National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for metal period number

  1. Inverse design of periodic metallic slits for extraordinary optical transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Yongbo; Liu, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    The inverse design methodology of periodic metallic slits for extraordinary optical transmission is presented based on the topology optimization method. Several topological configurations of periodic metallic slits with typical subwavelength size are derived with transmission peaks at the prescribed incident wavelengths in the visible light region, where the transmissivity is enhanced by effective excitation of surface-plasmon-polariton at the inlet side of the slit, Fabry-P\\'erot resonance of surface-plasmon-polariton inside the slit and radiation of the electromagnetic energy at the outlet side of the slit. The transmission peaks of the derived metallic configurations are raised along with the red shift of the incident wavelength, because of the reduction of the energy absorption and increase of the propagation distance of surface-plasmon-polariton. And the shift of transmission peak is controlled by prescribing a different incident wavelength in the corresponding topology optimization problem. To reduce th...

  2. Detection and discrimination of the periodicity of prime numbers by discrete Fourier transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levente Csoka

    2015-01-27

    A novel representation of a quasi-periodic modified von Mangoldt function L(n) on prime numbers and its decomposition into Fourier series has been investigated. We focus on some particular quantities characterizing the modified von Mangoldt function. The results indicate that prime number progression can be decomposed into periodic sequences. The main approach is to decompose it into sin or cosine function. Basically, it is applied to extract hidden periodicities in seemingly quasi periodic prime function. Numerical evidences were provided to confirm the periodic distribution of primes.

  3. Periodic Metallic Nanostructures as Plasmonic Chemical Sensors Chiara Valsecchi and Alexandre G. Brolo*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    ;evaluation as chemical sensors and a brief comparison of the pPeriodic Metallic Nanostructures as Plasmonic Chemical Sensors Chiara Valsecchi and Alexandre G generation of low- cost and efficient chemical sensors and biosensors. The extensive variety

  4. Valence, coordination number, and PAV cells in metallic rare earth compounds F. L. Carter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Valence, coordination number, and PAV cells in metallic rare earth compounds F. L. Carter Naval, generalized coordination numbers, and Pauling's metallic valences are given for 24 intermetallic rare earth self-consistently it was necessary to increase the rare earth metal (/-character and hence decrease

  5. Volume 90A, number 9 PHYSICS LETTERS 9 August 1982 BISTABILITY, PERIOD DOUBLING BIFURCATIONS AND CHAOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Leon

    AND CHAOS IN A PERIODICALLY FORCED OSCILLATOR Rafael PEREZ Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico and Leon GLASS Department of Physiology, McGill University, 3655 Drummond

  6. Thermal emission and design in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystal slabs David L. C. Chan, Marin Soljaci, and J. D. Joannopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljaèiæ, Marin

    Thermal emission and design in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystal slabs David L. C phenomena that drive thermal emission in one-dimensional periodic metallic photonic crystals, emphasizing of how the emissive properties of these systems can be tailored to our needs. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.74

  7. Super hard cubic phases of period VI transition metal nitrides: First principles investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    and shear modulus for stable phases, potential hard coating materials for cutting tools have been identified July 2008 Keywords: Coatings Elastic properties Hardness Nitrides We report a systematic study B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Hard coatings of many transition metal nitrides have

  8. Periodic Inclusion of Room-Temperature-Ferromagnetic Metal Phosphide Nanoparticles in Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Nanotubes Vincent Jourdain,*,, Edward T. Simpson,§ Matthieu Paillet, Takeshi Kasama,§,| Rafal E. Dunin Form: April 22, 2006 We demonstrate the use of sequential catalytic growth to encapsulate iron, nickel-iron, and iron-cobalt phosphide catalyst nanoparticles periodically along the entire lengths of carbon nanotubes

  9. Precise atmospheric parameters for the shortest-period binary white dwarfs: gravitational waves, metals, and pulsations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Dufour, P.; Bergeron, P.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.

    2014-10-10

    We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 61 low-mass white dwarfs and provide precise atmospheric parameters, masses, and updated binary system parameters based on our new model atmosphere grids and the most recent evolutionary model calculations. For the first time, we measure systematic abundances of He, Ca, and Mg for metal-rich, extremely low mass white dwarfs and examine the distribution of these abundances as a function of effective temperature and mass. Based on our preliminary results, we discuss the possibility that shell flashes may be responsible for the presence of the observed He and metals. We compare stellar radii derived from our spectroscopic analysis to model-independent measurements and find good agreement except for white dwarfs with T {sub eff} ? 10,000 K. We also calculate the expected gravitational wave strain for each system and discuss their significance to the eLISA space-borne gravitational wave observatory. Finally, we provide an update on the instability strip of extremely low mass white dwarf pulsators.

  10. New near-infrared period-luminosity-metallicity relations for RR Lyrae stars and the outlook for Gaia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muraveva, Tatiana; Clementini, Gisella; Luri, Xavier; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Moretti, Maria Ida; Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Rubele, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present results of the analysis of 70 RR Lyrae stars located in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Combining spectroscopically determined metallicity of these stars from the literature with precise periods from the OGLE III catalogue and multi-epoch $K_{\\rm s}$ photometry from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds system (VMC), we derive a new near-infrared period-luminosity-metallicity (${\\rm PL_{K_{\\rm s}}Z}$) relation for RR Lyrae variables. In order to fit the relation we use a fitting method developed specifically for this study. The zero-point of the relation is estimated in two different ways: by assuming the value of the distance to the LMC and by using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) parallaxes of five RR Lyrae stars in the Milky Way (MW). The difference in distance moduli derived by applying these two approaches is $\\sim0.2$ mag. To investigate this point further we derive the ${\\rm PL_{K_{\\rm s}}Z}$ relation based on 23 MW RR Lyrae stars which had been analysed in Baade-Wesselink stud...

  11. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  14. Implementation of an iterative map in the construction of (quasi)periodic instantons: chaotic aspects and discontinuous rotation numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakrabarti

    1998-01-05

    An iterative map of the unit disc in the complex plane (Appendix) is used to explore certain aspects of selfdual, four dimensional gauge fields (quasi)periodic in the Euclidean time. These fields are characterized by two topological numbers and contain standard instantons and monopoles as different limits. The iterations do not correspond directly to a discretized time evolution of the gauge fields. They are implemented in an indirect fashion. First, (t,r,\\theta,\\phi) being the standard coordinates, the (r,t) half plane is mapped on the unit disc in an appropriate way. This provides an (r,t) parametrization (Sec.1) of Z_0, the starting point of the iterations and makes the iterates increasingly complex functions of r and t. These are then incorporated as building blocks in the generating function of the fields (Sec.2). We explain (starting in Sec.1 and at different stages) in what sense and to what extent some remarkable features of our map (indicated in the title) are thus carried over into the continuous time development of the fields. Special features for quasiperiodicity are studied (Sec.3). Spinor solutions (Sec.4) and propagators (Sec.5) are discussed from the point of view of the mapping. Several possible generalizations are indicated (Sec.6). Some broader topics are discussd in conclusion (Sec.7).

  15. Simple formula for the interspaces of periodic grating structures self-organized on metal surfaces by femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashida, Masaki; Ikuta, Yoshinobu; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-29

    Self-organized grating structures formed on Mo and Ti metal surfaces irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at wavelengths of 800 and 400 nm are investigated by electron microscopy. We observe the formation of the self-organized grating structures on the metals irradiated with 400-nm laser pulses at low laser fluence in narrow fluence ranges. The interspaces of the grating structure depend on the wavelength and fluence of the laser. We find that the dependence of the grating interspaces on laser fluence can be explained by a simple formula for induction of a surface-plasma wave through the parametric decay of laser light.

  16. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  17. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  18. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 19 JANUARY 1998 Observation of Periodic Fine Structure in Reflectance from Biological Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    section of the nuclei: ss l, l 1 2 pl2 1 2 sin 2d l d l 1 µ sin d l d l 2 , (1) where d plnc n 2 1 to that of cytoplasm. Thus, the scattering cross section of the nuclei exhibits a periodicity withVOLUME 80, NUMBER 3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 19 JANUARY 1998 Observation

  19. Fourier series and periodicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donal F. Connon

    2014-12-07

    A large number of the classical texts dealing with Fourier series more or less state that the hypothesis of periodicity is required for pointwise convergence. In this paper, we highlight the fact that this condition is not necessary.

  20. PROJECT NUMBER: PROJECT TITLE: PERIOD COVERED:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeedingPATENTS- 05 - - A75 13, 2014

  1. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIARegional energyEIA-782A

  2. Beat Cepheid Period Ratios from OPAL Opacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Morgan; D. L. Welch

    1997-06-26

    The discovery of a large number of beat Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud in the MACHO survey, provides an opportunity to compare the characteristics of such Cepheids over a range of metallicities. We produced a large grid of linear nonadiabatic pulsation models using the OPAL opacity tables and with compositions corresponding to those of the Milky Way, and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using the relationship between the period ratio and the main pulsation period, we are able to define a range of models which correspond to the observed beat Cepheids, and thereby constrain the physical characteristics of the LMC beat Cepheids. We are also able to make some predictions about the nature of the yet-to-be-discovered SMC beat Cepheids.

  3. Binary Formation in Star-Forming Clouds with Various Metallicities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro N. Machida

    2008-03-01

    Cloud evolution for various metallicities is investigated by three-dimensional nested grid simulations, in which the initial ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of the host cloud \\beta_0 (=10^-1 - 10^-6) and cloud metallicity Z (=0 - Z_\\odot) are parameters. Starting from a central number density of n = 10^4 cm^-3, cloud evolution for 48 models is calculated until the protostar is formed (n \\simeq 10^23 cm^-3) or fragmentation occurs. The fragmentation condition depends both on the initial rotational energy and cloud metallicity. Cloud rotation promotes fragmentation, while fragmentation tends to be suppressed in clouds with higher metallicity. Fragmentation occurs when \\beta_0 > 10^-3 in clouds with solar metallicity, while fragmentation occurs when \\beta_0 > 10^-5 in the primordial gas cloud. Clouds with lower metallicity have larger probability of fragmentation, which indicates that the binary frequency is a decreasing function of cloud metallicity. Thus, the binary frequency at the early universe (or lower metallicity environment) is higher than at present day (or higher metallicity environment). In addition, binary stars born from low-metallicity clouds have shorter orbital periods than those from high-metallicity clouds. These trends are explained in terms of the thermal history of the collapsing cloud.

  4. Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Connelly; Jeffrey D. Shen; Alexander D. Smith

    2013-01-04

    We call a periodic ball packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve the period (that maintain some period with smaller or equal volume). In particular, we call a packing consistently periodically (strictly) jammed if it is periodically (strictly) jammed on every one of its periods. After extending a well-known bar framework and stress condition to strict jamming, we prove that a packing with period Lambda is consistently strictly jammed if and only if it is strictly jammed with respect to Lambda and consistently periodically jammed. We next extend a result about rigid unit mode spectra in crystallography to characterize periodic jamming on sublattices. After that, we prove that there are finitely many strictly jammed packings of m unit balls and other similar results. An interesting example shows that the size of the first sublattice on which a packing is first periodically unjammed is not bounded. Finally, we find an example of a consistently periodically jammed packing of low density \\delta = \\frac{4 \\pi}{6 \\sqrt{3} + 11} + \\epsilon ~ 0.59, where \\epsilon is an arbitrarily small positive number. Throughout the paper, the statements for the closely related notions of periodic infinitesimal rigidity and affine infinitesimal rigidity for tensegrity frameworks are also given.

  5. Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Billingsley

    2010-03-18

    This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

  6. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 15 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 10 APRIL 2000 First Principles Simulation of a Ceramic Metal Interface with Misfit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Simulation of a Ceramic Metal Interface with Misfit R. Benedek,1 A. Alavi,2 D. N. Seidman,1 L. H. Yang,3 D. A-7817 (Received 12 October 1999) The relaxed atomic structure of a model ceramic metal interface, 222 MgO Cu.35.Bs, 82.65.Dp A fundamental understanding of ceramic metal inter- faces [1] has been elusive, despite

  7. Metallization of electronic insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Uribe, Francisco A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An electroplated element is formed to include an insulating substrate, a conducting polymer polymerized in situ on the substrate, and a metal layer deposited on the conducting polymer. In one application a circuit board is formed by polymerizing pyrrole on an epoxy-fiberglass substrate in a single step process and then electrodepositing a metal over the resulting polypyrrole polymer. No chemical deposition of the metal is required prior to electroplating and the resulting layer of substrate-polymer-metal has excellent adhesion characteristics. The metal deposition is surprisingly smooth and uniform over the relatively high resistance film of polypyrrole. A continuous manufacturing process is obtained by filtering the solution between successive substrates to remove polymer formed in the solution, by maintaining the solution oxidizing potential within selected limits, and by adding a strong oxidant, such as KMnO.sub.4 at periodic intervals to maintain a low sheet resistivity in the resulting conducting polymer film.

  8. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  9. Pure and Applied Mathematics Quarterly Volume 2, Number 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldschmidt, Michel

    Keywords: Periods, transcendental numbers, irrationality, integrals, series, Diophantine approximation, irrationality measures, transcendence measures, measures of algebraic independence, Gamma function, Beta: to decide whether a period is a rational number, an irrational algebraic number or else a tran- scendental

  10. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  11. Thermodynamics and kinetics of ceramic/metal interfacial interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arróyave, Raymundo, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic/metal interfaces occur in a great number of important applications, such as ceramic/metal composites, microelectronics packaging, ceramic/metal seals, and so forth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such ...

  12. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  13. IS-ENES2 -Contract Number: 312979 reporting period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the IS-ENES2 project X IS-ENES2 MILESTONE (M -N°: 7.4) First review report on the ENES Earth System ModelReviewReportESMResources.docx or .pdf Release date: 30/03/2015 The reviews of IS-ENES2 services on Earth System Models, model components ...........................................12 #12;3 Executive Summary The reviews of IS-ENES2 services on Earth System Models, model

  14. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  15. Nucleosynthesis in Metal-Free and Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Zhong Qian

    2008-07-04

    There have been a number of important recent developments in theoretical and observational studies of nucleosynthesis, especially regarding nucleosynthetic sources at low metallicities. Those selected for discussion here include the origin of Li6, the primary production of N, the s-process, and the supernova sources for three groups of metals: (1) C to Zn with mass numbers A<70, (2) Sr to Ag with A~90-110, and (3) r-process nuclei with A~130 and above.

  16. Periodic cellular automata and Bethe ansatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsuo Kuniba; Akira Takenouchi

    2006-01-07

    We review and generalize the recent progress in a soliton cellular automaton known as the periodic box-ball system. It has the extended affine Weyl group symmetry and admits the commuting transfer matrix method and the Bethe ansatz at q=0. Explicit formulas are proposed for the dynamical period and the number of states characterized by conserved quantities.

  17. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  18. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datta, Ravindra (Iowa City, IA); Singh, Ajeet (Iowa City, IA); Halasz, Istvan (Iowa City, IA); Serban, Manuela (Iowa City, IA)

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  19. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate: M-16-04-04 Federal FacilityChange Number

  20. VOLUME 83, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 DECEMBER 1999 Universality in Metallic Nanocohesion: A Quantum Chaos Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stafford, Charles

    in Metallic Nanocohesion: A Quantum Chaos Approach C. A. Stafford,1,2,3 F. Kassubek,1,2,3 J. Bürki,1 from quantum chaos [12­15] to describe the quantum mechanics of such an open system. It is found

  1. Resolution-Stationary Random Number Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Ecuyer, Pierre

    of successive output values over their entire period length. For F2-linear generators, the commonly adopted efficient ways of implementing high-quality and long-period Tausworthe generators. Key words: random number un [0, 1) is the output of the generator at step n and the number of bits in this output, L

  2. Periodic subsystem density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele; Ceresoli, Davide

    2014-11-07

    By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

  3. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  4. Holding Period Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and the 30-day waiting period has ended. DOE is preparing a Record of Decision to announce and explain its chosen project alternative...

