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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Period of K system generator of pseudorandom numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers which has been proposed earlier. The structure of the periodic trajectories becomes more transparent when the rational sublattice coincides with the Galois field GF[p]. We are able to compute the period of the trajectories as a function of p and the dimension of the matrix d.

Akopov, N Z; Floratos, Emmanuel G; Savvidy, G K

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Period of K System Generator of Pseudorandom Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers which has been proposed earlier. The structure of the periodic trajectories becomes more transparent when the rational sublattice coincides with the Galois field $GF[p]$. We are able to compute the period of the trajectories as a function of $p$ and the dimension of the matrix $d$.

N. Z. Akopov; G. G. Athanasiu; E. G. Floratos; G. K. Savvidy

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Detection and discrimination of the periodicity of prime numbers by discrete Fourier transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel representation of a quasi-periodic modified von Mangoldt function L(n) on prime numbers and its decomposition into Fourier series has been investigated. We focus on some particular quantities characterizing the modified von Mangoldt function. The results indicate that prime number progression can be decomposed into periodic sequences. The main approach is to decompose it into sin or cosine function. Basically, it is applied to extract hidden periodicities in seemingly quasi periodic prime function. Numerical evidences were provided to confirm the periodic distribution of primes.

Levente Csoka

2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Metal-like self-organization of periodic nanostructures on silicon and silicon carbide under femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodic structures were generated on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. Self-organized structures with spatial periodicity of approximately 600?nm appear on silicon and silicon carbide in the laser fluence range just above the ablation threshold and upon irradiation with a large number of pulses. As in the case of metals, the dependence of the spatial periodicity on laser fluence can be explained by the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. The results show that the proposed model might be universally applicable to any solid state material.

Gemini, Laura [Advanced Research Center for beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-85802 Kyoto (Japan); FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); HiLASE Project, Institute of Physics, ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, 606-85802 Kyoto (Japan); Limpouch, Jiri [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Mocek, Tomas [HiLASE Project, Institute of Physics, ASCR, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

5

Differential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION IN A PERIODIC CHEMOSTAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the single-species growth model, has a threshold between global extinction and uniform persistenceDifferential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION is proved and then applied to models of single-species growth and n-species competition in a periodically

Wolkowicz, Gail S. K.

6

Mode propagation and absorption loss in metal-clad periodic optical waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In terms of the mode eigenvalue equations are field distributions, calculations are performed for Au/InGaAsP/InP, air/Au/InGaAsP/InP, and Au/DiO{sub 2}InGaAsP/InP periodic optical waveguides. On the basis of the computed results, the coupling property in the periodic structure is analyzed, the mode split and the mode band formation of both TE and TM guided modes are described, and the effects of the thickness of the metal cladding and the oxide buffer layer on mode propagation and absorption loss are discussed for TE and TM guided modes as well as for the TM surface-plasma mode. Furthermore, the conversion from the surface-plasma wave to the guided wave for the TM mode is explained for Au/SiO{sub 2}/InGaAsP/InP periodic structures. 27 refs., 8 figs.

Chunsheng Ma [Jilin Univ., Changchun (China)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thermal emission and design in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystal slabs David L. C. Chan, Marin Soljaci, and J. D. Joannopoulos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal emission and design in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystal slabs David L. C phenomena that drive thermal emission in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystals, emphasizing of how the emissive properties of these systems can be tailored to our needs. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.74

Soljaèiæ, Marin

8

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

Brogden, I. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Photoreduction of metal nanostructures on periodically proton exchanged MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local reactivity on periodically proton exchanged lithium niobate (PPE:LN) surfaces is a promising route for the fabrication of regularly spaced nanostructures. Here, using MgO-doped PPE:LN templates, we investigate the influence of the doping on the nanostructure formation as a function of the proton exchange (PE) depth. The deposition is found to occur preferentially along the boundary between MgO-doped LN and the PE region when the PE depth is at least 1.73 ?m, however, for shallower depths, deposition occurs across the entire PE region. The results are found to be consistent with an increased photoconductivity of the MgO-doped LN.

Balobaid, Laila [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Craig Carville, N.; Collins, Liam; Rodriguez, Brian J. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland) [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Manzo, Michele; Gallo, Katia [Department of Applied Physics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Applied Physics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Supported metal carbonyls: new catalysts for the indirect liquefaction of coal. Semiannual report for period to July 1, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis, characterization and evaluation of two series of supported metal catalysts have been achieved during the first six months of the contract period. The first series of potentially catalytic materials consisted of iron and cobalt and iron/cobalt mixtures on synthetic zeolite supports; the second series comprised iron and iron/molybdenum, iron/manganese and iron/ruthenium mixtures on oxide supports. The materials were prepared by using procedures recently reported. Characterization of the materials was accomplished both in our laboratories at Virginia Commonwealth University and also by using facilities in the Analytical Chemistry Division at PETC; techniques employed included x-ray diffraction, ion-scattering spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The ability of the prepared materials to catalyze the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide was evaluated by using micro-reactors in the Process Sciences Division at PETC.

Melson, Gordon A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated thatwith respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBRthe insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

Szyszka, A., E-mail: szyszka@ihp-microelectronics.com, E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Lupina, L.; Lupina, G.; Schubert, M. A.; Zaumseil, P. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B. [Siltronic, Hanns-Seidel-Platz 4, 81737 Mnchen (Germany); Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Metallization for Self Aligned Technology: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-295  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this CRADA NREL will modify/develop metallization inks that are compatible with 1366 Technologies technology. Various methods of deposition will be used to apply the inks to the textured silicon substrates. The goal of the project is to minimize the contact resistance while maximizing the cell efficiency.

Ginley, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Phase Characteristics of a Number of U-Pu-Am-Np-Zr Metallic Alloys for Use as Fast Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic fuel alloys consisting of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium with minor additions of americium and neptunium are under evaluation for potential use to transmute long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes in fast reactors. A series of test designs for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), designated as the AFC-1 and AFC-2 designs. Metal fuel compositions in these designs have included varying amounts of U, Pu, Zr, and minor actinides (Am, Np). Investigations into the phase behavior and relationships based on the alloy constituents have been conducted using x-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. Results of these investigations, along with proposed relationships between observed behavior and alloy composition, are provided. In general, observed behaviors can be predicted by a ternary U-Pu-Zr phase diagram, with transition temperatures being most dependent on U content. Furthermore, the enthalpy associated with transitions is strongly dependent on the as-cast microstructural characteristics.

Douglas E. Burkes; J. Rory Kennedy; Thomas Hartmann; Cynthia A. Papesch; Denis D. Keiser, Jr.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

van Hest, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Physics-Astronomy Library Permanent Reserve Collection -Loan Periods Vary (revised 8/27/2010) AUTHOR TITLE E-BOOK CALL NUMBER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics-Astronomy Library Permanent Reserve Collection - Loan Periods Vary (revised 8, 3rd ed. QA 931 L283 1986 Shu, F.H. Physical Universe QB 43.2 S54 1982 Chaisson, E., et al Astronomy: A Beginner's Guide to the Universe, 5th ed. QB 43.3 C43 2007 Chaisson, E., et al Astronomy Today, 5th ed. QB

Wurtele, Jonathan

20

Metal-support interactions: Their effects upon adsorption, electronic, and activity/selectivity properties of cobalt in CO hydrogenation: Final progress report for the period April 1, 1984 to July 1, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cobalt, iron and nickel catalysts find wide application in the fuels and chemical industries, particularly in hydrogenation and hydrotreating reactions. Most commercial catalysts containing these metals consist of a metal or metal oxide phase dispersed throughout a high surface area ceramic carrier or support. Effects of surface structure, dispersion and support on activity and selectivity of the active catalytic phase were assumed until recent times to be of secondary importance. However, in the past decade there was evidence that surface structure/dispersion and metal-support interactions can dramatically influence the adsorption and activity/selectivity properties of the metals in a number of reactions. While it is desirable to study separately the effects of surface structure, dispersion and metal-support interactions, these effects are often interrelated. During the past three years, the BYU Catalysis Laboratory has been involved in an investigation of the interaction of cobalt (and to a lesser extent iron) metal(s) with alumina, silica, titania, and carbon. Results of this investigation over these past three years are summarized in this brief report. 22 refs.

Bartholomew, C.H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: a window on AGB nucleosynthesis and binary evolution. I. Detailed analysis of 15 binary stars with known orbital periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGB stars are responsible for producing a variety of elements, including carbon, nitrogen, and the heavy elements produced in the slow neutron-capture process ($s$-elements). There are many uncertainties involved in modelling the evolution and nucleosynthesis of AGB stars, and this is especially the case at low metallicity, where most of the stars with high enough masses to enter the AGB have evolved to become white dwarfs and can no longer be observed. The stellar population in the Galactic halo is of low mass ($\\lesssim 0.85M_{\\odot}$) and only a few observed stars have evolved beyond the first giant branch. However, we have evidence that low-metallicity AGB stars in binary systems have interacted with their low-mass secondary companions in the past. The aim of this work is to investigate AGB nucleosynthesis at low metallicity by studying the surface abundances of chemically peculiar very metal-poor stars of the halo observed in binary systems. To this end we select a sample of 15 carbon- and $s$-element-en...

Abate, C; Karakas, A I; Izzard, R G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328 2,683DieselValuesEIA-782A and EIA-782B:0 U.S. Energy1‹Mo

23

A National Assistance Extension Program for Metal Casting: a foundation industry. Final report for the period February 16, 1994 through May 15, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRP award was proposed as an umbrella project to build infrastructure and extract lessons about providing extension-enabling services to the metal casting industry through the national network of Manufacturing Technology Center`s (MTC`s). It targeted four discrete task areas required for the MCC to service the contemplated needs of industry, and in which the MCC had secured substantial involvement of partner organizations. Task areas identified included Counter-Gravitational Casting, Synchronous Manufacturing, Technology Deployment, and Facility and Laboratory Improvements. Each of the task areas includes specific subtasks which are described.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

Steven R. Billingsley

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Magnetic metallic multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

Hood, R.Q.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

27

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

28

Permanent Home Number: Residential Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

Viglas, Anastasios

29

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

30

Metal aminoboranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermodynamics and kinetics of ceramic/metal interfacial interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ceramic/metal interfaces occur in a great number of important applications, such as ceramic/metal composites, microelectronics packaging, ceramic/metal seals, and so forth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such ...

Arryave, Raymundo, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Metal inks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

Supported molten-metal catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

Datta, Ravindra (Iowa City, IA); Singh, Ajeet (Iowa City, IA); Halasz, Istvan (Iowa City, IA); Serban, Manuela (Iowa City, IA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Periodic subsystem density-functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of KohnSham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with KohnSham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele, E-mail: m.pavanello@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Ceresoli, Davide [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); CNR-ISTM, Institute of Molecular Sciences and Technologies, Milano (Italy)

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

EMERGING TRENDS IN A PERIOD-RADIUS DISTRIBUTION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the distribution of extrasolar planets (both confirmed and Kepler candidates) according to their orbital periods P and planetary radii R. Among confirmed planets, we find compelling evidence for a paucity of bodies with 3 R {sub Circled-Plus} < R < 10 R {sub Circled-Plus }, where R {sub Circled-Plus} is Earth's radius and P < 2-3 days. We have christened this region a sub-Jovian Pampas. The same trend is detected in multiplanet Kepler candidates. Although approximately 16 Kepler single-planet candidates inhabit this Pampas, at least 7 are probable false positives (FPs). This last number could be significantly higher if the ratio of FPs is higher than 10%, as suggested by recent studies. In a second part of the paper we analyze the distribution of planets in the (P, R) plane according to stellar metallicities. We find two interesting trends: (1) a lack of small planets (R < 4 R {sub Circled-Plus }) with orbital periods P < 5 days in metal-poor stars and (2) a paucity of sub-Jovian planets (4 R {sub Circled-Plus} < R < 8 R {sub Circled-Plus }) with P < 100 days, also around metal-poor stars. Although all these trends are preliminary, they appear statistically significant and deserve further scrutiny. If confirmed, they could represent important constraints on theories of planetary formation and dynamical evolution.

Beauge, C. [Instituto de Astronomia Teorica y Experimental (IATE), Observatorio Astronomico, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Laprida 854, X5000BGR Cordoba (Argentina)] [Instituto de Astronomia Teorica y Experimental (IATE), Observatorio Astronomico, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Laprida 854, X5000BGR Cordoba (Argentina); Nesvorny, D. [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)] [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013 Storrs and Regional Campuses University of Connecticut Health Center Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: June 30, 2013 #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013 Project Number Project Index

Alpay, S. Pamir

40

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014 Storrs and Regional Campuses University of Connecticut Health Center Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: March 31, 2014 #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014 Project Number Project

Alpay, S. Pamir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Three regimes of extrasolar planets inferred from host star metallicities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Understanding the transition from the gaseous planets to Earth-like rocky worlds is important to estimate the number of potentially habitable planets in our Galaxy and provide constraints on planet formation theories. Here we report the abundances of heavy elements (that is, the metallicities) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (~ 4.5{\\sigma}) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1...

Buchhave, Lars A; Latham, David W; Sasselov, Dimitar; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Isaacson, Howard; Juncher, Diana; Marcy, Geoffrey W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Metals 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dendritic metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG); Young, Albert C. (Flushing, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity, hydrogen production, and process heat applications. The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic,...

48

Trends in Aqueous Hydration Across the 4f Period Assessed by Reliable Computational Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometric and electronic structures, as well as the thermodynamic properties of trivalent lanthanide hydrates {Ln(H?O)?,? ? and Ln(H?O)?,?(H?O)??,?? ?, Ln = La Lu} have been examined using unrestricted density functional theory (UDFT), unrestricted Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (UMP2), and multiconfigurational self-consistent field methods (MCSCF). While Ln-hydrates with 2-5 unpaired f-electrons have some multiconfigurational character, the correlation energy lies within 5-7 kcal/mol across the period and for varying coordination numbers. As such DFT yields structural parameters and thermodynamic data quite close to experimental values. Both UDFT and UMP2 predict free energies of water addition to the Ln(H?O)? ? species to become less favorable across the period; however, it is a non-linear function of the surface charge density of the ion. UDFT further predicts that the symmetry of the metal-water bond lengths is sensitive to the specific f-electron configuration, presumably because of repulsive interactions between filled f-orbitals and water lone-pairs. Within the Ln(H?O)?,?(H?O)??,?? ?clusters, interactions between solvation shells overrides this orbital effect, increasing the accuracy of the geometric parameters and calculated vibrational frequencies. Calculated atomic charges indicate that the water ligands each donate 0.1 to 0.2 electrons to the Ln(III) metals, with increasing electron donation across the period. Significant polarization and charge transfer between solvation shells is also observed. The relationship between empirical effective charges and calculated atomic charges is discussed with suggestions for reconciling the trends across the period.

Kuta, Jadwiga; Clark, Aurora E.

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

50

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

Metalization of lipid vesicles via electroless plating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The encapsulation of metallic particles and metallic oxides within lipid vesicles has recently been of interest for applications such as catalysis, water splitting, and magnetic control of spin coupling. In this communication the authors introduce the concept and practice of the deposition of metal on vesicles by using electroless plating techniques. Coordination of low valent transition metals to organic functional groups on the surface of the bilayer membrane provides a means of binding metal atoms to vesicles. Chemical reduction produced zero valent atoms which serve as sites for further metal deposition by the chemical reduction techniques of electroless plating. Specifically, this procedure involved the binding of a small amount of tetrachloropalladate to the vesicle bilayer, reduction of the palladium(II) to palladium(0), followed by the deposition of much larger amounts of metal from an electroless plating solution. Electroless plating solutions were used for the deposition of palladium, nickel, cobalt, or copper metal onto the catalytic palladium centers. Since the metallic particles were associated with the vesicles, colloids were formed that were stable in water for much longer periods than the control metal particles formed in water alone. If the vesicles were composed in part of unsaturated lipids, with the olefinic groups on the hydrocarbon chains, the initial evidence suggests the transition metal was directed into the bilayer, rather than staying on the surface.

Ferrar, W.T.; O'Brien, D.F.; Warshawsky, A.; Voycheck, C.L.

1988-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Approximating Metal-Insulator Transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate metal-insulator transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-Andre model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

C. Danieli; K. Rayanov; B. Pavlov; G. Martin; S. Flach

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

Kunnmann, Walter (Stony Brook, NY); Larese, John Z. (Rocky Point, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee September 2014 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,260,603,765 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee Site:...

56

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

57

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- September 2015 September 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 444,161,295 Contract Period:...

58

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Number: Contract Type: Contract Period: 0 Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information...

59

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Available 4,324,912 408,822,369 Contract Period: December 2010 -...

60

Metal Hydrides  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |Charles Page -toMetabolic PathwaysMetal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Insecticides and my Osmia cornifrons Nesting Container Nesting Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insecticides and my Osmia cornifrons Nesting Container Nesting Period The Osmia cornifrons nesting male offspring. The end caps of nesting tubes made by older females are thin and weak, and they tend to break easily. In addition, near the end of the nesting period the numbers of parasites and predators

62

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

models of glass waste form and metallic waste form degradation and the major corrosion products expected from these processes (e.g., gel and secondary phases such as clays...

63

Polarization dependence of the temporal response of metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MSM-PD effi- ciency when the electrode period ( ) is comparable to the wavelength of the incident-semiconductor-metal photodetector temporal response is shown to be significant, and largest for devices with electrode periods less insensitive devices require special electrode patterning7 or . When used as a polarization analyzer/ detector

Van Driel, Henry M.

64

Hyper Space Complex Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

Shanguang Tan

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development and Interfacial Characterization of Co/Mg Periodic Multilayers for the EUV K. Le Guen,* M.-H. Hu, J.-M. Andre, and P. Jonnard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the formation of compounds at the metal-metal interfaces, we consider the introduction of boron carbide at one over a period of time of three months. The introduction of thin boron carbide interfacial layers proves

67

CV evolution: AM Her binaries and the period gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AM Her variables -- synchronised magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) -- exhibit a different period distribution from other CVs across the period gap. We show that non-AM Her systems may infiltrate the longer-period end of the period gap if they are metal-deficient, but that the position and width of the gap in orbital period is otherwise insensitive to other binary parameters (excepting the normalisation of the braking rate). In AM Her binaries, magnetic braking is reduced as the wind from the secondary star may be trapped within the magnetosphere of the white dwarf primary. This reduced braking fills the period gap from its short-period end as the dipole magnetic moment of the white dwarf increases. The consistency of these models with the observed distribution of CVs, both AM Her and non-AM Her type, provides compelling evidence supporting magnetic braking as the agent of angular momentum loss among long-period CVs, and its disruption as the explanation of the 2 - 3 hour period gap among nonmagnetic CVs.

