB decomposing ability is enhanced by the NPs mixture of Fe{sub 0} and ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  6. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  7. Metallic nanoparticles grown in the core of femtosecond laser micromachined waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, J. M. P.; Ferreira, P. H. D.; Mendona, C. R.; Manzani, D.; Napoli, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.

    2014-05-21

    3D-waveguides containing silver nanoparticles have been fabricated in tungsten leadpyrophosphate glass by femtosecond laser micromachining. Nucleation and growth of nanoparticles occur in a single step process when high repetition rate laser (MHz) is employed, while an additional annealing is required for the irradiation using kHz laser system. The presence of nanoparticles locally changes the refractive index, and, therefore, the elliptical structures produced by direct laser writing were able to guide light. By increasing the pulse energy applied during the micromachining, the waveguide size increased from 2 to 30??m, while their propagation loss decrease from 1.4 to 0.5?dB/mm at 632.8?nm.

  8. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  9. Method for producing metallic microparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-06-29

    Method for producing metallic particles. The method converts metallic nanoparticles into larger, spherical metallic particles. An aerosol of solid metallic nanoparticles and a non-oxidizing plasma having a portion sufficiently hot to melt the nanoparticles are generated. The aerosol is directed into the plasma where the metallic nanoparticles melt, collide, join, and spheroidize. The molten spherical metallic particles are directed away from the plasma and enter the afterglow where they cool and solidify.

  10. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  11. Fermentative process for making inorganic nanoparticles (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermentative process for making inorganic nanoparticles Title: Fermentative process for making inorganic nanoparticles A method for producing mixed metal oxide compounds includes ...

  12. Fe3-xTixO4 Nanoparticles as Tunable Probes of Microbial Metal Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-05-14

    Present and emerging biotechnological applications for iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanomaterials depend on their interaction with microorganisms, as do their toxicity, transport, and fate in biological and environmental systems. However, mass or electron transfer along key molecular pathways at microbe-nanomaterial interfaces is extremely difficult to quantify because of system complexity. Inspired by Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes widespread in nature, we isolate and characterize one such pathway by examining the oxidation of Fe3-xTixO4 (magnetite-titanomagnetite) nanoparticles by the bacterial electron transfer enzyme MtoA, a decaheme c-type cytochrome. Oxidation by MtoA was studied as a function of the thermodynamic driving force for electron transfer by controlling the Ti(IV) doping content (x), which tunes the solid-state Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio built into the nanoparticles. A higher Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio appears to proportionally increase the electron transfer kinetics to the cytochrome. In situ x-ray diffraction indicated that during oxidation the spinel ferrite lattice remains intact while structural Fe(II) is progressively depleted. Surface and atomic site specific Fe L2,3-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism indicated that MtoA directly accesses magnetically-ordered B-sublattice Fe(II) at the interface. This study provides first quantitative insights into an isolated molecular pathway for biotransformation of iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanomaterials. And, more generally, it also illustrates new techniques for probing these pathways in detail, featuring use of tailored nanoparticles, purified metalloenzyme, and synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopies.

  13. Electroless copper plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael R.

    1998-12-15

    An optimized electroless copper plating technique suitable for plating electroless copper upon ceramics.

  14. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  15. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  16. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  17. T I ENHANCING THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF FLUIDS WITH NANOPARTICLES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hamilton and Crasser (1962) have developed a more elaborate model for the effective ... Applying the Hamilton and Crasser model to copper nanoparticles in water, the effective ...

  18. Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrop, Forrest B.; Jones, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

  19. Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Graphic showing the five layers of a CIGS PV cell: glass (or metal foil or plastics), Mo, CIGS, CdS, and transparent conductive oxide. DOE supports innovative research focused on overcoming the current technological and commercial barreirs for copper indium gallium diselenide [Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2], or CIGS, solar cells. A list of current projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion on the production and manufacturing of this

  20. Transition Metal Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Multiple Bonds: Exploration of Second Generation Ruthenium Catalysts and Extension to Copper Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Brent Gunnoe

    2011-02-17

    Catalysts provide foundational technology for the development of new materials and can enhance the efficiency of routes to known materials. New catalyst technologies offer the possibility of reducing energy and raw material consumption as well as enabling chemical processes with a lower environmental impact. The rising demand and expense of fossil resources has strained national and global economies and has increased the importance of accessing more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons to useful products. The goals of the research are to develop and understand single-site homogeneous catalysts for the conversion of readily available hydrocarbons into useful materials. A detailed understanding of these catalytic reactions could lead to the development of catalysts with improved activity, longevity and selectivity. Such transformations could reduce the environmental impact of hydrocarbon functionalization, conserve energy and valuable fossil resources and provide new technologies for the production of liquid fuels. This project is a collaborative effort that incorporates both experimental and computational studies to understand the details of transition metal catalyzed C-H activation and C-C bond forming reactions with olefins. Accomplishments of the current funding period include: (1) We have completed and published studies of C-H activation and catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu{l_brace}P(pyr){sub 3}{r_brace}(NCMe)R (pyr = N-pyrrolyl) complexes. While these systems efficiently initiate stoichiometric benzene C-H activation, catalytic olefin hydroarylation is hindered by inhibition of olefin coordination, which is a result of the steric bulk of the P(pyr){sub 3} ligand. (2) We have extended our studies of catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph systems to L = P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt. Thus, we have now completed detailed mechanistic studies of four systems with L = CO, PMe{sub 3}, P(pyr){sub 3} and P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt, which has provided a comprehensive understanding of the impact of steric and electronic parameters of 'L' on the catalytic hydroarylation of olefins. (3) We have completed and published a detailed mechanistic study of stoichiometric aromatic C-H activation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph (L = CO or PMe{sub 3}). These efforts have probed the impact of functionality para to the site of C-H activation for benzene substrates and have allowed us to develop a detailed model of the transition state for the C-H activation process. These results have led us to conclude that the C-H bond cleavage occurs by a {sigma}-bond metathesis process in which the C-H transfer is best viewed as an intramolecular proton transfer. (4) We have completed studies of Ru complexes possessing the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene). One of these systems is a unique four-coordinate Ru(II) complex that catalyzes the oxidative hydrophenylation of ethylene (in low yields) to produce styrene and ethane (utilizing ethylene as the hydrogen acceptor) as well as the hydrogenation of olefins, aldehydes and ketones. These results provide a map for the preparation of catalysts that are selective for oxidative olefin hydroarylation. (5) The ability of TpRu(PMe{sub 3})(NCMe)R systems to activate sp{sup 3} C-H bonds has been demonstrated including extension to subsequent C-C bond forming steps. These results open the door to the development of catalysts for the functionalization of more inert C-H bonds. (6) We have discovered that Pt(II) complexes supported by simple nitrogen-based ligands serve as catalysts for the hydroarylation of olefins. Given the extensive studies of Pt-based catalytic C-H activation, we believe these results will provide an entry point into an array of possible catalysts for hydrocarbon functionalization.

  1. Low-temperature route to metal titanate perovskite nanoparticles for photocatalytic applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alammar, Tarek; Hamm, Ines; Wark, Michael; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-11-13

    MTiO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step room-temperature ultrasound synthesis in ionic liquid. The samples we gathered are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, UV–vis diffuse reflectance, Raman and IR spectroscopy and their capability in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and methylene blue degradation was tested. Powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic investigations revealed the products to crystallize in the cubic perovskite structure. SEM observations showed that the obtained CaTiO3 consists of nanospheres, BaTiO3 of raspberry-like shaped particles of 20 nm in diameter. SrTiO3 particles have cubic-like morphology with an edge length varying frommore » 100 to 300 nm. SrTiO3 exhibited the highest catalytic activity for photocatalytic H2 evolution using only 0.025 wt.% Rh as co-catalyst and for the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. The influence of parameters such as synthesis method, calcination temperature, and doping with nitrogen on the morphology, crystallinity, chemical composition, and photocatalytic acivity of SrTiO3 was studied. Heating the as-prepared SrTiO3 to 700 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and catalytic activity. Ionothermal prepared SrTiO3 exhibits a higher activity than sonochemically prepared one without co-catalyst due to a synergistic effect of anatase which is present in small amount as a by-phase. Furthermore, after photodeposition of Rh, however, the activity is lower than that of the sonochemically prepared SrTiO3. Nitrogen-doped SrTiO3 showed photocatalytic acivity under visible light irradiation.« less

  2. Low-temperature route to metal titanate perovskite nanoparticles for photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alammar, Tarek; Hamm, Ines; Wark, Michael; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-11-13

    MTiO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step room-temperature ultrasound synthesis in ionic liquid. The samples we gathered are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, UV–vis diffuse reflectance, Raman and IR spectroscopy and their capability in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and methylene blue degradation was tested. Powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic investigations revealed the products to crystallize in the cubic perovskite structure. SEM observations showed that the obtained CaTiO3 consists of nanospheres, BaTiO3 of raspberry-like shaped particles of 20 nm in diameter. SrTiO3 particles have cubic-like morphology with an edge length varying from 100 to 300 nm. SrTiO3 exhibited the highest catalytic activity for photocatalytic H2 evolution using only 0.025 wt.% Rh as co-catalyst and for the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. The influence of parameters such as synthesis method, calcination temperature, and doping with nitrogen on the morphology, crystallinity, chemical composition, and photocatalytic acivity of SrTiO3 was studied. Heating the as-prepared SrTiO3 to 700 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and catalytic activity. Ionothermal prepared SrTiO3 exhibits a higher activity than sonochemically prepared one without co-catalyst due to a synergistic effect of anatase which is present in small amount as a by-phase. Furthermore, after photodeposition of Rh, however, the activity is lower than that of the sonochemically prepared SrTiO3. Nitrogen-doped SrTiO3 showed photocatalytic acivity under visible light irradiation.

  3. Electroless copper plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHenry, M.R.

    1998-12-15

    An optimized electroless copper plating technique is described suitable for plating electroless copper upon ceramics. 12 figs.

  4. Palladium Coated Copper Nanowires as a Hydrogen Oxidation Electrocatalyst in Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alia, Shaun M.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-05-09

    The palladium (Pd) nanotubes we synthesized by the spontaneous galvanic displacement of copper (Cu) nanowires, are forming extended surface nanostructures highly active for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in base. The synthesized catalysts produce specific activities in rotating disk electrode half-cells 20 times greater than Pd nanoparticles and about 80% higher than polycrystalline Pd. Although the surface area of the Pd nanotubes was low compared to conventional catalysts, partial galvanic displacement thrifted the noble metal layer and increased the Pd surface area. Moreover, the use of Pd coated Cu nanowires resulted in a HOR mass exchange current density 7 times greater than the Pd nanoparticles. The activity of the Pd coated Cu nanowires further nears Pt/C, producing 95% of the mass activity.

  5. Palladium Coated Copper Nanowires as a Hydrogen Oxidation Electrocatalyst in Base

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alia, Shaun M.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-05-09

    The palladium (Pd) nanotubes we synthesized by the spontaneous galvanic displacement of copper (Cu) nanowires, are forming extended surface nanostructures highly active for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in base. The synthesized catalysts produce specific activities in rotating disk electrode half-cells 20 times greater than Pd nanoparticles and about 80% higher than polycrystalline Pd. Although the surface area of the Pd nanotubes was low compared to conventional catalysts, partial galvanic displacement thrifted the noble metal layer and increased the Pd surface area. Moreover, the use of Pd coated Cu nanowires resulted in a HOR mass exchange current density 7 timesmore » greater than the Pd nanoparticles. The activity of the Pd coated Cu nanowires further nears Pt/C, producing 95% of the mass activity.« less

  6. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  7. Oxidative homo-coupling reactions of aryl boronic acids using a porous copper metal-organic framework as a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Lu, Zheng

    2015-06-02

    The disclosure provides methods for the use of open metal frameworks to catalyze coupling reactions.

  8. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  9. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2001-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  10. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  11. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Powers, Dana A.; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  12. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  13. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  14. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  15. Method and electrochemical cell for synthesis and treatment of metal monolayer electrocatalysts metal, carbon, and oxide nanoparticles ion batch, or in continuous fashion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2015-04-28

    An apparatus and method for synthesis and treatment of electrocatalyst particles in batch or continuous fashion is provided. In one embodiment, the apparatus comprises a sonication bath and a two-compartment chamber submerged in the sonication bath. The upper and lower compartments are separated by a microporous material surface. The upper compartment comprises a cover and a working electrode (WE) connected to a Pt foil contact, with the foil contact connected to the microporous material. The upper chamber further comprises reference counter electrodes. The lower compartment comprises an electrochemical cell containing a solution of metal ions. In one embodiment, the method for synthesis of electrocatalysts comprises introducing a plurality of particles into the apparatus and applying sonication and an electrical potential to the microporous material connected to the WE. After the non-noble metal ions are deposited onto the particles, the non-noble metal ions are displaced by noble-metal ions by galvanic displacement.

  16. Controlled Metal Photodeposition - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures High yields of site-selective nanoparticles Simple, scalable method for metal photodeposition Applications and Industries The...

  17. Volume-labeled nanoparticles and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2015-04-21

    Compositions comprising nanosized objects (i.e., nanoparticles) in which at least one observable marker, such as a radioisotope or fluorophore, is incorporated within the nanosized object. The nanosized objects include, for example, metal or semi-metal oxide (e.g., silica), quantum dot, noble metal, magnetic metal oxide, organic polymer, metal salt, and core-shell nanoparticles, wherein the label is incorporated within the nanoparticle or selectively in a metal oxide shell of a core-shell nanoparticle. Methods of preparing the volume-labeled nanoparticles are also described.

  18. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  19. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

    1984-01-06

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

  20. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  1. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  2. TREATMENT OF METALS PRIOR TO ELECTROPLATING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huddle, R.A.U.; Flint, O.

    1958-05-20

    The preparation of certain metal surfaces to receive electrodeposits is described. Surfaces of the metals are subjected to shot blasting by ferrous metal shot, and the surfaces then are given a coating of copper by displacement from a copper salt solution. The method applies to U, Zr, Ti, Ta, Ni, Mo, W, and V.

  3. Tracking Individual Gold Nanoparticles | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Individual Gold Nanoparticles Researchers have developed a new way to track gold nanorods as they move around and re-orient themselves on metal surfaces, with...

  4. Colloidal synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported Pd-Cu nanoparticle oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kariuki, N. N.; Wang, X.; Mawdsley, J. R.; Ferrandon, M. S.; Niyogi, S. G.; Vaughey, J. T.; Myers, D. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-07-27

    The ability to control the size and composition of metal or alloys nanoparticles is important in preparing catalysts. This paper reports a colloidal synthesis methodology for the preparation of monodisperse palladium-copper (Pd-Cu) alloy nanoparticles with an average diameter of 3 nm for the as-prepared particles and 5-10 nm upon removal of the capping agents. Our approach involves the use of metal precursors, capping agents, and reducing agents in controlled ratios for nanoparticle formation in a single organic phase, followed by deposition of the capped nanoparticles on high surface area carbon and removal of the capping agents via heat treatment in either oxidizing or reducing atmosphere. The results of characterizations using transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature programmed oxidation and reduction combined with mass spectrometry (TPO/TPR-MS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) are discussed. The resulting high-surface-area-carbon-supported Pd-Cu catalysts (PdCu/C) showed high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic electrolyte. Our study revealed composition and heat-treatment dependent ORR activity.

  5. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  6. Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso In the well-known Greek legend the touch of King Midas would convert anything to metallic gold. Recently, a team working at SSRL lead by Professor Jorge Gardea-Torresdey from the University of Texas at El Paso have shown that ordinary alfalfa plants can accumulate very small particles (nanoparticles) of metallic gold (1). The best-known materials that contain nanoparticles of metallic gold are gold colloids. These lack the familiar metallic

  7. COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

  8. In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parent, Lucas R.; Robinson, David B.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Hartnett, Ryan J.; Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Arslan, Ilke

    2014-01-17

    The prevalent approach to developing new nanomaterials is a trial-and-error process of iteratively altering synthesis procedures and then characterizing the resulting nanostructures. This is fundamentally limited in that the growth processes that occur during synthesis can be inferred only from the final synthetic structure. Directly observing real-time nanomaterial growth provides unprecedented insight into the relationship between synthesis conditions and product evolution and facilitates a mechanistic approach to nanomaterial development. Here, we use in situ liquid-stage scanning transmission electron microscopy to observe the growth of mesoporous palladium in a solvated block copolymer (BCP) template under various synthesis conditions, and we ultimately determined a refined synthesis procedure that yields extended structures with ordered pores. We found that after sufficient drying time of the casting solvent (tetrahydrofuran, THF), the BCP assembles into a rigid, cylindrical micelle array with a high degree of short-range order but poor long-range order. Upon slowing the THF evaporation rate using a solvent-vapor anneal step, the long-range order was greatly improved. The electron beam induces nucleation of small particles in the aqueous phase around the micelles. The small particles then flocculate and grow into denser structures that surround, but do not overgrow, the micelles, forming an ordered mesoporous structure. The microscope observations revealed that pore disorder can be addressed prior to metal reduction and is not invariably induced by the Pd growth process itself, allowing for more rapid optimization of the synthetic method.

  9. Solid state consolidation nanocrystalline copper-tungsten using cold spray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; Sarobol, Pylin; Argibay, Nicolas; Clark, Blythe; Diantonio, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that nanostructured metals can exhibit significantly improved properties compared to metals with conventional grain size. Unfortunately, nanocrystalline metals typically are not thermodynamically stable and exhibit rapid grain growth at moderate temperatures. This severely limits their processing and use, making them impractical for most engineering applications. Recent work has shown that a number of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metal alloys exist. These alloys have been prepared as powders using severe plastic deformation (e.g. ball milling) processes. Consolidation of these powders without compromise of their nanocrystalline microstructure is a critical step to enabling their use as engineering materials. We demonstrate solid-state consolidation of ball milled copper-tantalum nanocrystalline metal powder using cold spray. Unfortunately, the nanocrystalline copper-tantalum powder that was consolidated did not contain the thermodynamically stable copper-tantalum nanostructure. Nevertheless, this does this demonstrates a pathway to preparation of bulk thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Furthermore, it demonstrates a pathway to additive manufacturing (3D printing) of nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Additive manufacturing of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metals is attractive because it enables maximum flexibility and efficiency in the use of these unique materials.

