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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

2

Torsion-Adding and Asymptotic Winding Number for Periodic Window Sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In parameter space of nonlinear dynamical systems, windows of periodic states are aligned following routes of period-adding configuring periodic window sequences. In state space of driven nonlinear oscillators, we determine the torsion associated with the periodic states and identify regions of uniform torsion in the window sequences. Moreover, we find that the measured of torsion differs by a constant between successive windows in periodic window sequences. We call this phenomenon as torsion-adding. Finally, combining the torsion and the period adding rules, we deduce a general rule to obtain the asymptotic winding number in the accumulation limit of such periodic window sequences.

E. S. Medeiros; R. O. Medrano-T; I. L. Caldas; S. L. T. De Souza

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

Catalytic effects of period iv transition metal in the oxidation of biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??CATALYTIC EFFECTS OF PERIOD IV TRANSITION METALS IN THE OXIDATION OF BIODIESEL BRADLEY R CLARK December 2011 Advisors: Dr. Steve Salley, Dr. Simon Ng, Dr.… (more)

Clark, Bradley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

5

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B: Zip Code - Secure File Transfer option available at: - - - - Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Email address: Oil & Gas Survey U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 1. Total Acquisitions (Enter the total volume of foreign crude oil acquired during the report month for importation into the United States. This is the sum of column (l), Part III, excluding resubmission.) 2. Offshore Inventories (Enter the total volume of foreign oil owned by the firm, for eventual importation into the United States which is held in storage outside the United States and/or is enroute to the United States as of the

6

PHS 398 Modular Budget, Periods 1 and 2 OMB Number: 0925-0001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Period 41,665.00$ * Section A, Total Direct Costs for Entire Project Period 1,091,665.00 * Section B, Total Indirect Costs for Entire Project Period 506,000.00 * Section C, Total Direct and Indirect Costs (A+B) for Entire Project Period 1,597,665.00 Funds Requested ($) 307,333.00C. Total Direct

Bandettini, Peter A.

7

Periodic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

04 04 by C.G. Wohl (LBNL). Adapted from the Commission of Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances, "Atomic Weights of the Elements 1995," Pure and Applied Chemistry 68, 2339 (1996), and G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra, "The 1993 Mass Evaluation," Nucl. Phys. A565, 1 (1993). The atomic number (top left) is the number of protons in the nucleus. The atomic mass (bottom) is weighted by isotopic abundances in the Earth's surface. For a new determination of atomic masses, not weighted by abundances, see G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003). Atomic masses are relative to the mass of the carbon-12 isotope, defined to be exactly 12 unified atomic mass units (u). Errors range from 1 to 9 in the last digit quoted. Relative isotopic abundances often vary considerably, both in natural and commercial samples. A number in parentheses is the mass of the longest-lived

8

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

9

Formation of periodic structures upon laser ablation of metal targets in liquids  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on the formation of ordered microstructures produced upon ablation of metal targets in liquids irradiated by a copper vapour laser or a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are presented. The structures were obtained on brass, bronze, copper, and tungsten substrates immersed in distilled water or ethanol. As a result of multiple-pulse laser ablation by a scanning beam, ordered microcones with pointed vertexes are formed on the target surface. The structures are separated by deep narrow channels. The structure period was experimentally shown to increase linearly with diameter of the laser spot on the target surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Metals and ceramics division materials science program annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research progress is summarized concerning the structure of metals; deformation and mechanical properties; physical properties and transport phenomena; radiation effects; and engineering materials.

McHargue, C.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Periodic Properties of Force Constants of Small Transition-Metal and Lanthanide Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CASI), The City College of New York, Convent Ave. at 138th Street, New York, New York 10031 Received from the extensive knowledge we have about the physical properties of both atoms and metallic crystals. The relationship between atomic and metallic properties can be probed by following the attributes of clusters

Lombardi, John R.

12

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

Brogden, I. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The effect of metallicity on the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation from a Baade-Wesselink analysis of Cepheids in the Galaxy and in the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(ABRIDGED) We have applied the near-IR Barnes-Evans realization of the Baade-Wesselink method as calibrated by Fouque & Gieren (1997) to five metal-poor Cepheids with periods between 13 and 17 days in the Small Magellanic Cloud as well as to a sample of 34 Galactic Cepheids to determine the effect of metallicity on the period-luminosity (P-L) relation. For ten of the Galactic Cepheids we present new accurate and well sampled radial-velocity curves. The Baade-Wesselink analysis provides accurate individual distances and luminosities to the Cepheids in the two samples, allowing us to constrain directly, in a purely differential way, the metallicity effect on the Cepheid P-L relation. For the Galactic Cepheids we provide a new set of P-L relations which have zero-points in excellent agreement with astrometric and interferometric determinations. These relations can be used directly for the determination of distances to solar-metallicity samples of Cepheids in distant galaxies, circumventing any corrections for metallicity effects on the zero-point and slope of the P-L relation. We find evidence for both such metallicity effects in our data. Comparing our two samples of Cepheids at a mean period of about 15 days, we find a weak effect of metallicity on the luminosity similar to that adopted by the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale.

Jesper Storm; Bruce W. Carney; Wolfgang P. Gieren; Pascal Fouque; David W. Latham; Anne M. Fry

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

Busy period, time of the first loss of a customer and the number of customers in $ M^{\\varkappa}|G^{\\delta}|1|B$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-sided exit problem is solved for a difference of a compound Poisson process and a compound renewal process. More precisely, the Laplace transforms of the joint distribution of the first exit time, the value of the overshoot and the value of a linear component at this instant are found. Further, we study the process reflected in its supremum. We determine the main two-boundary characteristics of the process reflected in its supremum. These results are then applied for studying the $ M^{\\varkappa}|G^{\\delta}|1|B$ system. We derive the distribution of a busy period and the numbers of customers in the system in transient and stationary regimes. The advantage is that these results are in a closed form, in terms of resolvent sequences of the process.

Kadankova, Tetyana; Veraverbeke, Noel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

19

HIGH-TEMPERATURE LIQUID-METAL TECHNOLOGY REVIEW. A Bimonthly Technical Progress Review. Volume 1, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

Metals ---technology of high-temperature liquid, review; Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP-2) ---coolant boiling research for; Nuclear Power Plants ---development research on thermionic, Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiments ---fuel element analysis; Heat Transfer Systems ---conference on liquid metal; Bearings --coating for liquid metal, performance of; Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP-8) ---component development; Sodium---heat transfer research on; Mercury --heat transfer research on; Potassium ---heat transfer research on; Nitrogen Systems ---Hg --N, flow characteristics for two-phase; Mercury Systems ---Hg --N, flow characteristics for two-phase; Nuclear Power Plants ---heat transfer rejection by space, research on; Alkali Metals ---heat transfer research on; Turbines ---development of twostage potassium; Bearings --- development of liquid-metal lubricated; Niobium Alloys ---properties for alkali metal containment, research on; Rubidium ---thermophysical properties of; Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiments ---design of LAMPRE-1. (D.C.W.)

Dwyer, O.E. ed.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

22

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

23

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

24

Metallization for Self Aligned Technology: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-295  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this CRADA NREL will modify/develop metallization inks that are compatible with 1366 Technologies technology. Various methods of deposition will be used to apply the inks to the textured silicon substrates. The goal of the project is to minimize the contact resistance while maximizing the cell efficiency.

Ginley, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

van Hest, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Modeling the Noble Metal/TiO2 (110) Interface with Hybrid DFT Functionals: A Periodic Electrostatic Embedded Cluster Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of Aun and Ptn (n=2,3) clusters with the stoichiometric and partially reduced rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces has been investigated using periodic slab and periodic electrostatic embedded cluster models. Compared to Au clusters, Pt clusters interact strongly with both stoichiometric and reduced TiO2 (110) surfaces and are able to enhance the reducibility of the TiO2 (110) surface, i.e., reduce the oxygen vacancy formation energy. The focus of this study is the effect of Hartree–Fock exchange on the description of the strength of chemical bonds at the interface of Au/Pt clusters and the TiO2 (110) surface. Hartree–Fock exchange helps describing the changes in the electronic structures due to metal cluster adsorption as well as their effect on the reducibility of the TiO2 surface. Finally, the performance of periodic embedded cluster models has been assessed by calculating the Pt adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies. Cluster models, together with hybrid PBE0 functional, are able to efficiently compute reasonable electronic structures of the reduced TiO2 surface and predict charge localization at surface oxygen vacancies, in agreement with the experimental data, that significantly affect computed adsorption and reaction energies.

Ammal, Salai Cheettu; Heyden, Andreas

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

1995-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III: Results for the 2002--2007 data-taking period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in Dec. 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. We give here the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in Dec. 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through Dec. 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4 (+3.1)(-3.0) (stat) (+2.6)(-2.8) (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 +/- 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced 37Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior 51Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87 +/- 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63-66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be (6.0 +/- 0.8) x 10^(10)/(cm^2 s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

SAGE Collaboration; J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. V. Gorbachev; P. P. Gurkina; T. V. Ibragimova; A. V. Kalikhov; N. G. Khairnasov; T. V. Knodel; I. N. Mirmov; A. A. Shikhin; E. P. Veretenkin; V. E. Yants; G. T. Zatsepin; T. J. Bowles; S. R. Elliott; W. A. Teasdale; J. S. Nico; B. T. Cleveland; J. F. Wilkerson

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

KPA Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

30

A genetic approach to improved semi-solid forming of metals. Final report for period September 4, 1999 - March 4, 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lack of technology for the production of large inexpensive feedstock, with uniform spherical primary phase throughout as required for semi-solid forming, has restricted realization of the full potential for the semi-solid forming process. Furthermore narrow process windows and alloy chemistry restrictions increase process costs and limit performance attributes possible with existing semi-metal systems. Successful semi-solid forming trials utilizing Chesapeake Composites Corporation's DSC{sup TM} Metals for feedstock indicate that this represents a generic approach to providing a permanent highly uniform, spherical solid phase, without electromagnetic or mechanical shearing. This approach also provides for further growth of semi-solid forming by providing for: low cost large diameter billet stock, reduced semi-solid forming costs, extension of semi-solid forming to new alloy systems, and semi-solid formed components with substantially enhanced physical and mechanical properties.

Klier, Eric M.

2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

32

KELT-6b: A P~7.9 d Hot Saturn Transiting a Metal-Poor Star with a Long-Period Companion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly-inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was confirmed using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V=10.38 host star (TYC 2532-556-1) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T_eff=6102 \\pm 43 K, log(g_*)=4.07_{-0.07}^{+0.04} and [Fe/H]=-0.28 \\pm 0.04, with an inferred mass M_*=1.09 \\pm 0.04 M_sun and radius R_*=1.58_{-0.09}^{+0.16} R_sun. The planetary companion has mass M_p=0.43 \\pm 0.05 M_Jup, radius R_p=1.19_{-0.08}^{+0.13} R_Jup, surface gravity log(g_p)=2.86_{-0.08}^{+0.06}, and density rho_p=0.31_{-0.08}^{+0.07} g cm^{-3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a=0.079 \\pm 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22_{-0.10}^{+0.12}, which is rough...

Collins, Karen A; Beatty, Thomas G; Siverd, Robert J; Gaudi, B Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Kielkopf, John F; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Fischer, Debra A; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W; Fulton, Benjamin J; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A; Jensen, Eric L N; Stassun, Keivan G; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R; Hinkley, Sasha; Street, Rachel A; Cargile, Phillip; Mack, Claude E; Oberst, Thomas E; Avril, Ryan L; Mellon, Samuel N; McLeod, Kim K; Penny, Matthew T; Stefanik, Robert P; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L; Mao, Qingqing; Richert, Alexander J W; DePoy, Darren L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer L; Oelkers, Ryan J; Pogge, Richard W; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

Steven R. Billingsley

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

JOB NUMBER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

35

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

36

Glossary Term - Atomic Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Previous Term (Alpha Particle) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Avogadro's Number) Avogadro's Number Atomic Number Silver's atomic number is 47 The atomic number is equal to...

37

Site: Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Name: Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Contract Period: Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Performance Period Fee Available Total Fee Paid...

38

Glossary Term - Avogadro's Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Previous Term (Atomic Number) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Beta Decay) Beta Decay Avogadro's Number Avogadro's number is the number of particles in one mole of a...

39

Metal Aminoboranes  

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be ...

40

Undergraduate Catalog Phone Numbers & Address  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interest Research Exemption Programs 11 ReglsJrationPeriod III 6 Group (WashPIRG) 14 Faculty Number 9 State NaUonal Guard ' . , Full-Time Student Requirements __'_ 9 Service and Research Credit 10 Tuition notice. All announcements in the Time Schedule are subject to change without notice and do not constitute

Kelly, Scott David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Active period Sleep period Active period Sleep period Fig. 1. Sleep-awake cycles of SMAC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cycle Active period Sleep period Active period Sleep period SYNC usage DATA usage time Fig. 1 Yang and Wendi Heinzelman Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester duty cycles. Since a smaller duty cycle leads to a longer network lifetime but lower throughput

Heinzelman, Wendi

42

Assessment of heavy metal contamination of roadside soils in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2008 ... heavy metals was found using factor analysis. Keywords Heavy metals Á Roadside soils Á. Transportation period Á Contamination index Á.

43

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

44

Structural Effects on Trends in the Deposition and Dissolution of Metal-Supported Metal Adstructures  

SciTech Connect

A simple thermodynamic formalism is combined with Density Functional Theory calculations to determine periodic trends in the reversible deposition/dissolution potentials of admetals on a variety of transition metal substrates. For each admetal/substrate combination (81 in total), the deposition/ dissolution potential shift (referenced to the corresponding potential of the admetal in its bulk, elemental form) is calculated for isolated adatoms, for dimers, and for more extended kink structures. Clear periodic trends are found for the potential shifts across the space of different admetals and substrates. In addition, for the significant majority of these admetal/substrate systems, the structural effects are found to be a strong function of the local coordination number of the metal atoms, thereby verifying an important assumption that has been widely used in semiempirical models of deposition and dissolution.

Greeley, Jeffrey P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Structural effects on trends in the deposition and dissolution of metal-supported metal adstructures.  

SciTech Connect

A simple thermodynamic formalism is combined with Density Functional Theory calculations to determine periodic trends in the reversible deposition/dissolution potentials of admetals on a variety of transition metal substrates. For each admetal/substrate combination (81 in total), the deposition/dissolution potential shift (referenced to the corresponding potential of the admetal in its bulk, elemental form) is calculated for isolated adatoms, for dimers, and for more extended kink structures. Clear periodic trends are found for the potential shifts across the space of different admetals and substrates. In addition, for the significant majority of these admetal/substrate systems, the structural effects are found to be a strong function of the local coordination number of the metal atoms, thereby verifying an important assumption that has been widely used in semiempirical models of deposition and dissolution.

Greeley, J.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Gaussian random number generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid generation of high quality Gaussian random numbers is a key capability for simulations across a wide range of disciplines. Advances in computing have brought the power to conduct simulations with very large numbers of random numbers and with it, ... Keywords: Gaussian, Random numbers, normal, simulation

David B. Thomas; Wayne Luk; Philip H.W. Leong; John D. Villasenor

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

48

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

y). Irradiated pre-hydrided metallic materials will generate baseline data to benchmark hot-cell testing of high-burnup used fuel cladding at relatively low cost, and more...