  5. Constrained Ramsey Numbers of Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tao

    Constrained Ramsey Numbers of Graphs Robert E. Jamison,1 Tao Jiang,2* and Alan C. H. Ling3 1-like trees. � 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Graph Theory 42: 1­16, 2003 Keywords: Ramsey; monochromatic edges have the same color and rainbow iff all of its edges have different colors. In classical Ramsey

  6. Fabrication and structural performance of periodic cellular metal sandwich structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    are important new structures, enabled by novel fabrication and topology design tools. Fabrication protocols deposition [6] or slurry coating [7]. Others utilize hollow spheres [8­10] or aggregates of soluble particles welding (shown) or with an adhesive.The cores can be cut and adhesively bonded to face sheets to create

  7. Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

    1980-01-01

    Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

  8. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG); Young, Albert C. (Flushing, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  9. Short communication Fractal in fracture of bulk metallic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jianbo

    Short communication Fractal in fracture of bulk metallic glass M.Q. Jiang a,b , J.X. Meng a , J. Bulk metallic glass B. Dynamic fracture C. Nanoscale periodic corrugation C. Fractal a b s t r a c t We investigate the nanoscale periodic corrugation (NPC) structures on the dynamic fracture surface of a typical

  10. Chemical enhancement of metallized zinc anode performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, J.

    1998-12-31

    Galvanic current delivered to reinforced concrete by a metallized zinc anode was studied relative to the humidity of its environment and periodic direct wetting. Current decreased quickly at low humidity to values unlikely to meet accepted cathodic protection criteria, but could be easily restored by direct wetting of the anode. Thirteen chemicals were screened for their ability to enhance galvanic current. Such chemicals, when applied to the exterior surface of the anode, are easily transported by capillary action to the anode-concrete interface where they serve to maintain the interface conductive and the zinc electrochemically active. The most effective chemicals were potassium and lithium bromide, acetate, chloride and nitrate, which increased galvanic current by a factor of 2--15, depending on relative humidity and chloride contamination of the concrete. This new technique is expected to greatly expand the number of concrete structures which can be protected by simple galvanic cathodic protection, The use of lithium-based chemicals together with metallized zinc anode is also proposed for mitigation of existing problems due to ASR. In this case, lithium which prevents or inhibits expansion due to ASR can be readily injected into the concrete. A new process, electrochemical maintenance of concrete (EMC), is also proposed to benefit reinforced concrete structures suffering from chloride-induced corrosion.

  11. Terahertz metal wire waveguide Q. Cao and J. Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Terahertz metal wire waveguide Q. Cao and J. Jahns Quite recently, it was found that [1] a simple metal wire can effectively guide terahertz (THz) waves. This unexpected finding paves the way for a wide problems. It is well known that surface plasmons can be excited by periodic structures like metal gratings

  12. Composite metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  13. Composite metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1998-04-14

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  14. M dwarf metallicities and giant planet occurrence: Ironing out uncertainties and systematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.

    2014-08-10

    Comparisons between the planet populations around solar-type stars and those orbiting M dwarfs shed light on the possible dependence of planet formation and evolution on stellar mass. However, such analyses must control for other factors, i.e., metallicity, a stellar parameter that strongly influences the occurrence of gas giant planets. We obtained infrared spectra of 121 M dwarfs stars monitored by the California Planet Search and determined metallicities with an accuracy of 0.08 dex. The mean and standard deviation of the sample are –0.05 and 0.20 dex, respectively. We parameterized the metallicity dependence of the occurrence of giant planets on orbits with a period less than two years around solar-type stars and applied this to our M dwarf sample to estimate the expected number of giant planets. The number of detected planets (3) is lower than the predicted number (6.4), but the difference is not very significant (12% probability of finding as many or fewer planets). The three M dwarf planet hosts are not especially metal rich and the most likely value of the power-law index relating planet occurrence to metallicity is 1.06 dex per dex for M dwarfs compared to 1.80 for solar-type stars; this difference, however, is comparable to uncertainties. Giant planet occurrence around both types of stars allows, but does not necessarily require, a mass dependence of ?1 dex per dex. The actual planet-mass-metallicity relation may be complex, and elucidating it will require larger surveys like those to be conducted by ground-based infrared spectrographs and the Gaia space astrometry mission.

  15. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to changeNovemberEnergyMessage fromMetal

  16. MMT Extremely Metal Poor Galaxy Survey I. An Efficient Technique to Identify Metal Poor Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren R. Brown; Lisa J. Kewley; Margaret J. Geller

    2007-09-27

    We demonstrate a successful strategy for identifying extremely metal poor galaxies. Our preliminary survey of 24 candidates contains 10 metal poor galaxies of which 4 have 12+log(O/H)metallicity blue compact galaxies known to date. Interestingly, our sample of metal poor galaxies have systematically lower metallicity for their luminosity than comparable samples of blue compact galaxies, dIrrs, and normal star-forming galaxies. Our metal poor galaxies share very similar properties, however, with the host galaxies of nearby long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including similar metallicity, stellar ages, and star formation rates. We use H\\beta to measure the number of OB stars present in our galaxies and estimate a core-collapse supernova rate of ~10^-3 yr^-1. A larger sample of metal poor galaxies may provide new clues into the environment where GRBs form and may provide a list of potential GRB hosts.

  17. Sequential conditions for fixed and periodic points 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Burnis Charles

    1970-01-01

    ) (Member) ~A (Month) 1970 (Year) ~04SQQ ABSTRACT Sec, uential Conditions fo. Fixed and Periodic Points (August 1970) Burnis C. Peter, Jr. , B. A. , Texas ASM University; M. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Jack Bryant and L. F. Guseman, Jr.... Let (X, d) be a metric space and f a selfmap of X. It is shown that a number of known theorems on the existence of fixed and periodic points are related through simple properties of the n sequence (f ) of iterates . ACMOVI. EDGEMENTS I wish...

  18. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Adam F. (Los Angeles, CA); Vajo, John J. (West Hills, CA); Cumberland, Robert W. (Malibu, CA); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Salguero, Tina T. (Encino, CA)

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  19. On Ramsey Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhananjay P. Mehendale

    2006-05-24

    In this paper we define new numbers called the Neo-Ramsay numbers. We show that these numbers are in fact equal to the Ramsay numbers. Neo-Ramsey numbers are easy to compute and for finding them it is not necessary to check all possible graphs but enough to check only special kind of graphs having a well-defined adjacency pattern.

  20. Solid polymer battery electrolyte and reactive metal-water battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    In one implementation, a reactive metal-water battery includes an anode comprising a metal in atomic or alloy form selected from the group consisting of periodic table Group 1A metals, periodic table Group 2A metals and mixtures thereof. The battery includes a cathode comprising water. Such also includes a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a polyphosphazene comprising ligands bonded with a phosphazene polymer backbone. The ligands comprise an aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion and a metal ion carrier portion. The metal ion carrier portion is bonded at one location with the polymer backbone and at another location with the aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion. The invention also contemplates such solid polymer electrolytes use in reactive metal/water batteries, and in any other battery.

  1. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  2. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  3. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

    1988-08-16

    A method for preparing highly hydrogen-reactive surfaces on metals which normally require substantial heating, high pressures, or an extended induction period, which involves pretreatment of said surfaces with either a non-oxidizing acid or hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen-bearing coating on said surfaces, and subsequently heating said coated metal in the absence of moisture and oxygen for a period sufficient to decompose said coating and cooling said metal to room temperature. Surfaces so treated will react almost instantaneously with hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The method is particularly applicable to uranium, thorium, and lanthanide metals.

  4. COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    4, 1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACESAND METAL COMPLEXES Earl L. Muetterties December 1979 TWO-10308 COORDINATION CHEt1ISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL

  5. 1 -Routing Number 2 -Account Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    you will need: · Your Harvard University Id Number (HUID) · Your HUID pin number · Your Checking/Savings on the right side of the screen under Payroll and Compensation. #12;*Please, in an effort to save paper and if you do not wish to receive a paper copy of the check. Click the small box above the SAVE button. CLICK

  6. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 17 MAY 1999 Near-Field Fluorescence Microscopy Based on Two-Photon Excitation with Metal Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    . The interpretation of the contrast in the recorded images is difficult. In this Letter, we use the metal tip with femtosecond laser pulses of proper polarization. The strongly enhanced electric field at the metal tip ( 15 nm

  7. RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS By James B. Hedrick The rare earths are a relatively million, to thulium and lutetium, the least abundant rare-earth elements at about 0.5 parts per million. Scandium, atomic number 21, is the lightest rare-earth element. It is the 31st most abundant element

  8. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  9. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of...

  10. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  11. Simulations of optical sensors fabricated from metallic rods couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. R.; Balakrishanan, Shankar

    2014-03-31

    We have developed the optical sensing mechanism of photonic couplers fabricated from the periodically arranged metallic rods. The metallic rod lattice is embedded between two dielectric material waveguides. This structure is called metallic coupler. Using the transfer matrix method, expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients of electromagnetic wave propagating in waveguides have been obtained. We found that for certain energies, the electromagnetic wave is totally reflected from the coupler. Similarly, for a certain energy range the light is totally transmitted. It has also been found that by changing the periodicity of the metallic rods, the transmitted energy can be reflected. The periodicity of the metallic lattice can be modified by applying an external stress or pressure. In other words, the system can be used as stress and pressure sensors. The present findings can be used to make new types photonic sensors.

  12. Pulse vaccination in the periodic infection rate SIR epidemic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Jin; Mainul Haque; Quanxing Liu

    2006-06-09

    A pulse vaccination SIR model with periodic infection rate $\\beta (t)$ have been proposed and studied. The basic reproductive number $R_0$ is defined. The dynamical behaviors of the model are analyzed with the help of persistence, bifurcation and global stability. It has been shown that the infection-free periodic solution is globally stable provided $R_0 1$. Standard bifurcation theory have been used to show the existence of the positive periodic solution for the case of $R_0 \\to1^+$. Finally, the numerical simulations have been performed to show the uniqueness and the global stability of the positive periodic solution of the system.

  13. Application Form Reference Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    /yyyy) (/) Title and Description of License/ Certificate/Activity // Date of Award (mm/yyyy) (/) Name Degree/Level Achieved Major Full-time or Part-time Date of Award (mm/yyyy) (/) Period From (mm-time Date of Award (mm/yyyy) (/) Period From (mm/yyyy) (/) To (mm/yyyy) (/) School

  14. Heavy metal biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  15. Shannon Capacity Ramsey Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    Shannon Capacity Ramsey Numbers Old links between Shannon and Ramsey New links between Shannon and Ramsey Bounds on Shannon Capacity and Ramsey Numbers from Product of Graphs Xiaodong Xu1 Stanislaw Institute of Technology, NY, USA March 2014 1/24 #12;Shannon Capacity Ramsey Numbers Old links between

  16. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod7FAdj | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Name: Demand Charge Period 7 Fuel Adj Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProper...

  17. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  18. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mariko [Department of Astronomy, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8521 (Japan); Saio, Hideyuki [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Hachisu, Izumi [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ?} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (? 1.3 M {sub ?}) WDs with very high accretion rates (? 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  19. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  20. Department.: Psychology Course Number: PSYC 202QW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department.: Psychology Course Number: PSYC 202QW Course Title: Principles of Research in Psychology Credits: 4 Contact Person: Charles A. Lowe, Department Head Catalog Copy : PSYC 202QW. Principles of Research in Psychology Either semester. Four credits. Three 1-hour lecture periods and one 2-hour

  1. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  2. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koyama, Koichiro (Hyogo, JP); Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL)

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  3. METAL NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH METAL-LIGAND COVALENT BONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Xiongwu

    2012-01-01

    Formation of catalytic metal-molecule contacts. Science,of Organotransition Metal Compounds. Advances inof highly monodisperse metal nanoparticles. Journal of the

  4. Number Theory Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    2014-12-03

    Dec 3, 2014 ... TBA, Rachel Davis ... September 26, Rachel Davis .... Dessins d'Enfants · Indiana Pi Bill · Notes and Publications · Number Theory Seminar ...

  5. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  6. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  7. Trends in heavy metal concentrations in the Western and Central Baltic Sea waters detected by using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Trends in heavy metal concentrations in the Western and Central Baltic Sea waters detected by using 2003; accepted 10 October 2003 Abstract Heavy metal concentrations from annual sampling in the period metals; Baltic Sea; EOF analysis 1. Introduction The Baltic Sea is one of the largest brackish water

  8. About the logic of the prime number distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn

    2008-01-28

    There are two basic number sequences which play a major role in the prime number distribution. The first Number Sequence SQ1 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+5 and the second Number Sequence SQ2 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+1. All existing prime numbers seem to be contained in these two number sequences, except of the prime numbers 2 and 3. Riemanns Zeta Function also seems to indicate, that there is a logical connection between the mentioned number sequences and the distribution of prime numbers. This connection is indicated by lines in the diagram of the Zeta Function, which are formed by the points s where the Zeta Function is real. Another key role in the distribution of the prime numbers plays the number 5 and its periodic occurrence in the two number sequences SQ1 and SQ2. All non-prime numbers in SQ1 and SQ2 are caused by recurrences of these two number sequences with increasing wave-lengths in themselves, in a similar fashion as Overtones (harmonics) or Undertones derive from a fundamental frequency. On the contrary prime numbers represent spots in these two basic Number Sequences SQ1 and SQ2 where there is no interference caused by these recurring number sequences. The distribution of the non-prime numbers and prime numbers can be described in a graphical way with a -Wave Model- (or Interference Model) -- see Table 2.

  9. Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Print Monday, 19 December 2011 18:29 While mononuclear, polynuclear, and polymeric metal complexes are most often...

  10. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  11. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-10-11

    A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  12. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  13. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  14. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  15. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  16. Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Fractogel® Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC) Resins and Cartridges Tools for His·Tag® Fusion-MACTM Cartridges #12;2 Novagen · Fractogel Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC) Resins Ni-MACTM , Co-MACTM and u-MACTM Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC) Resins and Cartridges HI Ni2+ Ni2+ Ni2+ HISHISHI SHISHISHIS Ni2

  17. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit a cost benefit analysis and choose the most efficient and cost effective modification. Metal or shingle roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  18. Backward and forward modes guided by metal-dielectric-metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backward and forward modes guided by metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguides Arthur R. Davoyan by metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguides Arthur R. Davoyan,a Ilya V. Shadrivov,a Sergey I.davoyan@gmail.com Abstract. We revisited the problem of the existence of plasmonic modes guided by metal- dielectric-metal

  19. Big Numbers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with a length of 35 cm, which certainly helps . With Avogadro's number and the density of liquid hydrogen, we have about 1024 protons per cm2. We then take the beam of 160...

  20. KPA Activity Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http:cio.doe.govsqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering...

  1. High Metallicity LGRB Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, J F; Levesque, E M; Kewley, L J; Tanvir, N R; Levan, A J; Patel, S K; Misra, K; Huang, K -H; Reichart, D E; Nysewander, M; Schady, P

    2015-01-01

    We present our imaging and spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of two dark long bursts with anomalously high metallicities, LGRB 051022 and LGRB 020819B, which in conjunction with another LGRB event with an optical afterglow comprise the three LGRBs with high metallicity host galaxies in the Graham & Fruchter (2013) sample. In Graham & Fruchter (2013), we showed that LGRBs exhibit a strong and apparently intrinsic preference for low metallicity environments (12+log(O/H) & redshift. This is surprising: even among a preselected sample of high metallicity LGRBs, were the metal aversion to remain in effect for these objects, we would expect their metallicity to still be lower than the typical metallicity for the galaxies at that luminosity and redshift. Therefore we deduce that it...