  10. High adherence copper plating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  11. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  12. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  13. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing metal solidification nondestructively Probing metal solidification nondestructively This is the first time that high-energy protons have been used to nondestructively image a large metal sample during melting and solidification. April 11, 2014 An x-ray image of a 200 micron thick aluminum-14 atomic percent copper alloy during directional solidification, highlighting the growth of an aluminum-rich branched structure (dendrite) and the advancing solid-liquid (planar) interface. The

  14. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  15. Atomistic insights into aqueous corrosion of copper. (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Atomistic insights into aqueous corrosion of copper. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomistic insights into aqueous corrosion of copper. Corrosion is a fundamental problem in electrochemistry and represents a mode of failure of technologically important materials. Understanding the basic mechanism of aqueous corrosion of metals such as Cu in presence of halide ions is hence essential. Using molecular dynamics simulations incorporating reactive force-field

  16. METHOD OF APPLYING COPPER COATINGS TO URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protecting metallic uranium, which comprises anodic etching of the uranium in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution containing chloride ions, cleaning the etched uranium in aqueous nitric acid solution, promptly electro-plating the cleaned uranium in a copper electro-plating bath, and then electro-plating thereupon lead, tin, zinc, cadmium, chromium or nickel from an aqueous electro-plating bath.

  17. DNA Origami Directed Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as spatially addressable templates to organize noble-metal nanoparticles of silver and gold into well-defined discrete architectures visualized by TEM. Date of online publication:...

  18. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  19. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Platinum-Coated Non-Noble Metal-Noble Metal Core-Shell Electrocatalyst...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of platinum. The nanoparticles have a core-shell structure and include palladium, gold, and their alloys with other transition metals. The platinum-coated composite can be...

  1. Asymmetric Hybrid Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chumanov, George

    2015-11-05

    Hybrid Nanoparticles (AHNs) are rationally-designed multifunctional nanostructures and novel building blocks for the next generation of advanced materials and devices. Nanoscale materials attract considerable interest because of their unusual properties and potential for practical applications. Most of the activity in this field is focused on the synthesis of homogeneous nanoparticles from metals, metal oxides, semiconductors, and polymers. It is well recognized that properties of nanoparticles can be further enhanced if they are made as hybrid structures. This program is concerned with the synthesis, characterization, and application of such hybrid structures termed AHNs. AHNs are composed of a homogeneous core and several caps of different materials deposited on its surface (Fig. 1). Combined properties of the core and the caps as well as new properties that arise from core-cap and cap-cap interactions render AHNs multifunctional. In addition, specific chemical reactivity of the caps enables directional self-assembly of AHNs into complex architectures that are not possible with only spherical nanoparticles.

  2. Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2013-08-20

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  3. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  4. The preparation of a novel polymer film based on salicylaldoxime and its influence on aqueous copper electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Vaughan, D.H.; Cardosi, M.F.

    1994-07-01

    The metal complexing ligand salicylaldoxime was electropolymerized onto platinum electrodes and the resulting film characterized by reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy. The modified electrode response to aqueous iron, copper, cobalt and lead ions was investigated with the iron(III) and copper (II) ions showing significantly altered electrochemistry. The response of the modified electrode towards aqueous copper ion was found to be directly proportional to copper concentration with little interference from lead ions. The retention of copper ions, film stability and the nature of the film action are discussed along with its potential use in sensor construction.

  5. High adherence copper plating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  6. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  7. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  8. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  9. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  10. Catalytic synthesis of metal crystals using conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang

    2008-01-15

    A method of forming metal nanoparticles using a polymer colloid that includes at least one conductive polymer and at least one polyelectrolyte. Metal ions are reduced in water by the conductive polymer to produce the nanoparticles, which may be then incorporated in the colloidal structure to form a colloid composite. The method can also be used to separate selected metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  11. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  12. Ordered porous mesostructured materials from nanoparticle-block copolymer self-assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Scott; Wiesner, Ulrich; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides mesostructured materials and methods of preparing mesostructured materials including metal-rich mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrids, porous metal-nonmetal nanocomposite mesostructures, and ordered metal mesostructures with uniform pores. The nanoparticles can be metal, metal alloy, metal mixture, intermetallic, metal-carbon, metal-ceramic, semiconductor-carbon, semiconductor-ceramic, insulator-carbon or insulator-ceramic nanoparticles, or combinations thereof. A block copolymer/ligand-stabilized nanoparticle solution is cast, resulting in the formation of a metal-rich (or semiconductor-rich or insulator-rich) mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrid. The hybrid is heated to an elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of an ordered porous nanocomposite mesostructure. A nonmetal component (e.g., carbon or ceramic) is then removed to produce an ordered mesostructure with ordered and large uniform pores.

  13. Gold Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Science Perspective Chemistry World 16 December 2007 Structure of a Coated Gold Nanoparticle summary written by Amber Dance, SLAC Communication Office A team of...

  14. Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vieth, Gabriel M. [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J. [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-10

    A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of silver- and copper-coated Nylon 6 forcespun nanofibers by thermal evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihut, Dorina M., E-mail: dorinamm@yahoo.com; Lozano, Karen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas Pan American, 1201 W University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539 (United States); Foltz, Heinrich [Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Texas Pan American, 1201 W University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Silver and copper nanoparticles were deposited as thin films onto substrates consisting of Nylon 6 nanofibers manufactured using forcespinning{sup } equipment. Different rotational speeds were used to obtain continuous nanofibers of various diameters arranged as nonwoven mats. The Nylon 6 nanofibers were collected as successive layers on frames, and a high-vacuum thermal evaporation method was used to deposit the silver and copper thin films on the nanofibers. The structures were investigated using scanning electron microscopyscanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electrical resistance measurements. The results indicate that evaporated silver and copper nanoparticles were successfully deposited on Nylon 6 nanofibers as thin films that adhered well to the polymer substrate while the native morphology of the nanofibers were preserved, and electrically conductive nanostructures were achieved.

  16. Copper deposition on TiO{sub 2} from copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, David G.; Mulley, James S.; Bennett, Roger A.

    2013-01-15

    The authors have studied the adsorption of Cu{sup II}(hfac){sub 2} on the surface of a model oxide system, TiO{sub 2}(110), and probed the molecular stability with respect to thermal cycling, using atomic scale imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy supported by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. They find that at 473 K, the adsorbed metal-organic molecules begin to dissociate and release Cu atoms which aggregate and form Cu nanoparticles. These Cu nanoparticles ripen over time and the size (height) distribution develops into a bimodal distribution. Unlike other organometallic systems, which show a bimodal distribution due to enhanced nucleation or growth at surface step edges, the nanoparticles do not preferentially form at steps. The reduced mobility of the Cu islands may be related to the co-adsorbed ligands that remain in very small clusters on the surface.

  17. Die Casting Copper Motor Rotors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Though it conducts electricity less efficiently than copper, aluminum is the industry’s preferred fabrication material in electric induction motor rotors. Traditional tool steel casting molds...

  18. Further reduction of efficiency droop effect by adding a lower-index dielectric interlayer in a surface plasmon coupled blue light-emitting diode with surface metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chun-Han; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hui; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shih, Pei-Ying; Chen, Horng-Shyang; Hsieh, Chieh; Kiang, Yean-Woei Yang, C. C.; Kuo, Yang

    2014-09-08

    Further reduction of the efficiency droop effect and further enhancements of internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and output intensity of a surface plasmon coupled, blue-emitting light-emitting diode (LED) by inserting a dielectric interlayer (DI) of a lower refractive index between p-GaN and surface Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated. The insertion of a DI leads to a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance spectrum and increases the LSP coupling strength at the quantum well emitting wavelength in the blue range. With SiO{sub 2} as the DI, a thinner DI leads to a stronger LSP coupling effect, when compared with the case of a thicker DI. By using GaZnO, which is a dielectric in the optical range and a good conductor under direct-current operation, as the DI, the LSP coupling results in the highest IQE, highest LED output intensity, and weakest droop effect.

  19. Fabrication of two-dimensional Au at FePt core-shell nanoparticle arrays by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    photochemical metal deposition (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Fabrication of two-dimensional Au at FePt core-shell nanoparticle arrays by photochemical metal deposition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fabrication of two-dimensional Au at FePt core-shell nanoparticle arrays by photochemical metal deposition In this report, we experimentally demonstrate that single platinum nanoparticles exhibit the necessary catalytic activity

  20. Precision Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    John Hemminger

    2010-01-08

    A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

  1. KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * ?a, a5 fF#LG 44 it .L &=d ,,*, " ~=iL.oeL~~ KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION 101 EAST 42.. STREET $7/$ ,2 : -$ NEW YORU 17, N. Y. AND KOPPERS COMPAN,Y, INC. KOppERS B",'o,,,,G PITTSBURGH 19. PA. Classification Officer, OR0 October ,30, l!% ?!r. S. R. Saptile, Mmagez Oak Ridge Operations Office II. S. Atomic Enerfg Comission P. 0. BOX R. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Attention; Hr. John It. Moore, Director Contract Dltisloa Subjects Addendum (A) to F~oposal for a Feed Materials Processing

  2. Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Zhang, Chuanlun; Roh, Yul

    2002-09-03

    Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

  3. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Inger M

    2008-08-15

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  4. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  5. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  6. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  7. METALLIC AND HYBRID NANOSTRUCTURES: FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.

    2012-05-02

    This book chapter presents an overview of research conducted in our laboratory on preparation, optical and physico-chemical properties of metallic and nanohybrid materials. Metallic nanoparticles, particularly gold, silver, platinum or a combination of those are the main focus of this review manuscript. These metallic nanoparticles were further functionalized and used as templates for creation of complex and ordered nanomaterials with tailored and tunable structural, optical, catalytic and surface properties. Controlling the surface chemistry on/off metallic nanoparticles allows production of advanced nanoarchitectures. This includes coupled or encapsulated core-shell geometries, nano-peapods, solid or hollow, monometallic/bimetallic, hybrid nanoparticles. Rational assemblies of these nanostructures into one-, two- and tridimensional nano-architectures is described and analyzed. Their sensing, environmental and energy related applications are reviewed.

  8. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  9. Methods for making a supported iron-copper catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst is described for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO+H.sub.2 utilizing a porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support impregnated with iron and copper and optionally promoted with an alkali metal. The use of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support results in the suppression of heavy waxes (C.sub.26 + hydrocarbons), particularly in slurry phase operation, when compared to unsupported or co-precipitated catalysts.

  10. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  11. Nanosensors based on functionalized nanoparticles and surface enhanced raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Talley, Chad E.; Huser, Thomas R.; Hollars, Christopher W.; Lane, Stephen M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hart, Bradley R.; Laurence, Ted A.

    2007-11-27

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that utilizes metal surfaces to provide enhanced signals of several orders of magnitude. When molecules of interest are attached to designed metal nanoparticles, a SERS signal is attainable with single molecule detection limits. This provides an ultrasensitive means of detecting the presence of molecules. By using selective chemistries, metal nanoparticles can be functionalized to provide a unique signal upon analyte binding. Moreover, by using measurement techniques, such as, ratiometric received SERS spectra, such metal nanoparticles can be used to monitor dynamic processes in addition to static binding events. Accordingly, such nanoparticles can be used as nanosensors for a wide range of chemicals in fluid, gaseous and solid form, environmental sensors for pH, ion concentration, temperature, etc., and biological sensors for proteins, DNA, RNA, etc.

  12. Majorana Electroformed Copper Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Overman, Cory T.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2012-04-30

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize ultra high purity electroformed copper for a variety of detector components and shielding. A preliminary mechanical evaluation was performed on the Majorana prototype electroformed copper material. Several samples were removed from a variety of positions on the mandrel. Tensile testing, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness testing were conducted to evaluate mechanical response. Analyses carried out on the Majorana prototype copper to this point show consistent mechanical response from a variety of test locations. Evaluation shows the copper meets or exceeds the design specifications.

  13. Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This approach was used to deposit copper, gold and rhodium onto polysilicon MEMS. A method to study the adhesion of these metals to polysilicon was developed. It was also shown ...

  14. Fermentative Method for Making Nonoxide Fluorescent Nanoparticles (Quantum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dots) - Energy Innovation Portal Fermentative Method for Making Nonoxide Fluorescent Nanoparticles (Quantum Dots) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Incubation of quantum dots Incubation of quantum dots Technology Marketing SummaryA fermentative method for scalable, economical production of tailored quantum dots.DescriptionA method for manufacturing nanoparticles of certain nonoxide compounds of metals and nonmetals. The metals are typically Zn, Ag, Hg, Cd, Fe,

  15. Platinum-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell electrocatalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-04-14

    Core-shell particles encapsulated by a thin film of a catalytically active metal are described. The particles are preferably nanoparticles comprising a non-noble core with a noble metal shell which preferably do not include Pt. The non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles are encapsulated by a catalytically active metal which is preferably Pt. The core-shell nanoparticles are preferably formed by prolonged elevated-temperature annealing of nanoparticle alloys in an inert environment. This causes the noble metal component to surface segregate and form an atomically thin shell. The Pt overlayer is formed by a process involving the underpotential deposition of a monolayer of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a Pt salt. A thin Pt layer forms via the galvanic displacement of non-noble surface atoms by more noble Pt atoms in the salt. The overall process is a robust and cost-efficient method for forming Pt-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles.

  16. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S.; Nekuda, Jennifer A.

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  17. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  18. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  19. Synthesis of silver particles on copper substrates using ethanol-based solution for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li Zhang, Zuojun; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Hui; Lai, Chunhong; School of Physics and Electronic Information, China West Normal University, NanChong 637002

    2014-03-15

    The displacement reaction of AgNO{sub 3} and copper metal is an effective and economical way to fabricate Ag-Cu surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. Aqueous solutions of AgNO{sub 3} are usually used for substrate preparation. In this work, a new method for Ag-Cu SERS substrate preparation is proposed, which uses an ethanol solution rather than an aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution. Analysis of the surface morphologies of sample substrates by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) showed that the silver nanoparticles prepared by this new method were more regular than those prepared in the traditional aqueous solution. The SERS spectra of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on these Ag-Cu substrates were then investigated and compared. It was found that the Ag-Cu substrates prepared by this method provide significant improvements in Raman signal sensitivity and large-area uniformity. The enhancement factor of this new substrate is about 330 times higher than that prepared using an aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution under identical experimental conditions. It was also found that 70% of the original sensitivity of the substrate remains after 15 days of exposure to air.

  20. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  1. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  2. Role of copper promotion in precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, R.J.; Xu, L.; Davis, B.H.

    1996-10-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was conducted on precipitated iron-silicon catalysts. The affect of copper promotion on the activity and selectivity of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and syngas activated catalysts is presented. High activity and stability have been obtained for potassium promoted catalysts when operating at 270{degrees}C; however, it has been found that promotion with potassium and copper is essential to obtaining good activity in a wax producing mode at 230{degrees}C. Promotion with copper is critical to achieving good activity when pretreating catalysts with hydrogen or with syngas at high pressure. XRD and Mossbauer data indicate that copper facilitates the reduction of iron oxide to metallic iron and iron carbides during hydrogen and syngas pretreatments.

  3. Copper doped polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Koliwad, Krishna M.; Daud, Taher

    1981-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells having improved performance are fabricated from polycrystalline silicon containing copper segregated at the grain boundaries.

  4. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF COPPER AND BRONZE FOR ZINC CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P. S.

    2012-11-02

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350°C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550°C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non‐adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350‐450°C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500°C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.

  6. Amorphous copper tungsten oxide with tunable band gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Le; Shet, Sudhakar; Tang Houwen; Wang Heli; Yan Yanfa; Turner, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Ahn, Kwang-soon

    2010-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of amorphous copper tungsten oxide thin films with tunable band gaps. The thin films are synthesized by the magnetron cosputtering method. We find that due to the amorphous nature, the Cu-to-W ratio in the films can be varied without the limit of the solubility (or phase separation) under appropriate conditions. As a result, the band gap and conductivity type of the films can be tuned by controlling the film composition. Unfortunately, the amorphous copper tungsten oxides are not stable in aqueous solution and are not suitable for the application of photoelectrochemical splitting of water. Nonetheless, it provides an alternative approach to search for transition metal oxides with tunable band gaps.

  7. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  8. Preparation of nanoporous metal foam from high nitrogen transition metal complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Huynh, My Hang V.; Hiskey, Michael A.; Son, Steven F.; Oschwald, David M.; Chavez, David E.; Naud, Darren L.

    2006-11-28

    Nanoporous metal foams are prepared by ignition of high nitrogen transition metal complexes. The ammonium salts of iron(III) tris[bi(tetrazolato)-amine], cobalt(III) tris(bi(tetrazolato)amine), and high nitrogen compounds of copper and silver were prepared as loose powders, pressed into pellets and wafers, and ignited under an inert atmosphere to form nanoporous metal foam monoliths having very high surface area and very low density.

  9. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2010-01-08

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  10. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  11. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  12. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  13. Within- and among-population level differences in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Within- and among-population level differences in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris Stacey L. Lance * , R. Wesley Flynn, Matthew R. Erickson 1 , David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 5 September 2012 Received in revised form 29 January 2013 Accepted 5 February 2013 Keywords: Anaxyrus (Bufo) terrestris Amphibian Copper Ecotoxicology Metal

  14. Tetraphenylphosphonium copper(I) dicyanamide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Materials Science Division

    2007-01-01

    In the title compound, {l_brace}(C{sub 24}H{sub 20}P)[Cu(C{sub 2}N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}, the copper(I) dicyanamide anion forms a distorted three-dimensional single diamondoid network. Templating tetraphenylphosphonium cations reside within the cavities of the polymeric anion.