R. F. Webbink; D. T. Wickramasinghe

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing highly hydrogen-reactive surfaces on metals which normally require substantial heating, high pressures, or an extended induction period, which involves pretreatment of said surfaces with either a non-oxidizing acid or hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen-bearing coating on said surfaces, and subsequently heating said coated metal in the absence of moisture and oxygen for a period sufficient to decompose said coating and cooling said metal to room temperature. Surfaces so treated will react almost instantaneously with hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The method is particularly applicable to uranium, thorium, and lanthanide metals.

Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fluorescence in nonlocal dissipative periodic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an approach for the description of fluorescence from optically active material embedded in layered periodic structures. Based on an exact electromagnetic Green's tensor analysis, we determine the radiative properties of emitters such as the local photonic density of states, Lamb shifts, line widths etc. for a finite or infinite sequence of thin alternating plasmonic and dielectric layers. In the effective medium limit, these systems may exhibit hyperbolic dispersion relations so that the large wave-vector characteristics of all constituents and processes become relevant. These include the finite thickness of the layers, the nonlocal properties of the constituent metals, and local-field corrections associated with an emitter's dielectric environment. In particular, we show that the corresponding effects are non-additive and lead to considerable modifications of an emitter's luminescence properties.

Francesco Intravaia; Kurt Busch

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

Elements of number theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal.

Funk, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

Jones, Travis E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States) [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Metal-phosphate binders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

The discovery of plutonium reorganized the periodic table and aided the discovery of new elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern Periodic Table derives principally from the work of the great Russian scientist Dimitri Mendeleev, who in 1869 enunciated a 'periodic law' that the properties of the elements are a periodic function of their atomic weights, and arranged the 65 known elements in a 'periodic table'. Fundamentally, every column in the main body of the Periodic Table is a grouping of elements that display similar chemical and physical behavior. Similar properties are therefore exhibited by elements with widely different mass. Chemical periodicity is central to the study of chemistry, and no other generalization comes close to its ability to systematize and rationalize known chemical facts. With the development of atomic theory, and an understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity and the periodic table now find their natural explanation in the electronic structure of atoms. Moving from left to right along any row, the elements are arranged sequentially according to nuclear charge (the atomic number). Electrons counter balance that nuclear charge, hence each successive element has one more electron in its configuration. The electron configuration, or distribution of electrons among atomic orbitals, may be determined by application of the Pauli principle (paired spin in the same orbital) and the aufbau principle (which outlines the order of filling of electrons into shells of orbitals - s, p, d, f, etc.) such that in a given atom, no two electrons may have all four quantum numbers identical. In 1939, only three elements were known to be heavier than actinium: thorium, protactinium, and uranium. All three exhibited variable oxidation states and a complex chemistry. Thorium, protactinium and uranium were assumed to be d-transition metals and were placed in the Periodic Table under hafnium, tantalum, and tungsten, respectively. By 1940, McMillan and Abelson bombarded uranium atoms with slow neutrons and successfully identified atoms of element 93, which they named neptunium after the planet Neptune. This rapidly set the stage for the discovery of the next succeeding element, plutonium (Seaborg, McMillan, Kennedy, and Wahl, 1940), named after the next planet away from the Sun, Pluto. The newly discovered elements were presumed to fit comfortably in the Periodic Table under rhenium and osmium, respectively. However, subsequent tracer chemical experiments showed that neptunium and plutonium were closer in their chemical properties to uranium than their presumed homologues, rhenium and osmium. Spectroscopic evidence also indicated that the new elements were not typical transition elements, but had f-electrons in their valence shell. Thus, several researchers, including McMillan and Wahl, and Zachariasen at Los Alamos, suggested that these elements might be part of a second inner-transition series in which the 5f-electron subshell was being filled. It was not clear, however, where the new series would begin. McMillian had proposed a 'uraninide series' that started with neptunium, but attempts to isolate elements with atomic numbers 95 and 96 based on assumed similarities to uranium were unsuccessful. Both Wahl and Zacharias en had proposed a thoride series that started with protactinium. In 1944, Seaborg proposed that the series started with thorium, and that all of the elements heavier than actinium constituted an 'actinide' series similar to the lanthanides. Because the 5f-shell began filling in the same relative position as the 4f-shell, the electronic configuration of elements in the two series would be similar. Guided by the hypothesis that elements 95 and 96 were homologues of europium and gadolinium, new experiments were designed and the elements were uniquely synthesized and separated from all others. The new elements were subsequently named americium and curium. Seaborg's 'Actinide Concept' thus played a major role in the discovery of the transplutonium elements. It provided the framework that supported synthesis, isolation, and identification of the succeeding actinide elements berkelium through lawrenci

Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

Baker, Ian

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Metal Hydrides - Science Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with traditions in metal hydride research Metal and Ceramic Sciences Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry Chemical and Biological Sciences Located on campus of Tier...

82

Definitions Numbered Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Definitions · Numbered Space ­ a single space marked with a number and reserved for a single permit 24/7 · Unnumbered Space ­ a space which can be used by any customer allowed to park in that lot. High Low Average Question 4: If I buy a staff permit for an UNNUMBERED* space in a non-gated surface

Behmer, Spencer T.

83

Heavy metal biosensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

Gordon, John Howard

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

On the Mass-Period Correlation of the Extrasolar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a possible correlation between the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets, manifested as a paucity of massive planets with short orbital periods. Monte-Carlo simulations show the effect is significant, and is not solely due to an observational selection effect. We also show the effect is stronger than the one already implied by published models that assumed independent power-law distributions for the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets. Planets found in binary stellar systems may have an opposite correlation. The difference is highly significant despite the small number of planets in binary systems. We discuss the paucity of short-period massive planets in terms of some theories for the close-in giant planets. Almost all models can account for the deficit of massive planets with short periods, in particular the model that assumes migration driven by a planet-disk interaction, if the planet masses do not scale with their disk masses.

Shay Zucker; Tsevi Mazeh

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Liquid Metal PMI/PFC Initiative ! R. Maingi, on behalf of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Liquid Metal PMI/PFC Initiative ! R. Maingi, on behalf of a Liquid Metal PFC Working Group FESAC a number of challenges; focal area of worldwide PMI program 3 Accepted heat flux exhaust limit for W is 5

87

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

performance and PSC in NPPs and the latest information on mobile devices and software technology in order to explore a number of usage scenarios. In their research, the team...

88

Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

Koyama, Koichiro (Hyogo, JP); Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Metal-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Report number codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Periodic table for topological insulators and superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gapped phases of noninteracting fermions, with and without charge conservation and time-reversal symmetry, are classified using Bott periodicity. The symmetry and spatial dimension determines a general universality class, which corresponds to one of the 2 types of complex and 8 types of real Clifford algebras. The phases within a given class are further characterized by a topological invariant, an element of some Abelian group that can be 0, Z, or Z_2. The interface between two infinite phases with different topological numbers must carry some gapless mode. Topological properties of finite systems are described in terms of K-homology. This classification is robust with respect to disorder, provided electron states near the Fermi energy are absent or localized. In some cases (e.g., integer quantum Hall systems) the K-theoretic classification is stable to interactions, but a counterexample is also given.

Alexei Kitaev

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Liquid Metal Transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fee Paid 127,390,991 Contract Number: Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM...

96

Contract Periods for 2012-2013 Residence Halls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Periods for 2012-2013 Residence Halls All of the residence halls are on Fall/Spring Contracts. THERE IS NO FALL ONLY CONTRACT. · The residence halls open for the fall semester on September 1 rate for the number of days they stay. Apartments Your contract entitles you to an apartment space

Minnesota, University of

97

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

ALARA notes, Number 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A number of organizations,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green Technology shown here. CityofChicago Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy SOLAR TODAY Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy by Lori A. Bird and Edward A. Holt #12;November/December 2002 35 Power

102

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE VENDOR NUMBER GUIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE VENDOR NUMBER GUIDE FOR DEPARTMENTS W-9 AND W-8BEN FORMS TAXPAYER ID NUMBER (TIN), FEDERAL EMPLOYER ID NUMBER (FEIN), AND EMPLOYER'S ID NUMBER (EIN) HOW TO FIND A VENDOR'S ID NUMBER IN BANNER HOW TO DETERMINE IF A VENDOR IS IN BANNER UPDATED MAY 2013 #12;Vendor Number Guide

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide metal cations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluorescence image... , cwalsby@sfu.ca Anticancer Metallodrugs. A number of transition-metal containing compounds have shown high Source: Simon Fraser University, School of...

106

Plain Talk About Condensation and Radiation Below Metal Roof Assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During recent decades an increasing number of users have chosen metal roofing for various commercial, industrial and institutional buildings. Because of several advantages, construction of new pre-engineered and "hybrid" buildings has outpaced low...

Ward, L.

107

Liquid Metal Transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi2-yHyO.xM'O2.(1-x)Li1-zHzMO2 in which 0metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi2-yHy.xM'O2.(1-x)Li1-zHzMO2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi2M'O3.(1-x)LiMO2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclear waste,Report Articles

112

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclear waste,Report ArticlesReport

113

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): ADDRESS: CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: CELL PHONE NUMBER of financial institution. 14 Cell Phone Expenses 15 Other ordinary and necessary living expenses. 16 TOTAL (add

114

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest Basin andNsbowde's blog HomeNumber"

115

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be superior to the conventional oxide fuel since PCMI and rod burst, respectively, have been mitigated. Under beyond design basis accident scenarios where the fuel is exposed to high temperature steam for prolonged periods, larger inventory of zirconium metal in the core could negatively affect the accident progression. A thin steam resistant layer (e.g. alumina forming alloy steel), integrated into the solid rod during fabrication by co-extrusion or hot-isostatic-pressing, offers the potential to provide additional fuel protection from steam interaction: blanketing under a range of boiling regimes and under severe accident conditions up to high temperatures well beyond what is currently possible in the conventional fuel. A crucial aspect to the viability of M3 fuel in light water reactors is the reduced heavy metal load compared to standard pellet fuel. This study evaluated the design requirements to operate a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with M3 fuel in order to obtain fuel cycle length, reactivity coefficients, and power peaking factors comparable to that of standard fuel.

Fratoni, Massimiliano [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

Anderson, M.A.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Solubility Behavior and Phase Stability of Transition Metal Oxides in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility behavior of transition metal oxides in high temperature water is interpreted by recognizing three types of chemical reaction equilibria: metal oxide hydration/dehydration, metal oxide dissolution and metal ion hydroxocomplex formation. The equilibria are quantified using thermodynamic concepts and the thermochemical properties of the metal oxides/ions representative of the most common constituents of construction metal alloys, i.e., element shaving atomic numbers between Z = 22 (Ti) and Z = 30 (Zn), are summarized on the basis of metal oxide solubility studies conducted in the laboratory. Particular attention is devoted to the uncharged metal ion hydrocomplex, M{sup Z}(OH){sub Z}(aq), since its thermochemical properties define minimum solubilities of the metal oxide at a given temperature. Experimentally-extracted values of standard partial molal entropy (S{sup 0}) for the transition metal ion neutral hydroxocomplex are shown to be influenced by ligand field stabilization energies and complex symmetry.

S.E. Ziemniak

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

Grant Application Package CFDA Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grant Application Package CFDA Number: Opportunity Title: Offering Agency: Agency Contact: Opportunity Open Date: Opportunity Close Date: CFDA Description: Opportunity Number: Competition ID

Talley, Lynne D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sharma, Ashwani K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sharma, Ashwani K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123
124

Sounding Number Dr. Rachel Hall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

searching for "drum modes vibration" and "chladni plates." (Chladni plates are lat square metal plates-generated animations. Chladni plate experiment and Chladni patterns published by John Tyndall in 1869. From the UCLA

Hall, Rachel W.

125

Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Type of phytoremediation Cost effective form of environmental remediation (Glass 1999) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al -using hyperaccumulator plant biomass to produce a bio-ore for commercial use -Li et al. look at using Ni

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

127

Method for producing nanostructured metal-oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A synthetic route for producing nanostructure metal-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing. This procedure employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-metal inorganic salts and environmentally friendly solvents such as water and ethanol. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by the addition of a proton scavenger, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively. Using this method synthesis of metal-oxide nanostructured materials have been carried out using inorganic salts, such as of Fe3+, Cr3+, Al3+, Ga3+, In3+, Hf4+, Sn4+, Zr4+, Nb5+, W6+, Pr3+, Er3+, Nd3+, Ce3+, U3+ and Y3+. The process is general and nanostructured metal-oxides from the following elements of the periodic table can be made: Groups 2 through 13, part of Group 14 (germanium, tin, lead), part of Group 15 (antimony, bismuth), part of Group 16 (polonium), and the lanthanides and actinides. The sol-gel processing allows for the addition of insoluble materials (e.g., metals or polymers) to the viscous sol, just before gelation, to produce a uniformly distributed nanocomposites upon gelation. As an example, energetic nanocomposites of FexOy gel with distributed Al metal are readily made. The compositions are stable, safe, and can be readily ignited to thermitic reaction.

Tillotson, Thomas M.; Simpson, Randall L.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Gash, Alexander

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Control of metal dusting corrosion in Ni-base alloys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal dusting is a major issue in plants used in the production of hydrogen-and methanol-reformer systems, and syngas (H{sub 2}/CO mixtures) systems that are pertinent to the chemical and petrochemical industries. Usually, metal dusting corrosion has two stages: incubation and growth resulting in propagation of metal dusting pits. The two stages were studied by scanning electron microscopy and profile mapping to evaluate the scale of the surface oxide in the initiation and propagation of metal dusting attack. The initiation occurs because of the presence of defects, and the propagation is determined by the diffusion of carbon into the alloy. The carbon diffusion pathways can be blocked by periodically oxidizing alloy surface at moderate temperatures in controlled atmospheres. It was concluded that metal dusting degradation can be mitigated by selecting an alloy with a long incubation time and subjecting it to intermediate oxidation.

Zeng, Z.; Natesan, K.; Energy Technology

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The concrete theory of numbers: initial numbers and wonderful properties of numbers repunit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work initial numbers and repunit numbers have been studied. All numbers have been considered in a decimal notation. The problem of simplicity of initial numbers has been studied. Interesting properties of numbers repunit are proved: $gcd(R_a, R_b) = R_{gcd(a,b)}$; $R_{ab}/(R_aR_b)$ is an integer only if $gcd(a,b) = 1$, where $a\\geq1$, $b\\geq1$ are integers. Dividers of numbers repunit, are researched by a degree of prime number.

Boris V. Tarasov

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Transition Metal Switchable Mirror  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Transition Metal Switchable Mirror  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nonlinear resonance of superconductor/normal metal structures to microwaves E. Kandelaki,1 A. F. Volkov,1,2 K. B. Efetov,1 and V. T. Petrashov3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear resonance of superconductor/normal metal structures to microwaves E. Kandelaki,1 A. F.024502 PACS number s : 74.45. c, 74.50. r, 85.25.Dq, 03.67.Lx I. INTRODUCTION Superconductor/normal metal S conductance G=dj/dV of a normal metal wire in a superconductor/ normal metal heterostructure with a cross

Sheldon, Nathan D.

139

Functional Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functional groups. In some cases, these ligands undergo reactions during the solvothermal syntheses which can impart new chemical reactivity. Another method used to introduce functionality was to partially or completely substitute metal atoms within...

Perry, Houston Phillipp

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cooperative accumulation of coherent undulator radiation emitted from periodic electron bunches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavity build-up of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation emitted by periodic electron bunches is investigated. At the optimal off-grazing resonance, the bunch slippage relative to the radiation pulse introduces an initial transient period during which radiation accumulates cooperatively as if it is emitted by a single bunch. The power growth during the period is quadratic to the number of bunches. The number of cooperative bunches is {approx}2 Script-Small-L {sub s}{sup 2}, where Script-Small-L {sub s} denotes the slippage length in units of the resonant wavelength.

Seo, Y. H. [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L., E-mail: yilungmo@central.uh.edu [University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Laskar, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Menq, F. [University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Metallic glass composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Molten metal reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Theory of ordering transformations in metals and minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation presents an investigation of ordering in FCC based systems using the pair potential approximation in the ground state and mean field limits. The theoretical approach is used to explain the occurrence of observed equilibrium phases and characteristics of thermodynamic instabilities, in particular, spinodal ordering and decomposition. It is shown that the stability of non-integer domain sizes in long period superstructures such as Al{sub 3}Ti and Ag{sub 3}Mg may result from the tendency of a system to reduce the number of non-dominant ordering waves, thus producing domain sizes that have rational fraction form n/m. This conclusion is used to explain the domain size stability with respect to variations in temperature and electron concentration. The cation ordering in the precipitate phases in calcite and dolomite is analyzed by analogy with ordering in FCC based metals. The ordered phases in calcite and dolomite are shown to be consistent with pair potential minima at {l brace}100{r brace} and {l brace}1/2, 1/2, 1/2{r brace} positions in reciprocal space respectively. 32 refs., 6 figs.

Lindsey, T.F. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Preparation and use of crystalline bis-monoorganic phosphonate and phosphate salts of tetravalent metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing and using the crystalline organic derivatives of the tetravalent metal phosphates and phosphonates provides for the contacting of an aqueous solution of a metal nitrate, with a solution of an organophosphorus acid for a period of time at room temperature that is sufficient for the formation of a metal phosphate product, and thereafter recovering said product. According to the invention, the product of the disclosed process is used in effecting analytical separations, such as ion exchange and chromatography.

Maya, L.

1980-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

148

Trends in heavy metal concentrations in the Western and Central Baltic Sea waters detected by using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trends in heavy metal concentrations in the Western and Central Baltic Sea waters detected by using 2003; accepted 10 October 2003 Abstract Heavy metal concentrations from annual sampling in the period water, negative trends appear in cadmium SPM, lead SPM, and zinc SPM. However, positive trends can

Dippner, Joachim W.