  2. Analytic aspects of periodic instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charbonneau, Benoit, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The main result is a computation of the Nahm transform of a SU(2)-instanton over R x T³, called spatially-periodic instanton. It is a singular monopole over T³, a solution to the Bogomolny equation, whose rank is computed ...

  3. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  4. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  5. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  6. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royer, L.T.

    1987-03-20

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  7. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  8. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratoni, Massimiliano; Terrani, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be superior to the conventional oxide fuel since PCMI and rod burst, respectively, have been mitigated. Under beyond design basis accident scenarios where the fuel is exposed to high temperature steam for prolonged periods, larger inventory of zirconium metal in the core could negatively affect the accident progression. A thin steam resistant layer (e.g. alumina forming alloy steel), integrated into the solid rod during fabrication by co-extrusion or hot-isostatic-pressing, offers the potential to provide additional fuel protection from steam interaction: blanketing under a range of boiling regimes and under severe accident conditions up to high temperatures well beyond what is currently possible in the conventional fuel. A crucial aspect to the viability of M3 fuel in light water reactors is the reduced heavy metal load compared to standard pellet fuel. This study evaluated the design requirements to operate a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with M3 fuel in order to obtain fuel cycle length, reactivity coefficients, and power peaking factors comparable to that of standard fuel.

  9. Two-stage eutectic metal brushes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-07-14

    A two-stage eutectic metal brush assembly having a slip ring rigidly coupled to a shaft, the slip ring being electrically coupled to first voltage polarity. At least one brush is rigidly coupled to a second ring and slidingly engaged to the slip ring. Eutectic metal at least partially fills an annulus between the second ring and a stationary ring. At least one conductor is rigidly coupled to the stationary ring and electrically coupled to a second voltage polarity. Electrical continuity is maintained between the first voltage polarity and the second voltage polarity. Periodic rotational motion is present between the stationary ring and the second ring. Periodic rotational motion is also present between the brush and the slip ring.

  10. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  11. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  12. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  13. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

  14. UCGE Reports Number 20284

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    ABSTRACT Oil and gas are global fuels obtained primarily from drilling wells in underground terrestrial reservoirs. Vertical drilling is preferred because of its simplicity and therefore low cost, but subsurfaceUCGE Reports Number 20284 Department of Geomatics Engineering Continuous Measurement-While-Drilling

  15. Student Code Number: Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    Student Code Number: Thermodynamics Ph.D. Qualifying Exam Department of Mechanical Engineering;Thermodynamics Qualifier January 2013 Problem 1 Air is compressed in an axial-flow compressor operating at steady of exergy destruction within the compressor, in kJ per kg of air flowing. #12;Thermodynamics Qualifier

  16. UCGE Reports Number 20146

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    in considerable operational cost savings for many exploration and open-pit mining companies in the energy sectorUCGE Reports Number 20146 Department of Geomatics Engineering Development of a Mobile Equipment Equipment Management System solution. In the open-pit mining industries there is a need for these companies

  17. Australia NO REGISTRATION NUMBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portugal Romania Slovenia Spain Turkey UK USA Australia Austria Belgium Cyprus France Germany Greece#12;#12;Australia Austria Belgium Cyprus France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Japan Macedonia Ireland Italy Japan Macedonia Portugal Romania Slovenia Spain Turkey UK USA #12;NO REGISTRATION NUMBER 1

  18. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  19. Polyacidic multiloading metal extractants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, R. J.; Campbell, J.; Henderson, D.K.; Henry, D. C. R.; Swart, R. M.; Tasker, P. A.; White, F. J.; Wood, J. L.; Yellowlees, L. J

    2008-01-01

    Novel polynucleating, di- and tri-acidic ligands have been designed to increase the molar and mass transport efficiencies for the recovery of base metals by solvent extraction.

  20. Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

    2005-02-28

    In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

  1. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Galvin, James E. (Emeryville, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time.

  2. Metallomics of two microorganisms relevant to heavy metal bioremediation reveal fundamental differences in metal assimilation and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, Andrew [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Menon, Angeli [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Scott, Israel [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Poole, Farris [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Vaccaro, Brian [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Thorgersen, Michael P [ORNL] [ORNL; Geller, Jil [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hazen, Terry C [ORNL] [ORNL; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA] [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2014-01-01

    Although as many as half of all proteins are thought to require a metal cofactor, the metalloproteomes of microorganisms remain relatively unexplored. Microorganisms from different environments are likely to vary greatly in the metals that they assimilate, not just among the metals with well-characterized roles but also those lacking any known function. Herein we investigated the metal utilization of two microorganisms that were isolated from very similar environments and are of interest because of potential roles in the immobilization of heavy metals, such as uranium and chromium. The metals assimilated and their concentrations in the cytoplasm of Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) and Enterobacter cloacae strain Hanford (EcH) varied dramatically, with a larger number of metals present in Enterobacter. For example, a total of 9 and 19 metals were assimilated into their cytoplasmic fractions, respectively, and DvH did not assimilate significant amounts of zinc or copper whereas EcH assimilated both. However, bioinformatic analysis of their genome sequences revealed a comparable number of predicted metalloproteins, 813 in DvH and 953 in EcH. These allowed some rationalization of the types of metal assimilated in some cases (Fe, Cu, Mo, W, V) but not in others (Zn, Nd, Ce, Pr, Dy, Hf and Th). It was also shown that U binds an unknown soluble protein in EcH but this incorporation was the result of extracellular U binding to cytoplasmic components after cell lysis.

  3. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowndes, D.H.; Pedraza, A.J.; DeSilva, M.J.; Kumar, R.A.

    1997-12-30

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials are disclosed. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon. 7 figs.

  4. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Pedraza, Anthony J. (Oak Ridge, TN); DeSilva, Melvin J. (Ithaca, NY); Kumar, Rajagopalan A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon.

  5. Frozen light in periodic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Figotin; I. Vitebskiy

    2006-09-16

    Wave propagation in spatially periodic media, such as photonic crystals, can be qualitatively different from any uniform substance. The differences are particularly pronounced when the electromagnetic wavelength is comparable to the primitive translation of the periodic structure. In such a case, the periodic medium cannot be assigned any meaningful refractive index. Still, such features as negative refraction and/or opposite phase and group velocities for certain directions of light propagation can be found in almost any photonic crystal. The only reservation is that unlike hypothetical uniform left-handed media, photonic crystals are essentially anisotropic at frequency range of interest. Consider now a plane wave incident on a semi-infinite photonic crystal. One can assume, for instance, that in the case of positive refraction, the normal components of the group and the phase velocities of the transmitted Bloch wave have the same sign, while in the case of negative refraction, those components have opposite signs. What happens if the normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity vanishes? Let us call it a "zero-refraction" case. At first sight, zero normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity implies total reflection of the incident wave. But we demonstrate that total reflection is not the only possibility. Instead, the transmitted wave can appear in the form of an abnormal grazing mode with huge amplitude and nearly tangential group velocity. This spectacular phenomenon is extremely sensitive to the frequency and direction of propagation of the incident plane wave. These features can be very attractive in numerous applications, such as higher harmonic generation and wave mixing, light amplification and lasing, highly efficient superprizms, etc.

  6. The variable star population in Phoenix: coexistence of Anomalous and short-period Classical Cepheids, and detection of RR Lyrae variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gallart; A. Aparicio; W. L. Freedman; B. F. Madore; D. Martinez-Delgado; P. B. Stetson

    2004-02-17

    We present the results of a search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Phoenix. Nineteen Cepheids, six candidate long-period variables, one candidate eclipsing binary and a large number of candidate RR Lyrae stars have been identified. Periods and light curves have been obtained for all the Cepheid variables. Their distribution in the period-luminosity diagram reveals that both Anomalous Cepheids (AC) and short-period Classical Cepheids s-pCC are found in our sample. This is the first time that both types of variable star are identified in the same system even though they likely coexist, but have gone unnoticed so far, in other low-metallicity galaxies like Leo A and Sextans A. We argue that the conditions for the existence of both types of variable star in the same galaxy are a low metallicity at all ages, and the presence of both young and intermediate-age (or old, depending on the nature of AC) stars. The RR Lyrae candidates trace, together with the well developed horizontal branch, the existence of an important old population in Phoenix. The different spatial distributions of s-pCC, AC and RR Lyrae variables in the Phoenix field are consistent with the stellar population gradients found in Phoenix, in the sense that the younger population is concentrated in the central part of the galaxy. The gradients in the distribution of the young population within the central part of Phoenix, which seem to indicate a propagation of the recent star formation, are also reflected in the spatial distribution of the s-pCC.

  7. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. It is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known for aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  8. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: • further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework • further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability • use molecule structure building software to generate large numbers of candidate ligand architectures for given sets of donor groups • screen candidates and identify ligand architectures that will exhibit enhanced metal ion recognition. These new capabilities are being applied to ligand systems identified under other DOEsponsored projects where studies have suggested that modifying existing architectures will lead to dramatic enhancements in metal ion binding affinity and selectivity. With this in mind, we are collaborating with Professors R. T. Paine (University of New Mexico), K. N. Raymond (University of California, Berkeley), and J. E. Hutchison (University of Oregon), and Dr. B. A. Moyer (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) to obtain experimental validation of the predicted new ligand structures. Successful completion of this study will yield molecular-level insight into the role that ligand architecture plays in controlling metal ion complexation and will provide a computational approach to ligand design.

  9. Surface Signature of Flow Past a Sphere at Moderate Reynolds Numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qi

    2014-04-29

    The incompressible viscous flow past a sphere is investigated numerically at moderate Reynolds numbers. Periodic vortex shedding happens at these Reynolds numbers. The primary objective is to identify the surface signature when the wake reaches...

  10. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05

    Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern carnivalesque play...

  11. Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Main Group Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Based Frameworks with Open Metal Sites In previous work, weClusters Introduction Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)abundant choice of metal ions and clusters, numerous organic

  12. Control of Metal Nanocrystal Size Reveals Metal-Support Interface Role for Ceria Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargnello, M; Doan-Nguyen, VVT; Gordon, TR; Diaz, RE; Stach, EA; Gorte, RJ; Fornasiero, P; Murray, CB

    2013-08-15

    Interactions between ceria (CeO2) and supported metals greatly enhance rates for a number of important reactions. However, direct relationships between structure and function in these catalysts have been difficult to extract because the samples studied either were heterogeneous or were model systems dissimilar to working catalysts. We report rate measurements on samples in which the length of the ceria-metal interface was tailored by the use of monodisperse nickel, palladium, and platinum nanocrystals. We found that carbon monoxide oxidation in ceria-based catalysts is greatly enhanced at the ceria-metal interface sites for a range of group VIII metal catalysts, clarifying the pivotal role played by the support.

  13. Metallic nanowire networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-11-06

    A metallic nanowire network synthesized using chemical reduction of a metal ion source by a reducing agent in the presence of a soft template comprising a tubular inverse micellar network. The network of interconnected polycrystalline nanowires has a very high surface-area/volume ratio, which makes it highly suitable for use in catalytic applications.

  14. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  15. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 IdleReport

  16. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 IdleReportReport

  17. Method for producing nanostructured metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Simpson, Randall L.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Gash, Alexander

    2006-01-17

    A synthetic route for producing nanostructure metal-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing. This procedure employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-metal inorganic salts and environmentally friendly solvents such as water and ethanol. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by the addition of a proton scavenger, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively. Using this method synthesis of metal-oxide nanostructured materials have been carried out using inorganic salts, such as of Fe.sup.3+, Cr.sup.3+, Al.sup.3+, Ga.sup.3+, In.sup.3+, Hf.sup.4+, Sn.sup.4+, Zr.sup.4+, Nb.sup.5+, W.sup.6+, Pr.sup.3+, Er.sup.3+, Nd.sup.3+, Ce.sup.3+, U.sup.3+ and Y.sup.3+. The process is general and nanostructured metal-oxides from the following elements of the periodic table can be made: Groups 2 through 13, part of Group 14 (germanium, tin, lead), part of Group 15 (antimony, bismuth), part of Group 16 (polonium), and the lanthanides and actinides. The sol-gel processing allows for the addition of insoluble materials (e.g., metals or polymers) to the viscous sol, just before gelation, to produce a uniformly distributed nanocomposites upon gelation. As an example, energetic nanocomposites of Fe.sub.xO.sub.y gel with distributed Al metal are readily made. The compositions are stable, safe, and can be readily ignited to thermitic reaction.

  18. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  19. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  20. Quantum random number generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Stipcevic; B. Medved Rogina

    2007-01-01

    We report upon a novel principle for realization of a fast nondeterministic random number generator whose randomness relies on intrinsic randomness of the quantum physical processes of photonic emission in semiconductors and subsequent detection by the photoelectric effect. Timing information of detected photons is used to generate binary random digits-bits. The bit extraction method based on restartable clock theoretically eliminates both bias and autocorrelation while reaching efficiency of almost 0.5 bits per random event. A prototype has been built and statistically tested.

  1. Neither Name, Nor Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico Holik

    2011-12-20

    Since its origins, Quantum mechanics has presented problems with the concept of individuality. It is argued that quantum particles do not have individuality, and so, one can speak about "entities without identity". On the contrary, we claim that the problem of quantum non individuality goes deeper, and that one of its most important features is the fact that there are quantum systems for which particle number is not well defined. In this work, we continue this discussion in relation to the problem about the one and the many.

  2. Metal Enrichment in the Reionization Epoch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The presence of elements heavier than helium ("metals") is of fundamental importance for a large number of astrophysical processes occurring in planet, star and galaxy formation; it also affects cosmic structure formation and evolution in several ways. Even a small amount of heavy elements can dramatically alter the chemistry of the gas, opening the path to complex molecules. Metals might enhance the ability of the gas to radiate away its thermal energy, thus favoring the formation of gravitationally bound objects; they can also condensate in a solid phase (dust grains), partly or totally blocking radiation from luminous sources. Finally, they represent useful tracers of energy deposition by stars and probe the physical properties of the environment by absorption or emission lines. Last, but certainly not least, life -- as we know it on Earth -- is tightly related to the presence of at least some of the heavy elements. In this pedagogical review I will concentrate on the connection between early metal enrichm...

  3. Metal nanodisks using bicellar templates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A

    2013-12-03

    Metallic nanodisks and a method of making them. The metallic nanodisks are wheel-shaped structures that that provide large surface areas for catalytic applications. The metallic nanodisks are grown within bicelles (disk-like micelles) that template the growth of the metal in the form of approximately circular dendritic sheets. The zero-valent metal forming the nanodisks is formed by reduction of a metal ion using a suitable electron donor species.

  4. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  5. Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Frebel

    2008-02-13

    The abundance patterns of metal-poor stars provide us a wealth of chemical information about various stages of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In particular, these stars allow us to study the formation and evolution of the elements and the involved nucleosynthesis processes. This knowledge is invaluable for our understanding of the cosmic chemical evolution and the onset of star- and galaxy formation. Metal-poor stars are the local equivalent of the high-redshift Universe, and offer crucial observational constraints on the nature of the first stars. This review presents the history of the first discoveries of metal-poor stars that laid the foundation to this field. Observed abundance trends at the lowest metallicities are described, as well as particular classes of metal-poor stars such as r-process and C-rich stars. Scenarios on the origins of the abundances of metal-poor stars and the application of large samples of metal-poor stars to cosmological questions are discussed.

  6. On Some Zarankiewicz Numbers and Bipartite Ramsey Numbers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    On Some Zarankiewicz Numbers and Bipartite Ramsey Numbers for Quadrilateral Janusz Dybizba Ramsey number b(n1, · · · , nk) is the least positive integer b such that any coloring of the edges of Kb Ramsey numbers avoiding quadrilateral. In particular, we prove that b4(2) = 19, and establish new general

  7. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  8. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  9. EXELFS of Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Y.; Alamgir, F.M.; Schwarz, R.B.; Jain, H.; Williams, D.B.