  15. Comparison of availability of copper(II) complexes with organic ligands to bacterial cells and to chitin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasconcelos, M.T.S.D.; Azenha, M.A.O.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1997-10-01

    Bacterial cells or chitin were exposed to solutions with 100 {micro}M total but only 5 {micro}M free copper, due to the presence of a proper concentration of proline, lysine, cysteine, or ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA). The influence of the nature and concentration of the particles and soluble ligands, on the sorption and on the desorption of the copper, at pH 6.50 and 25.0 C, was investigated. The metal sorbed by the particles and that left in the solution were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, after different periods of contact between particles and solution. The interpretation of the results was based on the copper(II) speciation calculated through equilibrium approaches applied to homogeneous or heterogeneous systems. A significant fraction of copper bound to the organic ligands was displaced to the bacteria or chitin, and the extent of chemical reaction depended on the nature of both the soluble (or leaving) ligands and sites on the particle surface (or entering ligands), as expected by the equilibrium theory. But with chitin, the uptake of copper in the presence of cysteine or EDTA was higher than expected, which may be due to the adsorption of the soluble copper complexes on the particle surface. In consequence of a competition between soluble and particulate ligands (cells or chitin), the free copper(II) concentration decreased in the solution, even in the presence of very strong chelators. The results indicate that copper availability is not a simple function of the initial free copper concentration in the solution. Desorption of the previously fixed copper, originated by free soluble ligands indicated that the sorption of copper was quasireversible for both particles, though a larger dismissal of the equilibrium position occurred for the cells, probably due to their biological activity.

  16. Identification of copper-copper and copper-hydrogen complexes in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarykin, N. A.; Weber, J.

    2013-02-15

    The centers formed in silicon as a result of interaction between the substitutional copper impurity (Cu{sub s}) and interstitial copper (Cu{sub i}) or hydrogen (H) atoms, which are mobile at room temperature, are investigated in this study using the deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. It is shown that a well-known photoluminescence center, which includes four copper atoms, is formed from Cu{sub s} via the subsequent addition of Cu{sub i}. Both intermediate complexes (Cu{sub s}-Cu{sub i} and Cu{sub s}-2Cu{sub i}) are identified by their deep levels in the lower half of the band gap. It is found that Cu{sub s} atoms form complexes with one, two, and three hydrogen atoms, with Cu{sub s}-H and Cu{sub s}-2H being electrically active. It is noted that the addition of either hydrogen or copper has a similar effect on the deep-level structure of Cu{sub s}.

  17. Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred H.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    2000-01-01

    A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

  18. Apparatus for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald R. (Belmont, MA)

    1993-01-01

    Improved electrolytic cells for producing metals by the electrolytic reduction of a compound dissolved in a molten electrolyte are disclosed. In the improved cells, at least one electrode includes a protective layer comprising an oxide of the cell product metal formed upon an alloy of the cell product metal and a more noble metal. In the case of an aluminum reduction cell, the electrode can comprise an alloy of aluminum with copper, nickel, iron, or combinations thereof, upon which is formed an aluminum oxide protective layer.

  19. Eco-friendly copper recovery process from waste printed circuit boards using Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogarasi, Szabolcs; Imre-Lucaci, Florica; Egedy, Attila; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Ilea, Petru

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We developed an ecofriendly mediated electrochemical process for copper recovery. • The recovery of copper was achieved without mechanical pretreatment of the samples. • We identified the optimal flow rate for the leaching and electrowinning of copper. • The copper content of the obtained cathodic deposits was over 99.9%. - Abstract: The present study aimed at developing an original and environmentally friendly process for the recovery of copper from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) by chemical dissolution with Fe{sup 3+} combined with the simultaneous electrowinning of copper and oxidant regeneration. The recovery of copper was achieved in an original set-up consisting of a three chamber electrochemical reactor (ER) connected in series with a chemical reactor (CR) equipped with a perforated rotating drum. Several experiments were performed in order to identify the optimal flow rate for the dissolution of copper in the CR and to ensure the lowest energy consumption for copper electrodeposition in the ER. The optimal hydrodynamic conditions were provided at 400 mL/min, leading to the 75% dissolution of metals and to a low specific energy consumption of 1.59 kW h/kg Cu for the electrodeposition process. In most experiments, the copper content of the obtained cathodic deposits was over 99.9%.

  20. Unfolding pathway of CotA-laccase and the role of copper on the prevention of refolding through aggregation of the unfolded state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, Andre T. [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. da Republica, 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. da Republica, 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Lopes, Carlos [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine, Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)] [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine, Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Martins, Ligia O. [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. da Republica, 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. da Republica, 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Melo, Eduardo Pinho, E-mail: emelo@ualg.pt [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine, Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CotA-laccase unfolds with an intermediate state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper stabilizes the native and the intermediate state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper binding to the unfolded state prevents refolding through protein aggregation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper incorporation in CotA-laccase occurs as a later step during folding. -- Abstract: Copper is a redox-active metal and the main player in electron transfer reactions occurring in multicopper oxidases. The role of copper in the unfolding pathway and refolding of the multicopper oxidase CotA laccase in vitro was solved using double-jump stopped-flow experiments. Unfolding of apo- and holo-CotA was described as a three-state process with accumulation of an intermediate in between the native and unfolded state. Copper stabilizes the native holo-CotA but also the intermediate state showing that copper is still bound to this state. Also, copper binds to unfolded holo-CotA in a non-native coordination promoting CotA aggregation and preventing refolding to the native structure. These results gather information on unfolding/folding pathways of multicopper oxidases and show that copper incorporation in vivo should be a tight controlled process as copper binding to the unfolded state under native conditions promotes protein aggregation.

  1. Method for fabricating prescribed flaws in the interior of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, David K.; Thompson, Donald O.

    1989-03-07

    The method for fabricating a metal body having a flaw of predetermined size and shape located therein comprises placing half of the metal powder required to make the metal body in the die of a press and pressing it to create a flat upper surface thereon. A piece of copper foil is cut to the size and shape of the desired interior crack and placed on the upper surface of the powder and centered in position. The remaining powder is then placed in the die to cover the copper foil. The powder is first cold pressed and removed from the press. The powder metal piece is then sintered in a furnace at a temperature above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal. It is then removed from the furnace, cooled to room temperature, and placed back in the die and pressed further. This procedure results in an interior flaw or crack. Modified forms of the method involve using a press-sinter-press-sinter cycle with the first sinter being below the melting point of the copper and the second sinter being above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal.

  2. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contolini, Robert J.; Mayer, Steven T.; Tarte, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

  3. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  4. Tuning and synthesis of metallic nanostructures by mechanical compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou; Li, Binsong

    2015-11-17

    The present invention provides a pressure-induced phase transformation process to engineer metal nanoparticle architectures and to fabricate new nanostructured materials. The reversible changes of the nanoparticle unit cell dimension under pressure allow precise control over interparticle separation in 2D or 3D nanoparticle assemblies, offering unique robustness for interrogation of both quantum and classic coupling interactions. Irreversible changes above a threshold pressure of about 8 GPa enables new nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires, or nanosheets.

  5. Investigation of the nonlocal nonlinear optical response of copper nanostructured thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmanfarmaei, B; RashidianVaziri, M R; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F [Laser and Optics Research School, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Nanostructured copper thin films have been prepared using the pulsed laser deposition method. Optical absorption spectra of these films exhibit plasmonic absorption peaks around 619 nm, which suggests the formation of copper nanoparticles on their surfaces. Scanning electron micrographs of the films confirm the nanoparticle formation on the films surfaces. After laser beam passing through the thin films, the observed diffraction rings on a far-field screen have been recorded. Despite the smallness of the maximal axial phase shifts of the films, which have been obtained using the nonlocal z-scan theory, a series of low-intensity rings can be observed on the far field screen for some specific positions of the thin films from the focal point. It is shown that the best approach to determining the sign and magnitude of the nonlinear refractive index of thin samples is the application of the conventional closeaperture z-scan method. (nanostructures)

  6. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  7. Multilayered and complex nanoparticle architectures through plasma synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Wakeland, Stephen; Cui, Yuehua; Knapp, Angela; Richard, Monique; Luhrs, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Using the Aerosol Through Plasma (ATP) method in conjunction with simple chemical techniques a variety of complex and novel nanoparticle architectures were created. A TP was used to make metal-core/carbon shell nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm diameter) of SnlCarbon and AI/Carbon. These have, respectively, potential for application as battery anode (for hybrid and electric vehicles) and high energy fuel In one example of post processing, the Sn-core/carbon-shell material is treated in acidic solution and yields a true nano-sized hollow carbon shell. These shells have potential application as catalyst supports, gas storage, a neutral buoyancy material for applications as varied as proppants, and slow release capsules for pharmaceutical or agricultural applications. A different set of post-A-T-P processes were used to make three layer nanoparticles with a metal core, graphite inner shell and ceramic outer shell. This method extends the range of achievable nanoparticles architectures, hence enabling new applications.

  8. Lower-pH Copper Flotation Reagent System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower-pH Copper Flotation Reagent System Lower-pH Copper Flotation Reagent System New Reagent System Improves Recovery, Reducing Energy Use and Air Emissions in the Mining Industry In the mining industry, flotation is a process that concentrates minerals from their ores prior to metal recovery. Current practice uses slurry pHs in excess of 10, achieved by adding burnt lime (CaO). However, lime production is an energy-intensive process that releases large quantities of carbon dioxide into the

  9. Shapes of Spectral Lines of Nonuniform Plasma of Electric Arc Discharge Between Copper Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babich, Ida L.; Boretskij, Viacheslav F.; Veklich, Anatoly N.

    2007-09-28

    The radial profiles of the temperature and electron density in the plasma of the free burning electric arc between copper electrodes are studied by optical spectroscopy techniques. The electron density and the temperature in plasma as initial parameters were used in the calculation of the plasma composition in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) assumption. We used the Saha's equation for copper, nitrogen and oxygen, dissociation equation for nitrogen and oxygen, the equation of plasma electrical neutrality and Dalton's law as well. So, it would be possible to determine the amounts of metal vapours in plasma.

  10. A-01 metals in stormwater runoff evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldridge, L.L.

    1997-11-06

    As a part of the A-01 investigation required by the NPDES permit, an investigation was performed to ascertain the concentrations of metals specifically copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in stormwater being discharged through the outfall. This information would indicate whether all water being discharged would have to be treated or if only a portion of the discharged stormwater would have to be treated. A study was designed to accomplish this. The first goal was to determine if the metal concentrations increased, decreased, or remained the same as flow increased during a rain event. The second goal was to determine if the concentrations in the storm water were due to dissolved. The third goal was to obtain background data to ascertain if effluent credits could be gained due to naturally occurring metals.Samples from this study were analyzed and indicate that the copper and lead values increase as the flow increases while the zinc values remain essentially the same regardless of the flow rate. Analyses of samples for total metals, dissolved metals, TSS, and metals in solids was complicated because in all cases metals contamination was found in the filters themselves. Some conclusions can be derived if this problem is taken into account when analyzing the data. Copper concentrations in the total and dissolved fractions as well as the TSS concentrations followed the hydrograph at this outfall but the copper in solids concentration appeared to peak in the first flush and decline to nondetectable rapidly over the course of the storm event. Lead was present in the total analysis but not present in the dissolved fraction or the solids fraction of the samples. The data for zinc was interesting in that the dissolved fractions were higher than the total fraction in three out of four samples. This is probably due to the high zinc concentrations on the filters being transferred to the dissolved faction of the sample. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  12. Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-04

    The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

  13. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  14. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Hydrides Theodore Motyka Savannah River National Laboratory Metal Hydride System Architect Jose-Miguel Pasini, & Bart van Hassel UTRC Claudio Corgnale & Bruce Hardy SRNL ...

  15. An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. ...

  16. Modeling of Electromagnetic Heating in RF Copper Accelerating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling of Electromagnetic Heating in RF Copper Accelerating Cavities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling of Electromagnetic Heating in RF Copper Accelerating ...

  17. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Citation ...

  18. Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Single-Phase Copper Polycrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper Polycrystals You are ...

  19. Surface-Modified Copper Current Collector for Lithium Ion Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copper Current Collector for Lithium Ion Battery Anode Lawrence Berkeley National ... the adhesion of anode laminate to copper current collectors in lithium ion batteries. ...

  20. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik P; Tappan, Bryce; Mueller, Alex; Mihaila, Bogdan; Volz, Heather; Cardenas, Andreas; Papin, Pallas; Veauthier, Jackie; Stan, Marius

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  1. Common Sense Copper and RF Guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulhollan, G.

    2005-01-18

    The purpose of this document is to gather together both fundamental information on copper and on the cleaning and operation of copper in RF gun structures. While incomplete, this is a living document and will be added to and updated as necessary.

  2. Copper- and silver-zirconia aerogels: Preparation, structural properties and catalytic behavior in methanol synthesis from carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, R.A.; Stoecker, C.; Baiker, A. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry

    1998-10-25

    Copper- and silver-zirconia aerogels containing 10 at% IB metal were prepared from tetra-n-butoxy zirconium(IV) and IB metal acetates using the solution sol-gel method and ensuring high-temperature (HT) and low-temperature (LT) supercritical drying, respectively. The influence of preparation parameters and calcination on the structural and catalytic properties of the aerogels for the synthesis of methanol from carbon dioxide and hydrogen was investigated. After calcination in air at 573 K, the catalysts had BET surface areas in the range of 100--143 m{sup 2}/g (Cu/ZrO{sub 2}) and 77--125 m{sup 2}/g (Ag/ZrO{sub 2}), respectively. Due to the reductive alcoholic atmosphere during high-temperature supercritical drying, metallic copper and silver existed in all raw HT-aerogels. The mean size of the copper crystallites wa/s 30 nm. The silver crystallite size for the HT-aerogel prepared with nitric acid was 10 nm, whereas for samples prepared with acetic acid it was 5--7 nm. Calcination in air at 573 K led to the formation of highly dispersed amorphous copper oxide and silver. Comparing the catalytic behavior of the calcined copper-zirconia aerogels with corresponding xerogels prepared by coprecipitation revealed highest activity for the LT-aerogel, whereas the HT-aerogels were least active. In contrast, similar catalytic behavior was observed for the differently dried silver-zirconia samples. Generally, CO{sub 2}-conversion of the copper-zirconia samples. Generally, CO{sub 2}-conversion of the copper-zirconia aerogels was markedly higher than that of the corresponding silver-zirconia aerogels, whereas methanol selectivity was similar.

  3. Harnessing Molecule-solid Duality of Nanoclusters/nanoparticles for Nanoscale Control of Size Shape and Alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Yin; P Hu; B Wanjala; O Malis; C Zhong

    2011-12-31

    This report demonstrates a molecule-solid duality concept for nanoscale control of size, shape and alloying by showing novel evolution of binary copper and gold nanoclusters or nanoparticles towards alloy nanocubes, as evidenced by in situ real time synchrotron X-ray diffraction characterization.

  4. Cleaning and passivation of copper surfaces to remove surface radioactivity and prevent oxide formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Seifert, Allen; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Day, Anthony R.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Litke, Kevin E.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Smart, John E.; Warren, Glen A.

    2007-08-21

    High-purity copper is an attractive material for constructing ultra-low-background radiation measurement devices. Many low-background experiments using high-purity copper have indicated surface contamination emerges as the dominant background. Radon daughters plate out on exposed surfaces, leaving a residual 210Pb background that is difficult to avoid. Dust is also a problem; even under cleanroom conditions, the amount of U and Th deposited on surfaces can represent the largest remaining background. To control these backgrounds, a copper cleaning chemistry has been developed. Designed to replace an effective, but overly aggressive concentrated nitric acid etch, this peroxide-based solution allows for a more controlled cleaning of surfaces. The acidified hydrogen peroxide solution will generally target the Cu+/Cu2+ species which are the predominant surface participants, leaving the bulk of copper metal intact. This preserves the critical tolerances of parts and eliminates significant waste disposal issues. Accompanying passivation chemistry has also been developed that protects copper surfaces from oxidation. Using a high-activity polonium surface spike, the most difficult-to-remove daughter isotope of radon, the performance of these methods are quantified. 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  5. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  6. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  7. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of nickel to nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2301-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel, NO2200 or NO2201 (P-41) to nickel-copper NO4400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  8. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1302-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper NO4400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  9. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The {alpha}-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal were investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The selectivity for the hydrogenation of the C=C bond was found to depend on the number of methyl groups added to the bond. The adsorption modes of the three aldehydes were determined. The hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde was found to be nearly structure insensitive as the TOF and selectivity were very close to the same over Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG-VS indicated identical surface intermediates over the two crystal faces during crotonaldehyde hydrogenation.

  10. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  11. Nanoparticle toxicity testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to...

  12. Nanoparticle/nanotube-based nanoelectronic devices and chemically-directed assembly thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Howard K.

    2011-02-22

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a nanoelectronic device based on a nanostructure that may include a nanotube with first and second ends, a metallic nanoparticle attached to the first end, and an insulating nanoparticle attached to the second end. The nanoelectronic device may include additional nanostructures so a to form a plurality of nanostructures comprising the first nanostructure and the additional nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures may arranged in a network comprising a plurality of edges and a plurality of vertices, wherein each edge comprises a nanotube and each vertex comprises at least one insulating nanoparticle and at least one metallic nanoparticle adjacent the insulating nanoparticle. The combination of at least one edge and at least one vertex comprises a diode. The device may be an optical rectenna.

  13. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  14. Synthesis and Structural Flexibility of a Series of Copper(II)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Azolate-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Synthesis and Structural Flexibility of a Series of Copper(II) Azolate-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Kenji Sumida, Maw Lin Foo, Satoshi Horike, Jeffrey R. Long, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., (24), 3739-3744 (2010) DOI: 10.1002/ejic.201000490 nfigure2.jpg Abstract: The reaction of CuCl2*2H2O with three novel ditopic ligands, 2-methyl-1,4-benzeneditetrazolate

  15. Thermodynamic aspects of dehydrogenation reactions on noble metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svane, K. L. Hammer, B.