49

Stochastic Low Reynolds Number Swimmers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As technological advances allow us to fabricate smaller autonomous self-propelled devices, it is clear that at some point directed propulsion could not come from pre-specified deterministic periodic deformation of the swimmer's body and we need to develop strategies to extract a net directed motion from a series of random transitions in the conformation space of the swimmer. We present a theoretical formulation to describe the "stochastic motor" that drives the motion of low Reynolds number swimmers based on this concept, and use it to study the propulsion of a simple low Reynolds number swimmer, namely, the three-sphere swimmer model. When the detailed-balanced is broken and the motor is driven out of equilibrium, it can propel the swimmer in the required direction. The formulation can be used to study optimal design strategies for molecular-scale low Reynolds number swimmers.

Ramin Golestanian; Armand Ajdari

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

51

DOE/ID-Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of providing the power required for acceleration. Also, the battery's ability to accept energy from regenerative braking decreased significantly during the operating period....

52

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

53

Quantum Random Number Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... trusted beacon of random numbers. You could conduct secure auctions, or certify randomized audits of data. One of the most ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Budget Period 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Budget Period 1 Budget Period 1 Budget Period 2 Budget Period 3 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% PMC123.1 - Budget Justification for SF 424A Budget 0 Additional Explanations/Comments (as necessary) *IMPORTANT: In the space provided below (or as an attachment) provide a complete explanation and the full calculations used to derive the total indirect costs. If the total indirect costs are a cumulative amount of more than one calculation or rate application, the explanation and calculations should identify all rates used, along with the base they were applied to (and how the base was derived), and a total for each (along with grand total). The rates and how they are applied should not be averaged to get one indirect cost percentage. NOTE: The indirect rate should be applied to both the Federal Share and Recipient Cost Share.

56

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

three broad categories. Once-Through - Nuclear fuel makes a single pass through a reactor after which the used fuel is removed, stored for some period of time, and then...

57

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

58

Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

59

Periodic load balancing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiprocessor load balancing aims to improve performance by moving jobs from highly loaded processors to more lightly loaded processors. Some schemes allow only migration of new jobs upon arrival, while other schemes allow migration of ... Keywords: heavy traffic diffusion approximations, load balancing, periodic load balancing, reflected Brownian motion, resource sharing, transient behavior

Gísli Hjálmtýsson; Ward Whitt

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermodynamics and kinetics of ceramic/metal interfacial interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ceramic/metal interfaces occur in a great number of important applications, such as ceramic/metal composites, microelectronics packaging, ceramic/metal seals, and so forth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such ...

Arróyave, Raymundo, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Number | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number More Documents & Publications Analysis of Open Office of Inspector General Recommendations, OAS-L-08-07 Policy and International Affairs (WFP) Open Government Plan 2.0...

62

Expected Frobenius numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that for large instances the order of magnitude of the expected Frobenius number is (up to a constant depending only on the dimension) given by its lower bound.

Aliev, Iskander; Hinrichs, Aicke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effective Rate Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

64

Report number codes  

SciTech Connect

This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

66

Using Fractional Numbers of . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the design parameters in closed queueing networks is Np, the number of customers of class p. It has been assumed that Np must be an integer. However, integer choices will usually not achieve the target throughput for each class simultaneously. We use Mean Value Analysis with the Schweitzer-Bard approximation and nonlinear programming to determine the value of Np needed to achieve the production targets exactly, although the values of Np may be fractional. We interpret these values to represent the average number of customers of each class in the network. We implement a control rule to achieve these averages and verify our approach through simulation.

Rajan Suri; Rahul Shinde; Mary Vernon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative processes; Anode design and operation; Cell fundamentals and ... Hot-rolling technologies; Deformation of materials; Primary metal production.

68

A number of organizations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buying power to purchase green power. The city of Chicago has formed an alliance with 47 other local installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green to competition, the city of Chicago and 47 other local government agencies formed the Local Government Power

69

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

70

Disjunctive Rado numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If L1 and L2 are linear equations, then the disjunctive Rado number of the set {L1, L2} is the least integer n, provided that it exists, such that for every 2-coloring of ... Keywords: Rado, Ramsey, Schur, disjunctive

Brenda Johnson; Daniel Schaal

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

On occult period maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the "occult" period maps into ball quotients which exist for the moduli spaces of cubic surfaces, cubic threefolds, non-hyperelliptic curves of genus three and four. These were constructed in the work of Allcock/Carlson/Toledo, Looijenga/Swierstra, and Kondo. We interpret these maps as morphisms into moduli spaces of polarized abelian varieties of Picard type, and show that these morphisms, whose initial construction is transcendental, are defined over the natural field of definition of the spaces involved. This paper is extracted from section 15 of our paper arXiv:0912.3758, and differs from it only in some points of exposition.

Kudla, Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers...

73

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential...

74

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers...

75

Design of periodic beam-transport systems  

SciTech Connect

Periodic beam-transport systems have several advantages including insensitivity to errors, minimum magnet apertures, and use of standardized components. A simple procedure is given for the design of modules, with and without bending magnets, that have the same matched beam properties. These modules can be combined in certain ways to produce systems that are achromatic and require a minimum number of matching elements.

Farrell, J.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

77

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

78

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

79

Finite Neutrosophic Complex Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this book for the first time the authors introduce the notion of real neutrosophic complex numbers. Further the new notion of finite complex modulo integers is defined. For every $C(Z_n)$ the complex modulo integer $i_F$ is such that $2F_i = n - 1$. Several algebraic structures on $C(Z_n)$ are introduced and studied. Further the notion of complex neutrosophic modulo integers is introduced. Vector spaces and linear algebras are constructed using these neutrosophic complex modulo integers.

W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Advances in the Extractive Metallurgy of Selected Rare and Precious Metals" ( 1991 Review of Extractive Metallurgy), J.E. Hoffmann, April 1991, pp. 18-23.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

METAL COATING BATHS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

Robinson, J.W.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

83

KPA Activity Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

84

Quantum phase transitions in the quasi-periodic kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a microscopic theory of transport in quasi-periodically driven environments (`kicked rotors'), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of Planck's constant $\\tilde h$: for irrational values of $\\tilde h/(4\\pi)$ they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we derive the microscopic theory of the ensuing localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a `super-metal'. Signatures of the corresponding metal/super-metal transition are discussed.

Chushun Tian; Alexander Altland; Markus Garst

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

86

Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

87

Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

88

California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

89

California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

90

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

91

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

92

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

93

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

94

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

95

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

96

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

97

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

98

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

99

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

100

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

102

Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

103

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

104

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

105

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

106

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

107

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

108

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

109

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

110

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

111

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

112

Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

113

Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

114

Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

115

Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

116

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

117

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

118

Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

119

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

120

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

122

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

123

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

124

Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

125

Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

126

Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

127

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

128

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

129

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

130

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

131

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

132

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

133

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

134

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

135

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

136

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

137

Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

138

Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

139

An Alternate Graphical Representation of Periodic table of Chemical Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodic table of chemical elements symbolizes an elegant graphical representation of symmetry at atomic level and provides an overview on arrangement of electrons. It started merely as tabular representation of chemical elements, later got strengthened with quantum mechanical description of atomic structure and recent studies have revealed that periodic table can be formulated using SO(4,2)* SU(2) group. IUPAC, the governing body in Chemistry, doesn't approve any periodic table as a standard periodic table. The only specific recommendation provided by IUPAC is that the periodic table should follow the 1 to 18 group numbering. In this technical paper, we describe a new graphical representation of periodic table, referred as 'Circular form of Periodic table'. The advantages of circular form of periodic table over other representations are discussed along with a brief discussion on history of periodic tables.

Mohd Abubakr

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

About the logic of the prime number distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two basic number sequences which play a major role in the prime number distribution. The first Number Sequence SQ1 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+5 and the second Number Sequence SQ2 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+1. All existing prime numbers seem to be contained in these two number sequences, except of the prime numbers 2 and 3. Riemanns Zeta Function also seems to indicate, that there is a logical connection between the mentioned number sequences and the distribution of prime numbers. This connection is indicated by lines in the diagram of the Zeta Function, which are formed by the points s where the Zeta Function is real. Another key role in the distribution of the prime numbers plays the number 5 and its periodic occurrence in the two number sequences SQ1 and SQ2. All non-prime numbers in SQ1 and SQ2 are caused by recurrences of these two number sequences with increasing wave-lengths in themselves, in a similar fashion as Overtones (harmonics) or Undertones derive from a fundamental frequency. On the contrary prime numbers represent spots in these two basic Number Sequences SQ1 and SQ2 where there is no interference caused by these recurring number sequences. The distribution of the non-prime numbers and prime numbers can be described in a graphical way with a -Wave Model- (or Interference Model) -- see Table 2.

Harry K. Hahn

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

142

Periodicity estimation of Dynamic Textures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Textures (DTs) are image sequences of natural events like fire, smoke, water etc., that possesses regular motion patterns. Periodicity is a widely used tool to analyse regular structures of periodic one dimensional signals as well as two dimensional ... Keywords: co-occurrence matrix, dynamic textures, image sequences, image texture analysis, motion patterns, natural events, periodicity estimation, temporal textures

Khalid Zaman Bijon; Ahmed Hasan; Ashfaqur Rahman; Manzur Murshed

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Number: 305 Most Dangerous Vehicles ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... top> Number: 314 Marine Vegetation Description: Commercial harvesting of marine vegetation such as algae, seaweed and ...

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Periodic surface modeling for computer aided nano design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current solid and surface modeling methods based on Euclidean geometry in traditional computer aided design are not efficient in constructing a large number of atoms and particles. In this paper, we propose a periodic surface model for computer aided ... Keywords: Computer aided nano design, Hyperbolic geometry, Minimal surface, Periodic surface

Yan Wang

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coupling light to periodic nanostructures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes coupling of light to periodic structures. A material is patterned with a regular pattern on a length scale comparable to the wavelength… (more)

Driessen, Eduard Frans Clemens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

CHANGE OF NAME TIAA Annuity Number CREF Annuity Number TIAA Policy Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHANGE OF NAME TIAA Annuity Number CREF Annuity Number TIAA Policy Number Social Security Number and only use black or dark blue ink. Return this form to: TIAA-CREF P.O. Box 1264 Charlotte, NC 28201 NOTE City State Zip Code For TIAA-CREF USE ONLY Accepted -- Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association

Snider, Barry B.

147

Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

148

Discontinuous bifurcations of periodic solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of bifurcations of periodic solutions in discontinuous systems. It is explained how jumps in the fundamental solution matrix lead to jumps of the Floquet multipliers of periodic solutions. A Floquet multiplier of ... Keywords: Bifurcation, Discontinuous, Dry friction, Stick-slip

R. I. Leine; D. H. Van Campen

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Distribution of Ramsey Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the number of integers in the interval [0,x] that are non-trivial Ramsey numbers r(k,n) (3 order of magnitude (x ln x)**(1/2).

Clark, Lane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Number: 1394 Description: In what ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1752 Description: When was the Oklahoma City bombing? ... name of the plane that dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima? ...

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG); Young, Albert C. (Flushing, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

PERIODIC MOTION IN HIGH-SYMMETRIC FLOW Lennaert van Veen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is supplied by fixing the smallest wave number components of velocity. The smallest wave number corresponding to a nonzero velocity component is kf = |kf | = 11 and the energy of these fixed components is Ef = 3PERIODIC MOTION IN HIGH-SYMMETRIC FLOW Lennaert van Veen Department of Mechanical Engineering

van Veen, Lennaert

155

RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.JIJE)!)(- .JIJE)!)(- -- I. Project Title: CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company - Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring for the evaluation of beryllium to other naturally occurring metals on and near the Hanford Site, September 2012 to September 2013. II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions ·e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) will conduct site characterization and environmental monitoring on and near the Hanford Site beginning last quarter of FY12 and continuing into FY13. PRC will perform all activities in accordance with the categorical exclusion (CX) limitations set forth in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A & B to Subpart D, and ex

156

Jordan cells of periodic loop models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan cells in transfer matrices of finite lattice models are a signature of the logarithmic character of the conformal field theories that appear in their thermodynamical limit. The transfer matrix of periodic loop models, T_N, is an element of the periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra EPTL_N(\\beta, \\alpha), where N is the number of sites on a section of the cylinder, and \\beta = -(q+1/q) = 2 \\cos \\lambda and \\alpha the weights of contractible and non-contractible loops. The thermodynamic limit of T_N is believed to describe a conformal field theory of central charge c=1-6\\lambda^2/(\\pi(\\lambda-\\pi)). The abstract element T_N acts naturally on (a sum of) spaces V_N^d, similar to those upon which the standard modules of the (classical) Temperley-Lieb algebra act. These spaces known as sectors are labeled by the numbers of defects d and depend on a {\\em twist parameter} v that keeps track of the winding of defects around the cylinder. Criteria are given for non-trivial Jordan cells of T_N both between sectors with distinct defect numbers and within a given sector.

Alexi Morin-Duchesne; Yvan Saint-Aubin

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermostat Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...A thermostat metal is a composite material (usually in the form of sheet or strip) that consists of two or more materials bonded together, of which one can be a nonmetal. Because the materials bonded together to form the composite differ in

158

METAL COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

Seybolt, A.U.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Physical Model Explaining the Periodic Pattern of the Chemical Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental organizing principle resulting in the periodic table is the nuclear charge. Arranging the chemical elements in an increasing atomic number order, a symmetry pattern known as the Periodic Table is detectable. The correlation between nuclear charge and the Periodic System of the Chemical Elements (PSCE) indicates that the symmetry emerges from the nucleus. Nuclear symmetry can only be developed if the positions of the nucleons are preserved. Thus the phase of the nucleus must be solid where the positions of the nucleons are preserved in a lattice. A lattice model, representing the protons and the neutrons by equal spheres and arranging them alternately in a face centered cubic structure forming a double tetrahedron, is able to reproduce all of the properties of the nucleus including the quantum numbers and the periodicity of the elements. Using this nuclear structure model, an attempt is made here to give a physical explanation for the periodicity of the chemical elements.

Jozsef Garai

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Correlated magnetic reversal in periodic stripe patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetization reversal in a periodic magnetic stripe array has been studied with a combination of direct and reciprocal space methods: Kerr microscopy and polarized neutron scattering. Kerr images show that during magnetization reversal over a considerable magnetic-field range a ripple domain state occurs in the stripes with magnetization components perpendicular to the stripes. Quantitative analysis of polarized neutron specular reflection, Bragg diffraction, and off-specular diffuse scattering provides a detailed picture of the mean magnetization direction in the ripple domains as well as longitudinal and transverse fluctuations, and reveals a strong correlation of those components over a number of stripes.

Theis-Broehl, Katharina; Toperverg, Boris P.; Leiner, Vincent; Westphalen, Andreas; Zabel, Hartmut; McCord, Jeffrey; Rott, Karsten; Brueckl, Hubert [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01169 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University Bielefeld, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

162

Metallic Glasses for Electro-Catalytic Applications - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by these characteristics, we have explored the use of a number of metallic glasses as electro-catalysts in direct alcohol fuel cells. We demonstrate that ...