    1999-11-30

    The feasibility of using extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS) obtained from {approximately}1 nm regions of metallic glasses to study their short-range order has been examined. Ionization edges of the metallic glasses in the electron energy-loss spectrum (EELS) have been obtained from PdNiP bulk metallic glass and Ni{sub 2}P polycrystalline powder in a transmission electron microscope. The complexity of EXELFS analysis of L- and M-ionization edges of heavy elements (Z>22, i.e. Ni and Pd) is addressed by theoretical calculations using an ab initio computer code, and its results are compared with the experimental data.

  10. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  11. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  12. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  13. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  14. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  15. Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

    2014-12-11

    We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

  16. Period tripling causes rotating spirals in agitated wet granular layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang; Ingo Rehberg

    2011-07-07

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals.

  17. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

    1988-06-07

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

  18. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Sumpman, Wayne C. (North Huntingdon, PA); Baker, Robert J. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Williams, Robert S. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1988-01-01

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

  19. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  20. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  1. METALS DESIGN HANDBOOK DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9 06 Revision 0 METALS DESIGN HANDBOOK DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States...

  2. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  3. Point Vortices: Finding Periodic Orbits and their Topological Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer A. Smith

    2015-10-22

    The motion of point vortices constitutes an especially simple class of solutions to Euler's equation for two dimensional, inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational fluids. In addition to their intrinsic mathematical importance, these solutions are also physically relevant. Rotating superfluid helium can support rectilinear quantized line vortices, which in certain regimes are accurately modeled by point vortices. Depending on the number of vortices, it is possible to have either regular integrable motion or chaotic motion. Thus, the point vortex model is one of the simplest and most tractable fluid models which exhibits some of the attributes of weak turbulence. The primary aim of this work is to find and classify periodic orbits, a special class of solutions to the point vortex problem. To achieve this goal, we introduce a number of algorithms: Lie transforms which ensure that the equations of motion are accurately solved; constrained optimization which reduces close return orbits to true periodic orbits; object-oriented representations of the braid group which allow for the topological comparison of periodic orbits. By applying these ideas, we accumulate a large data set of periodic orbits and their associated attributes. To render this set tractable, we introduce a topological classification scheme based on a natural decomposition of mapping classes. Finally, we consider some of the intriguing patterns which emerge in the distribution of periodic orbits in phase space. Perhaps the most enduring theme which arises from this investigation is the interplay between topology and geometry. The topological properties of a periodic orbit will often force it to have certain geometric properties.

  4. Molten metal reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  5. Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records of Swiss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records 2014 #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Index 1 Long-period pulses in records 2 Motivation for the study 3 Developed program 4 Results #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed

  6. Preparation and use of crystalline bis-monoorganic phosphonate and phosphate salts of tetravalent metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1980-06-26

    A method of preparing and using the crystalline organic derivatives of the tetravalent metal phosphates and phosphonates provides for the contacting of an aqueous solution of a metal nitrate, with a solution of an organophosphorus acid for a period of time at room temperature that is sufficient for the formation of a metal phosphate product, and thereafter recovering said product. According to the invention, the product of the disclosed process is used in effecting analytical separations, such as ion exchange and chromatography.

  7. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  8. A Periodic Solution to Impulsive Logistic Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyong-Chol Kim; Hyong-Chol O; Sang-Mun Kim; Chol Kim

    2014-03-28

    In this paper is provided a new representation of periodic solution to the impulsive Logistic equation considered in [7].

  9. Thermally tolerant multilayer metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of a Group IVB or Group VB metal sandwiched between two layers of a Group VIIIB metal selected from the group consisting of palladium, platinum, nickel, rhodium, iridium, cobalt, and alloys thereof, and a non-continuous layer of a metal chalcogenide upon one layer of the Group VIIIB metal is disclosed together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture using such a composite membrane and a process for forming such a composite metal membrane.

  10. Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles Spencer Bloch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Spencer

    K0(X) = CHp (X)Q Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 Albert) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 ) - Zp (X) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3

  11. Peroxotitanates for Biodelivery of Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, David; Elvington, M.

    2009-02-11

    Metal-based drugs are largely undeveloped in pharmacology. One limiting factor is the systemic toxicity of metal-based compounds. A solid-phase, sequestratable delivery agent for local delivery of metals could reduce systemic toxicity, facilitating new drug development in this nascent area. Amorphous peroxotitanates (APT) are ion exchange materials with high affinity for several heavy metal ions, and have been proposed to deliver or sequester metal ions in biological contexts. In the current study, we tested a hypothesis that APT are able to deliver metals or metal compounds to cells. We exposed fibroblasts (L929) or monocytes (THP1) to metal-APT materials for 72 h in vitro, then measured cellular mitochondrial activity (SDH-MTT method) to assess the biological impact of the metal-APT materials vs. metals or APT alone. APT alone did not significantly affect cellular mitochondrial activity, but all metal-APT materials suppressed the mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts (by 30-65% of controls). The concentration of metal-APT materials required to suppress cellular mitochondrial activity was below that required for metals alone, suggesting that simple extracellular release of the metals from the metal-APT materials was not the primary mechanism of mitochondrial suppression. In contrast to fibroblasts, no metal-APT material had a measurable effect on THP1 monocyte mitochondrial activity, despite potent suppression by metals alone. This latter result suggested that 'biodelivery' by metal-APT materials may be cell type-specific. Therefore, it appears that APT are plausible solid phase delivery agents of metals or metal compounds to some types of cells for potential therapeutic effect.

  12. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  13. Method for forming metal contacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  14. Detection of superimposed periodic signals using wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Otazu; M. Ribo; M. Peracaula; J. M. Paredes; J. Nunez

    2002-02-05

    In this paper we present a wavelet based algorithm that is able to detect superimposed periodic signals in data with low signal-noise ratio. In this context, the results given by classical period determination methods highly depend on the intrinsic characteristics of each periodic signal, like amplitude or profile. It is then difficult to detect the different periods present in the data set. The results given by the wavelet based method for period determination we present here are independent of the characteristics of the signals.

  15. High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed Metal/Metal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference...

  16. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauerle, James E. (Plum Borough, PA); Reed, William H. (Monroeville, PA); Berkey, Edgar (Murrysville, PA)

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  17. The Distribution of Ramsey Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane Clark; Frank Gaitan

    2014-11-10

    We prove that the number of integers in the interval [0,x] that are non-trivial Ramsey numbers r(k,n) (3 <= k <= n) has order of magnitude (x ln x)**(1/2).

  18. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  19. Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1992-01-01

    A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  20. Nearest neighbor spacing distribution of prime numbers and quantum chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Wolf

    2014-01-07

    We give heuristic arguments and computer results to support the hypothesis that, after appropriate rescaling, the statistics of spacings between adjacent prime numbers follows the Poisson distribution. The scaling transformation removes the oscillations in the NNSD of primes. These oscillations have the very profound period of length six. We also calculate the spectral rigidity $\\Delta_3$ for prime numbers by two methods. After suitable averaging one of these methods gives the Poisson dependence $\\Delta_3(L)=L/15$.

  1. INFORMATION Course Number ISE 232L

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bukkapatnam, Satish T.S.

    manufacturing processes including casting, machining, forming with specific emphasis on metal part manufacturing

  2. Ordered Ramsey numbers David Conlon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jacob

    Ordered Ramsey numbers David Conlon Jacob Fox Choongbum Lee Benny Sudakov§ Abstract Given a labeled graph H with vertex set {1, 2, . . . , n}, the ordered Ramsey number r with vertices appearing in the same order as in H. The ordered Ramsey number of a labeled graph H is at least

  3. Hypergraph Ramsey numbers David Conlon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jacob

    Hypergraph Ramsey numbers David Conlon Jacob Fox Benny Sudakov Abstract The Ramsey number rk(s, n). In this paper we obtain new estimates for several basic hypergraph Ramsey problems. We give a new upper bound-color Ramsey number r3(n, n, n), which is the minimum N such that every 3-coloring of the triples

  4. Data Compression with Prime Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-11-16

    A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

  5. Metal-optic and Plasmonic Semiconductor-based Nanolasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhani, Amit

    2012-01-01

    of Metals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .coupled Metal-optic Nanocavities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .dependent quality factors Q metal for good conduc- tors.

  6. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  7. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  8. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  9. Metallic carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  10. Fast Rotation vs. Metallicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronaldo Levenhagen; Nelson Vani Leister; Juan Zorec; Yves Fremat

    2005-09-07

    Fast rotation seems to be the major factor to trigger the Be phenomenon. Surface fast rotation can be favored by initial formation conditions such as metal abundance. Models of fast rotating atmospheres and evolutionary tracks are used to determine the stellar fundamental parameters of 120 Be stars situated in spatially well-separated regions to imply there is between them some gradient of metallicity. We study the effects of the incidence of this gradient on the nature of the studied stars as fast rotators.

  11. Catalysis Without Precious Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2010-11-01

    Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Metal alloy identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  13. Ecological interactions between metals and microbes that impact bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Konopka; Cindy Nakatsu

    2004-03-17

    Distinct microbial communities had been found in contaminated soils that varied in their concentrations of Pb, Cr and aromatic compounds. It is difficult to distinguish between their effects as their presence is highly correlated. Microcosms were constructed in which either Pb{sup +2} or CrO{sub 4}{sup -2} was added at levels that produced acute modest or severe acute effects (50 or 90% reduction). We previously reported on changes in microbial activity and broad patterns of Bacterial community composition. These results showed that addition of an organic energy source selected for a relatively small number of phylotypes and the addition of Pb or Cr(VI) modulated the community response. We sequenced dominant phylotypes from microcosms amended with xylene and Cr(VI) and from those with the simple addition of glucose only. In both cases, the dominant selected phylotypes were diverse. We found a number of distinct Arthrobacter strains, as well as several Pseudomonas spp. In addition, the high GC-content bands belonged to members of the genera Nocardioides and Rhodococcus. The focus of amended microcosm work has now shifted to anaerobic processes. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) as a detoxification mechanism is of greater interest, as is the specific role of particular physiological groups of anaerobes in mediating Cr(VI) detoxification. The correlation between microbial activity, community structure, and metal level has been analyzed on 150 mg of soil collected at spatial scales <1, 5, 15 and 50 cm. There was no correlation between metal content and activity level. Soils <1 cm apart could differ in activity 10-fold and extractable Pb and Cr 7-fold. Therefore, we turned to geostatistical analysis. There was spatial periodicity which is likely to reflect the heterogeneous distribution of active microbes and metal contaminants. Variograms indicated that the range of spatial dependence was up to 20 cm. To visualize the spatial relationships between the primary variate (activity) and its covariates (lead and chromium content), block kriging was used. The kriging maps suggest that areas exist where increased metal concentrations have zones of decreased metabolic microbial activity. Cr(VI) resistant bacteria have been isolated from two contaminated sites. Most isolates are Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, or Pseudomonas spp. A chrA gene has been cloned from Arthrobacter strain CR15 isolated from Cannelton, MI. PCR-primers have been produced against conserved motifs analyzed from 8 chrA sequences. Of the 96 Cr-resistant isolates from Cannelton, 85% gave a positive reaction to these primers. In contrast, none of the 38 isolates from Seymour, IN were positive. Therefore, at least for the culturable community, a particular resistance determinant appears to be widespread at a geographical site but rare (absent) at another site. The phylogenetic relatedness of the Arthrobacter strains is being evaluated via the distribution of repetitive elements as well as genome-wide restriction fragment analysis. Work to date on the latter has also suggested that Arthrobacter genomes are small (<2.5 Mbp). Gene capture experiments demonstrated that chromate-sensitive Gram-negative bacterial strains could obtain resistance from Cr-contaminated soil. However, frequency of transfer is low (10-6-10-8). Genetic diversity of the acquired chromate resistance mechanism is being assessed.

  14. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2006-07-31

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc salt in the castable refractory block and it is released over the same time period as the salt. Therefore, to limit the impact of precipitated Fe on the release of 99Tc, both the amount of precipitated Fe in the BV glass and the diameter of these particles should be minimized.

  15. Method for the preparation of metal colloids in inverse micelles and product preferred by the method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcoxon, Jess P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for preparing catalytic elemental metal colloidal particles (e.g. gold, palladium, silver, rhodium, iridium, nickel, iron, platinum, molybdenum) or colloidal alloy particles (silver/iridium or platinum/gold). A homogeneous inverse micelle solution of a metal salt is first formed in a metal-salt solvent comprised of a surfactant (e.g. a nonionic or cationic surfactant) and an organic solvent. The size and number of inverse micelles is controlled by the proportions of the surfactant and the solvent. Then, the metal salt is reduced (by chemical reduction or by a pulsed or continuous wave UV laser) to colloidal particles of elemental metal. After their formation, the colloidal metal particles can be stabilized by reaction with materials that permanently add surface stabilizing groups to the surface of the colloidal metal particles. The sizes of the colloidal elemental metal particles and their size distribution is determined by the size and number of the inverse micelles. A second salt can be added with further reduction to form the colloidal alloy particles. After the colloidal elemental metal particles are formed, the homogeneous solution distributes to two phases, one phase rich in colloidal elemental metal particles and the other phase rich in surfactant. The colloidal elemental metal particles from one phase can be dried to form a powder useful as a catalyst. Surfactant can be recovered and recycled from the phase rich in surfactant.

  16. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ?{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ?{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  17. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Fabricated Metals Sector (NAICS 332) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS...

  18. Locating experiential richness in doom metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    as Trouble) (1984), Metal Blade. Witchfinder General.Death Penalty (1982), Heavy Metal Records.the Balinese Death/ Thrash Metal Scene. ” Popular Music 22,

  19. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-01

    Structural Evolution in Metal Oxide/Semiconductor Colloidalasymmetric one-sided metal-tipped semiconductor nanocrystalGrowth of Magnetic-Metal- Functionalized Semiconductor Oxide

  20. CONTROL OF TRACE METAL EMISSIONS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THOMAS C. HO

    1998-02-18

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. This final technical report details the work performed, the conclusions obtained, and the accomplishments achieved over the project performance period from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1997. Specifically, this report consists of the following five chapters: Chapter 1. Executive Summary; Chapter 2. Metal Capture by Various Sorbents; Chapter 3. Simultaneous Metal and Sulfur Capture; Chapter 4. Sorption and Desorption of Mercury on Sorbents; and Chapter 5. Project Conclusions. In summary, the metals involved in the project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and calcined limestone. The three sorbents have been found to have various degree of metal capture capability on arsenic, cadmium, chromium and lead. Among them, calcined limestone is capable of simultaneouely capturing metals and sulfur. Mercury and selenium, however, can not be effectively retained by these sorbents under the combustion conditions. Mercury adsorption by sorbents at low temperatures was also investigated and the developed mass transfer model for mercury absorption appears to describe reasonably well the experimental results. Overall, the project has generated 18 presentations and/or publications in professional conferences and journals.

  1. Metal working lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andress, H.J.; Davis, R.H.; Schick, J.W.

    1981-08-11

    A lubricant concentrate for use in metal processing comprises a sulfur compound such as a sulfurized olefin or sulfurized mineral oil and an ester prepared from a fatty acid having 12 to 40 carbon atoms or the dimer thereof or a polyalkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride and a hydroxyl-containing amine.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, William V. (Boulder, CO)

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  4. The erosion of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, David Richard

    1980-10-21

    The study of the erosion of metallic surfaces by solid particles has been an area of dispute recently (1980) especially concerning the importance of target melting as a mechanism for the removal of material. In addition, erosion by particles at a...

  5. Pricing Conspicuous Consumption Products in Recession Periods ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-26

    cally used in chemical engineering, e.g., to avoid irreversible reactions in ... Our basic problem is based on an economic setting with a recession period followed.