149

A study of the formation of cluster ions from metal acetates using plasma desorption mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mainly metal oxides. On the other hand, positive clusters ions from the group IIB of the periodic table were mainly mirror images of the negative spectra. These differences suggest that the bonding characteristics of the metal ion play an important role...

Mendez Silvagnoli, Winston Reinaldo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result.

Yong-Sung Kim

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermally tolerant multilayer metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of a Group IVB or Group VB metal sandwiched between two layers of a Group VIIIB metal selected from the group consisting of palladium, platinum, nickel, rhodium, iridium, cobalt, and alloys thereof, and a non-continuous layer of a metal chalcogenide upon one layer of the Group VIIIB metal is disclosed together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture using such a composite membrane and a process for forming such a composite metal membrane.

Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electron-Transport in La100-Xalx Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an understanding of electron transport in liquid and amorphous transition-metal alloys. The recent review article by Naugle' discusses the most popular scattering mechanisms which have been proposed to ex- plain the systematic trends in the transport... coefficients. Gallagher and Greig had noted that the sign of the ther- mopower for a large number of amorphous transition metal alloys could be explained in terms of the Mott s d- model in which the sign of the thermopower should be the same...

DELGADO, R.; ARMBRUSTER, H.; Naugle, Donald G.; TSAI, CL; JOHNSON, WL; WILLIAMS, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method for forming metal contacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

NUMBER: BUSF 7.00 SECTION: Business and Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUMBER: BUSF 7.00 SECTION: Business and Finance SUBJECT: Purchasing DATE: November 1, 2006 Policy. Purchases from $2,501.00 to $10,000.00 require a minimum of three (3) to ten (10) days processing time,000.00 require an additional ten (10) day Intent to Award Period before a purchase order can be issued. Please

Almor, Amit

156

REVSTAT Statistical Journal Volume 5, Number 3, November 2007, 229247  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, floods, wind storms, and extreme temperaturesREVSTAT ­ Statistical Journal Volume 5, Number 3, November 2007, 229­247 EXTREMES FOR SOLUTIONS is to look at the extremal properties of Xk = j=1 j-1 s=1 Ak-s Bk-j , k Z , where (Ak, Bk)kZ is a periodic

Alves, Maria Isabel Fraga

157

High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed Metal/Metal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference...

158

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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160

Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dlcfc^ooWS imsm "-"' Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period 1 January to 31 December 1962 (Uw National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark July 1963 #12;Ris-R-486 METALLURGY DEPARTMENT PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 1 JANUARY TO 31 DECEMBER 1982 Abstract. The activities of the Metallurgy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Broadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province, 230009, P. R. China. Solution processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have greatBroadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic nanostructuring of electrodes Michael M. Adachi demonstrate a bottom- illuminated periodic nanostructured CQD solar cell that enhances broadband absorption

162

METALS AND MATERIALS International, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2007), pp. 463~468 Comparative Study on Mechanical Properties of MoSiN Multilayer Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improved by controlling the number of layers, especially in metal silicide systems [12]. ThereforeMETALS AND MATERIALS International, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2007), pp. 463~468 Comparative Study

Boo, Jin-Hyo

163

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Metals and ceramics division annual progress report for period endng June 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning engineering materials; fuels and processes; materials science; other research activities; and specialized research facilities and equipment.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Y-12 development organization technical progress report: Part 3 - metal processing, period ending September 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors melted and cast an aluminum-uranium (Al-U) alloy by vacuum induction melting (VIM) prealloyed buttons made by arc melting. The resulting alloy casting displayed a large compositional gradient from top to bottom. The authors sampled the resulting casting for uranium to check homogeneity. The sampling revealed that the top of the casting contained 23.5 wt% uranium, and the bottom (an average of two samples) contained 42.4 wt% uranium. Although each button contained 36.5% uranium, these analyses show that the solidified casting was inhomogeneous. If the buttons were homogeneous, the segregation occurred during induction melting, and this method may not be feasible for making AL-U alloys. If the buttons were not homogeneous, perhaps arc melting the buttons more times would have helped. Bottom pouring the Al-U melt into a mold for faster cooling could also help prevent segregation.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Y-12 Development Organization technical progress report: Part 3 -- Metal processing, period ending March 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the effort to downsize its uranium processing facilities, the Y-12 Plant has supported an investigation to identify extraction solvents that would both work efficiently in centrifugal contactors and be disposed of easily. Various organic ethers, hydroxy ethers, ether ketones, acids, amides, and diketones were studied for their ability to extract uranyl nitrate from aqueous solutions. Although many of these solvents were obtained commercially, others had to be synthesized in-house. The authors found a large range of extraction coefficients for these solvents. Because of steric hindrance or some other factor, certain ethers performed poorly. On the other hand, various mono- and diethers of tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol exhibited excellent extraction and stripping coefficients for uranyl nitrate, justifying purchase of a pilot plant batch of one of this family of solvents. Likewise, the authors determined the extraction coefficient for one of the two amides synthesized in-house to be quite high.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr. [comp.

1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Y-12 Development Division technical progress report. Part 3, Metal processing period ending December 1, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type 1020 mild steel, IF-steel{reg_sign}(registered trademark of Armco Steel Corporation, Middletown, Ohio), and TI-Namel were exposed in molten lithium hydride (LiH) at 800C for cumulative times approaching 300 h. Mild steel decarburized at an extreme rate with the affected area exhibiting tremendous grain growth. In contrast, IF-steels{reg_sign} and TI-Namel do not experience decarburization or grain growth during identical exposures to LiH. All three steels experience net weight gains during extended exposure, and the data suggest that lithium penetration into the steel is the primary source of weight gain.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr. [comp.

1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hard metal composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

Sheinberg, H.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hard metal composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Metallic coating of microspheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

Meyer, S.F.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Metal Mechanisms | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells In ThisMetal Mechanisms Metal

178

Wick for metal vapor laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Transverse commensurability effect for vortices on periodic pinning arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using computer simulations, we demonstrate a type of commensurability that occurs for vortices moving longitudinally through periodic pinning arrays in the presence of an additional transverse driving force. As a function of vortex density, there is a series of broad maxima in the transverse critical depinning force that do not fall at the matching fields where the number of vortices equals an integer multiple of the number of pinning sites. The commensurability effects are associated with dynamical states in which evenly spaced structures consisting of one or more moving rows of vortices form between rows of pinning sites. Remarkably, the critical transverse depinning force can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the longitudinal depinning force.

Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

182

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

DEVELOPMENT OF RASASASTRA IN MEDIEVAL PERIOD*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: The paper deals with the historical development of Rasasastra in Medieval period. Knowledge of Rasa has been in existence from the time immemorial. Exploration of natural resources for the benefit of human beings is the object of this therapy. It is a medical science recognized during vedic periods for the betterment of even Devas. Medieval period can be treated as a golden age for the development of this science. Looking at its aim and objects, methodology and therapeutics, it was recognized as a medical science with an independent philosophical background in 14 th century, by Madhavacharya in his Sarva Darsana Samgraha.

Harishankar Sharma

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Single-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum tardiness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periods often appear in industry due to a machine breakdown (stochastic) or preventive maintenance of machine unavailability. However, in some cases (e.g. preventive maintenance), the maintenance of a machineSingle-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Serpentine metal gasket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic seal or gasket for use in the joining of cryogenic fluid conduits, the seal or gasket having a generally planar and serpentine periphery defining a central aperture. According to a preferred embodiment, the periphery has at least two opposing elongated serpentine sides and two opposing arcuate ends joining the opposing elongated serpentine sides and is of a hexagonal cross-section.

Rothgeb, Timothy Moore (Norfolk, VA); Reece, Charles Edwin (Yorktown, VA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ductile transplutonium metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

Conner, W.V.

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation A Practitioner's Overview Prof. Michael and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Types of pseudorandom numbers Properties of these pseudorandom numbers Parallelization of pseudorandom number generators New directions for SPRNG Quasirandom

Mascagni, Michael

188

Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Speed of Sound in metal Speed of Sound in metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the metal rod and metal bar. 2. Acquire a metal bar or rod and measure its mass. Use the meter stick and measure and record the length in meters. Use the vernier calipers and measure the other dimensionBar Select the Smart Tool. Position the Smart tool so that the vertical line bisects the pulse. The (x

Yu, Jaehoon

190

Metal hydrides as electrode/catalyst materials for oxygen evolution/reduction in electrochemical devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula, AB.sub.(5-Y)X(.sub.y), is claimed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of groups 8, 9, and 10 of the periodic table of the elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, and bismuth. Ternary or higher-order substitutions, to the base AB.sub.5 alloys, that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA); Halpert, Gerald (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent (Pasadena, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Hightower, Adrian (Whittier, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Analytical homogenization method for periodic composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an easy-to-implement technique for determining the effective properties of composite materials with periodic microstructures, as well as the field distributions in them. Our method is based on the transformation ...

Chen, Ying

192

Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

193

PARS II Process Document DOE Period Close  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document details the process adopted by the Office of Acquisition and Project Management to prepare APM DepSec Monthly Status Report, finalize DOE close period package, and perform reporting...

194

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Motion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Upgrading platform using alkali metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

Gordon, John Howard

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, L.J.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Methods of recovering alkali metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Metals processing control by counting molten metal droplets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for controlling metals processing (e.g., ESR) by melting a metal ingot and counting molten metal droplets during melting. An approximate amount of metal in each droplet is determined, and a melt rate is computed therefrom. Impedance of the melting circuit is monitored, such as by calculating by root mean square a voltage and current of the circuit and dividing the calculated current into the calculated voltage. Analysis of the impedance signal is performed to look for a trace characteristic of formation of a molten metal droplet, such as by examining skew rate, curvature, or a higher moment.

Schlienger, Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Robertson, Joanna M. (Safford, AZ); Melgaard, David (Albuquerque, NM); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM); Van Den Avyle, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Metal Abundances and Kinematics of Bright Metal-Poor Giants Selected from the LSE Survey: Implications for the Metal-Weak Thick Disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report medium-resolution (1-2 A) spectroscopy and broadband (UBV) photometry for a sample of 39 bright stars (the majority of which are likely to be giants) selected as metal-deficient candidates from an objective-prism survey concentrating on Galactic latitudes below |b| = 30 deg, the LSE survey of Drilling & Bergeron. Although the primary purpose of the LSE survey was to select OB stars (hence the concentration on low latitudes), the small number of bright metal-deficient giant candidates noted during this survey provide interesting information on the metal-weak thick disk (MWTD) population. The kinematics of the LSE giants indicate the presence of a rapidly rotating population, even at quite low metallicity. We consider the distribution of orbital eccentricity of the LSE giants as a function of [Fe/H], and conclude that the local fraction (i.e., within 1 kpc from the Sun) of metal-poor stars that might be associated with the MWTD is on the order of 30%-40% at abundances below [Fe/H] = -1.0. Contrary to recent analyses of previous (much larger) samples of non-kinematically selected metal-poor stars, we find that this relatively high fraction of local metal-poor stars associated with the MWTD may extend to metallicities below [Fe/H] = -1.6, much lower than had been considered before. We identify a subsample of 11 LSE stars that are very likely to be members of the MWTD, based on their derived kinematics; the lowest metallicity among these stars is [Fe/H] = -2.35. Implications of these results for the origin of the MWTD and for the formation of the Galaxy are considered. (abridged)

Timothy C. Beers; John S. Drilling; Silvia Rossi; Masashi Chiba; Jaehyon Rhee; Birgit Fuhrmeister; John E. Norris; Ted von Hippel

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fabrication of metallic glass structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

Cline, C.F.

1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Integrated decontamination process for metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Spatial Periodic Forcing Can Displace Patterns It Is Intended to Control  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Spatial periodic forcing of pattern-forming systems is an important, but lightly studied, method of controlling patterns. It can be used to control the amplitude and wave number of one-dimensional periodic patterns, to stabilize unstable patterns, and to induce them below instability onset. We show that, although in one spatial dimension the forcing acts to reinforce the patterns, in two dimensions it acts to destabilize or displace them by inducing two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns.

Mau, Yair; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

Raleigh, H.D. (ed.) [ed.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliogralphy includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

Raleigh, H.D. (ed.) [ed.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Numerical simulation of the Tayler instability in liquid metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electrical current through an incompressible, viscous and resistive liquid conductor produces an azimuthal magnetic field that becomes unstable when the corresponding Hartmann number exceeds a critical value in the order of 20. This Tayler instability, which is not only discussed as a key ingredient of a non-linear stellar dynamo model (Tayler-Spruit dynamo), but also as a limiting factor for the maximum size of large liquid metal batteries, was recently observed experimentally in a column of a liquid metal (Seilmayer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 244501, 2012}. On the basis of an integro-differential equation approach, we have developed a fully three-dimensional numerical code, and have utilized it for the simulation of the Tayler instability at typical viscosities and resistivities of liquid metals. The resulting growth rates are in good agreement with the experimental data. We illustrate the capabilities of the code for the detailed simulation of liquid metal battery problems in realistic geometries.

Weber, Norbert; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom; Wondrak, Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

Friesen, Cody

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

Friesen, Cody

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spray casting of metallic preforms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result 7 ' 30 u 31 in metal carbide cluster chemistry willin metal chemistry. Oxidation of the iron carbide cluster

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Industrially challenging separations via adsorption in metal-organic frameworks : a computational exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been identified as promising adsorbents in a number of industrially relevant, yet challenging, separations, including the removal of propane from propane/propylene ...

Lennox, Matthew James

2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

On rings of structural numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structural numbers over the set X, and let B(X) have the operations defined above with equality also as before. Theorem I. l. If X is any set, then B(X) is a commutative ring with identity. Proof. The structural number 0 is the additive identity element... with identity g. Definition I. 7. If A, B e S(X) then A'B = (P U q ( p e A, q e B, p Il q = &f and p U q can be formed in an odd number of ways). ~E1 t. 4. L t A = (( . b), (bj. 7 )) 4 B = ((b, c), (b), (a)) be in S(X) for some X. Then AD B = {{b, a), {a...

Powell, Wayne Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Measuring the rotation period distribution of field M-dwarfs with Kepler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55 M_sun. To derive the rotational period we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor ~ 30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M-dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37-69.7 days, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0-140.8 mmags. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~ 19 and ~ 33 days, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of ...

McQuillan, Amy; Mazeh, Tsevi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MSE 445 Corrosion of Metals -Syllabus Carl Altstetter ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSE 445 Corrosion of Metals - Syllabus Carl Altstetter , 302 MSEB, 217-333-4985 Topic Page Numbers I. Introduction 1 - 39 a) costs of corrosion b) types of corrosion c) corrosion rates) batteries b) fuel cells V. Electrochemical Corrosion a) mixed potential 86-108 b) Evans diagram c) effect

Weaver, John H.

222

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland J. (Wading River, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

Nolan, Michael [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ternary rare earth and actinoid transition metal carbides viewed as carbometalates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ternary carbides A{sub x}T{sub y}C{sub z} (A=rare earth metals and actinoids; T=transition metals) with monoatomic species C{sup 4-} as structural entities are classified according to the criteria (i) metal to carbon ratio, (ii) coordination number of the transition metal by carbon atoms, and (iii) the dimensionality of the anionic network [T{sub y}C{sub z}]{sup n-}. Two groups are clearly distinguishable, depending on the metal to carbon ratio. Those where this ratio is equal to or smaller than 2 may be viewed as carbometalates, thus extending the sequence of complex anions from fluoro-, oxo-, and nitridometalates to carbometalates. The second group, metal-rich carbides with metal to carbon ratios equal to or larger than 4 is better viewed as typical intermetallics (''interstitial carbides''). The chemical bonding properties have been investigated by analyzing the Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP). The chemical bonding situation with respect to individual T-C bonds is similar in both classes. The main difference is the larger number of metal-metal bonds in the crystal structures of the metal-rich carbides.

Dashjav, Enkhtsetseg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kreiner, Guido [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Wagner, Frank R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kniep, Ruediger [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: Kniep@cpfs.mpg.de; Jeitschko, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 8, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: jeitsch@uni-muenster.de

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Water supply and sludge metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultimate sludge disposal is one of the major tasks facing wastewater treatment facilities today. Where adequate farmland exists in proximity to the treatment facility and where sludge characteristics are suitable, land application is often the most economical method. In some cases, however, metal concentrations in the sludge either limit the site life or the application rate to the point where land application is not economical. When metals are above regulatory limits, land application may become impossible. The origin of the metals has largely been credited to industrial users and stormwater runoff and have, in fact, often represented significant sources of metals. Another potentially significant source of metals that has been frequently overlooked is the water supply system (including the distribution and home piping systems). Data from some treatment facilities suggest that the water supply system is the major source of metals and is the reason that sewage sludge metal levels are above allowable land application limits.

Brown, W.E. (Wright-Pierce Engineers, Topsham, ME (USA))

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coated metal fiber coalescing cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Periodic Exponential Shear of Complex Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a class of flows with exponential kinematics termed Periodic Exponential Shear (PES) flow which involve periodic exponential stretching of fluid elements along with their rotation. We exhibit analytical and numerical results for PES flow by using the Oldroyd-B model for viscoelastic fluids. We calculate the growth in the shear and the normal stresses analytically as well as demonstrate that repeated application of the flow leads to stable oscillatory shear and normal stresses. We define a material function applicable to a periodic, unsteady shear flow and show numerically that this material function exhibits deformation-rate thickening behavior for viscoelastic fluids subject to PES flow. We demonstrate the feasibility of PES flow by presenting preliminary experimental results from a controlled-strain rate rheometer, using a Newtonian mineral oil.