163

The Periodic Table of Elements C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Chemical Symbol Atomic Weight Chemical Name = Solid at room temperature = Liquid at room temperature = Gas at room temperature = Radioactive = Artificially Made KEY METALS NON-METALS 12.011 http://education.jlab.org/ Last revised on April 3, 2013 [294] H Li Na K Be Mg Ca Sc Ti Rb Cs Fr Sr Y Ba Ra Zr Hf Rf V Nb Ta Db Cr Mo W Sg Mn Tc Re Bh Fe Ru Os Hs Co Rh Ir Mt Ni Pd Pt Ds Cu Ag Au Rg Zn Cd Hg Cn Ga In Tl Uut Ge Sn Pb Fl As Sb Bi Uup Se Te Po Lv Br I At Uus Kr Xe Rn Uuo La Ac Ce Th Pr Pa Nd U Pm Np Sm Pu Eu Am Gd Cm Tb Bk Dy Cf Ho Es Er Fm Tm Md Yb Yb No Lu Lr B Al C Si N P O S F Cl Ne He Ar HYDROGEN LITHIUM SODIUM POTASSIUM BERYLLIUM MAGNESIUM CALCIUM SCANDIUM TITANIUM RUBIDIUM CESIUM FRANCIUM STRONTIUM YTTRIUM BARIUM RADIUM ZIRCONIUM HAFNIUM RUTHERFORDIUM VANADIUM NIOBIUM TANTALUM DUBNIUM CHROMIUM MOLYBDENUM TUNGSTEN SEABORGIUM MANGANESE TECHNETIUM RHENIUM BOHRIUM IRON RUTHENIUM OSMIUM HASSIUM

164

The Periodic Table of Elements C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.011 .011 Atomic Number Chemical Symbol Atomic Weight Chemical Name = Solid at room temperature = Liquid at room temperature = Gas at room temperature = Radioactive = Artificially Made KEY METALS NON-METALS http://education.jlab.org/ Last revised on April 3, 2013 [294] H Li Na K Be Mg Ca Sc Ti Rb Cs Fr Sr Y Ba Ra Zr Hf Rf V Nb Ta Db Cr Mo W Sg Mn Tc Re Bh Fe Ru Os Hs Co Rh Ir Mt Ni Pd Pt Ds Cu Ag Au Rg Zn Cd Hg Cn Ga In Tl Uut Ge Sn Pb Fl As Sb Bi Uup Se Te Po Lv Br I At Uus Kr Xe Rn Uuo La Ac Ce Th Pr Pa Nd U Pm Np Sm Pu Eu Am Gd Cm Tb Bk Dy Cf Ho Es Er Fm Tm Md Yb Yb No Lu Lr B Al C Si N P O S F Cl Ne He Ar HYDROGEN LITHIUM SODIUM POTASSIUM BERYLLIUM MAGNESIUM CALCIUM SCANDIUM TITANIUM RUBIDIUM CESIUM FRANCIUM STRONTIUM YTTRIUM BARIUM RADIUM ZIRCONIUM HAFNIUM RUTHERFORDIUM VANADIUM NIOBIUM TANTALUM DUBNIUM CHROMIUM MOLYBDENUM TUNGSTEN SEABORGIUM MANGANESE TECHNETIUM RHENIUM BOHRIUM IRON RUTHENIUM OSMIUM HASSIUM COBALT

165

Energy Conservation in Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Energy Conservation in Metals. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and ...

166

Dynamic virtual credit card numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theft of stored credit card information is an increasing threat to e-commerce.We propose a dynamic virtual credit card number scheme that reduces the damage caused by stolen credit card numbers. A user can use an existing credit card account to generate ... Keywords: credit card theft, e-commerce

Ian Molloy; Jiangtao Li; Ninghui Li

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

Kunnmann, Walter (Stony Brook, NY); Larese, John Z. (Rocky Point, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The discovery of plutonium reorganized the periodic table and aided the discovery of new elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modern Periodic Table derives principally from the work of the great Russian scientist Dimitri Mendeleev, who in 1869 enunciated a 'periodic law' that the properties of the elements are a periodic function of their atomic weights, and arranged the 65 known elements in a 'periodic table'. Fundamentally, every column in the main body of the Periodic Table is a grouping of elements that display similar chemical and physical behavior. Similar properties are therefore exhibited by elements with widely different mass. Chemical periodicity is central to the study of chemistry, and no other generalization comes close to its ability to systematize and rationalize known chemical facts. With the development of atomic theory, and an understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity and the periodic table now find their natural explanation in the electronic structure of atoms. Moving from left to right along any row, the elements are arranged sequentially according to nuclear charge (the atomic number). Electrons counter balance that nuclear charge, hence each successive element has one more electron in its configuration. The electron configuration, or distribution of electrons among atomic orbitals, may be determined by application of the Pauli principle (paired spin in the same orbital) and the aufbau principle (which outlines the order of filling of electrons into shells of orbitals - s, p, d, f, etc.) such that in a given atom, no two electrons may have all four quantum numbers identical. In 1939, only three elements were known to be heavier than actinium: thorium, protactinium, and uranium. All three exhibited variable oxidation states and a complex chemistry. Thorium, protactinium and uranium were assumed to be d-transition metals and were placed in the Periodic Table under hafnium, tantalum, and tungsten, respectively. By 1940, McMillan and Abelson bombarded uranium atoms with slow neutrons and successfully identified atoms of element 93, which they named neptunium after the planet Neptune. This rapidly set the stage for the discovery of the next succeeding element, plutonium (Seaborg, McMillan, Kennedy, and Wahl, 1940), named after the next planet away from the Sun, Pluto. The newly discovered elements were presumed to fit comfortably in the Periodic Table under rhenium and osmium, respectively. However, subsequent tracer chemical experiments showed that neptunium and plutonium were closer in their chemical properties to uranium than their presumed homologues, rhenium and osmium. Spectroscopic evidence also indicated that the new elements were not typical transition elements, but had f-electrons in their valence shell. Thus, several researchers, including McMillan and Wahl, and Zachariasen at Los Alamos, suggested that these elements might be part of a second inner-transition series in which the 5f-electron subshell was being filled. It was not clear, however, where the new series would begin. McMillian had proposed a 'uraninide series' that started with neptunium, but attempts to isolate elements with atomic numbers 95 and 96 based on assumed similarities to uranium were unsuccessful. Both Wahl and Zacharias en had proposed a thoride series that started with protactinium. In 1944, Seaborg proposed that the series started with thorium, and that all of the elements heavier than actinium constituted an 'actinide' series similar to the lanthanides. Because the 5f-shell began filling in the same relative position as the 4f-shell, the electronic configuration of elements in the two series would be similar. Guided by the hypothesis that elements 95 and 96 were homologues of europium and gadolinium, new experiments were designed and the elements were uniquely synthesized and separated from all others. The new elements were subsequently named americium and curium. Seaborg's 'Actinide Concept' thus played a major role in the discovery of the transplutonium elements. It provided the framework that supported synthesis, isolation, and identification of the succeeding actinide elements berkelium through lawrenci

Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

MULTIPLICITY AND PERIOD DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION II FIELD STARS IN SOLAR VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a sample of 223 F, G, and early K metal-poor subdwarfs ([m/H] 0.''2 yr{sup -1}) at distances of up to 250 pc from the Sun. By means of our own speckle interferometric observations conducted on the 6 m Bolshoi Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the spectroscopic and visual data taken from the literature, we determine the frequency of binary and multiple systems in this sample. The ratio of single, binary, triple, and quadruple systems among 221 primary components of the sample is 147:64:9:1. We show that the distribution of orbital periods of binary and multiple subdwarfs is asymmetric in the range of up to P = 10{sup 10} days, and has a maximum at P = 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days, which differs from the distribution, obtained for the thin disk G dwarfs. We estimated the number of undetected companions in our sample. Comparing the frequency of binary subdwarfs in the field and in the globular clusters, we show that the process of halo field star formation by the means of destruction of globular clusters is very unlikely in our Galaxy. We discuss the multiplicity of old metal-poor stars in nearby stellar streams.

Rastegaev, D. A., E-mail: leda@sao.r [Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS, Nizhnij Arkhyz 369167 (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

THE INDUCTION PERIOD IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a plant is illuminated, its rate of photosynthesis is at first low and gradually increases until it becomes constant. This induction period was first observed by Osterhout and Haas (1918) for UIva and independently confirmed by Warburg (1920) with Chlorella. It has

L. Smith

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Stability of Underwater Periodic Locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping. We obtain closed-form solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

Fangxu Jing; Eva Kanso

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Residential

173

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Period doubling route to chaos in Taylor-Green dynamo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform spectral simulations of dynamo for magnetic Prandtl number of one with Taylor-Green forcing. We observe dynamo transition through a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Beyond the transition, the numerical simulations reveal complex dynamo states with windows of constant, periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. For some forcing amplitudes, multiple attractors were obtained for different initial conditions. We show that one of the chaotic windows follows the period-doubling route to chaos.

R. Yadav; M. Chandra; M. K. Verma; S. Paul; P. Wahi

2010-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-supported metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. In this paper, we report a novel method to deposit metal catalysts and metal oxide nanoparticles on two-dimensional graphene sheets to improve the catalytic performance and stability of the catalyst materials. The new synthesis method allows indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals to be directly grown on functionalized graphene sheets forming the ITO-graphene hybrids. Pt nanoparticles are then deposited to form a special triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Both experimental study and periodic density functional theory calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are stable at Pt-ITO-graphene triple junction points. The new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity. The reasons for the high stability and activity of Pt-ITO-graphene are analyzed.

Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chong M.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Park, Seh K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Maslov indices for periodic orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that there is a generalization of the Conley-Zehnder index for periodic trajectories of a classical Hamiltonian system $(Q, \\omega, H)$ from the case $Q = T^*R^n$ to arbitrary symplectic manifolds. As it turns out, it is precisely this index which appears as a Maslov phase in the trace formulas by Gutzwiller and Duistermaat-Guillemin. Contribution presented at the XIX ICGTMP Salamanca June 92.

Meinrenken, E

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Solid polymer battery electrolyte and reactive metal-water battery  

SciTech Connect

In one implementation, a reactive metal-water battery includes an anode comprising a metal in atomic or alloy form selected from the group consisting of periodic table Group 1A metals, periodic table Group 2A metals and mixtures thereof. The battery includes a cathode comprising water. Such also includes a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a polyphosphazene comprising ligands bonded with a phosphazene polymer backbone. The ligands comprise an aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion and a metal ion carrier portion. The metal ion carrier portion is bonded at one location with the polymer backbone and at another location with the aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion. The invention also contemplates such solid polymer electrolytes use in reactive metal/water batteries, and in any other battery.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

MOTOR POOL RESERVATIONS Reservation Number:_______________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOTOR POOL RESERVATIONS Reservation Number:_______________ Evanston campus: Chicago campus: 2020: 312/503-9243 E-mail: motor-pool@northwestern.edu E-mail: motor-pool@northwestern.edu Hours: 8:00 a reservations require the "Organization Authorization for University Vehicles" form to be faxed to Motor Pool

Shull, Kenneth R.

184

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

LONG-TERM PERIODICITY VARIATIONS OF THE SOLAR RADIUS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study the long-term periodicity variations of the solar radius, daily solar radius data from 1978 February to 2000 September at the Calern Observatory are used. Continuous observations of the solar radius are difficult due to the weather, seasonal effects, and instrument characteristics. Thus, to analyze these data, we first use the Dixon criterion to reject suspect values, then we measure the cross-correlation between the solar radius and sunspot numbers. The result indicates that the solar radius is in complete antiphase with the sunspot numbers and shows lead times of 74 months relative to the sunspot numbers. The Lomb-Scargle and date compensated discrete Fourier transform methods are also used to investigate the periodicity of the solar radius. Both methods yield similar significance periodicities around {approx}1 yr, {approx}2.6 yr, {approx}3.6 yr, and {approx}11 yr. Possible mechanisms for these periods are discussed. The possible physical cause of the {approx}11 yr period is the cyclic variation of the magnetic pressure of the concentrated flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone.

Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The correlation of Abiyev's balanced squares with periodic law  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, a perfect algorithm for writing the magic squares has been found by Abiyev. With the help of this algorithm we can write not only magic squares, but also magic cubes from any numbers of any orders. These squares have been called the ... Keywords: algorithm, correlation, magic square, periodic law, sequence, super-heavy

Asker Ali Abiyev

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of each project together with progress photographs and the project manager's estimate of the cost to complete the project. Because the reports contain projected costs and also account for budget risks #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2012 Project Number Project Index

Holsinger, Kent

188

On the Polyharmonic Operator with a Periodic Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we obtain the asymptotic formulas of arbitrary order for the Bloch eigenvalues and Bloch functions of the multidimensional polyharmonic operator with periodic, with respect to arbitrary lattice, potential. Then we prove that the number of gaps in the spectrum of the operator is finite. In particular, we get the proof of the Bethe -Sommerfeld conjecture for arbitrary dimension and arbitrary lattice.

O. A. Veliev

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Climatological Time Series with Periodic Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many climatological time series display a periodic correlation structure. This paper examines three issues encountered when analyzing such time series: detection of periodic correlation, modeling periodic correlation, and trend estimation under ...

Robert Lund; Harry Hurd; Peter Bloomfield; Richard Smith

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of ...

191

Light Metals 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Softcover book: Light Metals 2008 Volume 2: Aluminum Reduction. Hardcover book and CD-ROM: Light Metals 2009 ...

192

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

193

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

194

Principal Metals Online  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Principal Metals Online Topic Summary: Principal Metals inventory database. Created On: 2/9/2007 5:41 AM, Topic View:.

195

Refractory Metals Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Refractory Metals Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Includes all technical aspects of the science of refractory metals and ...

196

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752 Rosslyn, VA 22209

197

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752

198

Property:NumberOfUnits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NumberOfUnits NumberOfUnits Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Subproperties This property has the following 8 subproperties: B Black River Farm Solar Project H Hall's Warehouse Corp Solar Project L Lightning Dock Geothermal Facility S Sacramento Municipal Utility District Solar Array Sacramento Soleil Solar Project Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility Sun Harvest Solar Project W Windy Flats Phase III Pages using the property "NumberOfUnits" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3-D Metals + 1 + A AB Tehachapi Wind Farm + 31 + AFCEE MMR Turbines + 2 + AG Land 1 + 1 + AG Land 2 + 1 + AG Land 3 + 1 + AG Land 4 + 1 + AG Land 5 + 1 + AG Land 6 + 1 + AVTEC + 1 + Adair Wind Farm I + 1 + Adair Wind Farm II + 230 + Adams Wind Project + 12 +

199

Computing with almost periodic functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper develops a method for discrete computational Fourier analysis of functions defined on quasicrystals and other almost periodic sets. A key point is to build the analysis around the emerging theory of quasicrystals and diffraction in the setting on local hulls and dynamical systems. Numerically computed approximations arising in this way are built out of the Fourier module of the quasicrystal in question, and approximate their target functions uniformly on the entire infinite space. The methods are entirely group theoretical, being based on finite groups and their duals, and they are practical and computable. Examples of functions based on the standard Fibonacci quasicrystal serve to illustrate the method (which is applicable to all quasicrystals modeled on the cut and project formalism).