  6. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  7. Risk, Financing and the Optimal Number of Suppliers Volodymyr Babich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Goker

    Risk, Financing and the Optimal Number of Suppliers Volodymyr Babich McDonough School of Business, fixed supplier costs, financial constraints, and the dual role played by suppliers as the providers, supplier selection, and supply chain performance. Using a one-period model, we consider the joint

  8. Metal hydrides as electrode/catalyst materials for oxygen evolution/reduction in electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA); Halpert, Gerald (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent (Pasadena, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Hightower, Adrian (Whittier, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula, AB.sub.(5-Y)X(.sub.y), is claimed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of groups 8, 9, and 10 of the periodic table of the elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, and bismuth. Ternary or higher-order substitutions, to the base AB.sub.5 alloys, that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  9. 9 Metal to Non-metal Transitions in Solids and on Surfaces studied using Photoemission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    9 Metal to Non-metal Transitions in Solids and on Surfaces studied using Photoemission Spectroscopy of the electrical properties of a material between those of a metal and those of a non-metal (be it semiconducting metal to non-metal transitions. (Thephrase `metal to non-metal transition' is used in this paper

  10. Parameters of Integral Circulant Graphs and Periodic Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitin Saxena; Simone Severini; Igor Shparlinski

    2007-03-26

    The intention of the paper is to move a step towards a classification of network topologies that exhibit periodic quantum dynamics. We show that the evolution of a quantum system, whose hamiltonian is identical to the adjacency matrix of a circulant graph, is periodic if and only if all eigenvalues of the graph are integers (that is, the graph is integral). Motivated by this observation, we focus on relevant properties of integral circulant graphs. Specifically, we bound the number of vertices of integral circulant graphs in terms of their degree, characterize bipartiteness and give exact bounds for their diameter. Additionally, we prove that circulant graphs with odd order do not allow perfect state transfer.

  11. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, L.J.

    1982-09-20

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  12. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  13. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1986-01-01

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  14. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  15. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  16. Metals and ceramics division annual progress report for period endng June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning engineering materials; fuels and processes; materials science; other research activities; and specialized research facilities and equipment.

  17. Periodic Properties of Force Constants of Small Transition-Metal and Lanthanide Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    of Experimental Results 2434 A. Group 3 2434 1. Scandium 2434 2. Yttrium 2435 3. Lutetium and the Lanthanides 2435

  18. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  19. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  20. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  1. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  2. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  3. Inference and Visualization of Periodic Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ying

    2011-10-21

    are evenly spaced in time. The period is estimated by a "leave-out-one-cycle" version of cross-validation (CV) and complements the periodogram, a widely used tool for period estimation. The CV method is computationally simple and implicitly penalizes...

  4. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNew York,' , /v-i 2

  5. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1980-11-01

    This bibliography includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

  6. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1980-11-01

    This bibliogralphy includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

  7. Neighboring Interactions in a Periodic Plasmonic Material for Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musho, Terence D; Coppens, Zackary J

    2015-01-01

    A periodic plasmonic meta-material was studied using finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method to investigate the influence of neighboring particles on the near unity optical absorptivity. The meta-material was constructed as a silver nanoparticle (20-90nm) situated above an alumina (Al$_2$O$_3$) dielectric environment. A full parametric sweep of the particle width and the dielectric thickness was conducted. Computational results identified several resonances between the metal-dielectric and metal-air that have potential to broadening the response through stacked geometry. A significant coupled resonance between the metal-dielectric resonance and a cavity resonance between particles was capture as a function of dielectric thickness. This coupled resonance was not evident below dielectric thicknesses of 40nm and above cavity widths of 20nm. Additionally, a noticeable propagating surface plasmon polariton resonance was predicted when the particle width was half the unit cell length.

  8. Metal-assisted chemical etch porous silicon formation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xiuling; Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2004-09-14

    A thin discontinuous layer of metal such as Au, Pt, or Au/Pd is deposited on a silicon surface. The surface is then etched in a solution including HF and an oxidant for a brief period, as little as a couple seconds to one hour. A preferred oxidant is H.sub.2 O.sub.2. Morphology and light emitting properties of porous silicon can be selectively controlled as a function of the type of metal deposited, Si doping type, silicon doping level, and/or etch time. Electrical assistance is unnecessary during the chemical etching of the invention, which may be conducted in the presence or absence of illumination.

  9. Bloch states, universality in light transport through a perforated metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevorkian, Zh S; Cuevas, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Light transport in a metal with hole arrays is considered.Analytical expressions for a normal incident lights transmission coefficient in a metallic system with periodic, isolated and disordered holes are obtained and analyzed. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of an extraordinary transmittance. It was proven that a sufficient condition for such extraordinary behavior is a long-range order in the dielectric permittivity profile. Based on the extended Bloch states model a ladder structure and universal behavior for a transmission spectra is predicted. The resonance wavelength of a transmission spectra is found for the Kronig-Penney model. The role of surface plasmons is discussed.

  10. BINARY BLUE METAL-POOR STARS: EVIDENCE FOR ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH MASS TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, John

    BINARY BLUE METAL-POOR STARS: EVIDENCE FOR ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH MASS TRANSFER Christopher Sneden We present new abundance analyses of six blue metal-poor (BMP) stars with very low iron abundances possess a small number of so-called blue stragglers--main-sequence stars that are clearly bluer

  11. Ecotoxicology 2, 68-78 (1994) Zinc, among a `cocktail' of metal pollutants, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkin, Steve

    1994-01-01

    ) contaminated in the laboratory with arange of concentrations of cadmium, copper, lead or zinc. The metals were applied topically to the leaves as nitrates. Growth and survival, numbers of live offspring produced). The relative toxicities of the four metals in the laboratory were compared with concentrations of cadmium

  12. Pipeline MT Instructions Identification Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Pipeline MT Instructions Identification Number For identification purposes, you will be assigned a special identification number. M# You can activate your MT email, login to PipelineMT to register for classes or pay tuition and fees. Activating the MTSU Email and PipelineMT accounts: Visit the website

  13. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-03-07

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  14. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-04-02

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  15. Spray casting of metallic preforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

  16. Industrially challenging separations via adsorption in metal-organic frameworks : a computational exploration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennox, Matthew James

    2015-06-29

    In recent years, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been identified as promising adsorbents in a number of industrially relevant, yet challenging, separations, including the removal of propane from propane/propylene ...

  17. Transverse commensurability effect for vortices on periodic pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J

    2008-01-01

    Using computer simulations, we demonstrate a type of commensurability that occurs for vortices moving longitudinally through periodic pinning arrays in the presence of an additional transverse driving force. As a function of vortex density, there is a series of broad maxima in the transverse critical depinning force that do not fall at the matching fields where the number of vortices equals an integer multiple of the number of pinning sites. The commensurability effects are associated with dynamical states in which evenly spaced structures consisting of one or more moving rows of vortices form between rows of pinning sites. Remarkably, the critical transverse depinning force can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the longitudinal depinning force.

  18. Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-08

    A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  20. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  1. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  2. Periodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    of ad effectiveness measurements across time. Additionally, the experimental units should rotate betweenPeriodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments Jon experiments to the measurement of advertising effectiveness. One reason this method of measurement

  3. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

  4. Types of random numbers and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascagni, Michael

    Types of random numbers and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Quasirandom number generation Conclusions WE246: Random Number Generation A Practitioner's Overview Prof. Michael Mascagni #12;Types of random numbers and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Quasirandom number

  5. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  6. MIXMAX random number generator. Generalised parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvidy, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We are exploring the parameter space of the MIXMAX random number generator, which is based on Kolmogorov-Anosov C-system defined on a torus. For a two-parameter family of C-system operators A(N,s), parametrised by the integers N and s, we found new larger values of N. One can deduce from this data that the entropy and the period are sharply increasing with N. For all of these parameters, the sequence passes all tests in the BigCrush suite. For the largest of them, N=44851, the period approaches million digits. The generator with N=256 and s=487013230256099064 has the best combination of speed, reasonable size of the state and availability for implementing the parallelisation and is currently the default generator in the ROOT software package at CERN. A three-parameter generator A(N,s,m) of the MIXMX family of generators is also presented, and it provides high quality statistical properties for small values of N.

  7. Shell Structures and Chaos in Deformed Nuclei and Large Metallic Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Dieter Heiss; Rashid G. Nazmitdinov; Stefanel Radu

    1994-09-30

    A reflection-asymmetric deformed oscillator potential is analysed from the classical and quantum mechanical point of view. The connection between occurrence of shell structures and classical periodic orbits is studied using the ''removal of resonances method'' in a classical analysis. In this approximation, the effective single particle potential becomes separable and the frequencies of the classical trajectories are easily determined. It turns out that the winding numbers calculated in this way are in good agreement with the ones found from the corresponding quantum mechanical spectrum using the particle number dependence of the fluctuating part of the total energy. When the octupole term is switched on it is found that prolate shapes are stable against chaos whereas spherical and oblate cases become chaotic. An attempt is made to explain this difference in the quantum mechanical context by looking at the distribution of exceptional points which results from the matrix structure of the respective Hamiltonians. In a similar way we analyse the modified Nilsson model and discuss its consequences for nuclei and metallic clusters.

  8. Solution of the Sturm-Liouville and the Korteweg-de-Vries equations with periodic and quasi-periodic parameters using theory of vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Melnikov

    2012-12-08

    We prove the existence of solutions to the Sturm-Liouville (SL) equation -y"(x)+q(x)y(x) = s^2 y(x) with periodic and quasi-periodic potential q(x) using theory of SL vessels, implementing a Backlund transformation of SL equation. In this paper quasi-periodic means a finite sum of periodic integrable functions. The solutions for a general s are explicitly constructed in terms of the solutions zn(x), satisfying the SL equation with initial conditions zn(0)=0, zn'(0)=1 for a discrete Levinson set of numbers s=sn, n-natural number. The tau function tau(x) of the corresponding vessel realizes the given potential via the formula q(x)= - 2(ln(tau(x)))". We also prove an analogue of the inverse scattering theorem in this setting too. Using the notion of "KdV evolutionary vessel", we construct a solution of the Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) equation q'_t = - 3/2 q q'_x + 1/4 q"'_{xxx}, which coincides for t=0 with a given (periodic or quasi-periodic) potential.

  9. Dynamics of Periodically-kicked Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin K. Lin; Lai-Sang Young

    2010-04-21

    We review some recent results surrounding a general mechanism for producing chaotic behavior in periodically-kicked oscillators. The key geometric ideas are illustrated via a simple linear shear model.

  10. Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

  11. University of Oregon Libraries Types of Periodicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockery, Shawn

    University of Oregon Libraries Types of Periodicals Scholarly Sources Popular Sources SCHOLARLY American Quarterly RN Automotive News Library Journal Restaurants & Institutions Chemical Engineering News & biographical information Statistics, including forecasts Some book reviews Commentary on political & social

  12. Mode Evolution and Transmission Suppression in a Perforated Ultrathin Metallic Film with a Triangular Array of Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mode Evolution and Transmission Suppression in a Perforated Ultrathin Metallic Film in a perforated ultrathin metallic film (PUMF) with a periodic triangular array of holes. It is found for the future studies in PUMF-based structures and devices. Keywords Surface plasmon . Perforated ultrathin

  13. QM/MM description of periodic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, K

    2015-01-01

    A QM/MM implementation for periodic systems is reported. This is done for the case of molecules and for systems with two and three-dimensional periodicity, which is suitable to model electrolytes in contact with electrodes. Tests on different water-containing systems, ranging from the water dimer up to liquid water indicate the correctness of the scheme. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed, as a possible direction to study realistic systems.

  14. The periodicity of the eta Carinae events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

    2007-11-27

    Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

  15. The Milky Way Tomography with SDSS: II. Stellar Metallicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeljko Ivezic; Branimir Sesar; Mario Juric; Nicholas Bond; Julianne Dalcanton; Constance M. Rockosi; Brian Yanny; Heidi J. Newberg; Timothy C. Beers; Carlos Allende Prieto; Ron Wilhelm; Young Sun Lee; Thirupathi Sivarani; John E. Norris; Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones; Paola Re Fiorentin; David Schlegel; Alan Uomoto; Robert H. Lupton; Gillian R. Knapp; James E. Gunn; Kevin R. Covey; J. Allyn Smith; Gajus Miknaitis; Mamoru Doi; Masayuki Tanaka; Masataka Fukugita; Steve Kent; Douglas Finkbeiner; Jeffrey A. Munn; Jeffrey R. Pier; Tom Quinn; Suzanne Hawley; Scott Anderson; Furea Kiuchi; Alex Chen; James Bushong; Harkirat Sohi; Daryl Haggard; Amy Kimball; John Barentine; Howard Brewington; Mike Harvanek; Scott Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie Snedden; Brian Lee; Hugh Harris; Jonathan Brinkmann; Donald P. Schneider; Donald G. York

    2008-04-24

    Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for ~60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2metallicity distribution for a complete volume-limited sample of stars at distances between 500 pc and 8 kpc. The metallicity distribution can be exquisitely modeled using two components with a spatially varying number ratio, that correspond to disk and halo. The two components also possess the kinematics expected for disk and halo stars. The metallicity of the halo component is spatially invariant, while the median disk metallicity smoothly decreases with distance from the Galactic plane from -0.6 at 500 pc to -0.8 beyond several kpc. The absence of a correlation between metallicity and kinematics for disk stars is in a conflict with the traditional decomposition in terms of thin and thick disks. We detect coherent substructures in the kinematics--metallicity space, such as the Monoceros stream, which rotates faster than the LSR, and has a median metallicity of [Fe/H]=-0.96, with an rms scatter of only ~0.15 dex. We extrapolate our results to the performance expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and estimate that the LSST will obtain metallicity measurements accurate to 0.2 dex or better, with proper motion measurements accurate to ~0.2 mas/yr, for about 200 million F/G dwarf stars within a distance limit of ~100 kpc (g<23.5). [abridged

  16. PULSATION PERIOD VARIATIONS IN THE RRc LYRAE STAR KIC 5520878

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Zee, A.; Edmondson, William H.; Lindner, John F.; Kia, Behnam; Ditto, William L.; Stevens, Ian R. E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu E-mail: w.h.edmondson@bham.ac.uk E-mail: wditto@hawaii.edu E-mail: irs@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Learned et al. proposed that a sufficiently advanced extra-terrestrial civilization may tickle Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars with a neutrino beam at the right time, thus causing them to trigger early and jogging the otherwise very regular phase of their expansion and contraction. This would turn these stars into beacons to transmit information throughout the galaxy and beyond. The idea is to search for signs of phase modulation (in the regime of short pulse duration) and patterns, which could be indicative of intentional, omnidirectional signaling. We have performed such a search among variable stars using photometric data from the Kepler space telescope. In the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878, we have found two such regimes of long and short pulse durations. The sequence of period lengths, expressed as time series data, is strongly autocorrelated, with correlation coefficients of prime numbers being significantly higher (p = 99.8%). Our analysis of this candidate star shows that the prime number oddity originates from two simultaneous pulsation periods and is likely of natural origin. Simple physical models elucidate the frequency content and asymmetries of the KIC 5520878 light curve. Despite this SETI null result, we encourage testing of other archival and future time-series photometry for signs of modulated stars. This can be done as a by-product to the standard analysis, and can even be partly automated.