    2014-11-07

    The reaction free energy for dehydrogenation of phenol, aniline, thiophenol, benzoic acid, and 1,4-benzenediol on the close packed copper, silver, and gold surfaces has been studied by density functional theory calculations. Dehydrogenation of thiophenol is found to be favourable on all three surfaces while aniline does not dehydrogenate on any of them. For phenol, benzenediol and benzoic acid dehydrogenation is favourable on copper and silver only, following the general trend of an increasing reaction free energy when going form gold to silver to copper. This trend can be correlated with the changes in bond lengths within the molecule upon dehydrogenation. While copper is able to replace hydrogen, leaving small changes in the bond lengths of the aromatic ring, the metal-molecule bond is weaker for silver and gold, resulting in a partial loss of aromaticity. This difference in bond strength leads to pronounced differences in adsorption geometries upon multiple dehydrogenations.

  16. From CO2 to Methanol via Novel Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    researchers have discovered that nanoparticles of cerium oxide (ceria) in contact with copper will form metal-oxide interfaces that allow the adsorption and activation of CO2,...

  17. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong; Peker, Atakan; Johnson, William L.

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  18. Thermally Stable Nanocatalyst for High Temperature Reactions: Pt-Mesoporous Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, J.Y.; Tsung, C.-K.; Yamada, Y.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-10-25

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis enabled the precise control of size, shape and composition of catalytic metal nanoparticles, allowing their use as model catalysts for systematic investigations of the atomic-scale properties affecting catalytic activity and selectivity. The organic capping agents stabilizing colloidal nanoparticles, however, often limit their application in high-temperature catalytic reactions. Here we report the design of a high-temperature stable model catalytic system that consists of Pt metal core coated with a mesoporous silica shell (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}). While inorganic silica shells encaged the Pt cores up to 750 C in air, the mesopores directly accessible to Pt cores made the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as catalytically active as bare Pt metal for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation. The high thermal stability of Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permitted high-temperature CO oxidation studies, including ignition behavior, which was not possible for bare Pt nanoparticles because of their deformation or aggregation. The results suggest that the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are excellent nanocatalytic systems for high-temperature catalytic reactions or surface chemical processes, and the design concept employed in the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} core-shell catalyst can be extended to other metal-metal oxide compositions.

  19. Understanding Interfaces in Metal-Graphitic Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Star, Alexander

    2013-01-03

    Metalgraphitic interfaces formed between metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or graphene play an important role in the properties of such hybrid nanostructures. This Perspective summarizes different types of interfaces that exist within the metalcarbon nanoassemblies and discusses current efforts on understanding and modeling the interfacial conditions and interactions. Characterization of the metalgraphitic interfaces is described here, including microscopy, spectroscopy, electrochemical techniques, and electrical measurements. Recent studies on these nanohybrids have shown that the metalgraphitic interfaces play critical roles in both controlled assembly of nanoparticles and practical applications of nanohybrids in chemical sensors and fuel cells. Better understanding, design, and manipulation of metalgraphitic interfaces could therefore become the new frontier in the research of MNP/CNT or MNP/graphene hybrid systems.

  20. Method of making controlled morphology metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan

    2016-05-17

    A method of making metal oxides having a preselected morphology includes preparing a suspension that includes a solvent, polymeric nanostructures having multiplicities of hydroxyl surface groups and/or carboxyl surface groups, and a metal oxide precursor. The suspension has a preselected ratio of the polymeric nanostructures to the metal oxide precursor of at least 1:3, the preselected ratio corresponding to a preselected morphology. Subsequent steps include depositing the suspension onto a substrate, removing the solvent to form a film, removing the film from the substrate, and annealing the film to volatilize the polymeric nanostructures and convert the metal oxide precursor to metal oxide nanoparticles having the preselected morphology or to a metal oxide nanosheet including conjoined nanoparticles having the preselected morphology.

  1. Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eller, Phillip G.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    1979-01-01

    Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

  2. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  3. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  4. A New Slant on a Cellular Balancing Act - The Copper-sensing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an essential component of many metalloenzymes, but free intracellular copper is highly toxic. Because of this copper within cells is very tightly controlled, with specific copper...

  5. Nanoparticles > Complex Oxides > Research > The Energy Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticles The nanoparticle synthesis efforts at EMC2 mostly take place in the Frank DiSalvo group, and focus on preparing useful fuel cell electrocatalysts in nanoparticle...

  6. With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better Molecular dynamics simulations provide unprecedented understanding of nanoparticle structure and...

  7. Solgel synthesis of SnO{sub 2}MgO nanoparticles and their photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayal, Nisha; Jeevanandam, P.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: A simple solgel method for the synthesis of SnO{sub 2}MgO nanoparticles is reported. Band gap of SnO{sub 2} can be tuned by varying the magnesium content in SnO{sub 2}MgO. SnO{sub 2}MgO shows good photocatalytic activity towards degradation of methylene blue. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2}MgO mixed metal oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a simple solgel method. The nanoparticles were characterized by power X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The XRD results indicate the formation of mixed metal oxide nanoparticles and also a decrease of SnO{sub 2} crystallite size in the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles with increasing magnesium oxide content. The reflectance spectroscopy results show a blue shift of the band gap of SnO{sub 2} in the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles. The photocatalytic activity of the SnO{sub 2}MgO nanoparticles was tested using the photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue in the presence of sunlight. The results indicate that the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles possess higher efficiency for the photodegradation of methylene blue compared to pure SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  8. Size and alloying induced shift in core and valence bands of Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Govind

    2014-03-28

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been carried out on Pd, Ag, Cu, Pd-Ag, and Pd-Cu nanoparticles having identical sizes corresponding to mobility equivalent diameters of 60, 40, and 20 nm. The nanoparticles were prepared by the gas phase synthesis method. The effect of size on valence and core levels in metal and alloy nanoparticles has been studied by comparing the values to those with the 60 nm nanoparticles. The effect of alloying has been investigated by comparing the valence and core level binding energies of Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag alloy nanoparticles with the corresponding values for Pd, Ag, and Cu nanoparticles of identical sizes. These effects have been explained in terms of size induced lattice contractions, alloying induced charge transfer, and hybridization effects. The observation of alloying and size induced binding energy shifts in bimetallic nanoparticles is important from the point of view of hydrogen reactivity.

  9. Metallic sulfide additives for positive electrode material within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, William J.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Yao, Neng-ping; Koura, Kobuyuki

    1976-01-01

    An improved active material for use within the positive electrode of a secondary electrochemical cell includes a mixture of iron disulfide and a sulfide of a polyvalent metal. Various metal sulfides, particularly sulfides of cobalt, nickel, copper, cerium and manganese, are added in minor weight proportion in respect to iron disulfide for improving the electrode performance and reducing current collector requirements.

  10. Encapsulated Nanoparticle Synthesis and Characterization for Improved Storage Fluids: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G. C.; Pradhan, S.; Kang, J.; Curtis, C.; Blake, D.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are typically composed of 50--500 atoms and exhibit properties that are significantly different from the properties of larger, macroscale particles that have the same composition. The addition of these particles to traditional fluids may improve the fluids' thermophysical properties. As an example, the addition of a nanoparticle or set of nanoparticles to a storage fluid may double its heat capacity. This increase in heat capacity would allow a sensible thermal energy storage system to store the same amount of thermal energy in half the amount of storage fluid. The benefit is lower costs for the storage fluid and the storage tanks, resulting in lower-cost electricity. The goal of this long-term research is to create a new class of fluids that enable concentrating solar power plants to operate with greater efficiency and lower electricity costs. Initial research on this topic developed molecular dynamic models that predicted the energy states and transition temperatures for these particles. Recent research has extended the modeling work, along with initiating the synthesis and characterization of bare metal nanoparticles and metal nanoparticles that are encapsulated with inert silica coatings. These particles possess properties that make them excellent candidates for enhancing the heat capacity of storage fluids.

  11. Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brar, Satinder K.; Verma, Mausam; Tyagi, R.D.; Surampalli, R.Y.

    2010-03-15

    Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

  12. Organic ligands reduce copper toxicity in Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azenha, M.; Vasconcelos, M.T.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae cells were exposed to 100 {mu}M copper alone, or to previously equilibrated copper sulfate-ligand solutions. Ligand concentrations were determined experimentally as those that reduced the free copper concentration to 5 {mu}M (determined with a Cu{sup 2+}-selective electrode). These values were in agreement with those calculated by computational equilibrium simulation based on published stability constants. Exposure of P. syringae cells to copper sulfate, chloride, or nitrate resulted in similar high mortality, suggesting that copper was responsible for cell death. Acetate, succinate, proline, lysine, cysteine, and EDTA significantly reduced both the amount of copper bound to the cells and cell death, indicating that not only strong chelating agents but also weak and moderate copper ligands can effectively antagonize copper toxicity. However, cysteine and EDTA were considerably more effective than acetate, succinate, proline, and lysine, indicating that copper toxicity is not simply a function of free copper concentration but depends on the nature of the ligand. The results suggested that a significant fraction of copper bound to acetate, succinate, proline, or lysine was displaced to the bacteria or, alternatively, mixed copper-ligand-cell complexes could be formed. On the contrary, none of these phenomena occurred for the copper complexes with cysteine or EDTA.

  13. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.

    1998-02-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. A diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 {micro}m thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency.

  14. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  15. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Ihlefeld, Jon; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; et al

    2015-03-05

    The interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers was studied. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffusemore » mismatch model. The results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.« less

  16. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Ihlefeld, Jon; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-03-05

    The interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers was studied. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffuse mismatch model. The results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.

  17. Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-06-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized CuFe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  19. Synthesis and characteristic of self-assembled diamond/copper nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Xiaoqn; Jiang Xiaohong Lu Lude; Yang Xujie; Wang Xin

    2008-11-03

    Nanodiamond (ND) supported metal oxide or metal catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity. ND/Cu nanocomposites and Cu nanoparticles were prepared by reducing Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in reverses micelle solution. Products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, UV-vis optical characteristic and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the point of nucleation and grow of crystal, ND contributed to heterogeneous nucleation of Cu nanocrystal. The reactive mechanism was explored based on theory of free energy. The formation of resultant self-assembled structures was explained through diffusion-limited aggregation model and Marangoni effect. Both Cu and ND/Cu nanoparticles were strong catalysts on decomposition of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} (AP), and ND/Cu is more effective.

  20. Copper Valley Elec Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Elec Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Copper Valley Elec Assn, Inc Place: Alaska Phone Number: Copper Basin: 907-822-3211 or Valdez: 907-835-4301 Website:...

  1. A Neutral Beam Pole Shield with Copper Plates and Serviceable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Neutral Beam Pole Shield with Copper Plates and Serviceable Molybdenum Inserts The copper pole shields for the neutral beam lines that have been in service at DIII-D have...

  2. Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets,Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Miller, Martin C.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2004-09-29

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington's 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. This Metals Verification Study was conducted to address the 303(d) segments that are listed for metal contaminants in marine sediment, because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the Inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected. The study was designed to obtain present-day sediment metals concentrations throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, with stations spatially distributed to support 303(d) listing updates and also watershed-level water quality and contaminant transport modeling efforts. A total of 160 surface sediment samples from Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage were screened for copper, lead, and zinc using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). 40 samples (25%) were selected for confirmatory metals analysis by ICP-MS for cadmium, silver, and arsenic in addition to copper, lead, and zinc. Regression relationships between the ICP-MS and XRF datasets were developed to estimate copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in all samples. The XRF results for copper, lead, and zinc correlated well with ICP-MS results, and predicted concentrations were calculated for all samples. The results of the Metals Verification Study show that sediment quality in Sinclair Inlet has improved markedly since implementation of cleanup and source control actions, and that the distribution of residual contaminants is limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Superfund Site where further source control actions and monitoring are under way. Outside of Sinclair Inlet, the target metals met state sediment quality standards.

  3. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  4. A Molecular Copper Catalyst for Hydrogenation of CO­2 to Formate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zall, Christopher M.; Linehan, John C.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2015-09-04

    There is widespread interest in the hydrogenation of CO2 to energy-rich products such as formate. However, first-row transition metal complexes that catalyze the hydrogenation of CO2 to formate remain rare. Copper phosphine complexes are widely used in the reduction of organic substrates but have not previously been used as catalysts for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to formate. Here we demonstrate that the triphosphine-ligated copper(I) complex LCu(MeCN)PF6 is an active catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation in the presence of a suitable base. Screening of bases and studies of catalytic reactions by in operando spectroscopy revealed important and unusual roles for the base in promoting H2 activation and turnover.

  5. Leaching behavior of copper from waste printed circuit boards with Brnsted acidic ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jinxiu; Chen, Mengjun Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Shu; Sun, Quan

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: A Brnsted acidic ILs was used to leach Cu from WPCBs for the first time. The particle size of WPCBs has significant influence on Cu leaching rate. Cu leaching rate was higher than 99% under the optimum leaching conditions. The leaching process can be modeled with shrinking core model, and the E{sub a} was 25.36 kJ/mol. - Abstract: In this work, a Brnsted acidic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([bmim]HSO{sub 4}), was used to leach copper from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs, mounted with electronic components) for the first time, and the leaching behavior of copper was discussed in detail. The results showed that after the pre-treatment, the metal distributions were different with the particle size: Cu, Zn and Al increased with the increasing particle size; while Ni, Sn and Pb were in the contrary. And the particle size has significant influence on copper leaching rate. Copper leaching rate was higher than 99%, almost 100%, when 1 g WPCBs powder was leached under the optimum conditions: particle size of 0.10.25 mm, 25 mL 80% (v/v) ionic liquid, 10 mL 30% hydrogen peroxide, solid/liquid ratio of 1/25, 70 C and 2 h. Copper leaching by [bmim]HSO{sub 4} can be modeled with the shrinking core model, controlled by diffusion through a solid product layer, and the kinetic apparent activation energy has been calculated to be 25.36 kJ/mol.

  6. Tantalum-copper alloy and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1983-06-01

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  7. Tantalum-copper alloy and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1984-11-06

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  8. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  9. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  10. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  11. Improved thermal stability of oxide-supported naked gold nanoparticles by ligand-assisted pinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, C; Divins, N. J.; Gazquez, Jaume; Varela, Maria; Angurell, I; Llorca, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a method to improve the thermal stability, up to 900 C, of bare-metal (naked) gold nanoparticles supported on top of SiO{sub 2} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates via ligand-assisted pinning. This approach leads to monodisperse naked gold nanoparticles without significant sintering after thermal annealing in air at 900 C. The ligand-assisted pinning mechanism is described.

  12. Structure of a Thiol Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoparticle at 1.1 A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolution Thiol Monolayer-protected Gold Nanoparticle at 1.1 Å Resolution Nanometer-size metal particles are of fundamental interest for their chemical and quantum electronic properties, and of practical interest for many potential applications [1, 2]. Historically gold nanoparticles are the best studied, dating back to ancient Rome where colloidal gold was thought to have medicinal properties due to its blood red color. Gold has proven to have applications in medicine with some modern

  13. Fluidized bed electrowinning of copper. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to: design and construct a 10,000- amp fluidized bed electrowinning cell for the recovery of copper from acidic sulfate solutions; demonstrate the technical feasibility of continuous particle recirculation from the electrowinning cell with the ultimate goal of continuous particle removal; and measure cell efficiency as a function of operating conditions.

  14. Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun; Yan, Qingzhi Lang, Shaoting

    2014-05-14

    A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

  15. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  16. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  17. Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji Won; Rondinone, Adam J.; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

    2014-06-24

    The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component containing at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

  18. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O'neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  19. Nanoparticle shuttle memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex Karlwalter

    2012-03-06

    A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

  20. Dendritic metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Song, Yujiang; Pereira, Eulalia F.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2010-08-31

    Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

  1. Interaction of o-aminophenol and o-nitrophenol with copper, zinc, molybdenum, and chromium ferrocyanides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, B.B.; Kamaluddin

    1997-09-15

    Removal of o-aminophenol and o-nitrophenol from aqueous solution through adsorption on copper, zinc, molybdenum, and chromium ferrocyanides were studied in pH range 2--10 at 27 C. At pH 7.0 o-nitrophenol adsorbed more than o-aminophenol on all the metal ferrocyanides studied. The Langmuir type of adsorption is followed in the concentration range of 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}4} M of o-aminophenol and o-nitrophenol solutions.

  2. Enhanced electron collection in TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle-based dye-sensitized solar cells by an array of metal micropillars on a planar fluorinated tin oxide anode.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z.; Xu, T.; Gao, S.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Charge collection efficiency exhibits a strong influence on the overall efficiency of nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells. It highly depends on the quality of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticulate layer in the photoanode, and hence most efforts have been directed on the improvement and deliberate optimization of the quality the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline layer. In this work, we aim to reduce the electron collection distance between the place of origin in the TiO{sub 2} layer to the electron-collecting TCO anode as an alternative way to enhance the charge collection efficiency. We use an array of metal micropillars on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) as the collecting anode. Under the same conditions, the Ni micropillar-on-FTO-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) exhibit a remarkably enhanced current density, which is approximately 1.8 times greater compared with the bare FTO-based DSSCs. Electron transport was investigated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. Our results reveal that the electron collection time in Ni micropillar-on-FTO-based DSSCs is much shorter than that of bare FTO-based DSSCs, indicating faster electron collection due to the Ni micropillars buried in TiO{sub 2} nanoparticulate layer that serve as electron transport shortcuts. As a result, the charge collection efficiency was enhanced by 15?20% with respect to that of the bare FTO-based DSSCs. Consequently, the overall energy conversion efficiency was found to increase from 2.6% in bare FTO-based DSSCs to 4.8% in Ni micropillar-on-FTO-based DSSCs for a 6 {micro}m-thick TiO{sub 2} NP film.

  3. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thick aluminum-14 atomic percent copper alloy during directional solidification, ... An x-ray image of a 200 micron thick aluminum-14 atomic percent copperalloy during ...

  4. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation.more » γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.« less

  5. Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Joseph

    2007-10-11

    In this book chapter, we review the recent advances in nanoparticles based bioassay. The nanoparticles include quantum dots, silica nanoparticles and apoferritin nanoparticles. The new nanoparticles-based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassays.