R. V. Moody; M. Nesterenko; J. Patera

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

200

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 I. Project Title: Washington River Protection Solutions & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International- Proposed Actions For CY 2012 Scheduled To Take Place Under CX B3.6, "Small-Scale Research and Development, Laboratory Operations, and Pilot Projects" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) & Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International Inc. (ATL) will perform indoor bench-scale & small-scale research & development projects, conventional laboratory operations, & pilot projects to verify proof- of-concept, on & near the Hanford Site during Calendar Year 2012. WRPS & ATL will perform

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 61 I. Project Title: Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Proposed Actions For CY 2012 Scheduled To Take Place Under CX B2.5, "Facility Safety and Environmental Improvements" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform safety and environmental improvements of a facility, including the replacement/upgrade of facility components on & near the Hanford Site during Calendar Year 2012. WRPS will perform all activities in accordance with the categorical exclusion (CX) limitations set forth in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A & B to Subpart 0, & CX B2.5. WRPS' facilities include all those identified in

202

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 I. Project Title: Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Proposed Actions For CY 2012 Scheduled To Take Place Under CX B1. 22, "Relocation of Buildings" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will relocate buildings on & near the Hanford Site during Calendar Year 2012. WRPS will perform all activities in accordance with the categorical exclusion (CX) limitations set forth in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A & B to Subpart D, & CX B1. 22. WRPS' facilities include all those identified in the Tank Operations Contract Sections J.13 and J.14. Activities would include, but are not

203

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

204

Precious Metals Conversion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precious Metals Conversion Information. The Office of Weights and Measures (OWM) has prepared a Conversion Factors ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Corrosion of valve metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized. (FS)

Draley, J.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

Magel, T.T.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ceramic to metal seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library is a widely used tool for random number generation on high-performance computing platforms. ...

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Gauge Interaction as Periodicity Modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to a geometrical interpretation of gauge invariance in terms of the formalism of field theory in compact space-time dimensions [arXiv:0903.3680]. In this formalism, the kinematic information of an interacting elementary particle is encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary of the theory through local transformations of the underlying space-time coordinates. Therefore, gauge interaction is described as invariance of the theory under local deformations of the boundary, the resulting local variations of field solution are interpreted as internal transformations, and the internal symmetries of the gauge theory turn out to be related to corresponding local space-time symmetries. In the case of local infinitesimal isometric transformations, Maxwell's kinematics and gauge invariance are inferred directly from the variational principle. Furthermore we explicitly impose periodic conditions at the boundary of the theory as semi-classical quantization condition in order to investigate the quantum behavior of gauge interaction. In the abelian case the result is a remarkable formal correspondence with scalar QED.

Donatello Dolce

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Control Measure Title Reference Number *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exhaustive search for emissions reductions to use in meeting federal Clean Air Act requirements for this 2008 PM2.5 Plan. Chapter 6 details the District’s process for developing control measures for reducing emissions of primary PM2.5 and PM2.5 precursors. This Appendix presents the product of this process: a master list of all candidate control measure ideas identified and evaluated for this plan. After assembling Appendix I, the District then screened the candidate measures into several categories: high priority measures to be implemented in the years immediately following plan adoption; measures that might be implemented in future years to allow for expected technology development; and those measures that require further study to identify when they could be implemented and what reductions they could achieve. Candidate control measure descriptions in Appendix I have the following major components:! Title and Number

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

212

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400 $4,871,000 $6,177,902 October 2000 - September 2012 Minimum Fee $0 Fee Available EM Contractor Fee Site: Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Contract Name: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations March 2013 $13,196,690 $9,262,042 $10,064,940 $14,828,770 $12,348,558 $12,204,247 $17,590,414 $17,856,774

213

Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

Koyama, Koichiro (Hyogo, JP); Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Method of boronizing transition-metal surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB/sub 2/, or CrB/sub 2/. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700/sup 0/C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

Koyama, K.; Shimotake, H.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas Summary This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.) PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 28, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension Recycling of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas December 12, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental

216

APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

Milleron, N.

1962-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

220

Network performance measurement with periodic streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo describes a periodic sampling method and relevant metrics for assessing the performance of IP networks. First, the memo motivates periodic sampling and addresses the question of its value as an alternative to the Poisson sampling described ...

V. Raisanen; G. Grotefeld; A. Morton

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

An odd-number limitation of extended time-delayed feedback control in autonomous systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a necessary condition for the successful stabilisation of a periodic orbit using the extended version of time-delayed feedback control. This condition depends on the number of real Floquet multipliers larger than unity and is therefore related to the well-known odd-number limitation in non-autonomous systems. We show that the period of the orbit which is induced by mismatching the delay-time of the control scheme and the period of the uncontrolled orbit plays an important role in the formulation of the odd-number limitation in the autonomous case.

Andreas Amann; Edward W. Hooton

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube (CNT) ... Application of Carbon Nanotubes – Energy to Bioelectronic Sensor.

223

Experimental observation of a complex periodic window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a special periodic window in the two-dimensional parameter space of an experimental Chua's circuit is reported. One of the main reasons that makes such a window special is that the observation of one implies that other similar periodic windows must exist for other parameter values. However, such a window has never been experimentally observed, since its size in parameter space decreases exponentially with the period of the periodic attractor. This property imposes clear limitations for its experimental detection.

D. M. Maranhão; M. S. Baptista; J. C. Sartorelli; I. L. Caldas

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantum Algorithm for Computing the Period Lattice of an Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a quantum algorithm for computing the period lattice of infrastructures of fixed dimension. The algorithm applies to infrastructures that satisfy certain conditions. The latter are always fulfilled for infrastructures obtained from global fields, i.e., algebraic number fields and function fields with finite constant fields, as described in [Fon11]. The first of our main contributions is a rigorous and complete proof that the running time of the algorithm is polynomial in the logarithm of the determinant of the period lattice and exponential in the dimension n. The second main contribution is the determination of an explicit lower bound on the success probability of our algorithm which improves on the bounds given in the works of Hallgren and Schmidt and Vollmer. The exponential scaling seems inevitable because the best currently known methods for carrying out fundamental arithmetic operations in infrastructures obtained from algebraic number fields take exponential time. In contrast, the problem of...

Fontein, Felix

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Why is hydrogen's atomic number 1?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the number of protons in an atom's nucleus. Hydrogen's atomic number is 1 because all hydrogen atoms contain exactly one proton. Author: Steve Gagnon, Science Education Specialist...

227

Reference Number PCR Kit Name Manufacturer Kit ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Reference Number PCR Kit Name Manufacturer Kit Description 1 Profiler Life Technologies AmpFlSTR® Profiler® (Part number 403038) ...

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Renewable Identification Numbers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Identification Numbers RIN Format EPA uses the following format to determine RINs for each physical gallon of

229

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites · Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic ...

230

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic ...

231

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Precision metal rulers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... precision metal rulers. Our customers include state bureaus of Weights and Measures and departments of Agriculture. We also ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fasteners & Metals Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Fasteners & Metals Program. The Fastener Quality Act (FQA), Public Law 101-592, was ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

235

TMS Light Metals Publication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following instructions should be used when submitting a manuscript for any TMS Light Metals proceedings volume. INTRODUCTION. Orientation to ...

236

Refractory Metals 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... TMS Structural Materials Division TMS: Refractory Metals Committee. Organizer( s), Omer Dogan, DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory

237

Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Title Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-49043 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Jonathan L. Slack, Baker Farangis, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Applied Physics Letters Volume 80 Pagination 1349-1351 Call Number LBNL-49043 Abstract Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following reduction cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by co-sputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

238

PRODUCTION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

239

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Number: 894 Description: How far is it ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1198 Description: When was Hiroshima bombed? ... 1264 Description: What is the atomic weight of ...

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Review of PV module performance at DOE/MIT Lincoln Laboratory test sites during the period 1977 to 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the years 1977 to 1982, over 11,000 photovoltaic (PV) modules have been placed at experimental PV power generating systems in a number of field test sites in the United States. Prominent among these are a 100-kW system at Natural Bridges National Monument in Utah, a 25-kWp system at Mead, Nebraska, and a 15-kW system at Bryan, Ohio. Through a program of periodic surveillance, measurements, and inspections at the aforementioned sites, electrically failed modules were located, removed and analyzed during this six-year period. The principal causes of failure were: (1) cells cracked due to weathering or internal module stresses, (2) failed solder joints, (3) interconnects not soldered to rear sides of cells at assembly, (4) cells or interconnects electrically shorted to metallic substrates, and (5) broken or split interconnects. Details and photographs of many of the different types of failures are presented and some of the analysis techniques used to locate the failures are described.

Forman, S E; Themelis, M P

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

Heung, L.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wicks, G.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A simple test for periodic signals in red noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a simple method for testing the significance of peaks in the periodogram of red noise data. The procedure was designed to test for spurious periodicities in X-ray light curves of active galaxies, but can be used quite generally to test for periodic components against a background noise spectrum assumed to have a power law shape. The method provides a simple and fast test of the significance of candidate periodic signals in short, well-sampled time series such as those obtained from XMM-Newton observations of Seyfert galaxies, without the need for Monte Carlo simulations. A full account is made of the number of trials and the uncertainties inherent to the model fitting. Ignoring these subtle effects can lead to substantially overestimated significances. These difficulties motivate us to demand high standards of detection (minimum >99.9 per cent confidence) for periodicities in sources that normally show red noise spectra. The method also provides a simple means to estimate the power spectral index, which may be an interesting parameter itself, regardless of the presence/absence of periodicities.

S. Vaughan

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

Gladysz, John A.

1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

SES Probationary Period | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SES Probationary Period SES Probationary Period SES Probationary Period An individual's initial appointment as an SES career appointee becomes final only after the individual has served a 1-year probationary period as a career appointee. That employee's rating official must perform an assessment of the new SES's performance during the probationary period. After the one year the selecting official must certify that the appointee performed at the level of excellence expected of a senior executive during the probationary period. When a career appointee's executive qualification have been certified by a Qualifications Review Board on the basis of special or unique qualities, as described in Sec. 317.502(c), the probationary assessment must address any executive development activities the agency identified in support of the

246

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, L.T.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Risk-averse periodic preventive maintenance optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We consider a class of periodic preventive maintenance (PM) optimization problems, for a single piece of equipment that deteriorates with time or use, and can… (more)

Singh, Inderjeet,1978-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Relationship of Collectors and Periodic Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Chemical Element (IV)—The Relationship of Collectors and Periodic Table of ..... One Dimensional Multiferroic Nanomaterials/Nanocomposites for Solar ...

250

NONPARAMETRIC BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES  

SciTech Connect

Many astronomical phenomena exhibit patterns that have periodic behavior. An important step when analyzing data from such processes is the problem of identifying the period: estimating the period of a periodic function based on noisy observations made at irregularly spaced time points. This problem is still a difficult challenge despite extensive study in different disciplines. This paper makes several contributions toward solving this problem. First, we present a nonparametric Bayesian model for period finding, based on Gaussian Processes (GPs), that does not make assumptions on the shape of the periodic function. As our experiments demonstrate, the new model leads to significantly better results in period estimation especially when the light curve does not exhibit sinusoidal shape. Second, we develop a new algorithm for parameter optimization for GP which is useful when the likelihood function is very sensitive to the parameters with numerous local minima, as in the case of period estimation. The algorithm combines gradient optimization with grid search and incorporates several mechanisms to overcome the high computational complexity of GP. Third, we develop a novel approach for using domain knowledge, in the form of a probabilistic generative model, and incorporate it into the period estimation algorithm. Experimental results validate our approach showing significant improvement over existing methods.

Wang Yuyang; Khardon, Roni [Department of Computer Science, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Protopapas, Pavlos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals Jump to: navigation, search Name Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals) Place Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan Zip 540-0041 Sector Solar Product Engaged in the steel, engineering, and electronics businesses; works on fuel cell component technology and manufactures silicon wafers for the solar sector. References Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals) is a company located in Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan . References ↑ "Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sumitomo_Metal_Industries_Ltd_Sumitomo_Metals&oldid=351744"

252

FORMING PROTECTIVE FILMS ON METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described of inhibiting the corrosion of ferrous metal by contact with heavy liquid metals such as bismuth and gallium at temperatures above 500 icient laborato C generally by bringing nltrogen and either the metal zirconium, hafnium, or titanium into reactlve contact with the ferrous metal to form a thin adherent layer of the nitride of the metal and thereafter maintaining a fractional percentage of the metal absorbed in the heavy liquid metal in contact with the ferrous metal container. The general purpose for uslng such high boiling liquid metals in ferrous contalners would be as heat transfer agents in liquid-metal-fueled nuclear reactors.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Kammerer, O.F.; Sadofsky, J.; Weeks, J.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs  

SciTech Connect

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be superior to the conventional oxide fuel since PCMI and rod burst, respectively, have been mitigated. Under beyond design basis accident scenarios where the fuel is exposed to high temperature steam for prolonged periods, larger inventory of zirconium metal in the core could negatively affect the accident progression. A thin steam resistant layer (e.g. alumina forming alloy steel), integrated into the solid rod during fabrication by co-extrusion or hot-isostatic-pressing, offers the potential to provide additional fuel protection from steam interaction: blanketing under a range of boiling regimes and under severe accident conditions up to high temperatures well beyond what is currently possible in the conventional fuel. A crucial aspect to the viability of M3 fuel in light water reactors is the reduced heavy metal load compared to standard pellet fuel. This study evaluated the design requirements to operate a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with M3 fuel in order to obtain fuel cycle length, reactivity coefficients, and power peaking factors comparable to that of standard fuel.

Fratoni, Massimiliano [Pennsylvania State University; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fast library for number theory: an introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss FLINT (Fast Library for Number Theory), a library to support computations in number theory, including highly optimised routines for polynomial arithmetic and linear algebra in exact rings.

William B. Hart

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

,"New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Residential" "Sourcekey","NA1501SNM8","NA1508SNM8","NA1509SNM8" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Count)","New Mexico Natural Gas Number of...

256

Number: 1 Description: How did the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 80 Description: What part did ITT (International Telephone and Telegraph) and Anaconda Copper play in the ...

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

Number: 1 Description: What powers did ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... top> Number: 10 Description: What is one of the major problems with electronic producing turbines (windmills) in California? ...

2002-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

Anderson, M.A.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

Huxford, Theodore J. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Supported metal alloy catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

Barrera, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David C. (Santa Clara, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Characterization of Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Characterization of Grit Blasted Metallic Biomaterials by ... The grit blasting, a surface improvement treatment is used to enhance mechanical ...

266

ELECTRON WELDING OF METALS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages and disadvantages of the electron welding of metals are briefly reviewed. Typical apparatuses used for electron welding are described. (J.S.R)

Stohr, J.-A.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Metal Matrix Composites - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

METAL- MATRIX COMPOSITES UNDER MULTI- AXIAL LOADINGS: M. V. S. Ravisankar ... including the values of the stress exponent and the activation energy.