Chirag Kalelkar; Gareth McKinley

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Performance testing of multi-metal continuous emissions monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three prototype multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in April 1996 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The CEM instruments were: Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES); Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometry-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (LIBS); and Laser Spark Spectrometry, another LIBS instrument. The three CEMs were tested simultaneously during test periods in which low, medium, and high concentration levels of seven toxic metals -- antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury -- were maintained under carefully controlled conditions. Two methods were used to introduce the test metals into the flue gas: (1) solution atomization, introducing metal-containing aerosol directly into the secondary combustion burner, and (2) injection of fly ash particulates. The testing addressed four measures of CEM performance: relative accuracy (RA), calibration drift, zero drift, and response time. These were accomplished by comparing the toxic metal analyte concentrations reported by the CEMs to the concentrations measured using the EPA reference method (RM) for the same analytes. Overall, the test results showed the prototype nature of the test CEMs and the clear need for further development. None of the CEMs tested consistently achieved RA values of 20% or less as required by the EPA draft performance specification. Instrument size reduction and automation will also likely need additional attention before multi-metal CEMs systems become commercially available for service as envisioned by regulators and citizens.

Haas, W.J. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); French, N.B. [Sky+, Inc. (United States); Brown, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burns, D.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V. [National Risk Management Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Priebe, S.J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Waterland, L.R. [Acurex Environmental Corp. (United States)

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Parc Periodical | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizingToolsto controlParc Periodical Parc Periodical

233

The Properties of Long Period Variables in the LMC from MACHO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new analysis of the long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud from the MACHO Variable Star Catalog. Three-quarters of our sample of evolved, variable stars have periodic light curves. We characterize the stars in our sample using the multiple periods found in their frequency spectra. Additionally, we use single-epoch 2MASS measurements to construct the average infrared light curves for different groups of these stars. Comparison with evolutionary models shows that stars on the RGB or the Early AGB often show non-periodic variability, but begin to pulsate with periods on the two shortest period-luminosity sequences (1 & 2) when they brighten to K{sub s} {approx} 13. The stars on the Thermally Pulsing AGB are more likely to pulsate with longer periods that lie on the next two P-L sequences (3 & 4), including the sequence associated with the Miras in the LMC. The Petersen diagram and its variants show that multi-periodic stars on each pair of these sequences (3 & 4, and 1 & 2), typically pulsate with periods associated only with that pair. The periods in these multi-periodic stars become longer and stronger as the star evolves. We further constrain the mechanism behind the long secondary periods (LSPs) seen in half of our sample, and find that there is a close match between the luminosity functions of the LSP stars and all of the stars in our sample, and that these star's pulsation amplitudes are relatively wavelength independent. Although this is characteristic of stellar multiplicity, the large number of these variables is problematic for that explanation.

Fraser, O J; Hawley, S L; Cook, K H

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

Wang, Lin-Wang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Identification for a Nonlinear Periodic Wave Equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is concerned with an approximation process for the identification of nonlinearities in the nonlinear periodic wave equation. It is based on the least-squares approach and on a splitting method. A numerical algorithm of gradient type and the numerical implementation are given.

Morosanu, C. [Department of Mathematics, University 'Al.I.Cuza', 6600 Iasi (Romania); Trenchea, C. [Institute of Mathematics of Romanian Academy, 6600 Iasi (Romania)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

237

Coherency saturation in periodic structures with randomization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,28 or multicascade stimulated Raman scattering.29­31 A major example of naturally occurring spatially periodic with very reasonable precision. In the specific case of x ray transition radiation of low layers can generate resonantly enhanced radiation in the hard x ray domain with almost unhampered

Kaplan, Alexander

238

Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN); White, Lloyd R. (Minneapolis, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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240

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen and Fuel CellTrending: Metal

242

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Specific-Heat of the Organic Metal Bis(tetrathiotetracene) Tri-Iodide from 20-K to 100-K, the Vicinity of the Metal-Nonmetal Phase-Transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selenium ana- log, the transition-metal complex KCP, ' and tetrathiofulvalenium-thiocyanate [TTF(SCN) 0588] and its selenium analog' which are similar to the organic metal studied in this work. That the metallic state is stabilized by impurities...PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 24, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1981 Specific heat of the organic metal bis(tetrathiotetracene) tri-iodide from 20 to 100 K, the vicinity of the metal-nonmetal phase transition B. Cort' and D. G. Naugle Department of Physics...

CORT, B.; Naugle, Donald G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Multiple metals predict prolactin and thyrotropin (TSH) levels in men  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to a number of metals can affect neuroendocrine and thyroid signaling, which can result in adverse effects on development, behavior, metabolism, reproduction, and other functions. The present study assessed the relationship between metal concentrations in blood and serum prolactin (PRL) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels, markers of dopaminergic, and thyroid function, respectively, among men participating in a study of environmental influences on male reproductive health. Blood samples from 219 men were analyzed for concentrations of 11 metals and serum levels of PRL and TSH. In multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI and smoking, PRL was inversely associated with arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc, but positively associated with chromium. Several of these associations (Cd, Pb, Mo) are consistent with limited studies in humans or animals, and a number of the relationships (Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo) remained when additionally considering multiple metals in the model. Lead and copper were associated with non-monotonic decrease in TSH, while arsenic was associated with a dose-dependent increase in TSH. For arsenic these findings were consistent with recent experimental studies where arsenic inhibited enzymes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and signaling. More research is needed for a better understanding of the role of metals in neuroendocrine and thyroid function and related health implications.

Meeker, John D., E-mail: meekerj@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 6635 SPH Tower, 109 S. Observatory St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Rossano, Mary G. [Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Protas, Bridget [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Diamond, Michael P.; Puscheck, Elizabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Daly, Douglas [Grand Rapids Fertility and IVF, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)] [Grand Rapids Fertility and IVF, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Paneth, Nigel [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Wirth, Julia J. [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States) [Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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248

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

249

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180NumberDecadeCommercial

250

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Metal-ceramic joint assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Oxidation catalysts comprising metal exchanged hexaaluminate wherein the metal is Sr, Pd, La, and/or Mn  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides metal-exchanged hexaaluminate catalysts that exhibit good catalytic activity and/or stability at high temperatures for extended periods with retention of activity as combustion catalysts, and more generally as oxidation catalysts, that make them eminently suitable for use in methane combustion, particularly for use in natural gas fired gas turbines. The hexaaluminate catalysts of this invention are of particular interest for methane combustion processes for minimization of the generation of undesired levels (less than about 10 ppm) of NOx species. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are also useful for oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly hydrocarbons. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are further useful for partial oxidation, particularly at high temperatures, of reduced species, particularly hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes).

Wickham, David (Boulder, CO); Cook, Ronald (Lakewood, CO)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

``Towards Strange Metallic Holography'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We initiate a holographic model building approach to 'strange metallic' phenomenology. Our model couples a neutral Lifshitz-invariant quantum critical theory, dual to a bulk gravitational background, to a finite density of gapped probe charge carriers, dually described by D-branes. In the physical regime of temperature much lower than the charge density and gap, we exhibit anomalous scalings of the temperature and frequency dependent conductivity. Choosing the dynamical critical exponent z appropriately we can match the non-Fermi liquid scalings, such as linear resistivity, observed in strange metal regimes. As part of our investigation we outline three distinct string theory realizations of Lifshitz geometries: from F theory, from polarized branes, and from a gravitating charged Fermi gas. We also identify general features of renormalization group flow in Lifshitz theories, such as the appearance of relevant charge-charge interactions when z {ge} 2. We outline a program to extend this model building approach to other anomalous observables of interest such as the Hall conductivity.

Hartnoll, Sean A.; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Tong, David; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

Clean Metal Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Periodic forcing of a 555-IC based hysteretic oscillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we designed and developed a master-slave electronic oscillatory system (based on the 555-timer IC working in the astable mode), and investigated its dynamic behavior regarding synchronization. For that purpose we measured the circulation number corresponding to the phase-locking rhythm achieved in a large set of values of the normalized forcing period (NFP) and of the coupling strength between the master and the slave oscillators. In particular we were interested in the system behavior in the strong-coupling limit, because such problem has not been extensively studied from an experimental perspective. Our results indicate the existence of a degenerate codimension-2 bifurcation point at NFP=1:2, where all the phase-locking regions converge in the very strong coupling limit. These findings were corroborated by a mathematical model we developed to that end.

Moises Santillan

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services -Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services - Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet to multime- dia steams by a large number of clients. Current research in this area has focussed primarily these algorithms. We present measurements detailing the overheads associated with the various server compo- nents

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

259

Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services ­ Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet time al- lowing asynchronous access to multimedia steams by a large number of clients. Current research, and explore the issues that arise when implementing these algorithms. We present measurements detailing

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

260

Metal deposition using seed layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Chaotic Transport in Planar Periodic Vortical Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a chaotic transport in a two-dimensional periodic vortical flow under a time-dependent perturbation with period T where the global diffusion occurs along the stochastic web. By using the Melnikov method we construct the separatrix map describing the approximate dynamics near the saddle separatrices. Focusing on the small T, the width of the stochastic layer is calculated analytically by using the residue criterion and the diffusion constant by using the random phase assumption and correlated random walks. The analytical results are in good agreements with the results of two different types of numerical simulations by integrations of the Hamilton's equation of motion and by iterations of the separatrix map, which establishes the validity of the use of the separatrix map.

Taehoon Ahn; Seunghwan Kim

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Periodic-Orbit Theory of Level Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a semiclassical explanation of the so-called Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture which asserts universality of spectral fluctuations in chaotic dynamics. We work with a generating function whose semiclassical limit is determined by quadruplets of sets of periodic orbits. The asymptotic expansions of both the non-oscillatory and the oscillatory part of the universal spectral correlator are obtained. Borel summation of the series reproduces the exact correlator of random-matrix theory.

Stefan Heusler; Sebastian Mller; Alexander Altland; Petr Braun; Fritz Haake

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Embedding a chaotic signature in a periodic train: can periodic signals be chaotic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how a chaotic system can be locked to emit a periodic waveform belonging to its chaotic attractor. We numerically demonstrate our idea in a system composed of a semiconductor laser driven to chaos by optical feedback from a short external cavity. The clue is the injection of an appropriate periodic signal that modulates the phase and amplitude of the intra-cavity radiation, a chaotic analogy of conventional mode-locking. The result is a time process that manifests a chaotic signature embedded in a long-scale periodic train.

Antonio Mecozzi; Cristian Antonelli

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

266

Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. These metals were not detected in background air samples. Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

269

University of Virginia Time Management Form Organization: _________________ Assignment Number: _____________ Payroll: Bi-weekly Pay Period: Begin ____________ End ___________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). ___ Administrative Summons ___ Employee Assistance Program (EAP) ___ Career Services ___ Grievance Process Leave AC Agency Closing (Inclement Weather) C Comp Leave CS Comp Special Leave E Educational Leave FP the Departmental Timekeeper for assistance. Short Term Disability and Workers Comp Leave Types OSTD STD (ORP) VSTD

Acton, Scott

270

Expanding hollow metal rings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

Peacock, Harold B. (Evans, GA); Imrich, Kenneth J. (Grovetown, GA)

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Quasi-periodic Fibonacci and periodic one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystals of porous silicon: Experiment and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional Fibonacci phononic crystal and a distributed Bragg reflector were constructed from porous silicon. The structures had the same number of layers and similar acoustic impedance mismatch, and were electrochemically etched in highly boron doped silicon wafers. The thickness of the individual layers in the stacks was approximately 2??m. Both types of hypersonic band gap structure were studied by direct measurement of the transmittance of longitudinal acoustic waves in the 0.12.6?GHz range. Acoustic band gaps deeper than 50?dB were detected in both structures. The experimental results were compared with model calculations employing the transfer matrix method. The acoustic properties of periodic and quasi-periodic structures in which half-wave retarding bi-layers do not consist of two quarter-wave retarding layers are discussed. The strong correlation between width and depth of gaps in the transmission spectra is demonstrated. The dominant mechanisms of acoustic losses in porous multilayer structures are discussed. The elastic constants remain proportional over our range of porosity, and hence, the Grneisen parameter is constant. This simplifies the expression for the porosity dependence of the Akhiezer damping.

Aliev, Gazi N., E-mail: g.aliev@bath.ac.uk; Goller, Bernhard [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Sturcken, E.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Wenguang (Elgin, IL); Bailey, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gao, Yuan (Brewer, ME)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition's Regional Contests Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business Plan...

276

DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

277

Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage R and D | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage R and D Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage R and D DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials...

278

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:Technology ReadinessTimePeriod Jump to:

280

Semiclassical Estimates of Electromagnetic Casimir Self-Energies of Spherical and Cylindrical Metallic Shells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The leading semiclassical estimates of the electromagnetic Casimir stresses on a spherical and a cylindrical metallic shell are within 1% of the field theoretical values. The electromagnetic Casimir energy for both geometries is given by two decoupled massless scalars that satisfy conformally covariant boundary conditions. Surface contributions vanish for smooth metallic boundaries and the finite electromagnetic Casimir energy in leading semiclassical approximation is due to quadratic fluctuations about periodic rays in the interior of the cavity only. Semiclassically the non-vanishing Casimir energy of a metallic cylindrical shell is almost entirely due to Fresnel diffraction.

Martin Schaden

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Instability and Charge Density Wave of Metallic Quantum Chains on a Silicon Surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembled indium linear chains on the Si(111) surface are found to exhibit instability of the metallic phase and 1D charge density wave (CDW). The room-temperature metallic phase of these chains undergoes a temperature-induced, reversible transition into a semiconducting phase. The 1D CDW along the chains is observed directly in real space by scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperature. The Fermi contours of the metallic phase measured by angle-resolved photoemission exhibit a perfect nesting predicting precisely the CDW periodicity.

Takeda, S.; Rotenberg, E.; Matsuda, I.; Horikoshi, K.; Schƒ ƒ ‚ ƒ ƒ ‚ ‚ ¤fer, J.; Lee, C. M.; Kevan, S. D.; Ohta, T.; Nagao, T.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

282

Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovacin Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragn (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizbal 15, 20018 San Sebastin (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovacin Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragn (Spain)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

Alleviation of fermi-level pinning effect at metal/germanium interface by the insertion of graphene layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the alleviation of the Fermi-level pinning on metal/n-germanium (Ge) contact by the insertion of multiple layers of single-layer graphene (SLG) at the metal/n-Ge interface. A decrease in the Schottky barrier height with an increase in the number of inserted SLG layers was observed, which supports the contention that Fermi-level pinning at metal/n-Ge contact originates from the metal-induced gap states at the metal/n-Ge interface. The modulation of Schottky barrier height by varying the number of inserted SLG layers (m) can bring about the use of Ge as the next-generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor material. Furthermore, the inserted SLG layers can be used as the tunnel barrier for spin injection into Ge substrate for spin-based transistors.

Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Seo, Yu-Jin; Oh, Joong Gun; Albert Park, Min Gyu; Bong, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Seong Jun; Lee, Seok-Hee, E-mail: seokheelee@ee.kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Minsu; Park, Seung-young [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), 169-148 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

Device Independent Random Number Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Randomness is an invaluable resource in today's life with a broad use reaching from numerical simulations through randomized algorithms to cryptography. However, on the classical level no true randomness is available and even the use of simple quantum devices in a prepare-measure setting suffers from lack of stability and controllability. This gave rise to a group of quantum protocols that provide randomness certified by classical statistical tests -- Device Independent Quantum Random Number Generators. In this paper we review the most relevant results in this field, which allow the production of almost perfect randomness with help of quantum devices, supplemented with an arbitrary weak source of additional randomness. This is in fact the best one could hope for to achieve, as with no starting randomness (corresponding to no free will in a different concept) even a quantum world would have a fully deterministic description.

Mataj Pivoluska; Martin Plesch

2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

287

Cosmic metal production and the mean metallicity of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of detailed chemo-photometric models for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies, we evaluate the cosmic history of the production of chemical elements as well as the metal mass density of the present-day universe. We then calculate the mean metal abundances for galaxies of different morphological types, along with the average metallicity of galactic matter in the universe (stars, gas and intergalactic medium). For the average metallicity of galaxies in the local universe, we find Z_gal= 0.0175, i.e. close to the solar value. We find the main metal production in spheroids (ellipticals and bulges) to occur at very early times, implying an early peak in the metal production and a subsequent decrease. On the other hand, the metal production in spirals and irregulars is always increasing with time. We perform a self-consistent census of the baryons and metals in the local universe finding that, while the vast majority of the baryons lies outside galaxies in the inter-galactic medium (IGM), 52 % of the metals (with the exception of the Fe-peak elements) is locked up in stars and in the interstellar medium. We estimate indirectly the amount of baryons which resides in the IGM and we derive its mean Fe abundance, finding a value of X_Fe,IGM=0.05 X_Fe,sun. We believe that this estimate is uncertain by a factor of 2, owing to the normalization of the local luminosity function. This means that the Fe abundance of 0.3 solar inferred from X-ray observations of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is higher than the average Fe abundance of the inter-galactic gas in the field.

F. Calura; F. Matteucci

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Metal-directed protein self-assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-Directed Protein Self- Assembly. Acc. Chem. Res. 43,Metal-directed protein self-assembly. Acc. Chem. Res. 43,Metal- mediated self-assembly of protein superstructures:

Salgado. Eric N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara Department of Physics, University to the distinction between normal metals and insulators: the superconducting ``metal'' with delocalized qua- siparticle excitations and the superconducting ``insulator'' with localized quasiparticles. We describe

290

On a periodicity measure and superoscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenon of superoscillation, where band limited signals can oscillate over some time period with a frequency higher than the band limit, is not only very interesting but it also seems to offer many practical applications. The first reason is that the superoscillation frequency can be exploited to perform tasks beyond the limits imposed by the lower bandwidth of the signal. The second reason is that it is generic and applies to any wave form, be it optical, electrical, sonic, or quantum mechanical. For practical applications, it is important to overcome two problems. The first problem is that an overwhelming proportion of the energy goes into the non superoscillating part of the signal. The second problem is the control of the shape of the superoscillating part of the signal. The first problem has been recently addressed by optimization of the super oscillation yield, the ratio of the energy in the superoscillations to the total energy of the signal. The second problem may arise when the superoscillation, is to mimic a high frequency purely perodic signal. This may be required, for example, when a superoscillating force is to drive a harmonic oscillator at a high resonance frequency. In this paper the degree of periodicity of a signal is defined and applied to some yield optimized superoscillating signals.