  6. Bacteriostatic and anti-collagenolytic dental materials through the incorporation of polyacrylic acid modified CuI nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renne, Walter George; Mennito, Anthony Samuel; Schmidt, Michael Gerard; Vuthiganon, Jompobe; Chumanov, George

    2015-05-19

    Provided are antibacterial and antimicrobial surface coatings and dental materials by utilizing the antimicrobial properties of copper chalcogenide and/or copper halide (CuQ, where Q=chalcogens including oxygen, or halogens, or nothing). An antimicrobial barrier is created by incorporation of CuQ nanoparticles of an appropriate size and at a concentration necessary and sufficient to create a unique bioelectrical environment. The unique bioelectrical environment results in biocidal effectiveness through a multi-factorial mechanism comprising a combination of the intrinsic quantum flux of copper (Cu.sup.0, Cu.sup.1+, Cu.sup.2+) ions and the high surface-to-volume electron sink facilitated by the nanoparticle. The result is the constant quantum flux of copper which manifests and establishes the antimicrobial environment preventing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. The presence of CuQ results in inhibiting or delaying bacterial destruction and endogenous enzymatic breakdown of the zone of resin inter-diffusion, the integrity of which is essential for dental restoration longevity.

  7. Direct production of nanostructured copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apaydin, Ramazan Oguzhan; Ebin, Burcak; Gurmen, Sebahattin

    2013-12-16

    Copper-Nickel (CuNi) nanostructured alloy particles were produced by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Hydrogen Reduction Method (USP-HR) from high purity copper and nickel nitrate aqueous solutions. The effect of the precursor solution in the range of 0.1 and 0.5 mol/L on the morphology and crystallite size of CuNi nanoparticles were investigated under 2 h running time, 700 °C operating temperature and 0.5 L/min H{sub 2} flow rate. Particle size, morphology, composition and crystallite structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Particle characterization studies show that nanostructured alloy particles have cubic crystal structure and they are in submicron size range with spherical morphology. The crystallite sizes of the particles calculated with Scherrer formula are 40 and 34 nm and average particles sizes observed from the SEM images are 300 and 510 nm for each experiment respectively.

  8. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, S. B. Little, B. K.; Xin, Y.; Ridge, C. J.; Lindsay, C. M.; Buszek, R. J.; Boatz, J. A.; Boyle, J. M.

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Nanoparticles of Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2015-03-12

    The research program from 2010 to the end of the grant focused on understanding the factors important to the synthesis of single phase intermetallic nano-particles (NPs), their size, crystalline order, surface properties and electrochemical activity. The synthetic method developed is a co-reduction of mixtures of single metal precursors by strong, soluble reducing agents in a non-protic solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). With some exceptions, the particles obtained by room temperature reduction are random alloys that need to be annealed at modest temperatures (200 to 600 °C) in order to develop an ordered structure. To avoid significant particle size growth and agglomeration, the particles must be protected by surface coatings. We developed a novel method of coating the metal nanoparticles with KCl, a by-product of the reduction reaction if the proper reducing agents are employed. In that case, a composite product containing individual metal nanoparticles in a KCl matrix is obtained. The composite can be heated to at least 600 °C without significant agglomeration or growth in particle size. Washing the annealed product in the presence of catalyst supports in ethylene glycol removes the KCl and deposits the particles on the support. Six publications present the method and its application to producing and studying new catalyst/support combinations for fuel cell applications. Three publications concern the use of related methods to explore new lithium-sulfur battery concepts.

  10. Metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, J.R.; Kherani, N.P.

    1987-11-01

    Metal hydride information is not available for most hydrides in a consolidated quick-reference source. This report's objective is to fill the need for such a document providing basic thermodynamic data for as many metal hydrides as possible. We conduced a computerized library search to access as many sources as possible and screened each source for such thermodynamic data as pressure-temperature graphs, van't Hoff curves, and impurity effects. We included any other relevant information and commented on it. A primary concern to be investigated in the future is the behavior of metal tritides. This would be important in the area of emergency tritium cleanup systems. The hydride graphs are useful, however, as tritides may be expected in most cases to behave similarly and at least follow trends of their respective hydrides. 42 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.

  12. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W.; Ault, Earl R.; Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  13. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  14. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  15. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-04-08

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

  16. Dissociation of dilute immiscible copper alloy thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, K.; Lucadamo, G. A.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Lavoie, C.; Harper, J. M. E.

    2000-03-01

    The dissociation behavior of dilute, immiscible Cu-alloy thin films is found to fall into three broad categories that correlate most closely with the form of the Cu-rich end of the binary alloy phase diagrams. Available thermodynamic and tracer diffusion data shed further light on alloy behavior. Eight alloying elements were selected for these studies, with five elements from groups 5 and 6, two from group 8, and one from group 11 of the periodic table. They are respectively V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, Fe, Ru, and Ag. The progress of precipitation in approximately 500-nm-thick alloy films, containing 2.5-3.8 at. % solute, was followed with in situ resistance and stress measurements as well as with in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. In addition, texture analysis and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the evolution of microstructure and texture of Cu(Ta) and Cu(Ag). For all eight alloys, dissociation occurred upon heating, with the rejection of solute and evolution of microstructure often occurring in multiple steps that range over several hundred degrees between approximately 100 and 900 degree sign C. However, in most cases, substantial reductions in resistivity of the films took place below 400 degree sign C, at temperatures of interest to copper metallization schemes for silicon chip technology. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Buffer layers on rolled nickel or copper as superconductor substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paranthaman, Mariappan; Lee, Dominic F.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    Buffer layer architectures are epitaxially deposited on biaxially-textured rolled substrates of nickel and/or copper and their alloys for high current conductors, and more particularly buffer layer architectures such as Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, YSZ/Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /CeO.sub.2 /Ni, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni (RE=Rare Earth), and Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /YSZ/CeO.sub.2 /Ni, Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, YSZ/Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /CeO.sub.2 /Cu, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, and Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /YSZ/CeO.sub.2 /Cu. Deposition methods include physical vapor deposition techniques which include electron-beam evaporation, rf magnetron sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, thermal evaporation, and solution precursor approach, which includes chemical vapor deposition, combustion CVD, metal-organic decomposition, sol-gel processing, and plasma spray.

  18. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  19. METAL COMPOSITIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1959-02-01

    Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

  20. Solder for oxide layer-building metals and alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-09-15

    A low temperature solder and method for soldering an oxide layer-building metal such as aluminum, titanium, tantalum or stainless steel is disclosed. The composition comprises tin and zinc; germanium as a wetting agent; preferably small amounts of copper and antimony; and a grit, such as silicon carbide. The grit abrades any oxide layer formed on the surface of the metal as the germanium penetrates beneath and loosens the oxide layer to provide good metal-to-metal contact. The germanium comprises less than approximately 10% by weight of the solder composition so that it provides sufficient wetting action but does not result in a melting temperature above approximately 300 C. The method comprises the steps rubbing the solder against the metal surface so the grit in the solder abrades the surface while heating the surface until the solder begins to melt and the germanium penetrates the oxide layer, then brushing aside any oxide layer loosened by the solder.

  1. Solder for oxide layer-building metals and alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A low temperature solder and method for soldering an oxide layer-building metal such as aluminum, titanium, tantalum or stainless steel. The comosition comprises tin and zinc; germanium as a wetting agent; preferably small amounts of copper and antimony; and a grit, such as silicon carbide. The grit abrades any oxide layer formed on the surface of the metal as the germanium penetrates beneath and loosens the oxide layer to provide good metal-to-metal contact. The germanium comprises less than aproximatley 10% by weight of the solder composition so that it provides sufficient wetting action but does not result in a melting temperature above approximately 300.degree. C. The method comprises the steps rubbing the solder against the metal surface so the grit in the solder abrades the surface while heating the surface until the solder begins to melt and the germanium penetrates the oxide layer, then brushing aside any oxide layer loosened by the solder.

  2. Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease figure 1 Fig. 1. Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping ex perimental setup. Synchrotron x-rays at 11 keV passed through a 50 µm aperture (Ap). The beam intensity was monitored with a N2-filled ion chamber (I0). The brain slice was mounted vertically on a motorized stage (St) at 45° to the incident x-ray beam and raster scanned in the beam. A 13-element Ge detector (Ge) was positioned at a 90° angle to the beam. We all require iron, copper and

  3. Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper Compounds

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Under Steam Generation Conditions (Conference) | SciTech Connect Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper Compounds Under Steam Generation Conditions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper Compounds Under Steam Generation Conditions The loss in efficiency of power plants with mixed metallurgy, due to transport and deposition of copper and its oxides in HP turbines, has been recognized as one of the key

  4. An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2010 | Department of Energy An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability monitors changes, threats, and risks to the energy infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric

  5. An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts Print Copper-based catalysts are widely used in chemical industries to convert water and carbon monoxide to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methanol. There are theoretical models used to explain this reaction, but a complete understanding of the process has been lacking. However, recent research at the ALS has shed light on the process, giving scientists key data about how copper-based catalysts function at the atomic level. These catalysts

  6. An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts Print Copper-based catalysts are widely used in chemical industries to convert water and carbon monoxide to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methanol. There are theoretical models used to explain this reaction, but a complete understanding of the process has been lacking. However, recent research at the ALS has shed light on the process, giving scientists key data about how copper-based catalysts function at the atomic level. These catalysts

  7. Method of imaging the heart using copper-64 citrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crook, James E.

    1988-01-01

    A method of imaging the heart to provide a distinct image using positron emission tomography comprises administering copper-64 citrate and a compatible carrier.

  8. Copper Canyon, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Copper Canyon, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0959546, -97.0966777 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  9. Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide Solar Cells Completed with Various Buffer Layers by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Citation ...

  10. Researchers Uncover Copper's Potential for Reducing CO2 Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Researchers Uncover Coppers Potential for Reducing CO2 Emissions in Chemical Looping ... When used as a part of a promising coal combustion technology known as chemical looping, ...

  11. Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The loss in efficiency of power plants with mixed metallurgy, due to transport and ... COPPER COMPOUNDS; EVALUATION; POWER PLANTS; SOLUBILITY; STEAM; STEAM GENERATION; ...

  12. Hot-junction electrode members for copper/silver chalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampl, Jr., Edward F.

    1979-12-25

    Tungsten, molybdenum, and alloys thereof are useful as electrode members for thermoelectric legs made from chalcogenides of copper and/or silver.

  13. Copper ionic liquids: Tunable ligand and anion chemistries to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to control electrochemistry and deposition morphology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Copper ionic liquids: Tunable ligand and anion chemistries to control ...

  14. Enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by metal-modified silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brahiti, N.; Hadjersi, T.; Menari, H.; Amirouche, S.; El Kechai, O.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: SiNWs modified with Pd, Au and Pt were used as photocatalysts to degrade MB. Yield of photodegardation increases with UV irradiation time. SiNWs modified with Pd nanoparticles show the best photocatalytic activity. A degradation of 97% was obtained after 200 min of UV irradiation. - Abstract: Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) modified with Au, Pt and Pd nanoparticles were used as heterogeneous photocatalysts for the photodegradation of methylene blue in water under UV light irradiation. The modification of SiNWs was carried out by deposition of metal nanoparticles using the electroless metal deposition (EMD) technique. The effect of metal nanoparticles deposition time on the photocatalytic activity was studied. It was found that the photocatalytic activity of modified SiNWs was enhanced when the deposition time of metal nanoparticles was increased. In addition of modified SiNWs with Pt, Au and Pd nanoparticles, oxidized silicon substrate (Ox-Si), oxidized silicon nanowires (Ox-SiNWs) and hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) were also evaluated for the photodegradation of methylene blue.

  15. Ceramic-metal composite article and joining method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Shinhoo; Selverian, John H.; Kim, Hans J.; Dunn, Edmund M.; Kim, Kyung S.

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic-metal article including a ceramic rod, a metal rod, and a braze joining the ceramic and metal rods at a braze area of a coaxial bore in the metal rod. The bore gradually decreases in diameter, having an inward seat area sized for close sliding fit about the ceramic, a larger brazing area near the joint end, and a void area intermediate the braze and seat areas. The ceramic is seated without brazing in the bore seat area. The side wall between the brazing area and the metal outer surface is about 0.030-0.080 inch. The braze includes an inner braze layer, an outer braze layer, and an interlayer about 0.030-0.090 inch thick. A shoulder between the brazing and void areas supports the interlayer during bonding while preventing bonding between the void area and the ceramic member, leaving a void space between the void area and the ceramic member. A venting orifice extends generally radially through the metal member from the outer surface to the void space. The braze layers are palladium, platinum, gold, silver, copper, nickel, indium, chromium, molybdenum, niobium, iron, aluminum, or alloys thereof. Preferred is a gold-palladium-nickel brazing alloy. The interlayer is nickel, molybdenum, copper, tantalum, tungsten, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, iron, or an alloy thereof.

  16. Ceramic-metal composite article and joining method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; Kim, H.J.; Dunn, E.M.; Kim, K.S.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic-metal article including a ceramic rod, a metal rod, and a braze joining the ceramic and metal rods at a braze area of a coaxial bore in the metal rod is described. The bore gradually decreases in diameter, having an inward seat area sized for close sliding fit about the ceramic, a larger brazing area near the joint end, and a void area intermediate the braze and seat areas. The ceramic is seated without brazing in the bore seat area. The side wall between the brazing area and the metal outer surface is about 0.030-0.080 inch. The braze includes an inner braze layer, an outer braze layer, and an interlayer about 0.030-0.090 inch thick. A shoulder between the brazing and void areas supports the interlayer during bonding while preventing bonding between the void area and the ceramic member, leaving a void space between the void area and the ceramic member. A venting orifice extends generally radially through the metal member from the outer surface to the void space. The braze layers are palladium, platinum, gold, silver, copper, nickel, indium, chromium, molybdenum, niobium, iron, aluminum, or alloys thereof. Preferred is a gold-palladium-nickel brazing alloy. The interlayer is nickel, molybdenum, copper, tantalum, tungsten, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, iron, or an alloy thereof. 4 figs.

  17. Composite metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1998-04-14

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  18. Composite metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peachey, Nathaniel M.; Dye, Robert C.; Snow, Ronny C.; Birdsell, Stephan A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  19. Microstructure and Rheology of Thermoreversible Nanoparticle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microstructure and Rheology of Thermoreversible Nanoparticle Gels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microstructure and Rheology of Thermoreversible Nanoparticle Gels ...

  20. Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation A new structure-control strategy to optimize nanoparticle catalysis is provided. The presence of Au in ...

  1. Hexagonal Ordering of Nanoparticles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron microscope, researchers can see the hexagonal ordering of nanoparticles in a gold nanoparticle membranes (right). This configuration helps researchers to simulate their...

  2. Adsorption behavior of copper and zinc in soils: Influence of pH on adsorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Msaky, J.J. ); Calvet, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors studied adsorption of copper and zinc on three different soils: a brown silty soil, an Oxisol, and a Podzol. They determined the amounts adsorbed and the shapes of adsorption isotherms as a function of the pH of the adsorbing medium at a constant ionic strength. The adsorbed amount-pH relationship depended strongly on the natures of the metallic cation and of the soil. The pH greatly influenced the characteristics of adsorption isotherms. They based interpretation on the variations with the pH of both adsorbent affinity for the metal in relation to the surface electric charge and chemical speciation in solution. The adsorption mechanism in the Oxisol probably involves monohydroxylated cations but is more determined by bivalent cations in the brown silty soil and the Podzol. From a general point of view, adsorption of copper and zinc cannot be represented with a single adsorption constant, but should be described by adsorption isotherms obtained at various pH values.

  3. Biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using a probiotic from coal fly ash effluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babitha, S; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Metal resistant probiotic species was isolated from coal fly ash effluent site. Uniform sized anatase form of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized using Propionibacterium jensenii. Diffraction patterns confirmed the anatase TiO{sub 2} NPs with average size <80 nm. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle incorporated wound dressing exhibits better wound healing. - Abstract: The synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO{sub 2} NP) has gained importance in the recent years owing to its wide range of potential biological applications. The present study demonstrates the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs by a metal resistant bacterium isolated from the coal fly ash effluent. This bacterial strain was identified on the basis of morphology and 16s rDNA gene sequence [KC545833]. The physico-chemical characterization of the synthesized nanoparticles is completely elucidated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM). The crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was confirmed by X-RD pattern. Further, cell viability and haemolytic assays confirmed the biocompatible and non toxic nature of the NPs. The TiO{sub 2} NPs was found to enhance the collagen stabilization and thereby enabling the preparation of collagen based biological wound dressing. The paper essentially provides scope for an easy bioprocess for the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs from the metal oxide enriched effluent sample for future biological applications.

  4. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  5. Bonding Low-density Nanoporous Metal Foams Using Sputtered Solder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bono, M; Cervantes, O; Akaba, C; Hamza, A; Foreman, R; Teslich, N

    2007-08-21

    A method has been developed for bonding low-density nanoporous metal foam components to a substrate using solder that is sputtered onto the surfaces. Metal foams have unusual properties that make them excellent choices for many applications, and as technologies for processing these materials are evolving, their use in industry is increasing dramatically. Metal foams are lightweight and have advantageous dynamic properties, which make them excellent choices for many structural applications. They also provide good acoustic damping, low thermal conductivity, and excellent energy absorption characteristics. Therefore, these materials are commonly used in the automotive, aerospace, construction, and biomedical industries. The synthesis of nanoporous metal foams with a cell size of less then 1 {micro}m is an emerging technology that is expected to lead to widespread application of metal foams in microdevices, such as sensors and actuators. One of the challenges to manufacturing components from metal foams is that they can be difficult to attach to other structures without degrading their properties. For example, traditional liquid adhesives cannot be used because they are absorbed into foams. The problem of bonding or joining can be particularly difficult for small-scale devices made from nanoporous foam, due to the requirement for a thin bond layer. The current study addresses this problem and develops a method of soldering a nanoporous metal foam to a substrate with a bond thickness of less than 2 {micro}m. There are many applications that require micro-scale metal foams precisely bonded to substrates. This study was motivated by a physics experiment that used a laser to drive a shock wave through an aluminum foil and into a copper foam, in order to determine the speed of the shock in the copper foam. To avoid disturbing the shock, the interface between the copper foam and the aluminum substrate had to be as thin as possible. There are many other applications that could benefit from the bonding technology developed in this study, such as small-scale lightweight structural members, high-strength thermal insulating layers for electronics, and micro-scale mechanical dampers, to name but a few. Each of these applications requires one or more small metal foam components precisely bonded to a substrate. Several methods for bonding metal foam components have been developed by previous researchers. Macroscopic metal foam parts have been successfully bonded by laser welding to create T-sections and butt joints. Ultrasonic welding has been used to join aluminum sheet metal to aluminum foam for structural applications. These methods work well for bonding large foam components, but reducing these methods to a smaller length scale would be challenging. One method that has shown great potential for bonding layers of metal foams to substrates is a brazing process that uses a sputter-deposited interface material. Shirzadi et al.[9] have demonstrated bonds between stainless steel foam and a stainless steel substrate using a layer of copper-titanium filler metal that is sputtered onto the interface surfaces. The foam pieces that they bonded were approximately 10 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with a cell size of approximately 200 {micro}m. After depositing the filler material, pressing the materials together, and heating them with an induction heater, bonds were achieved without causing significant damage to the foam. The current study also uses a sputter-deposited interface material to bond foam to a substrate. However, in contrast to previous work, the current study examines bonding microscale pieces of fragile nanoporous metal foam. In this study, a method is developed to bond a thin sheet of fragile, low-density nanoporous copper foam to an aluminum foil substrate of thickness 40 {micro}m. By sputter depositing an indium-silver alloy onto the foam and the substrate, a solder joint with a thickness of less than 2 {micro}m was achieved.