268

SEPARATION OF METAL VALUES FROM NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for separating beryllium fluoride and an alkali metal fluoride from a mixture containing same and rare earth fluorides. The method comprises contacting said mixture with a liquid hydrogen fluoride solvent containing no more than about 30 per cent water by weight and saturated with a fluoride salt characterized by its solubility in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride for a period of time sufficient to dissolve said beryllium fluoride in said solvent. (AEC)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1962-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Solar Wind Oscillations With a 1.3 Year Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The IMP-8 and Voyager 2 spacecraft have ecently detected a very strong modulation in the solar wind d w speed with an approximately 1.3 year period. Combine ith evidence from long-term auroral and magnetometer o studies, this suggests that fundamental changes in the Sun ccur on a roughly 1.3 year time scale. Introduction The Sun emits a continuous stream of ionized particles s d called the solar wind. This wind is not constant, but varie ue to changes on the Sun. Strong periodicities in the solar ) [ wind linked with the solar rotation period (roughly 25 days Neugebauer and Snyder, 1966] and the solar cycle , 1 [Neugebauer, 1975; Bridge, 1977; Lazarus and McNutt 990] have been observed. Periodicities ranging from 51 to r s 256 days have been reported both in solar wind and in othe olar observations (see Villanueva [1994] and references a therein). Solar cycle variations of sunspot numbers and uroral activity are well established [see review by Silverman, 1992]. The IMP...

John Richardson Karolen; John D. Richardson; Karolen I. Paularena; John W. Belcher; Alan J. Lazarus

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Periodic orbit spectrum in terms of Ruelle--Pollicott resonances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully chaotic Hamiltonian systems possess an infinite number of classical solutions which are periodic, e.g. a trajectory ``p'' returns to its initial conditions after some fixed time tau_p. Our aim is to investigate the spectrum tau_1, tau_2, ... of periods of the periodic orbits. An explicit formula for the density rho(tau) = sum_p delta (tau - tau_p) is derived in terms of the eigenvalues of the classical evolution operator. The density is naturally decomposed into a smooth part plus an interferent sum over oscillatory terms. The frequencies of the oscillatory terms are given by the imaginary part of the complex eigenvalues (Ruelle--Pollicott resonances). For large periods, corrections to the well--known exponential growth of the smooth part of the density are obtained. An alternative formula for rho(tau) in terms of the zeros and poles of the Ruelle zeta function is also discussed. The results are illustrated with the geodesic motion in billiards of constant negative curvature. Connections with the statistical properties of the corresponding quantum eigenvalues, random matrix theory and discrete maps are also considered. In particular, a random matrix conjecture is proposed for the eigenvalues of the classical evolution operator of chaotic billiards.

P. Leboeuf

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

A METALLICITY-SPIN TEMPERATURE RELATION IN DAMPED Lyalpha SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report evidence for an anti-correlation between spin temperature T{sub s} and metallicity [Z/H], detected at 3.6sigma significance in a sample of 26 damped Lyalpha absorbers (DLAs) at redshifts 0.09 gas temperature distribution. The trend between T{sub s} and [Z/H] can be explained by the larger number of radiation pathways for gas cooling in galaxies with high metal abundances, resulting in a high cold gas fraction, and hence, a low spin temperature. Conversely, low-metallicity galaxies have fewer cooling routes, yielding a larger warm gas fraction and a high T{sub s} . Most DLAs at z > 1.7 have low metallicities, [Z/H] tight correlation between DLA metallicity and the kinematic widths of metal lines. Most high-z DLAs are likely to arise in galaxies with low masses (M {sub vir} gas fractions.

Kanekar, Nissim [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Smette, Alain [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Briggs, Frank H. [RSAA, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, ACT 2611 (Australia); Chengalur, Jayaram N., E-mail: nkanekar@nrao.ed [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents  

SciTech Connect

Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: • further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework • further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability • use molecule structure building software to generate large numbers of candidate ligand architectures for given sets of donor groups • screen candidates and identify ligand architectures that will exhibit enhanced metal ion recognition. These new capabilities are being applied to ligand systems identified under other DOEsponsored projects where studies have suggested that modifying existing architectures will lead to dramatic enhancements in metal ion binding affinity and selectivity. With this in mind, we are collaborating with Professors R. T. Paine (University of New Mexico), K. N. Raymond (University of California, Berkeley), and J. E. Hutchison (University of Oregon), and Dr. B. A. Moyer (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) to obtain experimental validation of the predicted new ligand structures. Successful completion of this study will yield molecular-level insight into the role that ligand architecture plays in controlling metal ion complexation and will provide a computational approach to ligand design.

Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Massive Quantum Memories by Periodically Inverted Dynamic Evolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a general scheme to realize perfect quantum state reconstruction and storage in systems of interacting qubits. This novel approach is based on the idea of controlling the residual interactions by suitable external controls that, acting on the inter-qubit couplings, yield time-periodic inversions in the dynamical evolution, thus cancelling exactly the effects of quantum state diffusion. We illustrate the method for spin systems on closed rings with XY residual interactions, showing that it enables the massive storage of arbitrarily large numbers of local states, and we demonstrate its robustness against several realistic sources of noise and imperfections.

S. M. Giampaolo; F. Illuminati; A. Di Lisi; G. Mazzarella

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

MASSIVE QUANTUM MEMORIES BY PERIODICALLY INVERTED DYNAMIC EVOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a general scheme to realize perfect quantum state reconstruction and storage in systems of interacting qubits. This novel approach is based on the idea of controlling the residual interactions by suitable external controls that, acting on the inter-qubit couplings, yield time-periodic inversions in the dynamical evolution, thus cancelling exactly the effects of quantum state diffusion. We illustrate the method for spin systems on closed rings with XY residual interactions, showing that it enables the massive storage of arbitrarily large numbers of local states, and we demonstrate its robustness against several realistic sources of noise and imperfections. Keywords: Quantum Information; Quantum Control; Spin Systems. 1.

S. M. Giampaolo; F. Illuminati; A. Di Lisi; G. Mazzarella

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Precipitation Climatology of 5-Day Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precipitation climatology has been developed for the relative frequencies of zero, one, or two or more days with measurable precipitation within 5-day periods. In addition, the distribution of precipitation amounts is given for the one wet day ...

E. S. Epstein; A. G. Barnston

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) International Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) International Workshop, sponsored by NOAA Office of Global Programs and NASA Land Surface Hydrology Program, was held on 27 February 1 March 2001 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Rick Lawford

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

THE ORBITAL PERIOD OF SCORPIUS X-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The orbital period of Sco X-1 was first identified by Gottlieb et al. While this has been confirmed on multiple occasions, this work, based on nearly a century of photographic data, has remained the reference in defining the system ephemeris ever since. It was, however, called into question when Vanderlinde et al. claimed to find the one-year alias of the historical period in RXTE/All-Sky Monitor data and suggested that this was the true period rather than that of Gottlieb et al. We examine data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) spanning 2001-2009. We confirm that the period of Gottlieb et al. is in fact the correct one, at least in the optical, with the one-year alias strongly rejected by these data. We also provide a modern time of minimum light based on the ASAS data.

Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, Christopher T., E-mail: rih@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mars Atmosphere Pressure Periodicities from Viking Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first martian year of pressure data taken by the Viking landers on Mars is subjected to power spectrum analysis. The analysis suggests that strong periodicities are present in the martian atmosphere, especially at the high-latitude (48°N) ...

R. D. Sharman; J. A. Ryan

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Porous metallic bodies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

Landingham, R.L.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Explosion metal welding  

SciTech Connect

Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community.

Popoff, A.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Clean Metal Spray Forming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

controlled transfer of liquid metal from the ESR pool to the spray forming system is performed using a ... heating to maintain superheat and avoid freezing of the liquid metal as it flows through the funnel. ... As is the case with all similar cross-.

283

PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

1961-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

287

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

288

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

289

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

290

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

291

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

292

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

293

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

294

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

295

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

296

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

297

Archives and History Office: Popular Periodicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about SLAC activities since 1963. Allword Title Author Year Volume Number Perform Search Clear OR enter SPIRES Command Submit SLAC news sources to date have been (in...

298

A ~60 Myr periodicity is common to marine-87Sr/86Sr, fossil biodiversity, and large-scale sedimentation: what does the periodicity reflect?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find that the marine 87Sr/86Sr record shows a significant periodicity of 59.3 \\pm 3 Myr. The 87Sr/86Sr record is 171{\\deg} \\pm 12{\\deg}out of phase with a 62 (\\pm 3) Myr periodicity previously reported in the record of marine-animal diversity. These periodicities are close to 58 (\\pm 4) Myr cycles found for the number of gap-bounded sedimentary carbonate packages of North America We propose that these periodicities reflect the operation of a periodic "pulse of the Earth" in large-scale, Earth processes. These may be linked to mantle or plate-tectonic events, possibly uplift, which affects Earth's climate and oceans, and so the geochemistry, sedimentation, and biodiversity of the marine realm. Alternately, they may be linked to oscillation of the solar system normal to the plane of the galaxy.

Melott, Adrian L; Petersen, K D; McArthur, John M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

The periodicity of the eta Carinae events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

TYPES OF COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS: CFDA Number Program Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number Number Program Title Activities Allowed or Unallowed Allowable Costs/Cost Principles Cash Management Davis Bacon Act Eligibility Equipment and Real Property Management Matching, Level of Effort, Earmarking Period of Availability of Federal Funds Procurement/ Suspension/ Debarment Program Income Real Property Acquisition/ Relocation Reporting Subrecipient Monitoring NEPA National Historic Preservation Act Special Tests and Provisions 81.036 Inventions and Innovations Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 81.049 Office of Science Financial Assistance Program Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 81.079 Regional Biomass Energy Programs Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 81.086 Conservation Research and Development Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 81.087 Renewable Energy Research and

302

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Metals and ceramics division annual progress report for period endng June 30, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning engineering materials; fuels and processes; materials science; other research activities; and specialized research facilities and equipment.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

306

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

307

Production mechanisms, number concentration, size distribution...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002asl2.441 Meeting Report Production mechanisms, number concentration, size distribution, chemical composition, and...

308

Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRsDEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 All Active DOE Technical...

309

Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration Number Assignments (Completed) All Active DOE Technical Standards Document Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRsDEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002...

310

Sheffield Metals International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metals International Metals International Jump to: navigation, search Name Sheffield Metals International Address 5467 Evergreen Parkway Place Sheffield Village, Ohio Zip 44054 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Solar Product Agriculture; Consulting; Manufacturing; Retail product sales and distribution;Trainining and education Phone number 800-283-5262 Website http://www.sheffieldmetals.com Coordinates 41.452914°, -82.072009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.452914,"lon":-82.072009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

Northern States Metals Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metals Company Metals Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Northern States Metals Company Address 3207 Innovation Place Place Youngstown, Ohio Zip 44509 Sector Solar Product Manufacturing Phone number 330-799-1855 Website http://extrusions.com Coordinates 41.123592°, -80.704685° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.123592,"lon":-80.704685,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 VOLUME III Logistics Services A-76 Study - Service Provider Price Offer for Phase in Period, Volume III. Service Provider Name: GSA Schedule Contract Number: Expiration Date of GSA Schedule Contract: Duration of Phase in Period: 9 Calendar Months Term of Performance Phase-In Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2005 Base Period Year One07/01/2005 - 06/30/2006 Year Two 07/01/2006 - 06/30/2007 Period Three 07/01/2007 - 09/30/2007 Option Period Year One 10/01/2007 - 09/30/2008 Year Two 10/01/2008 - 09/30/2009 1. PRIME SERVICE PROVIDER COMMERCIAL DISCOUNT ATO FEDERAL OR BASE LABOR PERCENTAGE COMMERCIAL PROPOSED TOTAL GSA LABOR RATE RATE/HOUR FROM GSA RATE BURDENED RATE HOURS PROPOSED COST 2. TEAM MEMBER (Subcontractor) COMMERCIAL DISCOUNT ATO FEDERAL OR BASE LABOR PERCENTAGE

313

Customer Service Specialist Job Number: 54844874  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The credit company is able to link a customer's identification number with 1 A discussion of signatures can: identification numbers for the customer, the customer's credit company, and the merchant; the amount customers' identities. ffl The credit company will not know what customers buy. Security is implemented

Heller, Barbara

314

enter part number BNC / RP-BNC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enter part number Products 7/16 1.0/2.3 1.6/5.6 AFI AMC BNC / RP-BNC C FAKRA SMB FME HN MCX Mini ------- Product Search ------- Inventory Search Search Results for: 31-10152-RFX Results: 1 - 1 of 1 Part Number. All rights reserved. Copyright | Terms & Conditions | RF E-Mail Client | Contact Us | Amphenol

Berns, Hans-Gerd

315

Business Center for Precious Metals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Business Center for Precious Metals Department of Energy Business Center for Precious Metals Becky Eddy National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 Site...

316

Metal RIE 1: Unaxis 790  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scientific Opportunities / Applications: Physical milling of most metals; Anisotropic etching of metal films; Anisotropic etching of SiO 2 and SiN x. ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nonferrous Metals Society of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nonferrous Metals Society of China (NFSoc) is a technological organization of scientists and technologists engaged in the nonferrous metals industry.

318

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

320

Photon-number tomography and fidelity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scheme of photon-number tomography is discussed in the framework of star-product quantization. The connection of dual quantization scheme and observables is reviewed. The quantizer and dequantizer operators and kernels of star product of tomograms in photon-number tomography scheme and its dual one are presented in explicit form. The fidelity and state purity are discussed in photon{number tomographic scheme, and the expressions for fidelity and purity are obtained in the form of integral of the product of two photon-number tomograms with integral kernel which is presented in explicit form. The properties of quantumness are discussed in terms of inequalities on state photon{number tomograms.

O. V. Man'ko

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1991-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Charged Metallic Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usually in Nuclear Physics the minimum of the liquid drop model (LDM) energy occurs at a mass asymmetry which is different from the minimum of shell correction. Charged metallic clusters are ideal emitters of singly ionized trimers because both LDM and shell correction are reaching a minimum for the same mass asymmetry corresponding to the emission of a charged particle with two delocalized electrons. Maximum dissociation energy (Q-value) is obtained for metallic clusters with high surface tension and low Wigner-Seitz radius (transition metals). The Q-values for spheroidal shapes are much larger than for hemispheroids.

Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TimePeriod TimePeriod Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "TimePeriod" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 0.4 kV remote control (Smart Grid Project) + Not available + 2 220 kV SSSC device for power flow control (Smart Grid Project) + Jul 2009 Jul 2014 + A A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) + Oct 2009 Dec 2015 + ADELE Project AACAES (Smart Grid Project) + Dec 2009 Dec 2013 + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) + 2011-2014 + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Belgium) + 2011-2014 +

326

Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Sumpman, Wayne C. (North Huntingdon, PA); Baker, Robert J. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Williams, Robert S. (Plum Borough, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Neutron Physics Division progress report for period ending October 31, 1975  

SciTech Connect

Included are 127 abstracts and summaries of papers and reports published or presented at scientific meetings during the reporting period, which extends from August 31, 1974 to October 31, 1975. The primary areas of study are the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor program, the gas cooled fast breeder reactor program, the controlled thermonuclear reactor program, the high-energy accelerator shielding program, and the defense nuclear agency program. (BJG)

Maienschein, F.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Divalent metal nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

DeVries, Gretchen Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Controlled Metal Photodeposition  

A reliable syntheses of semiconductor-metal heterostructure has been developed to enable application of materials in catalytic, magnetic, and opto-electronic devices, and Iowa State University, The Ames Laboratory's Contractor, is looking for ...