  17. Motion at low Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

    2008-01-01

    The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

  18. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  19. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  20. MOTOR POOL RESERVATIONS Reservation Number:_______________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    of Department Chair or Organization Advisor: ________________________________________ Chart String Number: Fund: ______________________________________________________________________ Name of Department or Organization: _____________________________________________________ Name reservations require the "Organization Authorization for University Vehicles" form to be faxed to Motor Pool

  1. NUMBER: ADV 5.00 (formerly PUBP 1.00) SECTION: University Advancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    . Periodical or Continuing Publications 1. Definition: All news, information, scholarly or public serviceNUMBER: ADV 5.00 (formerly PUBP 1.00) SECTION: University Advancement SUBJECT: Publications: Laurence W. Pearce Issued by: Publications and Printing

  2. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore »the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  3. Metal Cycling by Bacteria: Moving Electrons Around

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealson, Ken

    2009-07-06

    About 20 years ago, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was isolated from a manganese-rich lack in upstate New York, and subsequently shown to utilize solid forms of oxidized manganese or iron as an electron acceptor. Recent studies of metal-reducing bacterial have unveiled a number of unexpected properties of microbes that have enlarged our view of microbes and their role(s) in natural ecosystems. For example, the processes of metal reduction themselves are fundamental to the carbon cycle in many lakes and sediments, where iron and manganese account for the major portion of organic carbon oxidation in many sediments. On more modest spatial scales, iron and manganese reduction can be linked to the oxidation of a wide variety of carbon compounds, many of them recalcitrant and/or toxic. One remarkable property of metal reducers is their ability to reduce solid, often highly crystalline substrates such as iron and manganese oxides and oxyhydroxides. It is now clear that this is done via the utilization of enzymes located on the outer wall of the bacteria - enzymes that apparently interact directly with these solid substrates. Molecular and genomic studies combined have revealed the genes and protoeins responsible for these activities, and many facets of the regulation. This talk focuses on the general features and properties of these remarkable organisms that seem to communicate via electron transfer across a wide variety of soluable, insoluable, and even "inert" substrates, and the way that these processes may be mechanistically linked.

  4. Metal Cycling by Bacteria: Moving Electrons Around

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nealson, Ken

    2010-01-08

    About 20 years ago, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was isolated from a manganese-rich lack in upstate New York, and subsequently shown to utilize solid forms of oxidized manganese or iron as an electron acceptor. Recent studies of metal-reducing bacterial have unveiled a number of unexpected properties of microbes that have enlarged our view of microbes and their role(s) in natural ecosystems. For example, the processes of metal reduction themselves are fundamental to the carbon cycle in many lakes and sediments, where iron and manganese account for the major portion of organic carbon oxidation in many sediments. On more modest spatial scales, iron and manganese reduction can be linked to the oxidation of a wide variety of carbon compounds, many of them recalcitrant and/or toxic. One remarkable property of metal reducers is their ability to reduce solid, often highly crystalline substrates such as iron and manganese oxides and oxyhydroxides. It is now clear that this is done via the utilization of enzymes located on the outer wall of the bacteria - enzymes that apparently interact directly with these solid substrates. Molecular and genomic studies combined have revealed the genes and protoeins responsible for these activities, and many facets of the regulation. This talk focuses on the general features and properties of these remarkable organisms that seem to communicate via electron transfer across a wide variety of soluable, insoluable, and even "inert" substrates, and the way that these processes may be mechanistically linked.

  5. Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

  6. An Electrically Switchable Metal-Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Martin, Paul F.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bowden, Mark E.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dang, Liem X.; Xu, Wu; Chen, Xilin; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-08-19

    Crystalline metal organic framework (MOF) materials containing interconnected porosity can be chemically modified to promote stimulus-driven (light, magnetic or electric fields) structural transformations that can be used in a number of devices. Innovative research strategies are now focused on understanding the role of chemical bond manipulation to reversibly alter the free volume in such structures of critical importance for electro-catalysis, molecular electronics, energy storage technologies, sensor devices and smart membranes. In this letter, we study the mechanism for which an electrically switchable MOF composed of Cu(TCNQ) (TCNQ 5 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) transitions from a high-resistance state to a conducting state in a reversible fashion by an applied potential. The actual mechanism for this reversible electrical switching is still not understood even though a number of reports are available describing the application of electric-field-induced switching of Cu(TCNQ) in device fabrication.

  7. An Electrically Switchable Metal-Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, CA; Martin, PC; Schaef, T; Bowden, ME; Thallapally, PK; Dang, L; Xu, W; Chen, XL; McGrail, BP

    2014-08-19

    Crystalline metal organic framework (MOF) materials containing interconnected porosity can be chemically modified to promote stimulus-driven (light, magnetic or electric fields) structural transformations that can be used in a number of devices. Innovative research strategies are now focused on understanding the role of chemical bond manipulation to reversibly alter the free volume in such structures of critical importance for electro-catalysis, molecular electronics, energy storage technologies, sensor devices and smart membranes. In this letter, we study the mechanism for which an electrically switchable MOF composed of Cu(TCNQ) (TCNQ = 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) transitions from a high-resistance state to a conducting state in a reversible fashion by an applied potential. The actual mechanism for this reversible electrical switching is still not understood even though a number of reports are available describing the application of electric-field-induced switching of Cu(TCNQ) in device fabrication.

  8. COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

  9. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / TransformingTransuranic Waste RetrievalTrending: Metal Oxo

  10. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / TransformingTransuranic Waste RetrievalTrending: Metal

  11. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions | National NuclearProbingProbing metal solidification

  12. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSS A-ZTravisTrending: Metal

  13. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSSTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds

  14. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSSTrending: Metal Oxo

  15. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices inPrincipalFirm Exchange . . .Probing metal

  16. Periodic magnetic structures generated by spin–polarized currents in nanostripes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkov, Oleksii M. Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri; Mertens, Franz G.

    2013-11-25

    The influence of a transverse spin–polarized current on long ferromagnetic nanostripes is studied numerically. The magnetization behavior is analyzed for all range of the applied currents, up to the saturation. It is shown that the saturation current is a nonmonotonic function of the stripe width. A number of stable periodic magnetization structures are observed below the saturation. Type of the periodical structure depends on the stripe width. Besides the one–dimensional domain structure, typical for narrow wires, and the two–dimensional vortex–antivortex lattice, typical for wide films, a number of intermediate structures are observed, e.g., cross–tie and diamond state.

  17. Degenerate doping of metallic anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody A; Zeller, Robert A; Johnson, Paul B; Switzer, Elise E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the invention relate to an electrochemical cell comprising: (i) a fuel electrode comprising a metal fuel, (ii) a positive electrode, (iii) an ionically conductive medium, and (iv) a dopant; the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the metal fuel is oxidized at the fuel electrode and the dopant increases the conductivity of the metal fuel oxidation product. In an embodiment, the oxidation product comprises an oxide of the metal fuel which is doped degenerately. In an embodiment, the positive electrode is an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, wherein during discharge mode, oxygen is reduced at the air electrode. Embodiments of the invention also relate to methods of producing an electrode comprising a metal and a doped metal oxidation product.

  18. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  19. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  20. REVERSIBLE METAL-TO-METAL METHYL TRANSFER IN n5-CYCLOPENTADIENYL(TRIPHENYLPHOSPHINE)DIMETHYLCOBALT(III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryndza, Henry E.

    2013-01-01

    transfer between transition metals which is assisted by aJournal of the American Chemical Society REVERSIBLE METAL-TO-METAL METHYL TRANSFER IN n 5-CYCLOPENTAOIENYL(

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number

  2. Measuring the rotation period distribution of field M-dwarfs with Kepler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuillan, Amy; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2013-01-01

    We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55 M_sun. To derive the rotational period we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor ~ 30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M-dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37-69.7 days, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0-140.8 mmags. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~ 19 and ~ 33 days, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of ...

  3. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  4. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  5. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  6. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  7. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  8. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  9. TRANSPORT NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2014-01-01

    NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard

  10. TRANSPORT NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2012-01-01

    NUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION LutgardNUMBER GRADIENTS AND SOLID ELECTROLYTE DEGRADATION Lutgard

  11. Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

    2012-07-30

    Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

  12. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  13. Oxidation catalysts comprising metal exchanged hexaaluminate wherein the metal is Sr, Pd, La, and/or Mn

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickham, David (Boulder, CO); Cook, Ronald (Lakewood, CO)

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides metal-exchanged hexaaluminate catalysts that exhibit good catalytic activity and/or stability at high temperatures for extended periods with retention of activity as combustion catalysts, and more generally as oxidation catalysts, that make them eminently suitable for use in methane combustion, particularly for use in natural gas fired gas turbines. The hexaaluminate catalysts of this invention are of particular interest for methane combustion processes for minimization of the generation of undesired levels (less than about 10 ppm) of NOx species. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are also useful for oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly hydrocarbons. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are further useful for partial oxidation, particularly at high temperatures, of reduced species, particularly hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes).

  14. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  15. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  16. Kepler and the long-period variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartig, Erich; Lebzelter, Thomas [University of Vienna, Department of Astrophysics, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Cash, Jennifer [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7024, Orangeburg, SC 29117 (United States); Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Walter, Donald K., E-mail: erich.hartig@univie.ac.at, E-mail: thomas.lebzelter@univie.ac.at, E-mail: jcash@physics.scsu.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: mighell@noao.edu, E-mail: dkw@physics.scsu.edu [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7296, Orangeburg, SC 29117 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Kepler photometry is used to explore the details of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) light curves. Since AGB variability has a typical timescale on the order of a year, we discuss at length the removal of long-term trends and quarterly changes in Kepler data. Photometry for a small sample of nine semi-regular (SR) AGB stars is examined using a 30 minute cadence over a period of 45 months. While undergoing long-period variations of many magnitudes, the light curves are shown to be smooth at the millimagnitude level over much shorter time intervals. No flares or other rapid events were detected on a sub-day timescale. The shortest AGB period detected is on the order of 100 days. All the SR variables in our sample are shown to have multiple modes. This is always the first overtone, typically combined with the fundamental. A second common characteristic of SR variables is shown to be the simultaneous excitation of multiple closely separated periods for the same overtone mode. Approximately half the sample had a much longer variation in the light curve, likely a long secondary period (LSP). The light curves were all well represented by a combination of sinusoids. However, the properties of the sinusoids are time variable, with irregular variations present at low levels. No non-radial pulsations were detected. It is argued that the LSP variation seen in many SR variables is intrinsic to the star and linked to multiple mode pulsation.

  17. Formation of in-volume nanogratings with sub-100 nm periods in glass by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Qiao, Lingling; Bellouard, Yves; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We present direct experimental observation of the morphological evolution during the formation of nanogratings with sub-100-nm periods with the increasing number of pulses. Theoretical simulation shows that the constructive interference of the scattering light from original nanoplanes will create an intensity maximum located between the two adjacent nanoplanes, resulting in shortening of the nanograting period by half. The proposed mechanism enables explaining the formation of nanogratings with periods beyond that predicted by the nanoplasmonic model.

  18. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Galvin, J.E.

    1991-05-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time. 10 figures.

  19. In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

    2004-12-14

    An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

  20. Experimental determination of Ramsey numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengbing Bian; Fabian Chudak; William G. Macready; Lane Clark; Frank Gaitan

    2013-08-14

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers $R(m,n)$. Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and $R(m,2)$ for $4\\leq m\\leq 8$. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  1. Magnetomechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causado-Buelvas, Jesus D.; Gomez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Torres, Pedro

    2008-04-15

    In this work, we report a simple, flexible method to create long period fiber gratings mechanically by controlling the repulsion/attraction force between two magnets that pressing a plate with a periodic array of small glass cylinders to a short length of optical fiber. Via the photoelastic effect, the pressure points induce the required periodic refractive index modulation to create the LPFG. We found that the induced device exhibits spectral characteristics similar to those of other types of LPFG. As the optical properties of LPFGs are directly related to the nature of the applied perturbations, we show, to our knowledge for the frrst time, how is the evolution of birefringence effects in mechanically induced LPFGs.

  2. Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

    2002-02-22

    A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  3. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  4. Heavy metal movement in metal-contaminated soil profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenbin; Shuman, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Heavy metal movement in soil profiles is a major environmental concern because even slow transport through the soil may eventually lead to deterioration of groundwater quality. In this study, three metal-contaminated soil (Fuquay, Dothan, and Clarendon) were selected from cropland were a high-metal flue dust had been applied annually for 6 years to raise soil pH, with application ending 4 years before sampling. One uncontaminated soil (Tifton) from the same physiographic area was also sampled as a control. Soil samples were collected in 15-cm increments from the surface to 105 cm in depth. Total contents of Zn, Cd, and Pb in the soils samples were determined. To better understand metal movement in relation to metal fractions in the soil profile, soil samples were also extracted sequentially for exchangeable (EXC), organic matter (OM), Mn oxide (MNO), amorphous Fe oxide (AFEO), crystalline Fe oxide (CFEO), and residual (RES) fractions. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Emergent hyperuniformity in periodically-driven emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joost H. Weijs; Raphaël Jeanneret; Rémi Dreyfus; Denis Bartolo

    2015-04-28

    We report the emergence of large-scale hyperuniformity in microfluidic emulsions. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that as opposed to equilibrium systems the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  6. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  7. Non-Destructive Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints Non-Destructive Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  8. Histological Features of Pseudotumor-like Tissues From Metal-on-Metal Hips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Pat; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Nelson, Scott; Takamura, Karren; Smet, Koen; Amstutz, Harlan C.

    2010-01-01

    Fayyazi A, Flury R, Windler M, Koster G, Lohmann CH. Metal-on-metal bearings and hyper- sensitivity in patients withthe acetabular com- ponent and metal ion levels in metal-on-

  9. Swimming by numbers QUANTUM CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadevan, L.

    flow, providing key qualitative insight in fluid mechanics. For example, the so-called Reynolds number be described by a universal mechanical principle seems optimistic -- if not entirely unrealistic. Now, however and pressure forces relevant for net propulsion. A measure of the thrust force is given by the mass

  10. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (Evans, GA); Imrich, Kenneth J. (Grovetown, GA)

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  11. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  13. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  14. Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals or Breaking the Irreducible Concentration Barrier R. Pitt Technologies for Urban Stormwater Conducted by the University of Alabamay y from 1999 to 2003 · Examined the characteristics and treatability of stormwater heavy metals at selected source areas and at outfalls. · Conducted

  15. Localization length of nearly periodic layered metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Barco, O

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed numerically the localization length of light $\\xi$ for nearly periodic arrangements of homogeneous stacks (formed exclusively by right-handed materials) and mixed stacks (with alternating right and left-handed metamaterials). Layers with index of refraction $n_1$ and thickness $L_1$ alternate with layers of index of refraction $n_2$ and thickness $L_2$. Positional disorder has been considered by shifting randomly the positions of the layer boundaries with respect to periodic values. For homogeneous stacks, we have shown that the localization length is modulated by the corresponding bands and that $\\xi$ is enhanced at the center of each allowed band. In the limit of long-wavelengths $\\lambda$, the parabolic behavior previously found in purely disordered systems is recovered, whereas for $\\lambda \\ll L_1 + L_2$ a saturation is reached. In the case of nearly periodic mixed stacks with the condition $|n_1 L_1|=|n_2 L_2|$, instead of bands there is a periodic arrangement of Lorenztian resonances, ...

  16. Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

  17. Periodic Reward-Based Scheduling and Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    catastrophic. Examples of real-time systems can be found in control systems of nuclear power plants, air36 Periodic Reward-Based Scheduling and Its Application to Power-Aware Real-Time Systems Hakan ........................... 36-9 Modeling Real-Time Workload and Energy on a Variable Speed CPU · Correlating Real-Time Power

  18. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  19. Composite metal membranes for hydrogen separation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, T.S.; Dye, R.C.

    1997-06-01

    A novel multilayer metal membrane has been developed that can be used for the separation of hydrogen from feed streams with near perfect selectivity. The membrane is comprised of very thin layers of fully dense palladium film deposited on both sides of a thin Group V metal foil, ion-milled prior to sputtering of the palladium. Palladium loading are kept low using the thin film deposition technology: 0.0012 grams of palladium per square centimeter of membrane is typically used, although thinner coatings have been employed. This membrane operates at temperatures on the order of 300 C and is capable of high rates of hydrogen flow. Flows are dependent on the pressure differential applied to the membrane, but flows of 105 sccm/cm{sup 2} and higher are regularly observed with differentials below one atmosphere. Long term testing of the membrane for a period in excess of 775 hours under constant conditions showed stable flows and an 85% hydrogen recovery efficiency. A system has been successfully applied to the hydrogen handling system of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and was tested using a pseudo-reformate feed stream without any degradation in performance.