  6. Airbrushed Nickel Nanoparticles for Large-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarac, Mehmet; ANDERSON, BRYAN; Pearce, Ryan; Railsback, Justin; Oni, Adedapo; White, Ryan M.; Hensley, Dale K; Lebeau, James M; Melechko, Anatoli; Tracy, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using Ni nanoparticle (NP) catalysts that were deposited by airbrushing onto Si, Al, Cu, and Ti substrates. Airbrushing is a simple method for depositing catalyst NPs over large areas that is compatible with roll-to-roll processing. The distribution and morphology of VACNFs are affected by the airbrushing parameters and the composition of the metal foil. Highly concentrated Ni NPs in heptane give more uniform distributions than pentane and hexanes, resulting in more uniform coverage of VACNFs. For VACNF growth on metal foils, Si micropowder was added as a precursor for Si-enriched coatings formed in situ on the VACNFs that impart mechanical rigidity. Interactions between the catalyst NPs and the metal substrates impart control over the VACNF morphology. Growth of carbon nanostructures on Cu is particularly noteworthy because the miscibility of Ni with Cu poses challenges for VACNF growth, and carbon nanostructures anchored to Cu substrates are desired as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and for thermal interface materials.

  7. Nanoscale mapping of plasmon and exciton in ZnO tetrapods coupled with Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertoni, Giovanni; Fabbri, Filippo; Villani, Marco; Lazzarini, Laura; Turner, Stuart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Calestani, Davide; Gradečak, Silvija; Zappettini, Andrea; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2016-01-12

    Metallic nanoparticles can be used to enhance optical absorption or emission in semiconductors, thanks to a strong interaction of collective excitations of free charges (plasmons) with electromagnetic fields. Herein we present direct imaging at the nanoscale of plasmon-exciton coupling in Au/ZnO nanostructures by combining scanning transmission electron energy loss and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and mapping. The Au nanoparticles (~30 nm in diameter) are grown in-situ on ZnO nanotetrapods by means of a photochemical process without the need of binding agents or capping molecules, resulting in clean interfaces. Interestingly, the Au plasmon resonance is localized at the Au/vacuum interface, rather than presentingmore » an isotropic distribution around the nanoparticle. Moreover, on the contrary, a localization of the ZnO signal has been observed inside the Au nanoparticle, as also confirmed by numerical simulations.« less

  8. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galkowski, Joseph J.

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  9. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  10. Gas Sensors Based on Tin Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized from a Mini-Arc Plasma Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Ganhua; Huebner, Kyle L.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Chen, Junhong

    2006-01-01

    Minimore » aturized gas sensors or electronic noses to rapidly detect and differentiate trace amount of chemical agents are extremely attractive. In this paper, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a functional tin oxide nanoparticle gas sensor. Tin oxide nanoparticles are first synthesized using a convenient and low-cost mini-arc plasma source. The nanoparticle size distribution is measured online using a scanning electrical mobility spectrometer (SEMS). The product nanoparticles are analyzed ex-situ by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for morphology and defects, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy for elemental composition, electron diffraction for crystal structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for surface composition. Nonagglomerated rutile tin oxide ( SnO 2 ) nanoparticles as small as a few nm have been produced. Larger particles bear a core-shell structure with a metallic core and an oxide shell. The nanoparticles are then assembled onto an e-beam lithographically patterned interdigitated electrode using electrostatic force to fabricate the gas sensor. The nanoparticle sensor exhibits a fast response and a good sensitivity when exposed to 100 ppm ethanol vapor in air.« less

  11. Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in supercondu...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in superconducting cuprate bilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxy...

  12. Layered Copper-Based Electrode for High-Dielectric Constant Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copper-Based Electrode for High-Dielectric Constant Oxide Thin-Film-Based Devices Technology available for licenisng: A multilayer thin-film device containing copper layers...

  13. Nanoparticles and nanowires: synchrotron spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sham, T.K.

    2008-08-11

    This paper reviews the research in nanomaterials conducted in our laboratory in the last decade using conventional and synchrotron radiation techniques. While preparative and conventional characterisation techniques are described, emphasis is placed on the analysis of nanomaterials using synchrotron radiation. Materials of primary interests are metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons. Synchrotron techniques based on absorption spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), which includes X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXFAS), and de-excitation spectroscopy, including X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) are described. We show that the tunability, brightness, polarisation and time structure of synchrotron radiation are providing unprecedented capabilities for nanomaterials analysis. Synchrotron studies of prototype systems such as gold nanoparticles, 1-D nanowires of group IV materials, C, Si and Ge as well as nanodiamond, and compound semiconductors, ZnS, CdS, ZnO and related materials are used to illustrate the power and unique capabilities of synchrotron spectroscopy in the characterisation of local structure, electronic structure and optical properties of nanomaterials.

  14. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard; Duda, Anna; Ginley, David S.; Yost, Vernon; Meier, Daniel; Ward, James S.

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  15. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothman, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  16. Fabricating Dielectric Ceramic Films on Copper Foils | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Fabricating Dielectric Ceramic Films on Copper Foils Technology available for licensing: A method for coating a ceramic film on copper foil. Process creates higher performing and more reliable embedded circuit boards Can be used to prepare ceramic materials consisting of various compounds, including lead, magnesium, barium, zirconium and, titanium PDF icon dielectric_ceramic_films

  17. Etching of Copper Coated Mylar Tubes With CF-4 Gas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ecklund, Karl M.; Hartman, Keith W.; Hebert, Michael J.; Wojcicki, Stanley G.

    1996-04-01

    Using 5 mm diameter copper coated mylar straw tubes at a potential of 2.30 KV relative to a concentric 20 (mu)m diameter gold-plated tungsten anode, it has been observed that with very low flow rates of CF4-based gases the conductive copper cathode material may be removed entirely from the mylar surface.

  18. Method for recovering metals from waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

    1998-12-01

    A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.

  19. Method for recovering metals from waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G.; Clark, David E.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    2000-01-01

    A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

  20. Method for recovering metals from waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G.; Clark, David E.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree.-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000.degree.-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

  1. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  2. Zinc oxide based diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles: Synthesis by laser ablation in liquids, microstructural and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savchuk, Andriy I.; Stolyarchuk, Ihor D.; Savchuk, Oleksandr A.; Makoviy, Vitaliy V.; Smolinsky, Mykhailo M.; Shporta, Oleksandra A.; Perrone, Alessio

    2013-12-04

    Nanoparticles of ZnO and ZnO doped with transition metals (Mn, Co) were synthesized by laser ablation in liquid medium. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed formation of nanostructures with different shapes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) gives information about surface morphology of the formed nanostructures. Absorption edge of ZnO, ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Co colloidal nanoparticles exhibits blue shift due to confinement effect. In photoluminescence spectra three peaks are attributed to the band-edge transitions and defect states. The Faraday rotation in ZnO:Mn nanoparticles gives evidence for paramagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  3. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, Victor A.; von Winbush, Samuel

    1988-01-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  4. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  5. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H.

    2014-09-07

    Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

  6. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor; Huang, Baiyu; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Woodfield, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

  7. CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

  8. Metal dusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edited by K. Natesan

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was held soon after the September 11th incident under a climate of sorrow and uncertainty among the people of the world, in particular the Workshop participants and their host organizations. With considerable help from the partiicpants, the Workshop was conducted as planed and we had excellent participation in spite of the circumstances. A good fraction of the attendees in the Workshop were from abroad and from several industries, indicating the importance and relevance of the subject for the chemical process industry. Degradation of structural metallic alloys by metal dusting has been an issue for over 40 years in the chemical, petrochemical, syngas, and iron ore reduction plants. However, the fundamental scientific reasons for the degradation of complex alloys in high carbon activity environments are not clear. one of the major parameters of importance is the variation in gas chemistry in both the laboratory experiments and in the plant-service environments. the industry has questioned the applicability of the laboratory test data, obtained in low steam environments, in assessment and life prediction for the materials in plant service where the environments contain 25-35% steam. Several other variables such as system pressure, gas flow velocity, incubation time, alloy chemistry, surface finish, and weldments, were also identified in the literature as to having an effect on the initiatino and propagation of metal dusting attack. It is the purpose of this Workshop to establish a forum in which the researchers from scientific and industrial laboratories, alloy manufacturers, end users, and research and development sponsors can exchange information, discuss different points of view, prioritize the issues, and to elaborate on the trends in industry for the future. We believe that we accomplished these goals successfully and sincerely thank the participants for their contributions.

  9. Novel, Low-Cost Nanoparticle Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    Fact sheet describing a modular hybrid plasma reactor and process to manufacture low-cost nanoparticles

  10. Coated Gold Nanoparticles Found to be Speedy Electron Sponges...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coated Gold Nanoparticles Found to be Speedy Electron Sponges Gold-coated nanoparticles capture electrons at an unprecedented rate in solution. Gold nanoparticles demonstrate the...

  11. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Pave the Way for Medical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology

    Titanium dioxide ... Titanium dioxide nanocomposites "locate and destroy" defective cell lines using the white ...

  12. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for targeting, initiation and control of in vitro and in vivo chemical reactions in biological molecules Commercial applications include synthetic DNARNA endonucleases, gene...

  13. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  14. Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

    1982-09-27

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  15. Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimotake, Hiroshi; Bartholme, Louis G.

    1984-01-01

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  16. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides

  17. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  18. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  19. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Phelps, Cindy

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  20. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  1. Authorized limits for Fernald copper ingots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frink, N.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Chen, S. Y.

    1997-09-01

    This development document contains data and analysis to support the approval of authorized limits for the unrestricted release of 59 t of copper ingots containing residual radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The analysis presented in this document comply with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,{close_quotes} as well as the requirements of the proposed promulgation of this order as 10 CFR Part 834. The document was developed following the step-by-step process described in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material.

  2. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

    1993-04-13

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal ZrO[sub 2] particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K[sub IC]). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5] (211) on the ZrO[sub 2] particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO[sub 2] coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K[sub IC] of 4.5 MPa(m)[sup 0.5].

  3. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Kullberg, Marc L.

    1993-01-01

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

  4. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of chromium-nickel steel to nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2602-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of 300 series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1) to nickel-copper N04400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  5. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper to nickel-chromium-iron. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper N04400 (P-42) to nickel-chromium-iron N06600 (P-43), in thickness range of 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  6. Surface engineered nanoparticles for improved surface enhanced Raman scattering applications and method for preparing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Blake A.; Talin, Albert Alec

    2009-11-27

    A method for producing metal nanoparticles that when associated with an analyte material will generate an amplified SERS spectrum when the analyte material is illuminated by a light source and a spectrum is recorded. The method for preparing the metal nanoparticles comprises the steps of (i) forming a water-in-oil microemulsion comprising a bulk oil phase, a dilute water phase, and one or more surfactants, wherein the water phase comprises a transition metal ion; (ii) adding an aqueous solution comprising a mild reducing agent to the water-in-oil microemulsion; (iii) stirring the water-in-oil microemulsion and aqueous solution to initiate a reduction reaction resulting in the formation of a fine precipitate dispersed in the water-in-oil microemulsion; and (iv) separating the precipitate from the water-in-oil microemulsion.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles via arc-plasma assisted CVD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.T.; Hu, C.; Yu, C.; Qiu, J.S.

    2009-12-15

    Carbon-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (CEMNs) were fabricated on a large scale by arc-plasma assisted CVD in acetylene. The coal-derived metal-containing (Fe, Co and Ni) carbon rods were used as anodes, while a high-purity graphite rod was used as a cathode that remained unchanged during the arcing process. The CEMNs obtained were characterized by TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms and VSM. The diameter distribution of the obtained CEMNs varies from 10 to 70 nm, of which the metal cores are proximately 5-50 nm. The core phases in Fe ) nanoparticles are body-centered cubic Fe and orthorhombic Fe3C while Co ) nanoparticles and Ni ) nanoparticles show the characteristic of a face-centered cubic structure. The Fe ), Co ) and Ni ) nanoparticles with well-ordered graphitic shells have the surface area of 89 m{sup 2}/g, 72 m{sup 2}/g and 75 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The CEMNs show ferromagnetic of which was characterized by a ratio of remnant magnetization (MR) to saturation magnetization (MS).

  8. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  9. An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts Print Thursday, 05 May 2016 12:20 Copper-based catalysts are widely used in chemical industries to convert water and carbon monoxide to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methanol. There are theoretical models used to explain this reaction, but a complete understanding of the process has been lacking. However, recent research at the ALS has shed light on the process, giving scientists key

  10. 1/f noise in semiconductor and metal nanocrystal solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Heng Lhuillier, Emmanuel Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-04-21

    Electrical 1/f noise is measured in thin films of CdSe, CdSe/CdS, ZnO, HgTe quantum dots and Au nanocrystals. The 1/f noise, normalized per nanoparticle, shows no systematic dependence on the nanoparticle material and the coupling material. However, over 10 orders of magnitude, it correlates well with the nearest neighbor conductance suggesting some universal magnitude of the 1/f noise in these granular conductors. In the hopping regime, the main mechanism of 1/f noise is determined to be mobility fluctuated. In the metallic regime obtained with gold nanoparticle films, the noise drops to a similar level as bulk gold films and with a similar temperature dependence.

  11. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission

  12. Microsoft Word - nanoparticles.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and WAXS, they were able to remove the small-particle size contribution to x-ray diffraction peak broadening and quantify the excess disorder and strain in the nanoparticles...

  13. Quantifying the influence of twin boundaries on the deformation of nanocrystalline copper using atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Garritt J.; Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2014-09-22

    Over the past decade, numerous efforts have sought to understand the influence of twin boundaries on the behavior of polycrystalline materials. Early results suggested that twin boundaries within nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals have a considerable effect on material behavior by altering the activated deformation mechanisms. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the role of twin boundaries on the deformation of <100> columnar nanocrystalline copper at room temperature under uniaxial strain. We leverage non-local kinematic metrics, formulated from continuum mechanics theory, to compute atomically-resolved rotational and strain fields during plastic deformation. These results are then utilized to compute the distribution of various nanoscale mechanisms during straining, and quantitatively resolve their contribution to the total strain accommodation within the microstructure, highlighting the fundamental role of twin boundaries. Our results show that nanoscale twins influence nanocrystalline copper by altering the cooperation of fundamental deformation mechanisms and their contributed role in strain accommodation, and we present new methods for extracting useful information from atomistic simulations. The simulation results suggest a tension–compression asymmetry in the distribution of deformation mechanisms and strain accommodation by either dislocations or twin boundary mechanisms. In highly twinned microstructures, twin boundary migration can become a significant deformation mode, in comparison to lattice dislocation plasticity in non-twinned columnar microstructures, especially during compression.

  14. Quantifying the influence of twin boundaries on the deformation of nanocrystalline copper using atomistic simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Garritt J.; Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2014-09-22

    Over the past decade, numerous efforts have sought to understand the influence of twin boundaries on the behavior of polycrystalline materials. Early results suggested that twin boundaries within nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals have a considerable effect on material behavior by altering the activated deformation mechanisms. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the role of twin boundaries on the deformation of <100> columnar nanocrystalline copper at room temperature under uniaxial strain. We leverage non-local kinematic metrics, formulated from continuum mechanics theory, to compute atomically-resolved rotational and strain fields during plastic deformation. These results are then utilized tomore » compute the distribution of various nanoscale mechanisms during straining, and quantitatively resolve their contribution to the total strain accommodation within the microstructure, highlighting the fundamental role of twin boundaries. Our results show that nanoscale twins influence nanocrystalline copper by altering the cooperation of fundamental deformation mechanisms and their contributed role in strain accommodation, and we present new methods for extracting useful information from atomistic simulations. The simulation results suggest a tension–compression asymmetry in the distribution of deformation mechanisms and strain accommodation by either dislocations or twin boundary mechanisms. In highly twinned microstructures, twin boundary migration can become a significant deformation mode, in comparison to lattice dislocation plasticity in non-twinned columnar microstructures, especially during compression.« less

  15. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  16. The Complexes of Bisphosphonate and Magnetite Nanoparticles to Remove Uranyl Ions from Aqueous Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Yang, Z.; Gao, J.; Xu, K.; Gu, H.; Xu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, X.

    2007-03-20

    Using tetraethyl-3-amino-propane-1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) as the functional molecule, we functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles via dopamine (DA) linkage to create a system with an Fe3O4-DA-BP nanostructure, which possesses high specificity for removing uranyl ions from water or blood. This work demonstrates that magnetic nanoparticles, combined with specific receptor-ligand interactions, promise a sensitive and rapid platform for the detection, recovery, and decorporation of radioactive metal toxins from biological environment.