Nehemia Schwartz; Moshe Schwartz

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

291

Periodic Cluster Mutations and Related Integrable Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the remarkable properties of cluster algebras is that any cluster, obtained from a sequence of mutations from an initial cluster, can be written as a Laurent polynomial in the initial cluster (known as the "Laurent phenomenon"). There are many nonlinear recurrences which exhibit the Laurent phenomenon and thus unexpectedly generate integer sequences. The mutation of a typical quiver will not generate a recurrence, but rather an erratic sequence of exchange relations. How do we "design" a quiver which gives rise to a given recurrence? A key role is played by the concept of "periodic cluster mutation", introduced in 2009. Each recurrence corresponds to a finite dimensional map. In the context of cluster mutations, these are called "cluster maps". What properties do cluster maps have? Are they integrable in some standard sense? In this review I describe how integrable maps arise in the context of cluster mutations. I first explain the concept of "periodic cluster mutation", giving some classification results. I then give a review of what is meant by an integrable map and apply this to cluster maps. Two classes of integrable maps are related to interesting monodromy problems, which generate interesting Poisson algebras of functions, used to prove complete integrability and a linearisation. A connections to the Hirota-Miwa equation is explained.

Allan P Fordy

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

Omar M. Yaghi

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Enhancing H[subscript 2] Uptake by 'Close-Packing' Alignment of Open Copper Sites in Metal-Organic Frameworks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inspired by close-packing of spheres, to strengthen the framework-H{sub 2} interaction in MOFs (metal-organic frameworks), a strategy is devised to increase the number of nearest neighboring open metal sites ofe ach H{sub 2}-hosting cage, and to align the open metal sites toward the H{sub 2} molecules. Two MOF polymorphs were made, one exhibiting a record high hydrogen uptake of 3.0 wt% at 1 bar and 77 k.

Wang, Xi-Sen; Ma, Shengqian; Forster, Paul M.; Yuan, Daqiang; Eckert, Juergen; Lpez, Joseph J.; Murphy, Brandon J.; Parise, John B.; Zhou, Hong-Cai (TAM); (SBU); (UCSB)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials In addition to the DOE making a final...

297

Metal-doped organic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

Rinde, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Parallel Chip-Firing on the Complete Graph: Devil's Staircase and Poincare Rotation Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how parallel chip-firing on the complete graph K_n changes behavior as we vary the total number of chips. Surprisingly, the activity of the system, defined as the average number of firings per time step, does not increase smoothly in the number of chips; instead it remains constant over long intervals, punctuated by sudden jumps. In the large n limit we find a "devil's staircase" dependence of activity on the number of chips. The proof proceeds by reducing the chip-firing dynamics to iteration of a self-map of the circle S^1, in such a way that the activity of the chip-firing state equals the Poincare rotation number of the circle map. The stairs of the devil's staircase correspond to periodic chip-firing states of small period.

Levine, Lionel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Verification Challenges at Low Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of Going to Zero. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100s of warheads, and then 10s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100s, 10s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

Samuel Walsh

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a Strontium ion are determined and a Strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions. PACS numbers: 31.15.AR,31

302

Free electron properties of metals under ultrafast laser-induced electron-phonon nonequilibrium: a first-principles study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free electron properties of metals under ultrafast laser-induced electron-phonon nonequilibrium CEA-DIF, 91297 Arpajon, France (Dated: April 3, 2014) The electronic behavior of various solid metals modelled based on the free electron classical theory, the free electron number is a key parameter. However

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption Metal (Zr) Metal (Mo) Carbide Nitride Oxidef /? a k ? Metal (Zr) Metal (Mo) Carbide Nitride Oxide Table? a k ? Metal (Zr) Metal (Mo) Carbide Nitride Oxide CHAPTER

Qvist, Staffan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Layer-by-Layer Fabrication of Oriented Porous Thin Films Based on Porphyrin-Containing Metal-Organic Frameworks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with number of growth cycles. Polarization excitation and fluorescence measurements indicate, Papanikolas et al. have reported on the fabrication and energy migration dynamics of metal for its exploitation for the preparation of molecular devices.19 Example materials include HKUST-1

305

EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TRAPPED, ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS: THE ORIGIN OF THE OBSERVED MASS-PERIOD RELATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large number of observed exoplanets ({approx}>700) provides important constraints on their origin as deduced from the mass-period diagram of planets. The most surprising features in the diagram are (1) the (apparent) pileup of gas giants at a period of {approx}500 days ({approx}1 AU) and (2) the so-called mass-period relation, which indicates that planetary mass is an increasing function of orbital period. We construct the evolutionary tracks of growing planets at planet traps in evolving protoplanetary disks and show that they provide a good physical understanding of how these observational properties arise. The fundamental feature of our model is that inhomogeneities in protoplanetary disks give rise to multiple (up to 3) trapping sites for rapid (type I) planetary migration of planetary cores. The viscous evolution of disks results in the slow radial movement of the traps and their cores from large to small orbital periods. In our model, the slow inward motion of planet traps is coupled with the standard core accretion scenario for planetary growth. As planets grow, type II migration takes over. Planet growth and radial movement are ultimately stalled by the dispersal of gas disks via photoevaporation. Our model makes a number of important predictions: that distinct sub-populations of planets that reflect the properties of planet traps where they have grown result in the mass-period relation, that the presence of these sub-populations naturally explains a pileup of planets at {approx}1 AU, and that evolutionary tracks from the ice line do put planets at short periods and fill an earlier claimed {sup p}lanet desert{sup -}a sparse population of planets in the mass-semimajor axis diagram.

Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pudritz, Ralph E., E-mail: hasegay@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summarizes NREL's FY09 battery materials research activity in developing metal oxide nanostructured anodes to enable high-energy, durable and affordable li-ion batteries for HEVs and PHEVs.

Dillon, A. C.; Riley, L. A.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Ban, C.; Gillaspie, D. T.; Pesaran, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Bernhart, John Charles (Fleetwood, PA)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Role of soil in Rhizobacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- Our surrounding is filled up with a large number of toxicants in different forms. They contaminate our water, land and atmosphere where we live. Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes. Phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals could be carried out by using specific metallophytes. Green plants are the lungs of nature with unique ability to purifying impure air by photosynthesis and remove or minimize heavy metals toxicity from soil and water ecosystem by absorption, accumulation and biotransformation process. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal toxicity in contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from Rhizosphere of plants growing metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. Index Terms- Environmental, heavy metal toxicity,

Rajendra Prasad Bharti; Abhilasha Shri Vastava; Kishor Soni; Asha Tiwari; Shivbhanu More

309

Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History71.7 588.51 " "5. Number of

310

Titanium metal: extraction to application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A comparison of graphene, superconductors and metals as conductors for metamaterials and plasmonics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advancements in metamaterials and plasmonics have promised a number of exciting applications, in particular at terahertz and optical frequencies. Unfortunately, the noble metals used in these photonic structures are not particularly good conductors at high frequencies, resulting in significant dissipative loss. Here, we address the question of what is a good conductor for metamaterials and plasmonics. For resonant metamaterials, we develop a figure-of-merit for conductors that allows for a straightforward classification of conducting materials according to the resulting dissipative loss in the metamaterial. Application of our method predicts that graphene and high-T{sub c} superconductors are not viable alternatives for metals in metamaterials. We also provide an overview of a number of transition metals, alkali metals and transparent conducting oxides. For plasmonic systems, we predict that graphene and high-T{sub c} superconductors cannot outperform gold as a platform for surface plasmon polaritons, because graphene has a smaller propagation length-to-wavelength ratio.

Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHIES IN ECOLOGY "HEAVY METAL TOLERANCE"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cellular mechanisms affected by heavy metals is Bánfalvi 2011. Pollution by heavy metals is an important environmental problem, and sources that focus on heavy metal pollution often contain information about heavyOXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHIES IN ECOLOGY "HEAVY METAL TOLERANCE" By Nishanta Rajakaruna and Robert S. Boyd

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

313

Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area.

Myneni, Ganapati R. (Yorktown, VA); Kneisel, Peter (Williamsburg, VA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Yu (Saline, MI); Banerjee, Debasish (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area. 4 figs.

Myneni, G.R.; Kneisel, P.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Anaerobic microbial remobilization of coprecipitated metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for solubilizing coprecipitated metals. Metals in waste streams are concentrated by treatment with an iron oxide coprecipitating agent. The coprecipitated metals are solubilized by contacting the coprecipitate with a bacterial culture of a Clostridium species ATCC 53464. The remobilized metals can then be recovered and recycled. 4 figs.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Maskless laser writing of microscopic metallic interconnects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a metal pattern on a substrate. The method includes depositing an insulative nitride film on a substrate and irradiating a laser beam onto the nitride film, thus decomposing the metal nitride into a metal constituent and a gaseous constituent, the metal constituent remaining in the nitride film as a conductive pattern.

Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Molten metal injector system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a molten metal injector system including a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and a molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal having a metal oxide film surface. The bottom side of the mold faces the holder furnace. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The injector projects into the holder furnace and is in fluid communication with the mold cavity. The injector includes a piston positioned within a piston cavity defined by a cylinder for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace and injecting the molten metal into the mold cavity under pressure. The piston and cylinder are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder further includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity. The molten metal intake is located below the metal oxide film surface of the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. A method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity of a casting mold is also disclosed.

Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA); Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Bigler, Nicolas (Morin Heights, CA); Arnaud, Guy (Riviere-Beaudette, CA)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Prime number generation and factor elimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

Vineet Kumar

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Effects of periodic matter in kaon regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effects of periodic matter in kaon regeneration, motivated by the possibility of parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations. The large imaginary parts of the forward kaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the decay width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma$ prevent a sizable enhancement of the $K_L\\to K_S$ transition probability. However, some interesting effects can be produced using regenerators made of alternating layers of two different materials. Despite the fact that the regenerator has a fixed length one can obtain different values for the probability distribution of the $K_L$ decay into a final state. Using a two-arm regenerator set up it is possible to measure the imaginary parts of the $K^0(\\bar{K}^0)$-nucleon scattering amplitudes in the correlated decays of the $\\phi$-resonance. Combining the data of the single-arm regenerator experiments with direct and reverse orders of the matter layers in the regenerator one can independently measure the CP violating parameter $\\delta$.

Evgeny Akhmedov; Augusto Barroso; Petteri Kernen

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Grant Title: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS (ITEST) Funding Opportunity Number: NSF 12-597. CFDA Number(s): 47.076.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: NSF 12-597. CFDA Number(s): 47.076. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation

Farritor, Shane

326

Grant Title: RESEARCH EXPERIENCES FOR TEACHERS (RET) IN ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER Funding Opportunity Number: NSF 11-509. CFDA Number(s): 47.041.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: NSF 11-509. CFDA Number(s): 47.041. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation

Farritor, Shane

327

Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization via periodic orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hierarchical ordering is demonstrated for the periodic orbits in a strongly coupled multidimensional Hamiltonian system, namely the hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields. It mirrors the hierarchy of broken resonant tori and thereby allows one to characterize the periodic orbits by a set of winding numbers. With this knowledge, we construct the action variables as functions of the frequency ratios and carry out a semiclassical torus quantization. The semiclassical energy levels thus obtained agree well with exact quantum calculations.

Stephan Gekle; Jrg Main; Thomas Bartsch; T. Uzer

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

1990-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Superconvergence of period doubling cascade in trapezoid maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the symmetric and the asymmetric trapezoid maps, as a slope of the trapezoid is increased, the period doubling cascade occurs and the symbolic sequence of periodic points is the Metropolis-Stein-Stein sequence and the convergence of the onset point of the period 2^m solution to the accumulation point is exponentially fast. We reported these results previously. In this paper, we give the detailed description of the proof on the results. Further, we study the period doubling cascade starting from period p solution and show the superconvergence of the period doubling cascade.

T. Uezu

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Criteria for Preparing and Packaging Plutonium Metals and Oxides for Long-Term Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard provides criteria for packaging of plutonium metals and stabilized oxides for storage periods of at least 50 years. To meet the criteria, plutonium-bearing materials must be in stable forms and be packaged in containers designed to maintain their integrity both under normal storage conditions and during anticipated handling accidents.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Laser vaporization clusters from metal loaded graphite used for SWNT generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, these metal-carbon clusters were proved to be very reactive. 40 60 80 100 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) Positive (b) Negative Fig2. Enlargement of C70 to C73 C74 C76 C72, The Univ. of Tokyo In order to study the generation mechanism of SWNTs, we have studied metal-carbon binary

Maruyama, Shigeo

335

Adhesion, stability, and bonding at metal/metal-carbide interfaces: Al/WC Donald J. Siegel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adhesion between metals and transition metal carbides/nitrides based on Density Functional Theory(DFT)[14Adhesion, stability, and bonding at metal/metal-carbide interfaces: Al/WC Donald J. Siegel the nature of metal/carbide bonding. Based on the surface and interfacial free energies, we find that both

Adams, James B

336

Periodic and quasiperiodic motions of many particles falling in a viscous fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of regular clusters of many non-touching particles falling under gravity in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number are analysed within the point-particle model. Evolution of two families of particle configurations is determined: 2 or 4 regular horizontal polygons (called `rings') centred above or below each other. Two rings fall together and periodically oscillate. Four rings usually separate from each other with chaotic scattering. For hundreds of thousands of initial configurations, a map of the cluster lifetime is evaluated, where the long-lasting systems are centred around periodic solutions for the relative motions. The results illustrate that the existence of periodic solutions is essential for clustering of many sedimenting particles.

Gruca, Marta; Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method of bonding metals to ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

Maroni, V.A.

1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coated metal articles and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

Foster, Nancy S. (Boulder, CO); Koval, Carl A. (Golden, CO); Noble, Richard D. (Boulder, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Infrared transparent frequency selective surface based on metallic meshes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an infrared transparent frequency selective surface (ITFSS) based on metallic meshes. In this ITFSS structure, periodic cross-slot units are integrated on square metallic meshes empowered by coating and UV-lithography. A matching condition is proposed to avoid the distortion of units. Experimental results show that this ITFSS possesses a good transmittance of 80% in the infrared band of 35 ?m, and also a stable band-pass behavior at the resonance frequency of 36.4 GHz with transmittance of ?0.56 dB. Theoretical simulations about the ITFSS diffractive characteristics and frequency responses are also investigated. The novel ITFSS will attract renewed interest and be exploited for applications in various fields.

Yu, Miao [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China) [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Xu, Nianxi; Liu, Hai; Gao, Jinsong, E-mail: gaojs@ciomp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

343

Climatic variability at ten long period stations in the coterminous United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of the mean annual and season-year maxima and min1ma decadal variances indicate the strength of the trend 11nes. A modified Student's t-test (Brooks and Carruthers, 1953) was used comparing the regression co- efficients and correlation coefficients to the1r...). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 The number of H, M, and L pentadal variances of isomeric coefficients occurring in fourteen five-year periods . . . 64 Correlation matrix: mean annual maximum temperatures. . . 74 Correlation matrix: mean annual minimum temperatures. . . 76...

Vining, Kevin C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

Jones, G

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

High speed optical quantum random number generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3351 (2009). 6. I. Reidler, Y. Aviad, M. Rosenbluh, and I. Kanter, "Ultrahigh-speed random number generation

Weinfurter, Harald

346

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

distributing and archiving of reports; and close period activities. PROCESS The Monthly Report and Close Period process starts on the 1 st working day of the reporting month. The...

347

DO PERIODICITIES IN EXTINCTION-WITH POSSIBLE ASTRONOMICAL CONNECTIONS-SURVIVE A REVISION OF THE GEOLOGICAL TIMESCALE?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major revision of the geological timescale was published in 2012. We re-examine our past finding of a 27 Myr periodicity in marine extinction rates by re-assigning dates to the extinction data used previously. We find that the spectral power in this period is somewhat increased, and persists at a narrow bandwidth, which supports our previous contention that the Nemesis hypothesis is untenable as an explanation for the periodicity that was first noted by Raup and Sepkoski in the 1980s. We enumerate a number of problems in a recent study comparing extinction rates with time series models.

Melott, Adrian L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Bambach, Richard K. [Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, P.O. Box 37012, MRC 121, Washington, DC 20013-7012 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Period-luminosity and period-luminosity-colour relations for Mira variables at maximum light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we confirm the existence of period-luminosity (PL) and period-luminosity-colour (PLC) relations at maximum light for O and C Mira variables in the LMC. We demonstrate that in the J and H bands the maximum light PL relations have a significantly smaller dispersion than their counterparts at mean light, while the K band and bolometric PL relations have a dispersion comparable to that at mean light. In the J, H and K bands the fitted PL relations for the O Miras are found to have smaller dispersion than those for the C Miras, at both mean and maximum light, while the converse is true for the relations based on bolometric magnitudes. The inclusion of a non-zero log period term is found to be highly significant in all cases except that of the C Miras in the J band, for which the data are found to be consistent with having constant absolute magnitude. This suggests the possibility of employing C Miras as standard candles. We suggest both a theoretical justification for the existence of Mira PL relations at maximum light and a possible explanation of why these relations should have a smaller dispersion than at mean light. The existence of such maximum light relations offers the possibility of extending the range and improving the accuracy of the Mira distance scale to Galactic globular clusters and to other galaxies.

S. M. Kanbur; M. A. Hendry; D. Clarke

1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Focusing-to-defocusing crossover in nonlinear periodic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focusing-to-defocusing crossover in nonlinear periodic structures Francis H. Bennet,* Inés A. Amuli

350

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents include articles entitled: Senators criticize DOE use of Envirocare and Molten Metal; Officials express concern re implications of WCS ruling; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; WCS responds to critics re implications of ruling; Background: Prior correspondence between the Senators and DOE re Envirocare; Waste control specialists authorized to conduct additional operations at Texas site; Molten Metal files for bankruptcy protection; Envirocare of Texas receives first approval for hazardous waste permit; Envirocare of Utah applies to NRC for SNM license; NRDC alleges death threats and financial intimidation by Envirocare; DOE and NRC sign off on external regulation pilot program; and NRDC requests Inspector General probe re Envirocare.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M881  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M881 Part I ­ The Schedule Section F Deliveries) Alternate I (Apr 1984) 1 F ­ 3 Deliverables 2 F ­ i #12;Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M881 F ­ 1 Period of Performance This Contract shall be effective as specified in Block No. 3 ­ Effective

352

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series6,9792"1. NumberNumber

353

Photonic crystal membrane reflectors by magnetic field-guided metal-assisted chemical etching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) is a simple etching method that uses metal as the catalyst for anisotropic etching of semiconductors. However, producing nano-structures using MacEtch from discrete metal patterns, in contrast to interconnected ones, has been challenging because of the difficulties in keeping the discrete metal features in close contact with the semiconductor. We report the use of magnetic field-guided MacEtch (h-MacEtch) to fabricate periodic nanohole arrays in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers for high reflectance photonic crystal membrane reflectors. This study demonstrates that h-MacEtch can be used in place of conventional dry etching to produce ordered nanohole arrays for photonic devices.