  20. Alleviation of fermi-level pinning effect at metal/germanium interface by the insertion of graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Seo, Yu-Jin; Oh, Joong Gun; Albert Park, Min Gyu; Bong, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Seong Jun; Lee, Seok-Hee, E-mail: seokheelee@ee.kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Minsu; Park, Seung-young [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), 169-148 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    In this paper, we report the alleviation of the Fermi-level pinning on metal/n-germanium (Ge) contact by the insertion of multiple layers of single-layer graphene (SLG) at the metal/n-Ge interface. A decrease in the Schottky barrier height with an increase in the number of inserted SLG layers was observed, which supports the contention that Fermi-level pinning at metal/n-Ge contact originates from the metal-induced gap states at the metal/n-Ge interface. The modulation of Schottky barrier height by varying the number of inserted SLG layers (m) can bring about the use of Ge as the next-generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor material. Furthermore, the inserted SLG layers can be used as the tunnel barrier for spin injection into Ge substrate for spin-based transistors.

  1. Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals by Brian Ross Maddox Electron correlation can affect profound changes transition in a transition metal monoxide. iv #12;The lanthanides (the 4f metals also known as rare-earths

  2. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    2011-11-29

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  3. Process for making surfactant capped metal oxide nanocrystals, and products produced by the process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Rockenberger, Joerg

    2006-01-10

    Disclosed is a process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals of metal oxides which are dispersable in organic solvents. The process comprises decomposing a metal cupferron complex of the formula MXCupX, wherein M is a metal, and Cup is a N-substituted N-Nitroso hydroxylamine, in the presence of a coordinating surfactant, the reaction being conducted at a temperature ranging from about 150 to about 400.degree. C., for a period of time sufficient to complete the reaction. Also disclosed are compounds made by the process.

  4. Elsevier Journal Specific Embargo Periods 2013 Journal Name Issn Embargo Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Elsevier Journal Specific Embargo Periods 2013 Journal Name Issn Embargo Period ACADEMIC PEDIATRICS 18762859 12 ACADEMIC RADIOLOGY 10766332 12 ACC CARDIOSOURCE REVIEW JOURNAL 15568571 12 ACCIDENT ANALYSIS 18759637 24 AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 12709638 24 AESTHETIC SURGERY JOURNAL 1090820X 12 AESTHETISCHE

  5. Metal-binding polymesr as chelating agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadi, Zahra

    2011-04-11

    , high affinity binding of toxic metals by these functionalized hydrogels offers potential applications in waste water treatment and may enable applications in acute metal poisoning. Finally, a unique synthetic methodology using similar metal chelating...

  6. Metal-directed protein self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgado. Eric N.

    2010-01-01

    F. A. 2010. Evolution of metal selectivity in templatedR. J. , Tezcan, F. A. 2010. Metal-Directed Protein Self-B. , Tezcan, F. A. 2010. Metal templated design of protein

  7. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    by Energetic Condensation of Metal Plasmas André AndersD: Appl. Phys. (2006) Metal plasmas for the fabrication ofA review is provided covering metal plasma production, the

  8. Metal-templated assembly of protein cages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huard, Dustin Johnathen Edward

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 2. Generation of Metal-Responsive HuHF Buildingprotein interactions through metal coordination: Assembly ofSalgado, E.N. , et al. , Metal-mediated self-assembly of

  9. Modeling the glass forming ability of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, Justin Lee

    2007-01-01

    compositions without rare earth metals in the Fe-Cr-Mo-C-B-Wsmall percentages of rare earth metals as the oxide formingmore, often containing rare earth metals, are among the best

  10. Growth of metal and semiconductor nanostructures using localized photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelnutt, John A; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J

    2006-03-08

    Our overall goal has been to understand and develop a light-driven approach to the controlled growth of novel metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this photochemical process, bio-inspired porphyrin-based photocatalysts reduce metal salts in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures when exposed to visible light, providing metal nucleation and growth centers. The photocatalyst molecules are pre-positioned at the nanoscale to control the location of the deposition of metal and therefore the morphology of the nanostructures that are grown. Self-assembly, chemical confinement, and molecular templating are some of the methods we are using for nanoscale positioning of the photocatalyst molecules. When exposed to light, each photocatalyst molecule repeatedly reduces metal ions from solution, leading to deposition near the photocatalyst and ultimately the synthesis of new metallic nanostructures and nanostructured materials. Studies of the photocatalytic growth process and the resulting nanostructures address a number of fundamental biological, chemical, and environmental issues and draw on the combined nanoscience characterization and multi-scale simulation capabilities of the new DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Georgia. Our main goals are to elucidate the processes involved in the photocatalytic growth of metal nanomaterials and provide the scientific basis for controlled nanosynthesis. The nanomaterials resulting from these studies have applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, sensors, catalysis, and micromechanical systems. Our specific goals for the past three years have been to understand the role of photocatalysis in the synthesis of dendritic metal (Pt, Pd, Au) nanostructures grown from aqueous surfactant solutions under ambient conditions and the synthesis of photocatalytic porphyrin nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes) as templates for fabrication of photo-active metal-composite nanodevices. The proposed nanoscience concentrates on two thematic research areas: (1) the creation of metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials for realizing novel catalytic phenomena and quantum control, (2) understanding photocatalytic metal deposition processes at the nanoscale especially on photocatalytic porphyrin nanostructures such as nanotubes, and (3) the development and use of multi-scale, multi-phenomena theory and simulation for ionic self-assembly and catalytic processes.

  11. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  13. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  14. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of33Cubic Foot)Year Jan

  15. California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 ArizonaResidential Consumers (Number of Elements)

  16. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360Industrial Consumers (Number of

  17. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360Industrial Consumers (Number

  18. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan FebElements) Industrial Consumers (Number of

  19. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan FebElements) Industrial Consumers (Number

  20. MECS 2006 - Fabricated Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Fabricated Metals More Documents & Publications Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Cement MECS 2006 - Glass...

  1. Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar...

  2. Thermodynamics of metallic systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamics of metallic systems Many thermodynamics properties of metallic systems are not readily available through experimental measurements or widely available databases...

  3. BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rosa L.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic Inclusions in Uranium Dioxide", LBL-11117 (1980).in Hypostoichiornetric Uranium Dioxide 11 , LBL-11095 (OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa L. Yang and

  4. Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials including light-weight complex hydrides, destabilized binary hydrides, intermetallic hydrides,...

  5. The Super Period Matrix With Ramond Punctures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Witten

    2015-01-11

    We generalize the super period matrix of a super Riemann surface to the case that Ramond punctures are present. For a super Riemann surface of genus g with 2r Ramond punctures, we define, modulo certain choices that generalize those in the classical theory (and assuming a certain generic condition is satisfied), a g|r x g|r period matrix that is symmetric in the Z_2-graded sense. As an application, we analyze the genus 2 vacuum amplitude in string theory compactifications to four dimensions that are supersymmetric at tree level. We find an explanation for a result that has been found in orbifold examples in explicit computations by D'Hoker and Phong: with their integration procedure, the genus 2 vacuum amplitude always vanishes "pointwise" after summing over spin structures, and hence is given entirely by a boundary contribution.

  6. Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-03-01

    Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

  7. Cyanide clusters of ReII with 3d metal ions and their magnetic properties: incorporating anisotropic ions into metal-cyanide clusters with high spin magnetic ground states 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schelter, Eric John

    2005-08-29

    Clusters of metal ions that possess large numbers of magnetically coupled unpaired electrons have attracted much interest in recent years due to their fascinating magnetic behavior. With an appreciable component of magnetic anisotropy, these large...

  8. The Milky Way Tomography with SDSS. 2. Stellar Metallicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Sesar, Branimir; Juric, Mario; Bond, Nicholas; Dalcanton, Julianne; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian; Newberg, Heidi J.; Beers, Timothy C.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Wilhelm, Ron; /Texas Tech. /Michigan State U.

    2008-04-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is producing a massive spectroscopic database which already contains over 280,000 stellar spectra. Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for {approx}60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2 < g-r < 0.6), we develop polynomial models, reminiscent of traditional methods based on the UBV photometry, for estimating these parameters from the SDSS u-g and g-r colors. These estimators reproduce SDSS spectroscopic parameters with a root-mean-square scatter of 100 K for effective temperature, and 0.2 dex for metallicity (limited by photometric errors), which are similar to random and systematic uncertainties in spectroscopic determinations. We apply this method to a photometric catalog of coadded SDSS observations and study the photometric metallicity distribution of {approx}200,000 F and G type stars observed in 300 deg{sup 2} of high Galactic latitude sky. These deeper (g < 20.5) and photometrically precise ({approx}0.01 mag) coadded data enable an accurate measurement of the unbiased metallicity distribution for a complete volume-limited sample of stars at distances between 500 pc and 8 kpc. The metallicity distribution can be exquisitely modeled using two components with a spatially varying number ratio, that correspond to disk and halo. The best-fit number ratio of the two components is consistent with that implied by the decomposition of stellar counts profiles into exponential disk and power-law halo components by Juric et al. (2008). The two components also possess the kinematics expected for disk and halo stars. The metallicity of the halo component can be modeled as a spatially invariant Gaussian distribution with a mean of [Fe/H] = -1.46 and a standard deviation of {approx}0.3 dex. The disk metallicity distribution is non-Gaussian, with a remarkably small scatter (rms {approx}0.16 dex) and the median smoothly decreasing with distance from the plane from -0.6 at 500 pc to -0.8 beyond several kpc. Similarly, we find using proper motion measurements that a non-Gaussian rotational velocity distribution of disk stars shifts by {approx}50 km/s as the distance from the plane increases from 500 pc to several kpc. Despite this similarity, the metallicity and rotational velocity distributions of disk stars are not correlated (Kendall's {tau} = 0.017 {+-} 0.018). This absence of a correlation between metallicity and kinematics for disk stars is in a conflict with the traditional decomposition in terms of thin and thick disks, which predicts a strong correlation ({tau} = ?0.30 {+-} 0.04) at {approx}1 kpc from the mid-plane. Instead, the variation of the metallicity and rotational velocity distributions can be modeled using non-Gaussian functions that retain their shapes and only shift as the distance from the mid-plane increases. We also study the metallicity distribution using a shallower (g < 19.5) but much larger sample of close to three million stars in 8500 sq. deg. of sky included in SDSS Data Release 6. The large sky coverage enables the detection of coherent substructures in the kinematics-metallicity space, such as the Monoceros stream, which rotates faster than the LSR, and has a median metallicity of [Fe/H] = ?0.95, with an rms scatter of only {approx}0.15 dex. We extrapolate our results to the performance expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and estimate that the LSST will obtain metallicity measurements accurate to 0.2 dex or better, with proper motion measurements accurate to {approx}0.2-0.5 mas/yr, for about 200 million F/G dwarf stars within a distance limit of {approx}100 kpc (g < 23.5).

  9. Light metal explosives and propellants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Lowell L.; Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Nuckolls, John H.; Pagoria, Phillip F.; Viecelli, James A.

    2005-04-05

    Disclosed herein are light metal explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants (LME&Ps) comprising a light metal component such as Li, B, Be or their hydrides or intermetallic compounds and alloys containing them and an oxidizer component containing a classic explosive, such as CL-20, or a non-explosive oxidizer, such as lithium perchlorate, or combinations thereof. LME&P formulations may have light metal particles and oxidizer particles ranging in size from 0.01 .mu.m to 1000 .mu.m.

  10. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  11. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  12. Studies of multiheme proteins from the disimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Genomic analysis of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA has shown that both are capable of expressing an unprecedented number of multiheme cytochromes. ...

  13. Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

  14. A Multiband Generalization of the Analysis of Variance Period Estimation Algorithm and the Effect of Inter-band Observing Cadence on Period Recovery Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Marshall, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method of extending the single band Analysis of Variance period estimation algorithm to multiple bands. We use SDSS Stripe 82 RR Lyrae to show that in the case of low number of observations per band and non-simultaneous observations, improvements in period recovery rates of up to $\\approx$60\\% are observed. We also investigate the effect of inter-band observing cadence on period recovery rates. We find that using non-simultaneous observation times between bands is ideal for the multiband method, and using simultaneous multiband data is only marginally better than using single band data. These results will be particularly useful in planning observing cadences for wide-field astronomical imaging surveys such as LSST. They also have the potential to improve the extraction of transient data from surveys with few ($\\lesssim 30$) observations per band across several bands, such as the Dark Energy Survey.

  15. The best and brightest metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Casey, Andrew R., E-mail: kschlauf@mit.edu, E-mail: arc@ast.cam.ac.uk [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    The chemical abundances of large samples of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be used to investigate metal-free stellar populations, supernovae, and nucleosynthesis as well as the formation and galactic chemical evolution of the Milky Way and its progenitor halos. However, current progress on the study of EMP stars is being limited by their faint apparent magnitudes. The acquisition of high signal-to-noise spectra for faint EMP stars requires a major telescope time commitment, making the construction of large samples of EMP star abundances prohibitively expensive. We have developed a new, efficient selection that uses only public, all-sky APASS optical, 2MASS near-infrared, and WISE mid-infrared photometry to identify bright metal-poor star candidates through their lack of molecular absorption near 4.6 microns. We have used our selection to identify 11,916 metal-poor star candidates with V < 14, increasing the number of publicly available candidates by more than a factor of five in this magnitude range. Their bright apparent magnitudes have greatly eased high-resolution follow-up observations that have identified seven previously unknown stars with [Fe/H] ? –3.0. Our follow-up campaign has revealed that 3.8{sub ?1.1}{sup +1.3}% of our candidates have [Fe/H] ? –3.0 and 32.5{sub ?2.9}{sup +3.0}% have –3.0 ? [Fe/H] ? –2.0. The bulge is the most likely location of any existing Galactic Population III stars, and an infrared-only variant of our selection is well suited to the identification of metal-poor stars in the bulge. Indeed, two of our confirmed metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] ? –2.7 are within about 2 kpc of the Galactic center. They are among the most metal-poor stars known in the bulge.

  16. The Fermat and Mersenne Numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowlin, W. D.

    1960-01-01

    . (Throughout this thesis, F will always denote a Feraat nmaber and M a Mersenne nuuber. ) The problea of deternining p which of the Fernat and Mersenne nmabers are prius has concerned uany matheuaticians during the last two centuries. This research has... or a Fermat, number. Next? Froth~a theorem, of which Pepin's test is a special case, is stated and proved. In the last section the theory of recurring series is used to establish primality tests of the Lucas type for both the Fermat and Mersenne...

  17. Electron-Transport in La100-Xalx Metallic Glasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DELGADO, R.; ARMBRUSTER, H.; Naugle, Donald G.; TSAI, CL; JOHNSON, WL; WILLIAMS, A.

    1986-01-01

    VOLUME 34, NUMBER 12 Electron transport in La&oo ?Al?metallic glasses 15 DECEMBER 1986 R. Delgado, ' H. Armbruster, and D. G. Naugle Department of Physics, Texas Ac%M Uniuersity, College Station, Texas 77843 C. L. Tsai~ ICA, northeastern University... argue that the dominant contribution to the conductivity and thermo- power is from La d states. I. INTRODUCTION Although considerable experimental and theoretical ef- fort has been expended, several major gaps remain in the development...

  18. Stopband optimised E-plane filters with multiple metal inserts of variable number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornemann, Jens

    element Prof. F. Arndt, Dr.-Ing., Sen.Mem.I.E.E.E., D. Heckmann, Dipl.-lng., H. Semmerow, Dipl.-lng., J

  19. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  20. EROSION MECHANISM IN DUCTILE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., Robert

    2013-01-01

    England. Mayvflle, fL A. , "Mechanism of fV1aterial RemovalSubmitted to WEAR EROSION MECHANISM IN DUCTILE METALS Robertmetals. ace and erosion rate mechanism is a signifi- mic in

  1. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  2. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A. C.; Riley, L. A.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Ban, C.; Gillaspie, D. T.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-05-01

    This summarizes NREL's FY09 battery materials research activity in developing metal oxide nanostructured anodes to enable high-energy, durable and affordable li-ion batteries for HEVs and PHEVs.