331

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir Casting Route: Anne Zulfia1; Maman Ajiriyanto1; 1University of Indonesia

333

General Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... A detailed literature survey indicates that vacuum sintering is able to produce ... In recent years, there is a high demand for light-weight metals foams. ... Each powder mixture's composition is determined by response surface ...

334

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1, Number 4 * February 2012 1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication Highlights 9 2011 NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Class S tockpile Stewardship Science is not for wimps, and

335

Molten metal reactors  

SciTech Connect

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Super Gabor frames on discrete periodic sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its potential applications in multiplexing techniques such as time division multiple access and frequency division multiple access, superframe has interested some mathematicians and engineering specialists. In this paper, we investigate super ... Keywords: 42C40, Discrete Zak transform, Discrete periodic sets, Gabor dual, Super Gabor frame, Superframe

Yun-Zhang Li; Qiao-Fang Lian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Periodic cyclic homology of certain nuclear algebras.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relying of properties of the inductive tensor product, we construct cyclic type homology theories for certain nuclear algebras. In this context we establish continuity theorems. We compute the periodic cyclic homology of the Schwartz algebra of p-adic GL(n) in terms of compactly supported de Rham cohomology of the tempered dual of GL(n).

Jacek Brodzki; Roger Plymen

339

Periodically kicked hard oscillators G. A. Cecchi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodically kicked hard oscillators G. A. Cecchi Departamento de Fisica, U.N.L.P.,Argentina D. L for publication 25 November 1992) A model of a hard oscillator with analytic solution is presented. Its behavior forcing, and is intrinsic to hard oscillators; it is characterized by discontinuous circle maps

Magnasco, Marcelo Osvaldo

340

Spatiotemporal periodical pattern mining in traffic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The widespread use of road sensors has generated huge amount of traffic data, which can be mined and put to various different uses. Finding frequent trajectories from the road network of a big city helps in summarizing the way the traffic behaves in ... Keywords: KL-divergence, density-based clustering, periodic patterns, probability distribution matrices, road network, spatiotemporal data, traffic data

Tanvi Jindal, Prasanna Giridhar, Lu-An Tang, Jun Li, Jiawei Han

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Periodic register saturation in innermost loops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article treats register constraints in high performance codes and embedded VLIW computing, aiming to decouple register constraints from instruction scheduling. It extends the register saturation (RS) concept to periodic instruction schedules, i.e., ... Keywords: Code analysis, Code optimisation, Cyclic register allocation, Instruction level parallelism, Register saturation, Software pipelining

Sid-Ahmed-Ali Touati; Zsolt Mathe

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

What's Behind the Numbers? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's Behind the Numbers? What's Behind the Numbers? What's Behind the Numbers? June 24, 2011 - 3:39pm Addthis What's Behind the Numbers? Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell What does this mean for me? New website shows data on the why's, when's and how's of crude oil prices. Among the most visible prices that consumers may see on a daily basis are the ones found on the large signs at the gasoline stations alongside our streets and highways. The biggest single factor affecting gasoline prices is the cost of crude oil, the main raw material for gasoline production, which accounts for well over half the price of gasoline at the pump. But what is behind the price of crude oil? This week the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) launched a new web-based assessment highlighting key factors that can affect crude oil

343

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

344

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

345

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

346

Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 1 Climate Zone Number 1 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC . The following places are categorized as class 1 climate zones: Broward County, Florida Hawaii County, Hawaii Honolulu County, Hawaii Kalawao County, Hawaii Kauai County, Hawaii Maui County, Hawaii Miami-Dade County, Florida Monroe County, Florida Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_Number_1&oldid=21604" Category: ASHRAE Climate Zones What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

347

Climate Zone Number 8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Climate Zone Number 8 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE...

348

Number of Interactions Involved in Software Failures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2. Number of variables in avionics software branches. Vars, Count, Pct, Cumulative. 1, 5691, 74.1%, 74.1%. 2, 1509, 19.6%, 93.7%. ...

349

Theorem Proving with the Real Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the use of the real numbers in theorem proving. Typically, theorem provers only support a few `discrete' datatypes such as the natural numbers. However the availability of the real numbers opens up many interesting and important application areas, such as the verification of floating point hardware and hybrid systems. It also allows the formalization of many more branches of classical mathematics, which is particularly relevant for attempts to inject more rigour into computer algebra systems. Our work is conducted in a version of the HOL theorem prover. We describe the rigorous definitional construction of the real numbers, using a new version of Cantor's method, and the formalization of a significant portion of real analysis. We also describe an advanced derived decision procedure for the `Tarski subset' of real algebra as well as some more modest but practically useful tools for automating explicit calculations and routine linear arithmetic reasoning. Finally,...

John Robert Harrison

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Richardson Number Statistics in the Seasonal Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistics of Richardson number in the seasonal thermocline are determined for a simple model and from experiments over the continental shelf. The model consists of normally distributed and uncorrelated density gradient and shear (such as may be ...

Laurie Padman; Ian S. F. Jones

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Source codes as random number generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A random number generator generates fair coin flips by processing deterministically an arbitrary source of nonideal randomness. An optimal random number generator generates asymptotically fair coin flips from a stationary ergodic source at a rate of bits per source symbol equal to the entropy rate of the source. Since optimal noiseless data compression codes produce incompressible outputs, it is natural to investigate their capabilities as optimal random number generators. In this paper we show under general conditions that optimal variable-length source codes asymptotically achieve optimal variable-length random bit generation in a rather strong sense. In particular, we show in what sense the Lempel–Ziv algorithm can be considered an optimal universal random bit generator from arbitrary stationary ergodic random sources with unknown distributions. Index Terms — Data compression, entropy, Lempel–Ziv algorithm, random number generation, universal source coding.

Karthik Visweswariah; Student Member; Sanjeev R. Kulkarni; Senior Member; Sergio Verdú

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Projection-based partial periodic pattern mining for event sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial periodic pattern mining is one of the important issues in the field of data mining due to its practical applications. A partial periodic pattern consists of some periodic and non-periodic events in a specific period length, and is repeated with ... Keywords: Data mining, Encoding, Partial periodic pattern, Projection, Sequential pattern

Kung-Jiuan Yang; Tzung-Pei Hong; Yuh-Min Chen; Guo-Cheng Lan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. ERIP technical progress report {number_sign}6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ground carbonized RDF slurry from the grinding trials at IKA Works at approximately 50 wt.% solids was sealed in drums and shipped to the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) for the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion tests. In addition, a fuel characterization and trace component analysis was completed for this final carbonized RDF slurry fuel. This final fuel was a blend of several fuels from the pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments. As can be seen from the data, the final carbonized RDF has an exceptional heating value and volatile matter content. In addition, trace components are significantly lower than the raw RDF pellets. The report summarizes results from combustion tests and air pollution monitoring of these tests. For the upcoming time period 10/96--01/97, it is anticipated that the analysis of the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion test will be completed. This analysis includes rheology and particle size distribution analysis of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel, carbon content and TCLP of the combustion ash, trace heavy metal balances around combustor, and dioxin/furan emissions. Finally, the slurry carbonization computer model and computer simulations will be completed in the next reporting period (including the waste water treatment subsystem). Based upon this computer model, initial economic estimates and optimizations of the slurry carbonization process will be completed in the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

Guideline for Underwater Welding to Achieve Acceptable Ferrite Number (FN) for Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ferrite number (FN) of stainless steel weld metal is critical in maintaining resistance to IGSCC (Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) in a BWR environment. In addition the carbon level of the stainless steel weld metal directly affects the level of ferrite necessary to assure IGSCC resistance. NUREG-0313 and Code Case N-503-1 recommends a maximum carbon content not to exceed 0.035 wt. percent and a minimum FN of 7.5. The regulations also require that the first layer FN meets the minimum requirem...

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.co [Department of Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, CA (United States); Sardesai, Milind [Department of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA (United States); Sun, Sean [Department of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Miller, Daniel W. [Department of Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Interaction Between Toxic Metals and Complex Biofilm/Mineral/Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights highlights title by Alexis S. Templeton, Thomas P. Trainor, and Gordon E. Brown, Jr., Stanford University Sorption reactions on particle surfaces can dramatically affect the speciation, cycling and bioavailability of essential micronutrients (i.e. PO43-, Cu, Zn etc.) and toxic metals and metalloids (i.e. Pb, Hg, Se, As) in soils and aquatic environments. Considerable attention has been focused on understanding metal sorption reactions at a molecular/mechanistic level and the effects of metal concentration, pH, ionic strength, and complexing ligands on the ways in which metal ions bind to the surfaces of common mineral phases such as Fe-, Mn- and Al-(hydr)oxides and clays. However, a significant fraction of mineral surfaces in natural environments are extensively colonized by microbial organisms, which can also be potent sorbents for metals due to the large number of reactive functional groups that decorate the cell walls and outer membranes of bacterial surfaces.

357

Tandem mass spectrometry for characterization of high-carbon-number geoporphyrins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geoporphyrins are separated into TCL fractions after being isolated from Boscan oil (West Venezuela) by column chromatography. Analysis of each fraction by electron ionization mass spectrometry identified the porphyrin classes present and their carbon number ranges, but the spectra were extremely complex. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) allowed selection of molecular ions of individual carbon number porphyrins of the DPEP and etio types for fragmentation by collisionally activated dissociation. Comparison of their daughter and neutral loss spectra with those of porphyrin standards provided the first structural information on individual high-carbon-number geoporphyrins (>C/sub 33/). This information is helpful in the study of their geologic evolution and suggests the potential for using MS/MS data on high-carbon-number geoporphyrins as a parameter in oil exploration. Metalated and demetalated porphyrins of the same carbon number produced similar spectra, suggesting that samples may require less treatment for analysis by MS/MS than by conventional MS.

Johnson, J.V.; Britton, E.D.; Yost, R.A.; Quirke, J.M.E.; Cuesta, L.L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + C Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + 2.3 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 4.0 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 3.0 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 3.0 +

359

Method for forming metal contacts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Shock Dynamics in Layered Periodic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of constant-coefficient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coefficients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

David I Ketcheson; Randall J. LeVeque

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Do Periodicities in Extinction -- with Possible Astronomical Connections -- Survive a Revision of the Geological Timescale?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major revision of the geological timescale was published in 2012. We re-examine our past finding of a 27 Myr periodicity in marine extinction rates by re-assigning dates to the extinction data used previously. We find that the spectral power at this period is somewhat increased, and persists at a narrow bandwidth, which supports our previous contention that the Nemesis hypothesis is untenable as an explanation for the periodicity that was first noted by Raup and Sepkoski in the 1980s. We enumerate a number of problems in a recent study comparing extinction rates with time series models.

Melott, Adrian L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A New RR Lyrae Metallicity Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have begun developing a new metallicity calibration for RR Lyrae stars that includes high-temperature phase regions. Our calibration is an updated and expanded version of the Delta-S, equivalent width method, but which is applicable for most phases of the pulsation, and for the hotter, shorter-period RRc stars. This calibration will be constructed from spectral observations of well studied, bright RR Lyrae stars with metallicities from published high-resolution studies, within the range $-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -0.3$. Phase information for our calibration stars were taken from the AAVSO website, and the MacAdam Student Observatory at the University of Kentucky. Low-resolution spectroscopy $(R \\sim 1000)$ was obtained using the McDonald Observatory, 2.1 meter telescope. Here we present our preliminary data, and find the phase region where the calibration will break down.

Spalding, E; De Lee, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Process for making silver metal filaments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making silver metal particles from silver salt particles having the same morphology. Precursor silver salt particles selected from the group consisting of silver acetate and silver sulfide having a selected morphology are contained in a reactor vessel having means for supporting the particles in an air suspension to prevent the agglomeration of the particles. Air is flowed through the reactor vessel at a flow rate sufficient to suspend the particles in the reactor vessel. The suspended precursor silver salt particles are heated to a processing temperature and at a heating rate below which the physical deterioration of the suspended precursor silver salt particles takes place. The suspended precursor silver salt particles are maintained at the processing temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the particles into silver metal particles having the same morphology as the precursor silver salt particles.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Department of Energy Extends Comment Period on Proposed Revisions to its  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extends Comment Period on Proposed Revisions Extends Comment Period on Proposed Revisions to its NEPA Rules Department of Energy Extends Comment Period on Proposed Revisions to its NEPA Rules February 17, 2011 - 5:29pm Addthis The Department of Energy today announced that, in response to requests from a number of parties, it has re-opened the public comment period on its proposed revisions to the Department's NEPA rules. The public comment period will be extended three weeks and will now close on March 7, 2011. DOE, on January 3, 2011, issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to amend its regulations governing compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposals focus primarily on the Department's categorical exclusion provisions, and reflect the first update to these provisions in

366

How Many CVs are Crossing the Period Gap? A Test for the Disruption of Magnetic Braking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply population synthesis techniques to calculate the present day number of two types of white dwarf-main sequence star (WDMS) binaries within the cataclysmic variable period gap. The first are post-common envelope binaries with secondary stars that have masses between 0.17 and 0.36 Msun (gPCEBs), such that they will commence mass transfer within the period gap. The second type are systems that were CVs at some point in their past, but detached once they evolved down in orbital period to ~3 h as a consequence of disrupted magnetic braking, and are crossing the period gap via gravitational radiation (dCVs). Full population synthesis calculations are performed where we assume either constant, global values of the common envelope ejection efficiency, or consider the ejection efficiency as a function of secondary mass. Several forms of magnetic braking are also considered. We predict an excess of dCVs over gPCEBs within the period gap of ~4 to ~13 assuming an ejection efficiency between 0.1 and 0.6, and a flat initial mass ratio distribution. This excess is revealed as a prominent peak at the location of the period gap in the orbital period distribution of the combined gPCEB and dCV population. We suggest that if such a feature is observed in the orbital period distribution of an observed sample of short orbital period WDMS binaries, this would strongly corroborate the disruption of magnetic braking.