Balasundaram, Karthik; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Li, Xiuling, E-mail: wzhou@uta.edu, E-mail: xiuling@illinois.edu [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shuai, Yi-Chen; Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong, E-mail: wzhou@uta.edu, E-mail: xiuling@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, NanoFAB Center, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, NanoFAB Center, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Metal volatilization and separation during incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified risks from a thermal treatment process. Fundamental research leading to better understanding of their behavior and improved control of their emissions is greatly needed. This paper reports studies on metal volatilization and separation during incineration. Metal volatilization studies were carried out in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, the dynamic volatilization characteristics of various metals during the combustion of metal-containing wood pellets were investigated in a high-temperature electric furnace. In addition to uncontrolled volatilization, the potential of employing chemical additives to bind metals and prevent them from volatilizing during combustion was also investigated. The second experiment involved the investigation of metal volatilization characteristics during the thermal treatment of metal-contaminated clay in a fluidized bed unit. The metal species tested in both experiments were compounds of lead and cadmium. Metal capture/separation studies were also carried out in two separate experiments. The first involved the use of sorbents in the combustion chamber to capture metals during the fluidized bed incineration of metal-containing wood pellets. The second experiments, however, employed sorbents to absorb metal vapors in a fluidized-bed waste-heat boiler. The objective of both the experiments is to characterize the metal absorption efficiency associated with the processes.

Ho, T.C.; Chu, H.W.; Hopper, J.R. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} with strain amplitudes in the range {+-}0.20 to {+-}1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. The 18-8 group of austenitic stainless steels, such as AISI type 316, 304, and their modified grades, finds applications as structural material for various components of the liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR).

Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Sankara Rao, K.B.; Mannan, S.L. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Photobiomolecular metallic particles and films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

Hu, Zhong-Cheng

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Metallization and insulization during impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is pointed out that the large strains produced by hypervelocity impacts can be expected to produce dramatic changes in the chemical bonding (electronic structures) of materials. This will change the mechanical behavior towards increased ductility when a semiconductor is compressed until it becomes metallic; and towards increased brittleness when a transition metal is expanded so as to localize its d-band electrons. Both isotropic compression (expansion) and shear strains can cause these transformations. Critical deformation criteria are given based on the observed cubic to tetragonal transformations in compressed semiconductors.

Gilman, J.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Analysis of electromagnetic scattering by nearly periodic structures: an LDRD report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this LDRD we examine techniques to analyze the electromagnetic scattering from structures that are nearly periodic. Nearly periodic could mean that one of the structure's unit cells is different from all the others--a defect. It could also mean that the structure is truncated, or butted up against another periodic structure to form a seam. Straightforward electromagnetic analysis of these nearly periodic structures requires us to grid the entire structure, which would overwhelm today's computers and the computers in the foreseeable future. In this report we will examine various approximations that allow us to continue to exploit some aspects of the structure's periodicity and thereby reduce the number of unknowns required for analysis. We will use the Green's Function Interpolation with a Fast Fourier Transform (GIFFT) to examine isolated defects both in the form of a source dipole over a meta-material slab and as a rotated dipole in a finite array of dipoles. We will look at the numerically exact solution of a one-dimensional seam. In order to solve a two-dimensional seam, we formulate an efficient way to calculate the Green's function of a 1d array of point sources. We next formulate ways of calculating the far-field due to a seam and due to array truncation based on both array theory and high-frequency asymptotic methods. We compare the high-frequency and GIFFT results. Finally, we use GIFFT to solve a simple, two-dimensional seam problem.

Johnson, William Arthur; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wilton, Donald R. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Basilio, Lorena I.; Peters, David William; Capolino, F. (University of Houston, Houston, TX)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cadmium, copper, and lead in soils and garden produce near a metal smelter at Flin Flon, Manitoba  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Towns in the vicinity of base metal smelters are subject to contamination from atmospheric fallout containing heavy metals. Many smelters have been in operation for decades, and have resulted in substantial accumulation of metals in the surrounding soils. Metal contamination of edible vegetation near mines and smelters has been the source of health concerns in a number of countries. One smelter that has operated for more than half a century is located at Flin Flon, Manitoba. Many Flin Flon residents utilize home vegetable gardens year after year. However little is known regarding heavy metal contamination of locally grown garden produce. Since food can contribute as much as 90% of total body uptake of metals it is important to identify any sources which may account for the disproportionate share. The objective of the present study was to examine concentrations of cadmium, copper and lead in soils and garden produce in the vicinity of the Flin Flon smelter.

Pip, E. (Univ. of Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

QUIESCENT NUCLEAR BURNING IN LOW-METALLICITY WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the impact of residual nuclear burning in the cooling sequences of hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarfs with very low metallicity progenitors (Z = 0.0001). These cooling sequences are appropriate for the study of very old stellar populations. The results presented here are the product of self-consistent, fully evolutionary calculations. Specifically, we follow the evolution of white dwarf progenitors from the zero-age main sequence through all the evolutionary phases, namely the core hydrogen-burning phase, the helium-burning phase, and the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase to the white dwarf stage. This is done for the most relevant range of main-sequence masses, covering the most usual interval of white dwarf massesfrom 0.53 M {sub ?} to 0.83 M {sub ?}. Due to the low metallicity of the progenitor stars, white dwarfs are born with thicker hydrogen envelopes, leading to more intense hydrogen burning shells as compared with their solar metallicity counterparts. We study the phase in which nuclear reactions are still important and find that nuclear energy sources play a key role during long periods of time, considerably increasing the cooling times from those predicted by standard white dwarf models. In particular, we find that for this metallicity and for white dwarf masses smaller than about 0.6 M {sub ?}, nuclear reactions are the main contributor to the stellar luminosity for luminosities as low as log (L/L {sub ?}) ? 3.2. This, in turn, should have a noticeable impact in the white dwarf luminosity function of low-metallicity stellar populations.

Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; Althaus, Leandro G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronmicas y Geofsicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)] [Facultad de Ciencias Astronmicas y Geofsicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Garca-Berro, Enrique [Departament de Fsica Aplicada, Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades 5, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)] [Departament de Fsica Aplicada, Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades 5, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

THE METALLICITY DEPENDENCE OF THE CEPHEID P L RELATION IN M101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of metallicity on the Cepheid period-luminosity (P L) relation is investigated using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys V and I images of M101. Variations in the reddening-free Wesenheit parameter (W), which is employed as a proxy for luminosity, are examined as a function of the radial distance from the center of M101 (and thus metallicity). We determine that there is no dependence of the slope on metallicity. However, the intercept is found to depend on metallicity by ?{sub VI} = 0.33 0.12 mag dex{sup 1} and ?{sub VI} = 0.71 0.17 mag dex{sup 1} using 2? and 3? rejection criteria, respectively. Sigma-clipping impacts the derived metallicity dependence, and the 2? criterion applied likely mitigates blending, particularly in the crowded inner regions of M101. A metallicity-corrected distance for M101 is obtained from 619 Cepheids (? = 28.96 0.11), a result that agrees with the recently determined SN Ia distance. The metallicity effects described can be bypassed by working at near and mid-infrared wavelengths (e.g., the Carnegie Hubble Program)

Mager, Violet A.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L., E-mail: mager@susqu.edu, E-mail: barry@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The ACS LCID Project. VIII. The short-period Cepheids of Leo A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 percent are new discoveries, and 33 candidate variables. Of the confirmed variables, we found 156 Cepheids, but only 10 RR Lyrae stars despite nearly 100 percent completeness at the magnitude of the horizontal branch. The RR Lyrae stars include 7 fundamental and 3 first-overtone pulsators, with mean periods of 0.636 and 0.366 day, respectively. From their position on the period-luminosity (PL) diagram and light-curve morphology, we classify 91, 58, and 4 Cepheids as fundamental, first-overtone, and second-overtone mode Classical Cepheids (CC), respectively, and two as population II Cepheids. However, due to the low metallicity of Leo A, about 90 percent of the detected Cepheids have periods shorter than 1.5 days. Comparison with theoretical models ind...

Bernard, Edouard J; Gallart, Carme; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Cole, Andrew A; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L; Skillman, Evan D; Stetson, Peter B; Tolstoy, Eline

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Metallicity Distribution of Intracluster Stars in Virgo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to detect and measure ~5300 stars in a single intracluster field in the Virgo Cluster. By performing F606W and F814W photometry on these stars, we have determined their metallicity distribution function, and constrained the types of stars present in this portion of Virgo's intracluster space. Based on the small number of stars detected brighter than the red giant branch (RGB) tip, we suggest that in this region, Virgo's intracluster stars are mostly old (>~10 Gyr). Through analysis of the RGB stars themselves, we determine that the population contains the full range of metallicities probed (-2.3-0.5. The spatial distribution of the most metal-poor stars in the field shows significantly more structure than that of the metal-rich stars, indicating that the intracluster population is not well-mixed. We discuss the implications these observations have for the production of intracluster stars and the dynamical evolution of the Virgo Cluster.

Benjamin F. Williams; Robin Ciardullo; Patrick R. Durrell; Matt Vinciguerra; John J. Feldmeier; George H. Jacoby; Steinn Sigurdsson; Ted von Hippel; Henry C. Ferguson; Nial R. Tanvir; Magda Arnaboldi; Ortwin Gerhard; J. Alfonso L. Aguerri; Ken Freeman

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Better Method for Evaluating Heavy Metal Water Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efforts to control heavy metal pollution have focused oncomponent of heavy metal pollution, Dr. Hering found thatthat makes measuring heavy metal pollution a moving target.

Hering, Janet

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

372

Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Schneibel, Joachim H. (Knoxville, TN); Pint, Bruce A. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heavy metals in Antarctic organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate levels of essential (zinc and copper) and non-essential (mercury and cadmium) heavy metals, 34 species of organisms from different areas close to the Antarctic Peninsula were analysed. These included algae, filter-feeders, omnivorous invertebrates and vertebrates. Mercury was not detected, while cadmium was found in the majority of organisms analysed (detection limit was 0.05 ppm for both metals). The highest cadmium concentration was observed in the starfish Odontaster validus. Anthozoans, sipunculids and nudibranchs showed maximum levels of zinc, while the highest copper level was found in the gastropod Trophon brevispira. Mercury and cadmium levels in fishes were below the detection limit. Concentrations of essential and non-essential metals in birds were highest in liver followed by muscle and eggs. Cadmium and mercury levels in muscle of southern elephant seals were above the detection limit, whereas in Antarctic fur seals they were below it. The objective of the study was to gather baseline information for metals in Antarctic Ocean biota that may be needed to detect, measure and monitor future environmental changes. 46 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Moreno, J.E.A. de; Moreno, V.J. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Gerpe, M.S.; Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pasterczyk, James W. (Westmont, IL); Winterer, Markus (Westmont, IL); Krause, Theodore R. (Lisle, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M962  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M962 PART III ­ List of Documents, Exhibits and Other Attachments Section J Appendix C Subcontracting Plan for Socioeconomic Programs J-C-i #12;Contract, 2002, for the entire Contract period associated with this Contract. However, annual goals shall

377

Material accountancy for metallic fuel pin casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. The pin casting operation, although only one of several operations in FCF, was the first to be on-line. As such, it has served to demonstrate the material accountancy system in many of its facets. This paper details, for the operation of the pin casting process with depleted uranium, the interaction between the mass tracking system (MTG) and some of the ancillary computer codes which generate pertinent information for operations and material accountancy. It is necessary to distinguish between two types of material balance calculations -- closeout for operations and material accountancy for safeguards. The two have much in common, for example, the mass tracking system database and the calculation of an inventory difference, but, in general, are not congruent with regard to balance period and balance spatial domain. Moreover, the objective, assessment, and reporting requirements of the calculated inventory difference are very different in the two cases.

Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.; Beitel, J.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

Labushev, Mikhail M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantum number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL- 57239 Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantumhep-th/0310223 UCB-PTH-03/26 Harmonic resolution as aquantum number, the harmonic resolution K. The Bekenstein

Bousso, Raphael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Synthesis and Characterization of Porous Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal phosphonates by investigating both the role of water and template molecules in the solvothermal synthesis. The role of water in solvothermal reactions was found to have a profound influence on the structure of monovalent metal phosphonates...

Kinnibrugh, Tiffany Lewis

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NANO - "Green" metal oxides ... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Green" metal oxides ... Water and nano-sized particles isolated from trees, plants and algae are the ingredients of a new recipe for low-cost metal oxides that are widely used in...

382

Aspects of the mechanics of metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic glasses are amorphous materials that possess unique mechanical properties, such as high tensile strengths and good fracture toughnesses. Also, since they are amorphous, metallic glasses exhibit a glass transition, ...

Henann, David Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component Materials," LBL-

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

Willis, Richard R. (Cary, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL), Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Benin, Annabelle I. (Oak Forest, IL); Snurr, Randall Q. (Evanston, IL); Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur (Evanston, IL)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

385

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Spectroscopic studies of metal growth on oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Chemistry SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF METAL GROWTH ON OXIDES A Thesis by KAI LUO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style a d content by: avid W. Goodman.... , Jilin University, P. R. China Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr, David W. Goodman Metal/oxide chemistry and metal cluster growth on oxides are fundamental to our understanding of the catalytic activity and selectivity of metal catalysts, thus...

Luo, Kai

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Preparation of metal-triazolate frameworks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides for novel metal-triazolate frameworks, methods of use thereof, and devices comprising the frameworks thereof.

Yaghi, Omar M; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J; Gandara-Barragan, Felipe; Britt, David K

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sintering and ripening resistant noble metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Durable porous metal nanostructures comprising thin metal nanosheets that are metastable under some conditions that commonly produce rapid reduction in surface area due to sintering and/or Ostwald ripening. The invention further comprises the method for making such durable porous metal nanostructures. Durable, high-surface area nanostructures result from the formation of persistent durable holes or pores in metal nanosheets formed from dendritic nanosheets.

van Swol, Frank B; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Challa, Sivakumar R

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

A KECK HIRES DOPPLER SEARCH FOR PLANETS ORBITING METAL-POOR DWARFS. II. ON THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS IN THE METAL-POOR REGIME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of three years of precision radial velocity (RV) measurements of 160 metal-poor stars observed with HIRES on the Keck 1 telescope. We report on variability and long-term velocity trends for each star in our sample. We identify several long-term, low-amplitude RV variables worthy of followup with direct imaging techniques. We place lower limits on the detectable companion mass as a function of orbital period. Our survey would have detected, with a 99.5% confidence level, over 95% of all companions on low-eccentricity orbits with velocity semiamplitude K {approx}> 100 m s{sup -1}, or M{sub p} sin i {approx}> 3.0 M {sub J}(P/yr){sup (1/3)}, for orbital periods P {approx}< 3 yr. None of the stars in our sample exhibits RV variations compatible with the presence of Jovian planets with periods shorter than the survey duration. The resulting average frequency of gas giants orbiting metal-poor dwarfs with -2.0{approx}<[Fe/H]{approx}<-0.6 is f{sub p} < 0.67% (at the 1{sigma} confidence level). We examine the implications of this null result in the context of the observed correlation between the rate of occurrence of giant planets and the metallicity of their main-sequence solar-type stellar hosts. By combining our data set with the Fischer and Valenti (2005) uniform sample, we confirm that the likelihood of a star to harbor a planet more massive than Jupiter within 2 AU is a steeply rising function of the host's metallicity. However, the data for stars with -1.0{approx}<[Fe/H]{approx}<0.0 are compatible, in a statistical sense, with a constant occurrence rate f{sub p} {approx_equal} 1%. Our results can usefully inform theoretical studies of the process of giant-planet formation across two orders of magnitude in metallicity.

Sozzetti, Alessandro; Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Korzennik, Sylvain G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Carney, Bruce W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laird, John B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States)], E-mail: asozzett@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dlatham@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skorzennik@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: rstefanik@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: boss@dtm.ciw.edu, E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: laird@bgsu.edu

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Can Bohmian trajectories account for quantum recurrences having classical periodicities?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum systems in specific regimes display recurrences at the period of the periodic orbits of the corresponding classical system. We investigate the excited hydrogen atom in a magnetic field -- a prototypical system of 'quantum chaos' -- from the point of view of the de Broglie Bohm (BB) interpretation of quantum mechanics. The trajectories predicted by BB theory are computed and contrasted with the time evolution of the wavefunction, which shows pronounced features at times matching the period of closed orbits of the classical hydrogen in a magnetic field problem. Individual BB trajectories do not possess these periodicities and cannot account for the quantum recurrences. These recurrences can however be explained by BB theory by considering the ensemble of trajectories compatible with an initial statistical distribution, although none of the trajectories of the ensemble are periodic, rendering unclear the dynamical origin of the classical periodicities.

A. Matzkin

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Halo Stars in NGC 5128. III: An Inner-Halo Field and the Metallicity Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new HST/WFPC2 (V,I) photometry for the red-giant stars in NGC 5128 at a projected distance of 8 kpc from the galaxy center, which probe a mixture of its inner halo and outer bulge. The color-magnitude diagram shows an old red-giant branch which is even broader in color than our two previously studied outer-halo fields (at 21 and 31 kpc), with significant numbers of stars extending to Solar metallicity and higher. The peak frequency of the metallicity distribution function (MDF) is at [m/H] ~ -0.4, with even fewer metal-poor stars than in the outer-halo fields. We find that the main features of the halo MDF can be reproduced by a simple chemical evolution model in which early star formation goes on simultaneously with an initial stage of rapid infall of very metal-poor gas, after which the infall dies away exponentially. A comparison with the MDF for the NGC 5128 globular clusters indicates that there is a clear decrease of specific frequency $S_N$ (number of clusters per unit halo light) with increasing metallicity, from S_N ~ 4-8 at [Fe/H] -1. This trend may indicate that globular cluster formation efficiency is a strong function of the metallicity of the protocluster gas.