  17. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  18. The influence of composition gradients on tensile properties of weld metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, I.D.; Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1988-09-01

    In this study, the effects of weld metal microsegregation, as altered by post-weld heat treatments, on both low and high temperature tensile properties were investigated on an alloy system which exhibits significant segregation of the major alloying elements without complex transformations or precipitation. Monel alloy 400, which consists primarily of nickel and copper, was chosen as a model system. This system is a single phase FCC solid solution at all temperatures, and has a low distribution coefficient, k. On solidification, significant microsegregation occurs with copper segregating to the interdendritic boundaries.

  19. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for copper detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-04-02

    A nucleic acid enzyme responsive to copper, comprising an oligonucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:1, wherein the nucleic acid enzyme is not self-cleaving.

  20. Copper Aluminate as a potential material for high temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copper Aluminate as a potential material for high temperature thermoelectric power generation Home Author: D. T. Morelli, E. D. Case, B. D. Hall, S. Wang Year: 2008 Abstract: URL:...

  1. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  2. Copper Aluminate as a potential material for high temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermoelectric power generation | Energy Frontier Research Centers Copper Aluminate as a potential material for high temperature thermoelectric power generation Home Author: D. T. Morelli, E. D. Case, B. D. Hall, S. Wang Year: 2008 Abstract: URL:

  3. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide

  4. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide

  5. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide

  6. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide

  7. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide

  8. Quantum nonlocal effects on optical properties of spherical nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-02-15

    To study the scattering of electromagnetic radiation by a spherical metallic nanoparticle with quantum spatial dispersion, we develop the standard nonlocal Mie theory by allowing for the excitation of the quantum longitudinal plasmon modes. To describe the quantum nonlocal effects, we use the quantum longitudinal dielectric function of the system. As in the standard Mie theory, the electromagnetic fields are expanded in terms of spherical vector wavefunctions. Then, the usual Maxwell boundary conditions are imposed plus the appropriate additional boundary conditions. Examples of calculated extinction spectra are presented, and it is found that the frequencies of the subsidiary peaks, due to quantum bulk plasmon excitations exhibit strong dependence on the quantum spatial dispersion.

  9. The role of interparticle heterogeneities in the selenization pathway of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle thin films: A real-time study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Nathaniel J.; Mainz, Roland; Walker, Bryce C.; Hages, Charles J.; Just, Justus; Klaus, Manuela; Schmidt, Sebastian S.; Weber, Alfons; Yang, Wei -Chang D.; Zander, Ole; Stach, Eric A.; Unold, Thomas; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-06-10

    Real-time energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) analysis has been utilized to observe the selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle films coated from three nanoparticle populations: Cu- and Sn-rich particles roughly 5 nm in size, Zn-rich nanoparticles ranging from 10 to 20 nm in diameter, and a mixture of both types of nanoparticles (roughly 1:1 by mass), which corresponds to a synthesis recipe yielding CZTSSe solar cells with reported total-area efficiencies as high as 7.9%. The EDXRD studies presented herein show that the formation of copper selenide intermediates during the selenization of mixed-particle films can be primarily attributed to the small, Cu- and Sn-rich particles. Moreover, the formation of these copper selenide phases represents the first stage of the CZTSSe grain growth mechanism. The large, Zn-rich particles subsequently contribute their composition to form micrometer-sized CZTSSe grains. In conclusion, these findings enable further development of a previously proposed selenization pathway to account for the roles of interparticle heterogeneities, which in turn provides a valuable guide for future optimization of processes to synthesize high quality CZTSSe absorber layers.

  10. The role of interparticle heterogeneities in the selenization pathway of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle thin films: A real-time study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carter, Nathaniel J.; Mainz, Roland; Walker, Bryce C.; Hages, Charles J.; Just, Justus; Klaus, Manuela; Schmidt, Sebastian S.; Weber, Alfons; Yang, Wei -Chang D.; Zander, Ole; et al

    2015-06-10

    Real-time energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) analysis has been utilized to observe the selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle films coated from three nanoparticle populations: Cu- and Sn-rich particles roughly 5 nm in size, Zn-rich nanoparticles ranging from 10 to 20 nm in diameter, and a mixture of both types of nanoparticles (roughly 1:1 by mass), which corresponds to a synthesis recipe yielding CZTSSe solar cells with reported total-area efficiencies as high as 7.9%. The EDXRD studies presented herein show that the formation of copper selenide intermediates during the selenization of mixed-particle films can be primarily attributed to the small, Cu- andmore » Sn-rich particles. Moreover, the formation of these copper selenide phases represents the first stage of the CZTSSe grain growth mechanism. The large, Zn-rich particles subsequently contribute their composition to form micrometer-sized CZTSSe grains. In conclusion, these findings enable further development of a previously proposed selenization pathway to account for the roles of interparticle heterogeneities, which in turn provides a valuable guide for future optimization of processes to synthesize high quality CZTSSe absorber layers.« less

  11. Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Polycrystals (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper Polycrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper Polycrystals Abstract not provided. Authors: Lieberman, Evan [1] ; Lebensohn, Ricardo A. [1] ; Kober, Edward Martin [1] ; Rollett, Anthony [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) Carnegie Mellon Univ.,

  12. An overview of copper-laser development for isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, B.E.

    1987-03-13

    We have developed a copper-laser pumped dye-laser system that addresses all of the requirements for atomic vapor laser isotope separation. The requirement for high average power for the laser system has led to the development of copper-laser chains with injection-locked oscillators and multihundred-watt amplifiers. By continuously operating the Laser Demonstration Facility, we gain valuable data for further upgrade and optimization.

  13. NOTES AND COMMENTS REVERE COPPER AR! BRASS DETROIT, MICHIGAN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * .t-* . * * - -. _ _ ,.. .I AIT. 4 NOTES AND COMMENTS REVERE COPPER AR! BRASS DETROIT, MICHIGAN A preliminary (screening) survey was conducted in several areas of the Revere Copper and Brass Facility, 5851 W. Jefferson Street, Detroit, Michigan. The survey was conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group on April 22, 1981. The Survey Group, consisting of W. Smith, R. Mundis, K. Flynn (all of ANI), and E. Jascewsky (DOE-CH) met on site with J. Evans (Safety Engineer), D. Tratt (Asst.

  14. NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Copper Indium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) cluster tool in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated chambers for depositing, processing, measuring, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. You can read more on the rationale for developing this cluster tool and its capabilities, and check out the National Solar Technology

  15. Copper ionic liquids: Tunable ligand and anion chemistries to control

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electrochemistry and deposition morphology. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Copper ionic liquids: Tunable ligand and anion chemistries to control electrochemistry and deposition morphology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Copper ionic liquids: Tunable ligand and anion chemistries to control electrochemistry and deposition morphology. Abstract not provided. Authors: Pratt, Harry ; Ingersoll, David ; Hudak, Nicholas ; McKenzie, Bonnie B. Publication Date: 2013-07-01 OSTI

  16. Measurement of electron-ion relaxation in warm dense copper

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-06

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. As a result, data are compared with various theoretical models.

  17. REFRACTORY METAL TUBE DRAWING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, C.H.; Karasek, F.J.

    1963-01-29

    A lubricant for drawing Zr and other refractory metals is described. Metallic Cu powder is added to a solution of acrylic resin in chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent. (AEC)

  18. Method for the rapid synthesis of large quantities of metal oxide nanowires at low temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros

    2009-09-22

    A process for the rapid synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles at low temperatures and methods which facilitate the fabrication of long metal oxide nanowires. The method is based on treatment of metals with oxygen plasma. Using oxygen plasma at low temperatures allows for rapid growth unlike other synthesis methods where nanomaterials take a long time to grow. Density of neutral oxygen atoms in plasma is a controlling factor for the yield of nanowires. The oxygen atom density window differs for different materials. By selecting the optimal oxygen atom density for various materials the yield can be maximized for nanowire synthesis of the metal.

  19. Approach to make macroporous metal sheets as current collectors for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wu; Canfield, Nathan L.; Wang, Deyu; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Li, Xiaohong S.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2010-05-05

    A new approach and simple method is described to produce macroporous metal sheet as current collector for anode in lithium ion battery. This method, based on slurry blending, tape casting, sintering, and reducing of metal oxides, produces a uniform, macroporous metal sheet. Silicon film sputter-coated on such porous copper substrate shows much higher capacity and longer cycle life than on smooth Cu foil. This methodology produces very limited wastes and is also adaptable to many other materials. It is easy for industrial scale production.

  20. Hydrostatic Microextrusion of Steel and Copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berti, Guido; Monti, Manuel; D'Angelo, Luciano

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents an experimental investigation based on hydrostatic micro extrusion of billets in low carbon steel and commercially pure copper, and the relevant results. The starting billets have a diameter of 0.3 mm and are 5 mm long; a high pressure generator consisting of a manually operated piston screw pump is used to pressurize the fluid up to 4200 bar, the screw pump is connected through a 3-way distribution block to the extrusion die and to a strain gauge high pressure sensor. The sensor has a full scale of 5000 bar and the extrusion pressure is acquired at a sampling rate of 2 kHz by means of an acquisition program written in the LabVIEW environment. Tests have been conducted at room temperature and a lubricant for wire drawing (Chemetall Gardolube DO 338) acts both as the pressurizing fluid and lubricant too. In addition, billets were graphite coated. Different fluid pressures and process durations have been adopted, resulting in different extrusion lengths. The required extrusion pressure is much higher than in non-micro forming operations (this effect is more evident for steel). On the cross section of the extruded parts, hardness and grain size distribution have been measured, the former through Vickers micro hardness (10 g load) tests. In the case of the extrusion of copper, the material behaves as in microdrawing process. In the case of the extrusion of steel, the hardness increases from the core to the surface as in the drawing process, but with lower values. The analysis evidenced the presence of the external layer, but its thickness is about 1/3 of the external layer in the drawn wire and the grains appear smaller than in the layer of the drawn wire. The extruding force required along the extruding direction is higher (22-24 N) than the drawing force along the same direction (12 N): being the material, the reduction ratio, the die sliding length the same in both cases, the higher extrusion force should be caused by a higher tangential friction force and/or a higher redundant work of deformation and/or a different material behaviour. Which is the real mechanism is not clear at present, but surface layer grains in extrusion are more deformed than in wire drawing. For this reason the deformation inhomogeneity increases in extrusion and the material under the highly deformed surface layer should be subjected to lower strains, strain hardening and finally resulting in lower hardness.

  1. Effect of filler metal composition on the strength of yttria stabilized zirconia joints brazed with Pd-Ag-CuOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-09-08

    The Ag-CuOx system is of interest to be used to be used as an air braze filler metal for joining high temperature electrochemical devices. Previous work has shown that the melting temperatures can be increased by adding palladium to Ag-CuOx and it is expected that this may aid high temperature stability. This work compares the room temperature bend strength of joints made between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air brazed using Ag-CuOx without palladium and with 5 and 15mol% palladium additions. It has been found that in general palladium decreases joint strength, especially in low copper oxide compositions filler metals. At high copper oxide contents, brittle fracture through both copper oxide rich phases and the YSZ limits joint strength.

  2. Metallic sheathing for protection of steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, W.W.

    1987-09-01

    A review of 37 years of experience with metallic sheathing to protect the splash and tidal zones of structural steel in seawater is presented. Variations in the corrosivity of the environment from zone to zone on a vertical structure and the interdependence among them are discussed. Corrosion-resistant alloys for sheathing include Monel (NiCu) Alloy 400, copper-nickel alloys, and stainless steel. The advantages and disadvantages of these noble alloys are compared with those of other protective materials such as paint coatings, concrete, polymers, and steel itself. Adequate protection of hot risers is critical and quite easily provided through proper design and sheathing attachment. The use of 90:10 copper-nickel Alloy C70600 is gaining visibility with progressive technology to provide biofouling control as well as corrosion protection.

  3. Hydrogen ingress into copper-nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pound, B.G. . Materials Research Center)

    1994-04-01

    Hydrogen (H) ingress into two copper (Cu)-nickel (Ni) alloys -- a commercial 77% Cu-15% Ni alloy (aged) and alloy K-500 (UNS N05500, aged and unaged) --- was studied using a technique referred to as hydrogen ingress analysis by potentiostatic pulsing (HIAPP). Anodic current transients obtained for these alloys in an acetate buffer (1 mol/L acetic acid + 1 mol/L sodium acetate [NaAc]) were analyzed using a diffusion-trapping model to determine trapping constants and H entry fluxes. A small increase was observed in the irreversible trapping constant for alloy K-500 with aging. Trapping constants of the aged alloys were similar within the limits of uncertainty, but H entry flux for the 77% Cu alloy was lower than that for aged or unaged alloy K-500. The lower flux may have accounted at least partly, for the Cu alloy's higher resistance to H embrittlement. Trap densities were consistent qualitatively with levels of sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P) in the two alloys. This finding supported an assumption that S and P provided the primary irreversible traps.

  4. Magnetic nano-particles | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic nano-particles The student will be involved in assembling CoFe2O4 nano-particles onto Si wafers for further studies by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) that will...

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Platinum Monolayer Oxygen-Reduction Electrocatalysts with Co-Pd Core-Shell Nanoparticle Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao,M.; Sasaki, K.; Marinkovic, N.; Zhang, L.; Adzic, R.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized Pt monolayer electrocatalysts for oxygen-reduction using a new method to obtain the supporting core-shell nanoparticles. They consist of a Pt monolayer deposited on carbon-supported Co-Pd core-shell nanoparticles with the diameter of 3-4 nm. The nanoparticles were made using a redox-transmetalation (electroless deposition) method involving the oxidation of Co by Pd cations, yielding a Pd shell around the Co core. The quality of the thus-formed core-shell structure was verified using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, while cyclic voltammetry was employed to confirm the lack of Co oxidation (dissolution). A Pt monolayer was deposited on the Co-Pd core-shell nanoparticles by the galvanic displacement of a Cu monolayer obtained by underpotential deposition. The total noble metal mass-specific activity of this Pt monolayer electrocatalyst was ca. 3-fold higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts.

  6. Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

  7. Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Nune, Satish K.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Dang, Liem X.

    2013-09-01

    Nanofluids, dispersions of metal or oxide nanoparticles in a base working fluid, are being intensively studied due to improvements they offer in thermal properties of the working fluid. However, these benefits have been erratically demonstrated and proven impacts on thermal conductivity are modest and well described from long-established effective medium theory. In this paper, we describe a new class of metal-organic heat carrier (MOHC) nanofluid that offers potential for a larger performance boost in thermal vapor-liquid compression cycles. MOHCs are nanophase porous coordination solids designed to reversibly uptake the working fluid molecules in which the MOHCs are suspended. Additional heat can be extracted in a heat exchanger or solar collector from the endothermic enthalpy of desorption, which is then released as the nanofluid transits through a power generating device such as a turboexpander. Calculations for an R123 MOHC nanofluid indicated potential for up to 15% increase in power output. Capillary tube experiments show that liquid-vapor transitions occur without nanoparticle deposition on the tube walls provided entrance Reynolds number exceeds approximately 100.

  8. With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better With Nanoparticles, Slower May Be Better Molecular dynamics simulations provide unprecedented understanding of nanoparticle structure and symmetry July 5, 2013 The last decade has seen a flurry of research and development involving nanoparticles - chemicals or objects in the 1-100 nanometer range. These tiny structures are of great scientific interest because they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic and molecular structures. And

  9. Heavy metal biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  10. METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magel, T.T.

    1958-03-01

    This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

  11. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  12. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A.; Wang, X.; Paparo, D.

    2014-09-21

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N=1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (2001000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  13. Surface Plasmon Excitation via Au Nanoparticles in CdSe Semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Konda, R. B.; Mundle, R.; Mustafa, H.; Bamiduro, O.; Roy, U. N.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.

    2008-10-23

    We present experimental evidence for the large Raman and photoluminescence enhancement in CdSe semiconductor films grown on Si and glass substrates due to excitation of surface plasmon resonances in proximate gold metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of CdSe film. Heterojunction diodes containing n-CdSe on p-Si semiconductor were fabricated and the surface of the diodes was in situ coated with Au nanoparticles using the ultra-high vacuum pulsed-laser deposition technique. A significant enhancement of the photocurrent was obtained in CdSe/p-Si containing Au nanoparticles on the surface compared to CdSe/p-Si due to the enhanced photo-absorption within the semiconductor by the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance. These observations suggest a variety of approaches for improving the performance of devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaic, and related devices, including biosensors.

  14. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Li, Shari; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-12-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

  15. Selected heavy metals and other constituents in soil and stormwater runoff at the Interstate 95 interchange near Atlee, Virginia, April 1993--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speiran, G.K.

    1998-12-31

    Concentrations of the heavy metals copper, lead, and zinc, and other constituents, were measured in soil and runoff before and after construction of a stormwater detention basin at the Interstate 95-State Route 656 interchange near Atlee, VA, from April 1993 through May 1997. The spatial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in soil indicate that the paved traffic lanes of the interstate highway are a source of the metals. Concentrations of the metals in soil decrease with increasing soil depth below the ground surface and with increasing distance from the highway lanes. Of the three metals for which samples were analyzed, lead was generally present at the greatest concentration, and copper was at the lowest concentration in the soil.