P. J. Davis; U. Kolb; B. Willems; B. T. Gänsicke

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

870 Federal Register 870 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 140 / Monday, July 22, 2013 / Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803. Type of Review: Extension without change of an existing collection of information. Respondents/Affected Public: Individuals or households. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 135,000. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 27,000. Abstract: This is a request for a 3-year renewal of the generic clearance to allow the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to continue to develop, test, and improve its survey and assessment instruments and methodologies. The procedures utilized to this effect include but are not limited to experiments with levels of incentives for various types of survey operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory

368

Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 7 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 7 is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7 climate zones: Aitkin County, Minnesota Aleutians East Borough, Alaska Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska Anchorage Borough, Alaska Aroostook County, Maine Ashland County, Wisconsin Baraga County, Michigan Barnes County, North Dakota Bayfield County, Wisconsin Becker County, Minnesota Beltrami County, Minnesota Benson County, North Dakota Bottineau County, North Dakota Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Burke County, North Dakota Burnett County, Wisconsin Carlton County, Minnesota Cass County, Minnesota

369

SPRNG Parallel Random Number Generators at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPRNG SPRNG SPRNG Description The SPRNG libraries of generators produce good quality random numbers, and are also fast. They have been subjected to some of the largest random number tests, with around 10^13 RNs per test. SPRNG provides both FORTRAN and C (also C++) interfaces for the use of the parallel random number generators. Access SPRNG v2.0 is available on Carver (gcc, intel and pgi) and Cray systems (pgi and cce). Use the module utility to load the software. module load sprng Using SPRNG On Cray systems: ftn sprng_test.F $SPRNG -lsprng On Carver: mpif90 sprng_test.F $SPRNG -lsprng Documentation On Carver there are various documents in $SPRNG/DOCS and various examples in $SPRNG/EXAMPLES. See the SPRNG web site at Florida State University for complete details. For help using SPRNG at NERSC contact the

370

Microsoft Word - Document Numbering Plan.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

document Number Plan 11/3/2005 document Number Plan 11/3/2005 All documents numbers start with a 9 9 _ _ ___ | | | | | Document per chart | Generation (i.e. PSS has 1,2&3, FEEPS has 1&2) Use 0 when the document doesn't apply to any of these System 0- Non system Specific (group wide) 1- PSS 2- Reserved for PSS expansion 3- FEEPS 4- Reserved for FEEPS expansion 5- BLEPS 6- Reserved for BLEPS expansion 7- DIW 8- Reserved for future use 9- Reserved for future use 000-099 Requirements 000 - Statement of work For x.1.4.1.4 - Design Statement of Work For Beamlines - Installation Statement of Work 001-009 Reserved for Statement of Works for upgrade, revisions, add-ons, etc. 010 - Cost Estimate 011-019 Additional Cost Estimates

371

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

372

RLE progress report number 117. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

This report, No. 117 in a series of progress reports issued by the M.I.T. Research Laboratory of Electronics, reviews the research activities of the entire laboratory for the half-year period ending December 31, 1975. Progress for each research unit support by the Joint Services Electronics Program (Contract DAAB07-75-C-1346) is summarized and is designated by the letters JSEP in the outside margin. (Author) (GRA)

Zimmermann, H.J.; King, J.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Towards a Number Theoretic Discrete Hilbert Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach for the development of a number theoretic discrete Hilbert transform. The forward transformation has been applied by taking the odd reciprocals that occur in the DHT matrix with respect to a power of 2. Specifically, the expression for a 16-point transform is provided and results of a few representative signals are provided. The inverse transform is the inverse of the forward 16-point matrix. But at this time the inverse transform is not identical to the forward transform and, therefore, our proposed number theoretic transform must be taken as a provisional result.

Kandregula, Renuka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Transition-Metal Hydrides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics A new type of electrochromic hydride material has interesting and unusual properties. Thin Ni-Mg films, for example, are mirror-like in appearance and have very low visible transmittance. On exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films become transparent. The transition is believed to result from formation of nickel magnesium hydride, Mg2NiH4. Switchable mirrors based on rare earth hydrides were discovered in 1996 at Vrije University in the Netherlands, Rare earth-magnesium alloy films were subsequently found to be superior to the pure lanthanides in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity by Philips Laboratories. The newer transition-metal types which use less expensive and less reactive materials were discovered at LBNL. This has now become a very active area of study with a network of researchers.

376

LEVELING METAL COATINGS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

Gage, H.A.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 FY2010 0 FY2011 0 FY2012 12,862 FY2013 0 Cumulative Fee Paid 12,862 1,111,678 URS Energy & Construction, Inc. DE-AT30-08CC60014SP16 Contractor: Contract Number: Minimum...

378

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

379

Metallic carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Catalysis Without Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Bullock, R. Morris

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Embedding a chaotic signature in a periodic train: can periodic signals be chaotic?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how a chaotic system can be locked to emit a periodic waveform belonging to its chaotic attractor. We numerically demonstrate our idea in a system composed of a semiconductor laser driven to chaos by optical feedback from a short external cavity. The clue is the injection of an appropriate periodic signal that modulates the phase and amplitude of the intra-cavity radiation, a chaotic analogy of conventional mode-locking. The result is a time process that manifests a chaotic signature embedded in a long-scale periodic train.

Antonio Mecozzi; Cristian Antonelli

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Utah Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

754,554 778,644 794,880 810,442 821,525 830,219 1987-2011 Sales 754,554 821,525 830,219 1997-2011 Commercial Number of Consumers 55,821 57,741 59,502 60,781 61,976 62,885 1987-2011...

384

Michigan Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1997-2011 Commercial Number of Consumers 254,923 253,139 252,382 252,017 249,309 249,456 1987-2011 Sales 236,447 217,325 213,995 1998-2011 Transported 18,476 31,984 35,461...

385

Beamline Phone Numbers| Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Map Interactive Map Beamlines Map Beamlines Directory Techniques Directory Sectors Directory Beamline Phone Numbers Status and Schedule Beamline Phone Numbers From on-site, dial 2, then a number listed below. From off-site, dial 630-252 and a number listed below. Sector 1 1-BM-A: 1701 1-BM-C: 5468 1-ID: 1801 Sector 2 2-BM: 1702 2-ID-B: 1628 2-ID-D: 1802 2-ID-E: 3711 Sector 3 3-ID: 1803 Sector 4 4-ID-C: 1704 4-ID-D: 1804 Sector 5 5-BM: 1705 5-ID: 1805 Sector 6 6-ID-B: 1806 6-ID-C: 1406 6-ID-D: 1606 Sector 7 7-ID-B: 1607 7-ID-C: 1707 7-ID-D: 1807 7-ID-E: 1207 Sector 8 8-ID-E: 1908 8-ID-I: 1808 Sector 9 9-BM-B: 1709 9-ID-B: 0349 9-ID-C: 1809 Column 95: 4705 Sector 10 10-BM-B: 6792 10-ID-B: 1710 Sector 11 11-BM-B: 5877 11-ID-B: 1711 11-ID-C: 1711 11-ID-D: 2162 Laser lab: 0379 Sector 12 12-BM-B: 0378 12-ID-B,C: 1712

386

New Jersey Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number of Consumers: 8,245: 8,036: 7,680: 7,871: 7,505: 7,391: 1987-2011: Sales: 7,248 : 6,282: 6,036: 1998-2011: Transported: 997 : 1,223: 1,355: 1998-2011: Average ...

387

Wisconsin Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

,611,772 1,632,200 1,646,644 1,656,614 1,663,583 1,671,834 1987-2011 Sales 1,611,772 1,663,583 1,671,834 1997-2011 Transported 0 0 0 1997-2011 Commercial Number of Consumers...

388

Michigan Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3,193,920 3,188,152 3,172,623 3,169,026 3,152,468 3,153,895 1987-2011 Sales 3,066,542 2,952,550 2,946,507 1997-2011 Transported 127,378 199,918 207,388 1997-2011 Commercial Number...

389

Idaho Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

23,114 336,191 342,277 346,602 350,871 353,963 1987-2012 Sales 346,602 350,871 353,963 1997-2012 Commercial Number of Consumers 33,767 37,320 38,245 38,506 38,912 39,202 1987-2012...

390

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universities 30 2,886,684 State of Colorado** 35 2,210,660 Miscellaneous agencies 11 498 the University of Colorado and Colorado State University Colorado School of Mines Awards by Funding Agency FiscalNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce 4

391

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

289 13,089,070 Other Universities 31 2,399,092 State of Colorado** 27 2,139,037 Miscellaneous agencies the University of Colorado and Colorado State University Colorado School of Mines Awards by Funding Agency FiscalNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Agriculture 1 499,815 Department

392

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,739,813 State of Colorado** 26 1,846,825 Miscellaneous agencies 10 697,285 326 29,281,431 Total Awards ReceivedNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Commerce 2 25,613 Department 215,000 Environmental Protection Agency 0 - National Aeronautics and Space Administration 1 30

393

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,096,445 State of Colorado 22 1,007,618 Miscellaneous agencies 10 514,288 327 24,608,655 Total Awards ReceivedNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Commerce 3 117,227 Department,385,219 Environmental Protection Agency 1 21,602 National Aeronautics and Space Administration 5 703,140 National

394

The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

395

Vermont Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

34,081 34,937 35,929 37,242 38,047 38,839 1987-2011 Sales 34,081 38,047 38,839 1997-2011 Commercial Number of Consumers 4,861 4,925 4,980 5,085 5,137 5,256 1987-2011 Sales 4,861...

396

On crossing numbers of geometric proximity graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let P be a set of n points in the plane. A geometric proximity graph on P is a graph where two points are connected by a straight-line segment if they satisfy some prescribed proximity rule. We consider four classes of higher order proximity graphs, ... Keywords: Crossing number, Geometric graphs, Proximity graphs

Bernardo M. Ábrego; Ruy Fabila-Monroy; Silvia Fernández-Merchant; David Flores-Peñaloza; Ferran Hurtado; Vera Sacristán; Maria Saumell

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Colorado Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,558,911 1,583,945 1,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716 1986-2011 Sales 1,558,908 1,634,582 1,645,711 1997-2011 Transported 3 5 5 1997-2011 Commercial Number of Consumers...

398

Octane Number Prediction in a Reforming Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a neural network for the prediction of the complex and non-linear behavior of a Catalytic Reforming of a refinery has been developed. In a fuel, refinery reforming is a conversion process to increase octane number (RON) of the desulphurated ...

E. Chibaro

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Illinois Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

,812,121 3,845,441 3,869,308 3,839,438 3,842,206 3,855,997 1987-2011 Sales 3,619,628 3,568,120 3,594,102 1997-2011 Transported 192,493 274,086 261,895 1997-2011 Commercial Number...

400

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Macroscopic quantum behaviour of periodic quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce a simple procedure for computing the macroscopic quantum behaviour of periodic quantum systems in the high energy regime. The macroscopic quantum coherence is ascribed to a one-particle state, not to a condensate of a many-particle system; and we are referring to a system of high energy but with few degrees of freedom. We show that, in the first order of approximation, the quantum probability distributions converge to its classical counterparts in a clear fashion, and that the interference effects are strongly suppressed. The harmonic oscillator provides a testing ground for these ideas and yields excellent results.

A. Martín-Ruiz; J. Bernal; Adrián Carbajal-Domínguez

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

Serpentine metal gasket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallic seal or gasket for use in the joining of cryogenic fluid conduits, the seal or gasket having a generally planar and serpentine periphery defining a central aperture. According to a preferred embodiment, the periphery has at least two opposing elongated serpentine sides and two opposing arcuate ends joining the opposing elongated serpentine sides and is of a hexagonal cross-section.

Rothgeb, Timothy Moore (Norfolk, VA); Reece, Charles Edwin (Yorktown, VA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

Metal halogen electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

1988-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

406

Weld Metal Metallurgical Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of an ongoing series of metallurgical handbooks that are being developed for utility engineers to use in assessing metallurgical characteristics of any given alloy. This report focuses specifically on the weld metal metallurgical characteristics of carbon, low-alloy martensitic, and austenitic stainless steel welds.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ductile transplutonium metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

Conner, W.V.

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

STRIPPING METAL COATINGS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc salt in the castable refractory block and it is released over the same time period as the salt. Therefore, to limit the impact of precipitated Fe on the release of 99Tc, both the amount of precipitated Fe in the BV glass and the diameter of these particles should be minimized.

Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Table B14. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" 4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",4657,3528,688,114,48,27,251 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1897,272,"Q","Q","Q",164 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,802,222,17,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,506,121,51,12,"Q",17 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,184,33,15,15,"Q","Q"

411

Functional Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of the work described in this dissertation was the incorporation of functionality into metal phosphonates. This was done in one of several ways. The first involved using phosphonate ligands that had covalently attached organic functional groups. In some cases, these ligands undergo reactions during the solvothermal syntheses which can impart new chemical reactivity. Another method used to introduce functionality was to partially or completely substitute metal atoms within phosphonate clusters to create materials which may have interesting magnetic properties. By controlling the way these clusters pack in the solids, their magnetic properties may be able to be augmented. The final method used to impart functionality to metal phosphonates was the incorporation of N-donor and bulky aryl groups into the phosphonate ligands. These influences caused structural variations which exposed potentially active sites within the materials, including both Lewis acidic and basic sites, as well as Bronsted acid sites. The first strategy was employed in the design of tetravalent metal phosphonates which have covalently incorporated bipyridine moieties. The materials are porous so that the bipyridine sites can chelate Pd atoms from solution, which can then be reduced to stable nanoparticles trapped within the phosphonate matrix. This approach was also used in the synthesis of surface-functionalized divalent metal phosphonates which exhibit interesting amine uptake properties. Solvent and cation substitution effects were used to control the packing and connectivity of phosphonate-based clusters. The selective substitution of metal atoms within the clusters may lead to interesting magnetic materials. In other work, N-donor and bulky phosphonates were used to influence the structure of several SnII phosphonates, which resulted in the discovery of a new layered structure type. The effect of the Sn-N interaction on the structures is investigated, and found to have significant effects on the structural units formed and how they pack in the solid state. The work presented herein represents only a small fraction of the rich chemistry of metal phosphonates. Creative researchers will continue to push boundaries and find new and interesting applications for phosphonate-based materials.

Perry, Houston Phillipp

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

MR LLRF VXI upgrade beam study period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AD/RFI/LLRF group personnel performed several studies with the MR LLRF VXI upgrade system during the evening of 7/29/95. The study period lasted about 4 hours. The MR operating conditions were a mixture of $29 and $2B cycles, with beam injected only on the $29. The author believes the $2B cycles were present for reasons unrelated to the study. The basic study period goal was to test the initial VXI version of MR LLRF finite state machine (FSM) execution. This goal represents what has been called MR LLRF VXI Upgrade Implementation Stage No.2 throughout presentations and documentation on the upgrade project. The test includes control of MR LLRF NIM hardware, the MR RF cavities, and beam via XVI TTL FSM outputs. Numerous MR LLRF VXI system objects, or components, must work together correctly for a successful test. Very briefly, the required objects include VXI Front End hardware, the ACNET/Front End interface code, and the VXI/NIM Interface chassis (the chassis solves VXI-CAMAC-NIM RF and FSM output connectivity and development problems). Though this initial FSM does not yet fully support Upgrade Implementation Stage 2 functionality, all code and hardware for the following basic functionality is tested.

Mesiner, K.; /Fermilab

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Recipients: The 2001 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

414

Recipients: The 2003 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

415

Recipients: The 2002 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

416

Recipients: The 2004 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

417

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May » May » Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

418

Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.  