W. E. Harris; G. L. H. Harris

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Biotechnology for the decontamination of Metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laurentian University SNO Science North #12;Problem: Pollution Heavy Metals Aluminium Lead Caesium CalciumBiotechnology for the decontamination of Metal Wastes Professor Vasu D. Appanna PhD Chair Yttrium #12;Accumulation of metals in living systems #12;Biological Effects #12;Adaptation #12;Aluminium

Appanna, Vasu

393

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

Bray, L.A.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a dust of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900C. Literature survey has shown...

Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I

396

Plasticity of Metal Nanowires Christopher R. Weinberger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasticity of Metal Nanowires Christopher R. Weinberger Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque-4040 (Dated: November 24, 2011) Abstract The mechanisms of plasticity in metal naowires with diameters below 100 nm are reviewed. At these length scales, plasticity in face-centered-cubic metals subjected

Cai, Wei

397

subcollector Schottky collector contact & interconnect metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

base collector depletion layer subcollector ohmic metal (a) base collector depletion layer Schottky metal base emitter collector collector We emitter base emitter emitter We Wc Wc (b) Schottky collector contact & interconnect metals Emitter & collector Ohmics undoped collector depletion layer base N

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

398

Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Metal carbonyl-hydrosilane reactions and hydrosilation catalysis. Final report for period May 1, 1995 - August 14, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese carbonyl complexes serve as hydrosilation precatalysts for selectively transforming a carbonyl group into a doxy methylene or a fully reduced methylene group. Substrates of interest include (1) aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, silyl esters, and esters, and (2) their organometallic acyl counterparts. Two types of manganese precatalysts have been reported: (a) alkyl and acyl complexes (L)(CO){sub 4}MnR [L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = COCH{sub 3}, COPh, CH{sub 3}] and (b) halides (CO){sub 5}MnX and [(CO){sub 4}MnX]{sub 2} (X = Br, I). The former promote hydrosilation and deoxygenation catalysis; the latter promote dehydrogenative silation of alcohols and carboxylic acids as well as hydrosilation and deoxygenation of some metallocarboxylic acid derivatives. In every case studied, these Mn precatalysts are far more reactive or selective than traditional Rh(l) precatalysts. The reaction chemistry of the above and other Mn alkyl complexes with hydrosilanes was studied in order to probe catalysis mechanism(s). Thus, Mn(CO){sub 5} methyl, benzyl, acetyl, and benzoyl (4 p-substituents) complexes reacted with hydrosilines by four different mechanisms, which were established. A noteworthy development was that the methyl and benzoyl complexes gave moderate yields of a new ({eta}{sup 2}-Si-H) silane adduct (CO){sub 4}Mn(SiMe{sub 2}Ph)(H-SiMe{sub 2}Ph), which is stable in the presence of excess silane. This silane adduct promotes all three catalytic reactions; its extraordinary activity and potential selectivity are under study.

Cutler, Alan R.

2001-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

Protocol Number: (IBC office use only)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protocol Number: (IBC office use only) 1 UNF Registration of Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) A-2 Form", describe the methods of inactivation. #12;Protocol Number: (IBC office use only) 2 10. Describe the mechanism for decontaminating lab waste prior to disposal. Yes No If "Yes", describe the methods

Asaithambi, Asai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

enter part number BNC / RP-BNC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enter part number Products 7/16 1.0/2.3 1.6/5.6 AFI AMC BNC / RP-BNC C FAKRA SMB FME HN MCX Mini ------- Product Search ------- Inventory Search Search Results for: 31-10152-RFX Results: 1 - 1 of 1 Part Number. All rights reserved. Copyright | Terms & Conditions | RF E-Mail Client | Contact Us | Amphenol

Berns, Hans-Gerd

402

GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST ISBN Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2013 GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST Course Number ISBN Number Title of Text and/or Material Edition Author Publishers 11100 978-1-2591-9687-4 Introduction to Chemistry, 3rd ed. (packaged w 978-1-2591-6192-6 Chemistry, The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6e (packaged w

Jiang, Wen

403

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

404

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

405

Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Stochastic chemical enrichment in metal-poor systems I. Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A stochastic model of the chemical enrichment of metal-poor systems by core-collapse (Type II) supernovae is presented, allowing for large-scale mixing of the enriched material by turbulent motions and cloud collisions in the interstellar medium. Infall of pristine material is taken into account by following the evolution of the gas density in the medium. Analytical expressions were derived for the number of stars enriched by a given number of supernovae, as well as for the amount of mass with which the ejected material from a supernova is mixed before being locked up in a subsequently formed star. It is shown that for reasonable values of the gas density (~0.1 cm-3) and of the supernova rate (~0.25 kpc-3 Myr-1) of the Galactic halo, the resulting metallicity distributions of the extreme Population II stars show a distinct cut-off at [Fe/H] ~= -4. In fact, by assuming no low-mass Population III stars were able to form out of the primordial interstellar medium, the derived fraction of stars below [Fe/H] = -4 is in agreement with observations. Moreover, the probability is high that even the most metal-poor stars observed to date have been enriched by several contributing supernovae. This partly explains the relatively small star-to-star scatter in many chemical-abundance ratios for stars down to [Fe/H] = -4, as recently found in several observational studies. Contribution from the thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae is found to be negligible over almost the entire extremely metal-poor regime. (***abridged***)

T. Karlsson

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Broadening the Statistical Search for Metal Price Super Cycles to Steel and Related Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadening the Statistical Search for Metal Price Super Cycles to Steel and Related Metals in the prices of six metals traded on the London Metal Exchange (the `LME6'). This paper extends the search, and other emerging economies. Some have argued that the world economy has entered the early phases

408

Slag Metal Reactions in Binary CaF2-Metal Oxide Welding Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Slag Metal Reactions in Binary CaF2-Metal Oxide Welding Fluxes Some otherwise chemically stable fluxes may decompose into suboxides in the presence of welding arcs, thereby providing higher levels of 0 2 in weld metal than those oxides which do not form suboxides ABSTRACT. The stability of metal

Eagar, Thomas W.

409

Changes in worldwide demand for metals (final). Open File report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide demand for metals was analyzed to identify the important factors that explain differences in the level of demand among world countries. The per capita demand for steel, aluminum, copper, and total nonferrous metals was investigated for 40 to 50 countries over a 22-year period. These countries have been further grouped into four world regions for purposes of making generalizations about the importance of these factors for countries in different stages of development and with dissimilar levels of per capita gross domestic product (GDP). Intercountry and intertemporal differences are explained largely by differences in per capita GDP and changes over time in per capita GDP, oil real prices, and to a lesser extent, metal real prices. The trend in world consumption is dramatically different in the last decade than the previous one. In 1962-73, per capita consumption increased in all areas and consumption intensity (consumption divided by (GDP) increased in most areas). In 1973-84, per capita consumption fell in most areas and intensity fell dramatically, except in developing nations.

Faucett, J.G.; Chmelynski, H.J.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project were to design new electrophilic metal alkyl complexes and to exploit these systems in fundamental studies of olefin polymerization and other important and new catalytic reactions. A key target reaction is insertion copolymerization of olefins and polar CH2=CHX vinyl monomers such as vinyl halides and vinyl ethers. During the period covered by this report we (i) investigated the properties of ortho-alkoxy-arylphosphine ligands in Ni-based olefin polymerization catalysts, (ii) studied the synthesis of double-end-capped polyethylene using group 4 metal catalysts that contain tris-pyrazolylborate ligands, (iii) explored the ethylene insertion reactivity of group 4 metal tris-pyrazolyl-borate complexes, (iv) showed that (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species undergo multiple insertion of silyl vinyl ethers, (v) synthesized and explored the reactivity of base-free Ni benzyl complexes that contain ortho-phosphino-arene sulfonate ligands, (vi) established the mechanism of the reaction of vinyl chloride with (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} catalysts, (vii) explored the role of cationic polymerization and insertion chemistry in the reactions of vinyl ethers with (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species, (viii) discovered a new class of self-assembled tetranuclear Pd catalysts that produce high molecular weight linear polyethylene and copolymerize ethylene and vinyl fluoride, and (ix) developed model systems that enabled investigation of cis-trans isomerization of {phosphine-sulfonate}Pd(II) complexes.

Jordan, Richard F. [University of Chicago] University of Chicago

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

The role of crystallography and nanostructures on metallic friction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ductile metals, sliding contact is often accompanied by severe plastic deformation localized to a small volume of material adjacent to the wear surface. During the initial run-in period, hardness, grain structure and crystallographic texture of the surfaces that come into sliding contact undergo significant changes, culminating in the evolution of subsurface layers with their own characteristic features. Here, a brief overview of our ongoing research on the fundamental phenomena governing the friction-induced recrystallization in single crystal metals, and how these recrystallized structures with nanometer-size grains would in turn influence metallic friction will be presented. We have employed a novel combination of experimental tools (FIB, EBSD and TEM) and an analysis of the critical resolved shear stress (RSS) on the twelve slip systems of the FCC lattice to understand the evolution of these friction-induced structures in single crystal nickel. The later part of the talk deals with the mechanisms of friction in nanocrystalline Ni films. Analyses of friction-induced subsurfaces seem to confirm that the formation of stable ultrafine nanocrystalline layers with 2-10 nm grains changes the deformation mechanism from the traditional dislocation mediated one to that is predominantly controlled by grain boundaries, resulting in significant reductions in the coefficient friction.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology, Socorro, NM); Kotula, Paul Gabriel

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Grant Title: NIDCD PHASE I/II PRELIMINARY CLINICAL TRIALS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-123. CFDA Number(s): 93.173.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: PAR-12-123. CFDA Number(s): 93.173. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH

Farritor, Shane

414

Grant Title: AHRQ HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH DEMONSTRATION AND DISSEMINATION GRANTS Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

Farritor, Shane

415

Grant Title: INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES RESEARCH CENTERS (P30) Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-HD-13-002. CFDA Number(s): 93.865.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number: RFA-HD-13-002. CFDA Number(s): 93.865. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

Farritor, Shane

416

Grant Title: RESEARCH ON PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES (R01) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

Farritor, Shane

417

Grant Title: MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH DISSERTATION GRANT TO INCREASE DIVERSITY (R36) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

Farritor, Shane

418

Grant Title: RESEARCH GRANTS FOR PREVENTING VIOLENCE AND VIOLENCE-RELATED INJURY Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-CE-14-006. CFDA Number(s): 93.136.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: RFA-CE-14-006. CFDA Number(s): 93.136. Agency/Department: Centers for Disease Control

Farritor, Shane

419

Grant Title: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE TRACK AWARD FOR RAPID TRANSITION (B/START) (R03) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

Farritor, Shane

420

Grant Title: ARTS IN EDUCATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND DISSEMINATION PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: ED-GRANTS-022013-001. CFDA Number(s): 84.351D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number: ED-GRANTS-022013-001. CFDA Number(s): 84.351D. Agency/Department: Department of Education, Office

Farritor, Shane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Green's function analysis of periodic structures in computational electromagnetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the two-dimensional periodic Green's function," IEEE Trans.evaluation of the Green's function for the Helmholtzrepresentations of certain Green's functions," J. Comp.

Van Orden, Derek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

EIS-0250: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV...

423

EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment The Department of Energy is now announcing...

424

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Draft ULPEIS comment extension community notification041813 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications...

425

Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funds and the Procedures for Reporting of Obligated Funds for the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to...

426

EIS-0431: Extension of Public Comment Period | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comment Period Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published...

427

Quality of Monitoring of Stochastic Events by Periodic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be periodically turned off to conserve energy, thereby ... such as chemical, biological, nuclear, radiational, .... ited/offset by the latency and energy costs of turn-.

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for Electric Transmission Projects Requiring Federal Authorizations Extension of...

429

Reclaiming metallic material from an article comprising a non-metallic friable substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reclaiming a metallic material from a article including a non-metallic friable substrate. The method comprising crushing the article into a plurality of pieces. An acidic solution capable of dissolving the metallic material is provided dissolving the metallic material in the acidic material to form an etchant effluent. The etchant effluent is separated from the friable substrate. A precipitation agent, capable of precipitating the metallic material, is added to the etchant effluent to precipitate out the metallic material from the etchant effluent. The metallic material is then recovered.

Bohland, John Raphael (Oregon, OH); Anisimov, Igor Ivanovich (Whitehouse, OH); Dapkus, Todd James (Toledo, OH); Sasala, Richard Anthony (Toledo, OH); Smigielski, Ken Alan (Toledo, OH); Kamm, Kristin Danielle (Swanton, OH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Process for reducing series resistance of solar cell metal contact systems with a soldering flux etchant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for substantially reducing the series resistance of a solar cell having a thick film metal contact assembly thereon while simultaneously removing oxide coatings from the surface of the assembly prior to applying solder therewith. The process includes applying a flux to the contact assembly and heating the cell for a period of time sufficient to substantially remove the series resistance associated with the assembly by etching the assembly with the flux while simultaneously removing metal oxides from said surface of said assembly.

Coyle, R. T. (Lakewood, CO); Barrett, Joy M. (Eldorado Springs, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by Bacterial Cells Displaying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals by Bacterial Cells Displaying Synthetic Phytochelatins for enhanced bioaccumulation of toxic metals. Synthetic genes encoding for several metal strategy for develop- ing high-affinity bioadsorbents suitable for heavy metal removal. © 2000 John Wiley

Chen, Wilfred

432

Reactive trace metals in the stratified central North Pacific  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical concentration profiles of the dissolved and suspended particulate phases were determined for a suite of reactive trace metals, Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cd, during summertime at a station in the center of the North Pacific gyre. During summer the euphotic zone becomes stratified, forming a shallow (0-25 m), oligotrophic, mixed layer overlying a subsurface (25-140 m), strongly-stratified region. The physical, biological, and chemical structure within the euphotic zone during this period enhanced the effect of atmospheric inputs of Al, Fe, and Mn on mixed layer concentrations. For example, the concentration of dissolved Fe in the surface mixed layer was eighteen times that observed at a depth of 100 m. The observed aeolian signature of these metals matched that predicted from estimates of atmospheric input during the period between the onset of stratification and sampling. The distributions of suspended particulate Al, Fe, and Mn all exhibited minima in the euphotic zone and increased with depth into the main thermocline. Particulate Al and Fe were then uniform with depth below 1000 m before increasing in the near bottom nepheloid layer. Average particulate phase concentrations in intermediate and deep waters of the central North Pacific were 1.0, 0.31, and 0.055 nmol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1] for Al, Fe, and Mn, respectively. The distribution of particulate Cd exhibited a maximum within the subsurface euphotic zone. Particulate zinc also exhibited a surface maximum, albeit a smaller one. Concentrations of particulate Zn and Cd in intermediate and deep waters were 17 and 0.2 pmol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]. Substantial interbasin differences in particulate trace metals occur. Concentrations of suspended particulate Al, Fe, and Mn were three to four times lower in the central North Pacific than recently reported for the central North Atlantic gyre, consistent with differences in atmospheric input to these two regions.

Bruland, K.W. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)); Orians, K.J. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Cowen, J.P. (Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

First-principles prediction of redox potentials in transition-metal compounds with LDA+U Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as those at which lithium intercalates in transition metal compounds. We argue that this inaccuracy this approach, the experimental lithium intercalation voltages of a number of transition metal compounds corrosion, fuel cells and rechargeable Li batteries, and the ability to study these processes from first

Ceder, Gerbrand

434

(Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon metal and alloys (excluding semiconductor-grade silicon)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; China, 16%; South Africa, 13%; Canada, 12%; and other, 39%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations metal: Brazil, 37%; South Africa, 25%; Canada, 14%; Norway, 6%; and other, 18%. Total: Brazil, 20 energy costs. Demand for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries

435

Synthesis of transition metal carbonitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal carbonitrides (in particular, titanium carbonitride, TiC.sub.0.5 N.sub.0.5) are synthesized by a self-propagating reaction between the metal (e.g., titanium) and carbon in a nitrogen atmosphere. Complete conversion to the carbonitride phase is achieved with the addition of TiN as diluent and with a nitrogen pressure .gtoreq.0.6 MPa. Thermodynamic phase-stability calculations and experimental characterizations of quenched samples provided revealed that the mechanism of formation of the carbonitride is a two-step process. The first step involves the formation of the nonstoichiometric carbide, TiC.sub.0.5, and is followed by the formation of the product by the incorporation of nitrogen in the defect-structure carbide.

Munir, Zuhair A. R. (Davis, CA); Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam (Davis, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, S. Marvin (Kingston, TN); Rexford, Donald (Pattersonville, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

Andersen C, Hoogendoom S, Hudson B, Prince J, Teichert K, Wood J, Chase K

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

CVD of refractory amorphous metal alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a novel process is described for the fabrication of multi-metallic amorphous metal alloy coatings using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Of special interest in this work are amorphous metal alloys containing Mo and/or Cr which have high crystallization temperatures and readily available low decomposition temperature metal-bearing precursors. The conditions for amorphous alloy formation via CVD are described as well as the chemical properties of these materials. High temperature, aqueous corrosion tests have shown these materials (especially those containing Cr) are among the most corrosion resistant metal alloys known.

Tenhover, M. [The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Better Method for Evaluating Heavy Metal Water Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Method for Evaluating Heavy Metal Water Pollution Janetheavy metal contamination would also help communities evaluate their water

Hering, Janet

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Amorphous metal alloy and composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Metal-air battery assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to evaluate the present technical status of the zinc-air, aluminum/air and iron/air batteries and assess their potential for use in an electric vehicle. In addition, this report will outline proposed research and development priorities for the successful development of metal-air batteries for electric vehicle application. 39 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs.

Sen, R.K.; Van Voorhees, S.L.; Ferrel, T.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

BIG METALS, SMALL LIGANDS: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE 15-COORDINATE COMPLEX THORIUM AMINODIBORANATE [Th(H3BN(CH3)2BH3)4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIG METALS, SMALL LIGANDS: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE 15- COORDINATE COMPLEX THORIUM AMINODIBORANATE aminodiboranate ligands coordinate to the thorium center. The Werner coordination number of 15 in the solid state

Girolami, Gregory S.