  16. Amorphous metal composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, Martin A. (Troy, NY); Lupinski, John H. (Scotia, NY)

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  17. High Thermoelectric Performance in Copper Telluride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Tiansong; Shi, Xun; Wei, Su-Huai; Chen, Lidong

    2015-06-21

    Recently, Cu 2-δ S and Cu 2-δ Se were reported to have an ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit zT. Thus, as a member of the copper chalcogenide group, Cu 2-δ Te is expected to possess superior zTs because Te is less ionic and heavy. However, the zT value is low in the Cu2Te sintered using spark plasma sintering, which is typically used to fabricate high-density bulk samples. In addition, the extra sintering processes may change the samples’ compositions as well as their physical properties, especially for Cu2Te, which has many stable and meta-stable phasesmore » as well as weaker ionic bonding between Cu and Te as compared with Cu2S and Cu2Se. In this study, high-density Cu2Te samples were obtained using direct annealing without a sintering process. In the absence of sintering processes, the samples’ compositions could be well controlled, leading to substantially reduced carrier concentrations that are close to the optimal value. The electrical transports were optimized, and the thermal conductivity was considerably reduced. The zT values were significantly improved—to 1.1 at 1000 K—which is nearly 100% improvement. Furthermore, this method saves substantial time and cost during the sample’s growth. The study demonstrates that Cu 2-δ X (X=S, Se and Te) is the only existing system to show high zTs in the series of compounds composed of three sequential primary group elements.« less

  18. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  19. THE SUBMILLIMETER AND MILLIMETER EXCESS OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: MAGNETIC DIPOLE EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draine, B. T.; Hensley, Brandon

    2012-09-20

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) has surprisingly strong submillimeter- and millimeter-wavelength emission that is inconsistent with standard dust models, including those with emission from spinning dust. Here, we show that the emission from the SMC may be understood if the interstellar dust mixture includes magnetic nanoparticles, emitting magnetic dipole radiation resulting from thermal fluctuations in the magnetization. The magnetic grains can be metallic iron, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, or maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The required mass of iron is consistent with elemental abundance constraints. The magnetic dipole emission is predicted to be polarized orthogonally to the normal electric dipole radiation if the nanoparticles are inclusions in larger grains. We speculate that other low-metallicity galaxies may also have a large fraction of the interstellar Fe in magnetic materials.

  20. Synthesis of few-walled carbon nanotube-Rh nanoparticles by arc discharge: Effect of selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yanfeng

    2012-06-15

    Highly crystalline rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by selective oxidation method. Carbon nanotubes and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in hydrogen arc plasma. The as-grown nanomaterials can be purified by heat treatment in open air and by soaking in HCl. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction results reveal that as-grown FeRh nanoparticles have a typical chemical CsCl-type structure which can be transformed into a face-centered cubic structure by thermal annealing in the purification process. The purification process is selective toward the removal of the amorphous carbon coating the nanoparticles, and transforms Fe to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be easily dissolved in hydrochloric acid, leaving carbon nanotubes-Rh nanoparticles. Rh nanoparticles with diameters of 2-60 nm are deposited uniformly on the surface of the carbon nanotube bundles. This simple and selective chemistry offers a new process for synthesizing and controlling Fe content in carbon nanotube-FeRh nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-crystallinity CNTs and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in arc plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The diameter distribution of CNTs depends on different gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment in open air and soaking in HCl can convert CNTs-FeRh to CNTs-Rh. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The selective oxidation mechanisms of metal nanoparticles and carbon materials differ.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and application of surface-functionalized ordered mesoporous nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Po-Wen

    2009-12-15

    The dissertation begins with Chapter 1, which is a general introduction of the fundamental synthesis of mesoporous silica materials, the selective functionlization of mesoporous silica materials, and the synthesis of nanostructured porous materials via nanocasting. In Chapter 2, the thermo-responsive polymer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) was synthesized via surface-initated polymerization and exhibited unique partition activities in a biphasic solution with the thermally induced change. In Chapter 3, the monodispersed spherical MSN with different mesoporous structure (MCM-48) was developed and employed as a template for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCN) via nanocasting. MCN was demonstrated for the delivery of membrane impermeable chemical agents inside the cells. The cellular uptake efficiency and biocompabtibility of MCN with human cervical cancer cells were also investigated. In addition to the biocompabtibility of MCN, MCN was demonstrated to support Rh-Mn nanoparticles for catalytic reaction in Chapter 4. Owing to the unique mesoporosity, Rh-Mn nanoparticles can be well distributed inside the mesoporous structure and exhibited interesting catalytic performance on CO hydrogenation. In Chapter 5, the synthesis route of the aforementioned MCM-48 MSN was discussed and investigated in details and other metal oxide nanoparticles were also developed via nanocasting by using MCM-48 MSN as a template. At last, there is a general conclusion summarized in Chapter 6.

  2. Concomitant Microbial Generation of Palladium Nanoparticles and Hydrogen To Immobilize Chromate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidambaram, D.; Hennebel, T; Taghavi, S; Mast, J; Boon, N; Verstraete, W; Van Der Lelie, D; Fitts, J

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic properties of various metal nanoparticles have led to their use in environmental remediation. Our aim is to develop and apply an efficient bioremediation method based on in situ biosynthesis of bio-Pd nanoparticles and hydrogen. C. pasteurianum BC1 was used to reduce Pd(II) ions to form Pd nanoparticles (bio-Pd) that primarily precipitated on the cell wall and in the cytoplasm. C. pasteurianum BC1 cells, loaded with bio-Pd nanoparticle in the presence of glucose, were subsequently used to fermentatively produce hydrogen and to effectively catalyze the removal of soluble Cr(VI) via reductive transformation to insoluble Cr(III) species. Batch and aquifer microcosm experiments using C. pasteurianum BC1 cells loaded with bio-Pd showed efficient reductive Cr(VI) removal, while in control experiments with killed or viable but Pd-free bacterial cultures no reductive Cr(VI) removal was observed. Our results suggest a novel process where the in situ microbial production of hydrogen is directly coupled to the catalytic bio-Pd mediated reduction of chromate. This process offers significant advantages over the current groundwater treatment technologies that rely on introducing preformed catalytic nanoparticles into groundwater treatment zones and the costly addition of molecular hydrogen to above ground pump and treat systems.

  3. Solid-phase materials for chelating metal ions and methods of making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K.; Wey, John E.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2003-06-10

    A solid material for recovering metal ions from aqueous streams, and methods of making and using the solid material, are disclosed. The solid material is made by covalently bonding a chelating agent to a silica-based solid, or in-situ condensing ceramic precursors along with the chelating agent to accomplish the covalent bonding. The chelating agent preferably comprises a oxime type chelating head, preferably a salicylaldoxime-type molecule, with an organic tail covalently bonded to the head. The hydrocarbon tail includes a carbon-carbon double bond, which is instrumental in the step of covalently bonding the tail to the silica-based solid or the in-situ condensation. The invented solid material may be contacted directly with aqueous streams containing metal ions, and is selective to ions such as copper (II) even in the presence of such ions as iron (III) and other materials that are present in earthen materials. The solid material with high selectivity to copper may be used to recover copper from mining and plating industry streams, to replace the costly and toxic solvent extraction steps of conventional copper processing.

  4. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  5. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  6. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  7. Method of producing highly oxidized superconductors containing barium, copper, and a third metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, D.E.

    1996-02-20

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

  8. Method of producing highly oxidized superconductors containing barium, copper, and a third metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

  9. Copper-base alloy for liquid phase sintering of ferrous powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John L.; Pickus, Milton R.; Chen, Meng-Hsiu

    1978-01-01

    A copper-base alloy composition consisting essentially of 85 - 89% copper, 2 - 4% manganese, and 8 - 11% silicon and use of same in liquid phase sintering of ferrous powders.

  10. Copper Mountain Expansion I and II Solar Power Plant | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain Expansion I and II Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Copper Mountain Expansion I and II Solar Power Plant Facility Copper Mountain Expansion I and II...

  11. EERE Success Story-From Silver to Copper: SunShot Awardee TetraSun...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    From Silver to Copper: SunShot Awardee TetraSun's Technology to be Mass Produced EERE Success Story-From Silver to Copper: SunShot Awardee TetraSun's Technology to be Mass Produced ...

  12. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term ...

  13. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

    2007-03-30

    Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

  14. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  15. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775?K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77?K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  16. Refining of solid ferrous scrap intermingled with copper by using molten aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwase, M.

    1996-12-31

    A new approach for the removal of copper from solid ferrous scrap has been proposed by the present authors. With this process, solid ferrous scrap intermingled with pure copper is brought into contact with molten aluminum, which dissolved copper preferentially, and is recovered as {l_brace}Al + Cu{r_brace} alloys. After a duration of 30 minutes at temperatures between 963 K and 1,223 K, steel scrap is removed from the bath, resulting in being free of copper contamination.

  17. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  18. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2013-04-19

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  19. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  20. Metal to semiconductor transition in metallic transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yan; Kang, Jun; Li, Jingbo; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao; Yue, Qu

    2013-11-07

    We report on tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of metallic transition metal dichalcogenides (mTMDCs) by 2D to 1D size confinement. The stability of the mTMDC monolayers and nanoribbons is demonstrated by the larger binding energy compared to the experimentally available semiconducting TMDCs. The 2D MX{sub 2} (M?=?Nb, Ta; X?=?S, Se) monolayers are non-ferromagnetic metals and mechanically softer compared to their semiconducting TMDCs counterparts. Interestingly, mTMDCs undergo metal-to-semiconductor transition when the ribbon width approaches to ?13? and ?7? for zigzag and armchair edge terminations, respectively; then these ribbons convert back to metal when the ribbon widths further decrease. Zigzag terminated nanoribbons are ferromagnetic semiconductors, and their magnetic properties can also be tuned by hydrogen edge passivation, whereas the armchair nanoribbons are non-ferromagnetic semiconductors. Our results display that the mTMDCs offer a broad range of physical properties spanning from metallic to semiconducting and non-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic that is ideal for applications where stable narrow bandgap semiconductors with different magnetic properties are desired.

  1. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  2. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P; Toops, Todd J; Tortorelli, Peter F; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Pihl, Josh A; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Gervasio, Don; Rakowski, Jim; EstevezGenCell, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Effort devoted to scale up and demonstration of thin stamped metallic bipolar plates. Overall goal is to demonstrate potential for metallic bipolar plates to meet 5000 h automotive durability goal at a cost of less than $5/kW.

  3. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-10-11

    A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  4. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  5. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  6. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robinson, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  7. New Method Tracks Metal-ion Movement in Periplasmic Proteins | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource New Method Tracks Metal-ion Movement in Periplasmic Proteins Friday, October 31, 2014 Fig 1 Figure 1. Cartoon overview of the CusCBFA efflux pump in the periplasm. Copper is an essential nutrient for most organisms. However, it is toxic at high concentrations and, in fact, is used by macrophages to kill invading microbes. To counter the lethal effects of both environmental and host-defense onslaught, bacteria have devolved intricate efflux systems that

  8. Design and construction of a radiation resistant quadrupole using metal oxide insulated CICC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert F. Zeller

    2012-12-28

    The construction of a engineering test model of a radiation resistant quadrupole is described. The cold-iron quadrupole uses coils fabricated from metal-oixide (synthetic spinel) insulated Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC). The superconductor is NbTi in a copper matrix. The quadrupole is designed to produce a pole-tip field of 2 T with an operating current of 7,000 A.

  9. ITP Metal Casting: Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices ITP Metal Casting: Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices PDF icon implementation_final.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Energy Use in Selected Metalcasting Facilities - 2003 ITP Metal Casting: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal casting

  10. Chemical changes in carbon Nanotube-Nickel/Nickel Oxide Core/Shell nanoparticle heterostructures treated at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, Nitin; McWhinney, Hylton G.; Shi Wenwu

    2011-06-15

    Heterostructures composed of carbon nanotube (CNT) coated with Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles (denoted as CNC heterostructures) were synthesized in a wet-chemistry and single-step synthesis route involving direct nucleation of nanoparticles on CNT surface. Two different aspects of CNC heterostructures were studied here. First, it was observed that the nanoparticle coatings were more uniform on the as-produced and non-purified CNTs compared to purified (or acid treated) CNTs. These heterostructures were characterized using electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Second, thermal stability of CNC heterostructures was studied by annealing them in N{sub 2}-rich (O{sub 2}-lean) environment between 125 and 750 deg. C for 1 h. A detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of annealing temperatures on chemical composition, phases, and stability of the heterostructures. It was observed that the CNTs present in the heterostructures completely decomposed and core Ni nanoparticle oxidized significantly between 600 and 750 deg. C. - Research Highlights: {yields} Heterostructures composed of CNTs coated with Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles. {yields} Poor nanoparticle coverage on purified CNT surface compared to non-purified CNTs. {yields} CNTs in heterostructures decompose between 600 and 750 deg. C in N{sub 2}-rich atmosphere. {yields} Metallic species in heterostructures were oxidized at higher temperatures.

  11. Methods for producing nanoparticles using palladium salt and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Siu-Wai; Liang, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The disclosed subject matter is directed to a method for producing nanoparticles, as well as the nanoparticles produced by this method. In one embodiment, the nanoparticles produced by the disclosed method have a high defect density.

  12. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

    2014-01-27

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  13. Copper oxide/N-silicon heterojunction photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-01-01

    A photovoltaic device having characteristics of a high efficiency solar cell comprising a Cu.sub.x O/n-Si heterojunction. The Cu.sub.x O layer is formed by heating a deposited copper layer in an oxygen containing ambient.

  14. Industrial applications of high-power copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, B.E.; Boley, C.D.; Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Havstad, M.A.; Martinez, M.; McLean, W. II

    1995-08-01

    A growing appreciation has developed in the last several years for the copper vapor laser because of its utility in ablating difficult materials at high rates. Laser ablation at high rates shows promise for numerous industrial applications such as thin film deposition, precision hole drilling, and machining of ceramics and other refractories.

  15. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  16. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  17. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  18. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  19. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-03-01

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

  20. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Ruoyi; Smith, James L.; Embury, John David

    1998-01-01

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps.

  1. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-01-06

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

  2. Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multimetallic nanoparticle catalysts with enhanced electrooxidation A new structure-control strategy to optimize nanoparticle catalysis is provided. The presence of Au in FePtAu facilitates FePt structure transformation from chemically disordered face centered cubic (fcc) structure to chemically ordered face centered tetragonal (fct) structure, and

  3. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  4. Low Cost TiO2 Nanoparticles - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing SummaryCurrent methods of producing titanium dioxide nanoparticles ... elegant and economically advantageous method to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles. ...

  5. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and ...

  6. Nanoparticle Technology for Biorefinery of Non-Food Source Feedstocks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Upper right: Transmission electron microscope image of mesoporous silica nanoparticles sample. Lower right: The pilot plant for nanoparticle-catalyzed production of biodiesel. ...

  7. Magneto-Optic Biosensor Using Bio-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magneto-Optic Biosensor Using Bio-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A long-range interaction between magnetic nanoparticles and an external...

  8. Sandia Energy - BES Highlight: Stress-Induced NanoparticleCrystalliza...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlight: Stress-Induced Nanoparticle Crystallization Home Highlights - Energy Research BES Highlight: Stress-Induced Nanoparticle Crystallization Previous Next BES Highlight:...

  9. Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus > Archived...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus January 24th, 2013 A Nature Materials paper on ordered nanoparticle catalysts has been highlighted as an "Energy...

  10. Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle ...

  11. High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric ...

  12. Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Abstract not provided. Authors: Altman, Susan Jeanne ...

  13. A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel Process Employing Heterometallic Alkoxides A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel ...

  14. Response of Human Lung Epithelial Cells to Engineered Nanoparticles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Response of Human Lung Epithelial Cells to Engineered Nanoparticles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response of Human Lung Epithelial Cells to Engineered Nanoparticles. ...

  15. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives PDF icon nanoparticulate-basedlubricati...

  16. Gold Nanoparticles Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gold Nanoparticles Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by DNA Origami Authors: Ding, B., Deng, Z., Yan, H., Cabrini, S., Zukerman, R., and Boker, J. Title: Gold Nanoparticles...

  17. Copper contamination effects on hydrogen-air combustion under SCRAMJET (supersonic combustion ramjet) testing conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of copper catalytic reactions (homogeneous and heterogeneous) in hydrogen flames were found in a literature survey. Hydrogen atoms in flames recombine into hydrogen molecules through catalytic reactions, and these reactions which affect the timing of the combustion process. Simulations of hydrogen flames with copper contamination were conducted by using a modified general chemical kinetics program (GCKP). Results show that reaction times of hydrogen flames are shortened by copper catalytic reactions, but ignition times are relatively insensitive to the reactions. The reduction of reaction time depends on the copper concentration, copper phase, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and initial temperature and pressure. The higher the copper concentration of the smaller the particle, the larger the reduction in reaction time. For a supersonic hydrogen flame (Mach number = 4.4) contaminated with 200 ppm of gaseous copper species, the calculated reaction times are reduced by about 9%. Similar reductions in reaction time are also computed for heterogeneous copper contamination. Under scramjet testing conditions, the change of combustion timing appears to be tolerable (less than 5%) if the Mach number is lower than 3 or the copper contamination is less than 100 ppm. The higher rate the Mach number, the longer the reaction time and the larger the copper catalytic effects. 7 tabs., 8 figs., 34 refs.

  18. FORMING TUBES AND RODS OF URANIUM METAL BY EXTRUSION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method and apparatus are presented for the extrusion of uranium metal. Since uranium is very brittle if worked in the beta phase, it is desirable to extrude it in the gamma phase. However, in the gamma temperature range thc uranium will alloy with the metal of the extrusion dic, and is readily oxidized to a great degree. According to this patent, uranium extrusion in thc ganmma phase may be safely carried out by preheating a billet of uranium in an inert atmosphere to a trmperature between 780 C and 1100 C. The heated billet is then placed in an extrusion apparatus having dies which have been maintained at an elevated temperature for a sufficient length of time to produce an oxide film, and placing a copper disc between the uranium billet and the die.

  19. Nonlinear optical studies of curcumin metal derivatives with cw laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henari, F. Z. Cassidy, S.

    2015-03-30

    We report on measurements of the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients for curcumin and curcumin metal complexes of boron, copper, and iron at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique. These materials are found to be novel nonlinear media. It was found that the addition of metals slightly influences its nonlinearity. These materials show a large negative nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10{sup ?7} cm{sup 2}/W and negative nonlinear absorption of the order of 10{sup ?6} cm/W. The origin of the nonlinearity was investigated by comparison of the formalism that is known as the Gaussian decomposition model with the thermal lens model. The optical limiting behavior based on the nonlinear refractive index was also investigated.

  20. Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums As multi-keV x-ray sources, plastic hohlraums with inner walls coated with titanium, copper, and germanium have been fired on Omega in September 2009. For all the targets, the measured and calculated multi-keV x-ray power time histories are in a good qualitative agreement. In the same irradiation