SciTech Connect

Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

AMR for low Mach number reacting flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a summary of recent progress on the development and application of adaptive mesh refinement algorithms for low Mach number reacting flows. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations based on a general equation of state that discretely conserves both mass and energy. The discretization methodology is based on a robust projection formulation that accommodates large density contrasts. The algorithm supports modeling of multicomponent systems and incorporates an operator-split treatment of stiff reaction terms. The basic computational approach is embedded in an adaptive projection framework that uses structured hierarchical grids with subcycling in time that preserves the discrete conservation properties of the underlying single-grid algorithm. We present numerical examples illustrating the application of the methodology to turbulent premixed combustion and nuclear flames in type Ia supernovae.

Bell, John B.

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Entanglement Distillation Protocols and Number Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the analysis of entanglement distillation protocols for qudits of arbitrary dimension $D$ benefits from applying basic concepts from number theory, since the set $\\zdn$ associated to Bell diagonal states is a module rather than a vector space. We find that a partition of $\\zdn$ into divisor classes characterizes the invariant properties of mixed Bell diagonal states under local permutations. We construct a very general class of recursion protocols by means of unitary operations implementing these local permutations. We study these distillation protocols depending on whether we use twirling operations in the intermediate steps or not, and we study them both analitically and numerically with Monte Carlo methods. In the absence of twirling operations, we construct extensions of the quantum privacy algorithms valid for secure communications with qudits of any dimension $D$. When $D$ is a prime number, we show that distillation protocols are optimal both qualitatively and quantitatively.

H. Bombin; M. A. Martin-Delgado

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Case Numbers: TBH-0063, TBZ-0063  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 21, 2008 May 21, 2008 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Motion To Dismiss Name of Case: Richard L. Urie Dates of Filing: May 15, 2007 July 19, 2007 Case Numbers: TBH-0063 TBZ-0063 This Decision concerns a Complaint filed by Richard L. Urie (hereinafter referred to as "Mr. Urie" or "the Complainant") against Los Alamos National Laboratory (hereinafter referred to as "LANL" or "the Respondent"), his former employer, under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor

422

Faster Quantum Number Factoring via Circuit Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major obstacle to implementing Shor's quantum number-factoring algorithm is the large size of modular-exponentiation circuits. We reduce this bottleneck by customizing reversible circuits for modular multiplication to individual runs of Shor's algorithm. Our circuit-synthesis procedure exploits spectral properties of multiplication operators and constructs optimized circuits from the traces of the execution of an appropriate GCD algorithm. Empirically, gate counts are reduced by 4-5 times, and circuit latency is reduced by larger factors.

Igor L. Markov; Mehdi Saeedi

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Higgs Quantum Numbers in Weak Boson Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have reported the discovery of a Higgs like resonance at the LHC. The next analysis step will include the determination of its spin and CP quantum numbers or the form of its interaction Lagrangian channel-by-channel. We show how weak-boson-fusion Higgs production and associated ZH production can be used to separate different spin and CP states.

C. Englert; D. Goncalves-Netto; K. Mawatari; T. Plehn

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Property:PhoneNumber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PhoneNumber PhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "PhoneNumber" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1st Light Energy, Inc. + 209-824-5500 + 2 21-Century Silicon, Inc. + 972-591-0713 + 3 3Degrees + 415.449.0500 + 3M + 1-888-364-3577 + 4 4C Offshore Limited + +44 (0)1502 509260 + 4th Day Energy + 877-484-3291 + @ @Ventures (California) + (650) 322-3246 + @Ventures (Massachusetts) + (978) 658-8980 + A A.J. Rose Manufacturing Company + 440-934-2859 + A.O. Smith + 414-359-4000 + A1 Sun, Inc. + (510) 526-5715 + A10 Power + 415-729-4A10 or 415-729-4210 + ABC Solar, Inc. + 1-866-40-SOLAR + ABS Alaskan Inc + (800) 235-0689 + ACME solar works + 877-226-3004 + ACORE + 202-393-0001 +

425

Gathering an even number of robots in an odd ring without global multiplicity detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a gathering protocol for an even number of robots in a ring-shaped network that allows symmetric but not periodic configurations as initial configurations, yet uses only local weak multiplicity detection. Robots are assumed to be anonymous ... Keywords: Robots, asynchronous gathering, local weak multiplicity detection

Sayaka Kamei; Anissa Lamani; Fukuhito Ooshita; Sébastien Tixeuil

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Metal reduction kinetics in Shewanella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Metal reduction kinetics have been studied in cultures of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria which include the Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Estimation of system parameters from time-series data faces obstructions in ...

Raman Lall; Julie Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Print Monday, 19 December 2011 18:29 While mononuclear, polynuclear, and polymeric metal complexes are most often synthesized by the reaction of a metal precursor and a presynthesized organic ligand, it is also possible to generate the ligand in situ from an easily available organic compound. This approach allows the reactivity of the metal ion to activate a proligand, transforming it through an in situ reaction, sometimes providing coordination compounds with ligands not accessible by conventional organic synthesis. The intense interest in the reactivity of coordinated ligands is mainly due to the necessity of interpreting the mechanisms of homogeneous metal-catalyzed processes, in which a substrate is activated upon its coordination to one or more metal sites. A coordinated oxime group contains three active sites (C, N, O) for reactivity.

429

Prefix-based node numbering for temporal XML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prefix-based numbering (also called Dewey numbering, Dewey level order, or dynamic level numbering) is a popular method for numbering nodes in an XML data model instance. The nodes are numbered so that spatial relationships (e.g., is a node a descendant ... Keywords: Dewey numbering, XML, prefix-based numbering, temporal, versioning

Curtis E. Dyreson; Kalyan G. Mekala

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID Number: ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00125, Rev 0 I. Project Title: MSA Annual Categorical Exclusion for Actions to Conserve Energy or Water under 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B, B5.1 II. Project Description and location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Mission Support Alliance (MSA) and its subcontractors perform actions to conserve energy or

431

Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National...

432

EA-1566: Notice of Comment Period Extension | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1566: Notice of Comment Period Extension Proposed Infrastructure Improvements for the Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada DOE is extending the public comment period for the Yucca...

433

DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium...

434

EIS-0403: Notice to Extend Public Comment Period | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice to Extend Public Comment Period EIS-0403: Notice to Extend Public Comment Period Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States The Department of Energy and the Bureau...

435

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, L.J.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

437

[Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75)] | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75) Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75) Federal Register: April 19, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 75) More...

438

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

METHOD OF PURIFYING URANIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of lmpurities from uranlum metal can be done by a process conslstlng of contacting the metal with liquid mercury at 300 icient laborato C, separating the impunitycontalnlng slag formed, cooling the slag-free liquld substantlally below the point at which uranlum mercurlde sollds form, removlng the mercury from the solids, and recovering metallic uranium by heating the solids.

Blanco, R.E.; Morrison, B.H.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Integrated decontamination process for metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Fabrication of metallic glass structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

Cline, C.F.

1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

Raleigh, H.D. (ed.) [ed.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliogralphy includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

Raleigh, H.D. (ed.) [ed.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Evolution with size in a locally periodic system: Scattering and deterministic maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the evolution of the wave function with the system size in a locally periodic structure. In particular we analyse the dependence of the wave function with the number of unit cells, which also reflects information about its spatial behaviour in the system. We reduce the problem to a nonlinear map and find an equivalence of its energy regions of single periodicity and of weak chaos, with the forbidden and allowed bands of the fully periodic system, respectively. At finite size the wave function decays exponentially with system size, as well as in space, when the energy lies inside a region of single periodicity, while for energies in the weak chaotic region never decays. At the transition between those regions the wave function still decays but in a $q$-exponential form; we found that the decay length is a half of the mean free path, which is larger than the lattice constant.

V. Dominguez-Rocha; M. Martinez-Mares

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

446

New periodic variable stars coincident with ROSAT sources discovered using SuperWASP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical lightcurves of 428 periodic variable stars coincident with ROSAT X-ray sources, detected using the first run of the SuperWASP photometric survey. Only 68 of these were previously recognised as periodic variables. A further 30 of these objects are previously known pre-main sequence stars, for which we detect a modulation period for the first time. Amongst the newly identified periodic variables, many appear to be close eclipsing binaries, their X-ray emission is presumably the result of RS CVn type behaviour. Others are probably BY Dra stars, pre-main sequence stars and other rapid rotators displaying enhanced coronal activity. A number of previously catalogued pulsating variables (RR Lyr stars and Cepheids) coincident with X-ray sources are also seen, but we show that these are likely to be misclassifications. We identify four objects which are probable low mass eclipsing binary stars, based on their very red colour and light curve morphology.

A. J. Norton; P. J. Wheatley; R. G. West; C. A. Haswell; R. A. Street; A. Collier Cameron; D. J. Christian; B. Enoch; M. Gallaway; C. Hellier; K. Horne; J. Irwin; S. R. Kane; T. A. Lister; J. P. Nicholas; N. Parley; D. Pollacco; R. Ryans; I. Skillen; D. M. Wilson

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

447

New periodic variable stars coincident with ROSAT sources discovered using SuperWASP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical lightcurves of 428 periodic variable stars coincident with ROSAT X-ray sources, detected using the first run of the SuperWASP photometric survey. Only 68 of these were previously recognised as periodic variables. A further 30 of these objects are previously known pre-main sequence stars, for which we detect a modulation period for the first time. Amongst the newly identified periodic variables, many appear to be close eclipsing binaries, their X-ray emission is presumably the result of RS CVn type behaviour. Others are probably BY Dra stars, pre-main sequence stars and other rapid rotators displaying enhanced coronal activity. A number of previously catalogued pulsating variables (RR Lyr stars and Cepheids) coincident with X-ray sources are also seen, but we show that these are likely to be misclassifications. We identify four objects which are probable low mass eclipsing binary stars, based on their very red colour and light curve morphology.

Norton, A J; West, R G; Haswell, C A; Street, R A; Cameron, A C; Christian, D J; Enoch, B; Gallaway, M; Hellier, C; Horne, K; Irwin, J; Kane, S R; Lister, T A; Nicholas, J P; Parley, N; Pollacco, D; Ryans, R; Skillen, I; Wilson, D M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 * May 2012 1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in Non-hydrostatic Behavior in the Diamond Anvil Cell 8 Emission of Shocked Inhomogeneous Materials 9 2012 NNSA Stewardship Science Academic

449

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

450

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

451

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

452

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

453

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

454

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

455

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

456

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

457

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

458

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

459

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

460

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

462

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

463

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

464

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

465

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

466

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

467

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

468

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

469

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

470

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

471

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

472

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

473

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

474

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

475

Risk communication: Uncertainties and the numbers game  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The science of risk assessment seeks to characterize the potential risk in situations that may pose hazards to human health or the environment. However, the conclusions reached by the scientists and engineers are not an end in themselves - they are passed on to the involved companies, government agencies, legislators, and the public. All interested parties must then decide what to do with the information. Risk communication is a type of technical communication that involves some unique challenges. This paper first defines the relationships between risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication and then explores two issues in risk communication: addressing uncertainty and putting risk number into perspective.

Ortigara, M. [ed.

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

1950-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

477

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

478

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

479

SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) Dataset Summary Description The SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers is a compilation of numerical data gathered from Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) forms filed by financial institutions. It serves as a companion piece to The SAR Activity Review - Trends, Tips & Issues, which provides information about the preparation, use, and utility of Suspicious Activity Reports. By the Numbers generally is published twice a year to cover two filing periods: January 1 to June 30 and July 1 to December 31. Tags {"Suspicious Activity Report",SAR,FinCEN,"SAR Statistics","Depository Institutions","Money Services Businesses",Casinos,"Card Clubs","Securities and Futures","Bank Secrecy Act",BSA}

480

PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

Knighton, J.B.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal period number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Spray casting of metallic preforms  

SciTech Connect

A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

483

Recycling Metals for the Environment - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2008 ... This article describes metal production from primary and secondary resources, recovering metals from waste streams and environmental ...

484

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Recycling Metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... This article describes metal production from primary and secondary resources, recovering metals from waste streams and environmental ...

485

Liquid Metal Processing and Casting 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic, Slag and Refractory Reactions with Liquid Metals - Refining, Evaporation and Gas/Metal Reactions - Fundamentals of Reactions involving Liquid ...

486

MESOPOROUS METAL OXIDE MICROSPHERE ELECTRODE COMPOSITIONS AND ...  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The mesoporous metal oxide microsphere ...

487

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

488

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

SciTech Connect

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250/sup 0/F and about 700/sup 0/F and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing watersoluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Kalina, T.; Wolfs, D.Y.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

490

THE OPERATOR © FOR THE CHROMATIC NUMBER OF A GRAPH£ ¡  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce an operator © mapping any graph parameter ¬( ), nested between the stability number ...... Local chromatic number and Sperner capacity. ?ournal.

491

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

SciTech Connect

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

SciTech Connect

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition are described. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, L.K.

1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

493

Transition-metal-doped chalcogenide lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broadly tunable mid-infrared lasers are desirable for a number of scientific, remote-sensing, and military applications. Recently, Cr2+-doped chalcogenide lasers have emerged as an attractive source of tunable laser radiation in the 2-3.4-µm ... Keywords: Cr:CdMnTe, Cr:CdSe, Cr:ZnS, Cr:ZnSe, Fe:ZnSe, chalcogenide, continuous-wave laser, diode-pumped solid-state laser, mode-locked laser, solid-state laser, transition-metal ion

Timothy J. Carrig

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

Dr. Ramana Reddy

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

495

Weighted trapezoidal approximation-preserving cores of a fuzzy number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, various researchers have proved that approximations of fuzzy numbers may fail to be fuzzy numbers. In this contribution, we suggest a new weighted trapezoidal approximation of an arbitrary fuzzy number, which preserves its cores. We prove that ... Keywords: Core of fuzzy number, Fuzzy numbers, Trapezoidal fuzzy numbers, Weighted approximation

S. Abbasbandy; T. Hajjari

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

METALLURGY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MAY 31, 1961  

SciTech Connect

>Fundamental Alloying. Studies of crystal structures, reactions at metal surfaces, spectroscopy of molten salts, mechanical deformation, and alloy theory are reported. Long-Range Applied Metallurgy. A thermal comparator is described and the characteristic temperature of U0/sub 2/ determined. Sintering studies were carried out on ThO/sub 2/. The diffusion of fission products in fuel and of Al/sup 26/ and Mn/sup 54/ in Al and the reaction of Be with UC were studied. Transformation and oxidation data were obtained for a number of Zr alloys. Reactor Metallurgy. A large number of ceramic technology projects are described. Some corrosion data are given for metals exposed to impure He and molten fluorides. Studies were made of the fission-gas-retention Properties of ceramic fuel bodies. A large number of materials compatibility studies are described. The mechanical properties of some reactor materials were studied. Fabrication work was conducted to develop materials for application in low-, medium-, and high-temperature reactors or systems. A large number of new metallographic and nondestructive testing techniques are reported. Studies were carried out on the oxidation, carburization, and stability of alloys. Equipment for postirradiation examination is described. Preparation of some alloys and dispersion fuels by powder metallurgy methods was studied. The development of welding and brazing techniques for reactor materials is described. (D.L.C.)

1961-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

497

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

Nolan, Michael [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

500

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804