443

Periodic orbit analysis of a system with continuous symmetry - a tutorial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical systems with translational or rotational symmetry arise frequently in studies of spatially extended physical systems, such as Navier-Stokes flows on periodic domains. In these cases, it is natural to express the state of the fluid in terms of a Fourier series truncated to a finite number of modes. Here, we study a 4-dimensional two-mode SO(2)-equivariant model of this type, the smallest possible truncation that retains the symmetry but is high-dimensional enough to allow for chaotic dynamics. A crucial step in the analysis of such a system is symmetry reduction. We use the model to illustrate different symmetry-reduction techniques. Its relative equilibria are conveniently determined by rewriting the dynamics in terms of a symmetry-invariant polynomial basis. However, for the analysis of its chaotic dynamics, the `method of slices', which is applicable to very high-dimensional problems, is preferable. We show that a Poincar\\'e section taken on the `slice' can be used to further reduce this flow to what is for all practical purposes a unimodal map. This enables us to systematically determine all relative periodic orbits and their symbolic dynamics up to any desired period. We then present cycle averaging formulas adequate for systems with continuous symmetry and use them to compute dynamical averages using relative periodic orbits. The convergence of such computations is discussed.

Nazmi Burak Budanur; Daniel Borrero-Echeverry; Predrag Cvitanovi?

2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

444

Quasiperiodic Dynamics in Bose-Einstein Condensates in Periodic Lattices and Superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ KAM theory to rigorously investigate quasiperiodic dynamics in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in periodic lattices and superlattices. Toward this end, we apply a coherent structure ansatz to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation to obtain a parametrically forced Duffing equation describing the spatial dynamics of the condensate. For shallow-well, intermediate-well, and deep-well potentials, we find KAM tori and Aubry-Mather sets to prove that one obtains mostly quasiperiodic dynamics for condensate wave functions of sufficiently large amplitude, where the minimal amplitude depends on the experimentally adjustable BEC parameters. We show that this threshold scales with the square root of the inverse of the two-body scattering length, whereas the rotation number of tori above this threshold is proportional to the amplitude. As a consequence, one obtains the same dynamical picture for lattices of all depths, as an increase in depth essentially only affects scaling in phase space. Our approach is applicable to periodic superlattices with an arbitrary number of rationally dependent wave numbers.

Martijn van Noort; Mason A. Porter; Yingfei Yi; Shui-Nee Chow

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

Meagher, Richard Brian (Athens, GA); Summers, Anne O. (Athens, GA); Rugh, Clayton L. (Athens, GA)

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

447

FT-ICR ,,,Carbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 70 80 720 760 800 Ion Mass [amu] ScC60 + C64 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) ScC60FT-ICR ,?,æ,éCarbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters ·>Í­ì·³"¹1 ·C Masamichi Kohno1 , Tetsuya

Maruyama, Shigeo

448

FT-ICR Study of Generation and Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Clusters (The Univ. ofTokyo1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) NiC38 ­ CoC38 ­ NiC38(NO) ­ CoC38(NO) ­ C43(NO) ­ (a) (b) 2s. 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Number of Carbon AtomsIntensity(arbitrary) (b) Ni on catalytic metals. 520 570 620 670 720 45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a

Maruyama, Shigeo

449

Induction slag reduction process for purifying metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous method is provided for purifying and recovering transition metals such as neodymium and zirconium that become reactive at temperatures above about 500.degree. C. that comprises the steps of contacting the metal ore with an appropriate fluorinating agent such as an alkaline earth metal fluosilicate to form a fluometallic compound, and reducing the fluometallic compound with a suitable alkaline earth or alkali metal compound under molten conditions, such as provided in an induction slag metal furnace. The method of the invention is advantageous in that it is simpler and less expensive than methods used previously to recover pure metals, and it may be employed with a wide range of transition metals that were reactive with enclosures used in the prior art methods and were hard to obtain in uncontaminated form.

Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Fisher, II, George T. (Albany, OR); Hansen, Dennis A. (Corvallis, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Methods of selectively incorporating metals onto substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming multi-metallic sites on a substrate is disclosed and described. A substrate including active groups such as hydroxyl can be reacted with a pretarget metal complex. The target metal attached to the active group can then be reacted with a secondary metal complex such that an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction occurs to form a multi-metallic species. The substrate can be a highly porous material such as aerogels, xerogels, zeolites, and similar materials. Additional metal complexes can be reacted to increase catalyst loading or control co-catalyst content. The resulting compounds can be oxidized to form oxides or reduced to form metals in the ground state which are suitable for practical use.

Ernst; Richard D. (Salt Lake City, UT), Eyring; Edward M. (Salt Lake City, UT), Turpin; Gregory C. (Salt Lake City, UT), Dunn; Brian C. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

REVIEW PAPER How metal-tolerant ecotypes of ectomycorrhizal fungi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract & Introduction Heavy metal pollution is a strong driver for heavy metal-contaminated soils. Keywords Heavy metal pollution . Heavy metal tolerance . EctomycorrhizalREVIEW PAPER How metal-tolerant ecotypes of ectomycorrhizal fungi protect plants from heavy metal

Boyer, Edmond

452

Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions S.Y. Ye,1 D. A emissions is examined, restricting the spacecraft location to either the northern or the southern hemisphere of Saturn. It is found that in both hemispheres, the modulation period of 5 kHz narrowband emissions has two

Gurnett, Donald A.

453

Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

Harrison, Neil (Santa Fe, NM); Singleton, John (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Another look at periodic wavelets Brody Dylan Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Another look at periodic wavelets Brody Dylan Johnson St. Louis University 16 May 2009 Brody Dylan Johnson (St. Louis University) Another look at periodic wavelets 16 May 2009 1 / 31 #12;Overview Overview. (see, e.g., the texts of Meyer and Daubechies) Brody Dylan Johnson (St. Louis University) Another look

Johnson, Brody Dylan

455

Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates MICHAEL R. GUEVARA, ALVIN GUEVARA,MICHAEL R., ALVIN SHRIER,ANDLEONGLASS. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell, THE SINOATRIAL NODE acts as the pace- maker of the heart. As a result of the orderly spread of excitation

Glass, Leon

456

TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARADIGM FOR TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS BLAKE consistent with time-periodic sound wave propagation in the 3 ? 3 nonlinear compressible Euler equations description of shock-free waves that propagate through an oscillating entropy field without breaking or dis

457

Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO+H.sub.2) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

Miller, Steven S. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO + H/sub 2/) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

Miller, S.S.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

459

SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

460

Grant Title: DECISION, RISK AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES (DRMS) Funding Opportunity Number: PD-98-1321. CFDA Number(s): 47.075.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1321. CFDA Number(s): 47.075. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation. Area of Research: Research

Farritor, Shane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Grant Title: NIH DIRECTOR'S EARLY INDEPENDENCE AWARDS (DP5) Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-RM-12-018. CFDA Number(s): 93.310.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-018. CFDA Number(s): 93.310. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Strategic

Farritor, Shane

462

Grant Title: NIDCD CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER GRANT (P50) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-13-277. CFDA Number(s): 93.173.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-277. CFDA Number(s): 93.173. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute

Farritor, Shane

463

Grant Title: ACADEMIC-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP CONFERENCE SERIES (R13) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-102. CFDA Number(s): 93.865.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-12-102. CFDA Number(s): 93.865. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, National

Farritor, Shane

464

Grant Title: ALCOHOL RESEARCH EDUCATION PROJECT GRANTS (R25) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR -11-205. CFDA Number(s) 93.273.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-205. CFDA Number(s) 93.273. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), National

Farritor, Shane

465

Grant Title: NIDA CORE CENTER OF EXCELLENCE GRANT PROGRAM (P30) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-10-220. CFDA Number(s): 93.279.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-220. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes

Farritor, Shane

466

Grant Title: INITIATIVE FOR MAXIMIZING STUDENT DEVELOPMENT (IMSD) (R25) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-13-082. CFDA Number(s): 93.859.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: PAR-13-082. CFDA Number(s): 93.859. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National

Farritor, Shane

467

A method for making dendritic metal nanostructures using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making dendritic metal nanostructures using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Factors affecting wild turkey distribution and numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if there was any significant difference between them. PC SAS (SAS Institute Inc. 1985), STATGRAPHICS (STSC 1986), and DECORANA (Hill 1979) were used to analyze the data. 22 RESULTS Diet composition ~Co ~Cot t: ll t t ky oil tdd g the study period (3...

Van Norman, Timothy Jon

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Inhalation carcinogenicity study with nickel metal powder in Wistar rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epidemiological studies of nickel refinery workers have demonstrated an association between increased respiratory cancer risk and exposure to certain nickel compounds (later confirmed in animal studies). However, the lack of an association found in epidemiological analyses for nickel metal remained unconfirmed for lack of robust animal inhalation studies. In the present study, Wistar rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation to 0, 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal powder (MMAD = 1.8 {mu}m, GSD = 2.4 {mu}m) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for up to 24 months. A subsequent six-month period without exposures preceded the final euthanasia. High mortality among rats exposed to 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal resulted in the earlier termination of exposures in this group. The exposure level of 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} was established as the MTD for the study. Lung alterations associated with nickel metal exposure included alveolar proteinosis, alveolar histiocytosis, chronic inflammation, and bronchiolar-alveolar hyperplasia. No increased incidence of neoplasm of the respiratory tract was observed. Adrenal gland pheochromocytomas (benign and malignant) in males and combined cortical adenomas/carcinomas in females were induced in a dose-dependent manner by the nickel metal exposure. The incidence of pheochromocytomas was statistically increased in the 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} male group. Pheochromocytomas appear to be secondary to the lung toxicity associated with the exposure rather than being related to a direct nickel effect on the adrenal glands. The incidence of cortical tumors among 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} females, although statistically higher compared to the concurrent controls, falls within the historical control range; therefore, in the present study, this tumor is of uncertain relationship to nickel metal exposure. The lack of respiratory tumors in the present animal study is consistent with the findings of the epidemiological studies.

Oller, Adriana R. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)], E-mail: aoller@nipera.org; Kirkpatrick, Daniel T.; Radovsky, Ann [WIL Research Laboratories, LLC, 1407 George Road, Ashland, OH 44805 8946 (United States); Bates, Hudson K. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Contributions to Metric Number Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributions to Metric Number Theory Paul Rowe Technical Report RHULMA20022 5 December 2002, Professor Glyn Harman, for sug- gestions of problems to attempt, helpful advice on methods and help

Dent, Alexander W.

471

Estimating visitor and visit numbers to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................ 24 4.5 Monitoring and Evaluating Quality of Life for CRS'07 .......................................25 4.6 Quality of experience visitor, visit and total numbers of visits to woodlands. This document builds on guidance on visitor

472

Dynamical real numbers and living systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently uncovered second derivative discontinuous solutions of the simplest linear ordinary differential equation define not only an nonstandard extension of the framework of the ordinary calculus, but also provide a dynamical representation of the ordinary real number system. Every real number can be visualized as a living cell -like structure, endowed with a definite evolutionary arrow. We discuss the relevance of this extended calculus in the study of living systems. We also present an intelligent version of the Newton's first law of motion.

Dhurjati Prasad Datta

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

Chemical kinetics of cetane number improving agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing demand for diesel fuels has resulted in the use of greater percentage of cracked distillates having poor ignition properties. The ignition properties of diesel fuels can be rated in terms of their cetane number and diesel fuels having low cetane number may have poor ignition properties such as diesel knock, difficulties to start engines in the cold weather and so on. Such diesel fuels need cetane number improving agents. In the 1940s and 1950s alkyl nitrates, alkyl nitrites and organic peroxides were found to be effective cetane number improving additives. Our recent study suggests that free radicals produced from thermal decomposition just before ignition should have an important role to improve their ignition properties. However no studies on the reaction mechanism for improving effect of these additives have been attempted because of complex nature of spontaneous ignition reaction of hydrocarbons. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism for improving effects of cetane number improving agents. We here have attempted to simulate the spontaneous ignition of n-butane as a model compound in the presence of alkyl nitrites as cetane number improving agents.

Hashimoto, K.; Akutsu, Y.; Arai, M.; Tamura, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

The concrete theory of numbers : Problem of simplicity of Fermat number-twins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of simplicity of Fermat number-twins $f_{n}^{\\pm}=2^{2^n}\\pm3$ is studied. The question for what $n$ numbers $f_{n}^{\\pm}$ are composite is investigated. The factor-identities for numbers of a kind $x^2 \\pm k $ are found.

Boris V. Tarasov

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

475

Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Hunt, Fred H. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Workington, GB); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URI Jump to:DemandChargePeriod2 Jump

478

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod2FAdj | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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479

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URI Jump Name: Demand Charge Period 4

480

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod4FAdj | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Arsenic, Lead, Chromium, and Cadmium in a Metal-contaminated Histosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical and mineralogical forms of As, Pb, Cr, and Cd were studied in a metal-contaminated organic soil (Histosol) that received runoff and seepage water from a site that was once occupied by a lead smelter. Soil samples were collected from different depth intervals during both wet and dry seasons and analyzed using bulk powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based micro X-ray diffraction ({mu}-XRD), and micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) spectroscopy. There was a clear pattern of mineral distribution with depth that indicated the presence of an intense redox gradient. The oxidized reddish brown surface layer (0-10 cm) was dominated by goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and poorly crystalline akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH). Lead and arsenic were highly associated with these Fe oxides, possibly by forming inner-sphere surface complexes. Gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O) was abundant in the layer as well, particularly for samples collected during dry periods. Fe(II)-containing minerals, such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), were identified in the intermediate layers (10-30 cm) where the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxides occurred. A number of high-temperature minerals, such as mullite (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 2Si{sub 2}O), corundum ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and wustite (FeO) were identified in the subsurface and they probably formed as a result of a burning event. Several sulfide minerals were identified in the most reduced layers at depths > 30 cm. They included realgar (AsS), alacranite (As{sub 4}S{sub 4}), galena (PbS), and sphalerite (Zn, Fe{sup 2+})S, and a series of Fe sulfides, including greigite (Fe{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2}{sup 3+} S{sub 4}), pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S), mackinawite (FeS), marcasite (FeS{sub 2}), and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Most of these minerals occurred as almost pure phases in sub-millimeter aggregates and appeared to be secondary phases that had precipitated from solution. Despite the elevated levels of Cd in the soil, no specific Cd phases were identified. The complex mineralogy has important implications for risk assessment and the design of in-situ remediation strategies for this and similar metal-contaminated sites.

Gao, X.; Schulze, D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A PRELIMINARY CALIBRATION OF THE RR LYRAE PERIOD-LUMINOSITY RELATION AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS: WISE DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using time-resolved, mid-infrared data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and geometric parallaxes from the Hubble Space Telescope for four Galactic RR Lyrae variables, we derive the following Population II period-luminosity (PL) relations for the WISE [W1], [W2], and [W3] bands at 3.4, 4.6, and 12 ?m, respectively: The slopes and the scatter around the fits are consistent with a smooth extrapolation of those same quantities from previously published K-band observations at 2.2 ?m, where the asymptotic (long-wavelength) behavior is consistent with a period-radius relation with a slope of 0.5. No obvious correlation with metallicity (spanning 0.4 dex in [Fe/H]) is found in the residuals of the four calibrating RR Lyrae stars about the mean PL regression line.

Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Monson, Andy; Eric Persson, S.; Rich, Jeff A. Jr.; Scowcroft, Victoria; Seibert, Mark [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hoffman, Douglas, E-mail: barry@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: jak@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: amonson@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: persson@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: jrich@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: vs@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center 770 South Wilson, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

483

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

485

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

487

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

488

Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wire for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites will be discussed. 20 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Titran, R.H.; Stephens, J.R.; Petrasek, D.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Genome-Assisted Analysis of Dissimilatory Metal-Reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whole genome sequence for Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens has provided numerous new biological insights into the function of these model dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Many of the discoveries, including the identification of a high number of c-type cytochromes in both organisms, have been the result of comparative genomic analyses including several that were experimentally confirmed. Genome sequence has also aided the identification of genes important for the reduction of metal ions and other electron acceptors utilized by these organisms during anaerobic growth by facilitating the identification of genes disrupted by random insertions. Technologies for assaying global expression patterns for genes (mRNA) and proteins have also been enabled by the availability of genome sequence but their application has been limited mainly to the analysis of the role of global regulatory genes and to identifying genes expressed or repressed in response to specific electron acceptors. It is anticipated that details regarding the mechanisms of metal ion respiration, and metabolism in general, will eventually be revealed by comprehensive, systems-level analyses enabled by functional genomic analyses.

Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States); Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Clamshell closure for metal drum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Closure ring to retain a lid in contact with a metal drum in central C-section conforming to the contact area between a lid and the rim of a drum and further having a radially inwardly directed flange and a vertically downwardly directed flange attached to the opposite ends of the C-section. The additional flanges reinforce the top of the drum by reducing deformation when the drum is dropped and maintain the lid in contact with the drum. The invention is particularly valuable in transportation and storage of fissile material.

Blanton, Paul S

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

493

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF.sub.4 and HNO.sub.3 and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200.degree. C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

Sturcken, Edward F. (P.O. Box 900, Isle of Palms, SC 29451)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubeyChallengeMetal & Alloy Services

495

Sandia National Laboratories: Compass Metals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMappingCombustionBiofuelsCompass Metals

496

Volume 67, Numbers 1 & 2 (Complete)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. brown, wesleyan university. This is an important book. It is the culmination of years of work by one of the leading historians of early modern Italy. Anyone interested in the culture and society of Renaissance Florence and of urban development... the capital 2 seventeenth-century news of Italy and yet again the site of major urban changes. What then are some of the major transformations Litchfield ob- serves in the social geography of the city in the period under central consideration? Changes...

Dickson, Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

Peng, Yu-Min (Hsinchu, TW); Wang, Jih-Wen (Hsinchu, TW); Liue, Chun-Ying (Tau-Yung, TW); Yeh, Shinn-Horng (Kaohsiung, TW)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters and Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research in this area since October 2007 has resulted in seven completed publications and more papers of the completed work are in progress. Our work during this period principally focused on actinide complexes with secondary emphasis on spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of metal complexes. As the publications are available online with all of the details of the results, tables and figures, we are providing here only a brief summary of major highlights, in each of the categories.

Balasubramanian, K

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

499

Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985.

Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Contour forming of metals by laser peening  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z