  3. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2014-05-07

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  4. Emissions from Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods Emissions from Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2002deerlewis.pdf...

  5. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Extended Initial Period ROD - 2010-10...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Initial Period... 6 b. Benefits to BPA will equal or exceed costs for the Extended Initial Period of the Block Contract. ......

  6. DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

  7. Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Nune, Satish K.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Dang, Liem X.

    2013-09-01

    Nanofluids, dispersions of metal or oxide nanoparticles in a base working fluid, are being intensively studied due to improvements they offer in thermal properties of the working fluid. However, these benefits have been erratically demonstrated and proven impacts on thermal conductivity are modest and well described from long-established effective medium theory. In this paper, we describe a new class of metal-organic heat carrier (MOHC) nanofluid that offers potential for a larger performance boost in thermal vapor-liquid compression cycles. MOHCs are nanophase porous coordination solids designed to reversibly uptake the working fluid molecules in which the MOHCs are suspended. Additional heat can be extracted in a heat exchanger or solar collector from the endothermic enthalpy of desorption, which is then released as the nanofluid transits through a power generating device such as a turboexpander. Calculations for an R123 MOHC nanofluid indicated potential for up to 15% increase in power output. Capillary tube experiments show that liquid-vapor transitions occur without nanoparticle deposition on the tube walls provided entrance Reynolds number exceeds approximately 100.

  8. DRAFT CRUISE REPORT Cruise Number: DY0807

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuston (Neu) 68 Deployment of satellite buoy (SatBuoy) 3 Samples Collected Tows Number Number of larvae of buoy or mooring (Deploy) 3 3 Stimulated fluorescence collected during CTD casts (Fluor) 18 Number

  9. Metal-sensing layer-semiconductor and metal-sensing layer-metal heterostructure gas sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Li, Zheng; Fonash, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Extremely sensitive gas sensors can be fabricated using heterostructures of the form metal-sensing layer-semiconductor or metal-sensing layer-metal. These structures are heterostructure diodes which have the barrier controlling transport at least partially located in the sensing layer. In the presence of the gas species to be detected, the electrical properties of the sensing layer evolve, resulting in a modification of the barrier to electric current transport and, hence, resulting in detection due to changes in the current-voltage characteristics of the device. This type of sensor structure is demonstrated using the Pd/Ti-O/sub x/Ti heterostructure hydrogen detector.

  10. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  11. Hydrogen isotopic exchange over palladium metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carstens, D.H.W.; Encinias, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    We have recently developed the laser-Raman technique as a means of unambiguously measuring the partial pressures of all possible hydrogen isotopes in the gas phase. Using this technique we have investigated the hydrogen-deuterium exchange in a number of metals. This report presents detailed data for isotopic exchange in the palladium hydride system over the temperature range 26{degree}C to -100{degree}C at a pressure of 7 atm. First order kinetic rate constants and activation energies are summarized for the forward (hydride to deuteride) and reverse (deuteride to hydride) exchange processes. In addition, we have found that small amounts (100 ppm) of impurities in the exchange gases considerably slow the exchange kinetics with the effect increasing down the series CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CO. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 40 EDUCATION ABOUT ASIA Volume 12, Number 1 Spring 2007 ISTORIANS HAVE PORTRAYED the period from 1450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman, Benjamin

    , statistical records, histories, gazetteers, legal codes, and ency- clopedias that induced elites in India natives and Westerners in India. New knowledge was in turn ordered and classified according, for example, describes how the British regime staged science in India via museums, exhibitions

  13. IS-ENES2 -Contract Number: 312979 Reporting period: 01/04/2013 30/09/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /characteristics of coupled Earth System Models have been gathered in a series of mindmaps "CouplingTechnology", "Components

  14. Metal detector technology data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, L.K.; Gallo, L.R.; Murray, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    The tests described in this report were conducted to obtain information on the effects target characteristics have on portal type metal detector response. A second purpose of the tests was to determine the effect of detector type and settings on the detection of the targets. Although in some cases comparison performance of different types and makes of metal detectors is found herein, that is not the primary purpose of the report. Further, because of the many variables that affect metal detector performance, the information presented can be used only in a general way. The results of these tests can show general trends in metal detection, but do little for making accurate predictions as to metal detector response to a target with a complex shape such as a handgun. The shape of an object and its specific metal content (both type and treatment) can have a significant influence on detection. Thus it should not be surprising that levels of detection for a small 100g stainless steel handgun are considerably different than for detection of the 100g stainless steel right circular cylinder that was used in these tests. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Bernhart, John Charles (Fleetwood, PA)

    2012-08-21

    Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

  16. Down-hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

    1982-10-28

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  17. Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology Jump to: navigation, search ThisTimePeriod

  18. Molten metal injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA); Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Bigler, Nicolas (Morin Heights, CA); Arnaud, Guy (Riviere-Beaudette, CA)

    2003-04-01

    Disclosed is a molten metal injector system including a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and a molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal having a metal oxide film surface. The bottom side of the mold faces the holder furnace. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The injector projects into the holder furnace and is in fluid communication with the mold cavity. The injector includes a piston positioned within a piston cavity defined by a cylinder for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace and injecting the molten metal into the mold cavity under pressure. The piston and cylinder are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder further includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity. The molten metal intake is located below the metal oxide film surface of the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. A method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity of a casting mold is also disclosed.

  19. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  20. Maskless laser writing of microscopic metallic interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1995-10-17

    A method of forming a metal pattern on a substrate is disclosed. The method includes depositing an insulative nitride film on a substrate and irradiating a laser beam onto the nitride film, thus decomposing the metal nitride into a metal constituent and a gaseous constituent, the metal constituent remaining in the nitride film as a conductive pattern. 4 figs.

  1. Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.; Kneisel, P.

    1995-12-26

    A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area. 4 figs.

  2. Anaerobic microbial remobilization of coprecipitated metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-10-11

    A process is provided for solubilizing coprecipitated metals. Metals in waste streams are concentrated by treatment with an iron oxide coprecipitating agent. The coprecipitated metals are solubilized by contacting the coprecipitate with a bacterial culture of a Clostridium species ATCC 53464. The remobilized metals can then be recovered and recycled. 4 figs.

  3. Metal nanoparticles as a conductive catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-03

    A metal nanocluster composite material for use as a conductive catalyst. The metal nanocluster composite material has metal nanoclusters on a carbon substrate formed within a porous zeolitic material, forming stable metal nanoclusters with a size distribution between 0.6-10 nm and, more particularly, nanoclusters with a size distribution in a range as low as 0.6-0.9 nm.

  4. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  5. METAL IONS: Physiological function and Pathological rle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    METAL IONS: Physiological function and Pathological rôle #12;METAL IONS ARE ESSENTIAL CELL COMPONENTS At least one-third of all proteins encoded in the human genome contain metal ions They can easily of biological processes Their ionization state influences how easily metal can get into cells (e.g.: Fe++ cross

  6. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns Hisn #12;E. coli cell lysates containing a recombinant Hisn-tagged protein were purified using Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns and competitor products. The Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns were pre- loaded with different metal ions

  7. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  8. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  9. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  10. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  11. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  12. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  13. Method for separating contaminants from solution employing an organic-stabilized metal-hydroxy gel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Donald H. (212 High Meadows, Richland, WA 99352)

    1996-01-01

    Metals and organics are extracted from solution by co-precipitating them with a gel comprising aluminum hydroxide and a complexing agent such as EDTA. After the gel is processed to remove the metals and organics, it can be recycled for further use by dissolving it in a high-pH solution, leaving no secondary waste stream. A number of alternative complexing agents perform better than EDTA.

  14. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  15. Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

    2011-08-09

    The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

  16. Dynamical system theory of periodically collapsing bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2015-01-01

    We propose a reduced form set of two coupled continuous time equations linking the price of a representative asset and the price of a bond, the later quantifying the cost of borrowing. The feedbacks between asset prices and bonds are mediated by the dependence of their "fundamental values" on past asset prices and bond themselves. The obtained nonlinear self-referencing price dynamics can induce, in a completely objective deterministic way, the appearance of periodically exploding bubbles ending in crashes. Technically, the periodically explosive bubbles arise due to the proximity of two types of bifurcations as a function of the two key control parameters $b$ and $g$, which represent, respectively, the sensitivity of the fundamental asset price on past asset and bond prices and of the fundamental bond price on past asset prices. One is a Hopf bifurcation, when a stable focus transforms into an unstable focus and a limit cycle appears. The other is a rather unusual bifurcation, when a stable node and a saddle...

  17. All-Angle Negative Refraction for Surface Plasmon Waves Using a Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    All-Angle Negative Refraction for Surface Plasmon Waves Using a Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structure, California 94305, USA (Received 16 September 2005; published 24 February 2006) We show that a metal-dielectric-metal structure can function as a negative refraction lens for surface plasmon waves on a metal surface

  18. Characterization and prioritization of mining-related metal sources with metal loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Characterization and prioritization of mining- related metal sources with metal loading tracer-related metal sources with metal loading tracer dilution tests, and a review of regulations and mine restoration by Professor Joseph N. Ryan Metal-mining associated wastes in the Lefthand Creek watershed in Boulder County

  19. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.

    1991-04-23

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

  20. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, An and alloys thereof.

  1. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  2. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

    2002-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  3. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  4. Metal alkoxides and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hentges, Patrick J.; Greene, Laura H.; Pafford, Margaret Mary; Westwood, Glenn; Klemperer, Walter G.

    2005-01-04

    A method of making a superconducting structure includes depositing a metal alkoxide on a surface of a metal and hydrolyzing the metal alkoxide on the surface to form a pinhole-free film. The metal is a superconductor. The metal alkoxide may be a compound of formula (I): where M is zirconium or hafnium, and the purity of the compound is at least 97% as measured by NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Nancy S. (Boulder, CO); Koval, Carl A. (Golden, CO); Noble, Richard D. (Boulder, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  6. Entrainment of marginally stable excitation waves by spatially extended sub-threshold periodic forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph M. Starobin; Vivek Varadarajan

    2011-06-02

    We analyze the effects of spatially extended periodic forcing on the dynamics of one-dimensional excitation waves. Entrainment of unstable primary waves has been studied numerically for different amplitudes and frequencies of additional sub-threshold stimuli. We determined entrainment regimes under which excitation blocks were transformed into consistent 1:1 responses. These responses were spatially homogeneous and synchronized in the entire excitable medium. Compared to primary pulses, pulses entrained by secondary stimulations were stable at considerably shorter periods which decreased at higher amplitudes and greater number of secondary stimuli. Our results suggest a practical methodology for stabilization of excitation in reaction-diffusion media with regions of reduced excitability.

  7. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: December 31, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Cast Stone Replacement 901833 Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: December 31, 2014

  8. A field expansions method for scattering by periodic multilayered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of acoustic and electromagnetic waves with periodic structures plays an important role

  9. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  10. The Effect of Metallicity on Cepheid-Based Distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoko Sakai; Laura Ferrarese; Rob Kennicutt; Abi Saha

    2004-02-20

    We have used the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain V and I images of seven nearby galaxies. For each, we have measured a distance using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. By comparing the TRGB distances to published Cepheid distances, we investigate the metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. Our sample is supplemented by 10 additional galaxies for which both TRGB and Cepheid distances are available in the literature, thus providing a uniform coverage in Cepheid abundances between 1/20 and 2 (O/H)solar. We find that the difference between Cepheid and TRGB distances decreases monotonically with increasing Cepheid abundance, consistent with a mean metallicity dependence of the Cepheid distance moduli of (delta(m-M))/(delta[O/H]) = -0.24 +- 0.05 mag/dex.

  11. Clean energy from municipal solid waste. ERIP technical progress report {number_sign}6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-08

    The ground carbonized RDF slurry from the grinding trials at IKA Works at approximately 50 wt.% solids was sealed in drums and shipped to the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) for the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion tests. In addition, a fuel characterization and trace component analysis was completed for this final carbonized RDF slurry fuel. This final fuel was a blend of several fuels from the pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments. As can be seen from the data, the final carbonized RDF has an exceptional heating value and volatile matter content. In addition, trace components are significantly lower than the raw RDF pellets. The report summarizes results from combustion tests and air pollution monitoring of these tests. For the upcoming time period 10/96--01/97, it is anticipated that the analysis of the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion test will be completed. This analysis includes rheology and particle size distribution analysis of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel, carbon content and TCLP of the combustion ash, trace heavy metal balances around combustor, and dioxin/furan emissions. Finally, the slurry carbonization computer model and computer simulations will be completed in the next reporting period (including the waste water treatment subsystem). Based upon this computer model, initial economic estimates and optimizations of the slurry carbonization process will be completed in the next reporting period.

  12. Equilibrium quasi-periodic configurations with resonant frequencies in quasi-periodic media I: perturbative expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xifeng Su; Lei Zhang; Rafael de la Llave

    2015-03-11

    We consider 1-D quasi-periodic Frenkel-Kontorova models (describing, for example, deposition of materials in a quasi-periodic substratum). We study the existence of equilibria whose frequency (i.e. the inverse of the density of deposited material) is resonant with the frequencies of the substratum. We study perturbation theory for small potential. We show that there are perturbative expansions to all orders for the quasi-periodic equilibria with resonant frequencies. Under very general conditions, we show that there are at least two such perturbative expansions for equilibria for small values of the parameter. We also develop a dynamical interpretation of the equilibria in these quasi-periodic media. We show that the dynamical system has very unusual properties. Using these, we obtain results on the Lyapunov exponents of the resonant quasi-periodic solutions. In a companion paper, we develop a rather unusual KAM theory (requiring new considerations) which establishes that the perturbative expansions converge when the perturbing potentials satisfy a one-dimensional constraint.

  13. Ramsey numbers of sparse hypergraphs David Conlon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jacob

    Ramsey numbers of sparse hypergraphs David Conlon Jacob Fox Benny Sudakov Abstract We give a short proof that any k-uniform hypergraph H on n vertices with bounded degree has Ramsey number at most c(, k on the Ramsey number of hypergraphs with at most m edges. 1 Introduction For a graph H, the Ramsey number r

  14. CMRR Report Number 35 Research Highlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    as the steam reformation of CH4 in synthesis gas production and other similar applications utilizing the catalytic nature of transition-metal surfaces. Ni-based NWs in particular have high surface area

  15. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  16. Single-periodic-film optical bandpass filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niraula, Manoj; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Resonant periodic surfaces and films enable new functionalities with wide applicability in practical optical systems. Their material sparsity, ease of fabrication, and minimal interface count provide environmental and thermal stability and robustness in applications. Here we report an experimental bandpass filter fashioned in a single patterned layer on a substrate. Its performance corresponds to bandpass filters requiring perhaps 30 traditional thin-film layers as shown by an example. We demonstrate an ultra-narrow, high-efficiency bandpass filter with extremely wide, flat, and low sidebands. This class of devices is designed with rigorous solutions of the Maxwell equations while engaging the physical principles of resonant waveguide gratings. The proposed technology is integration-friendly and opens doors for further development in various disciplines and spectral regions where thin-film solutions are traditionally applied.

  17. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Kluzniak, Wlodek

    2015-01-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of perturbed tori orbiting a black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Klu{\\'z}niak-Lee). Epicyclic motions were triggered by adding sub-sonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured $L_{2}$ norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of $L_{2}$ norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. We observe a pair of modes which occur in an approximate 3:2 ratio. Results from our simulations are relevant in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries.

  18. Periodic Arrays of M2-Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imtak Jeon; Neil Lambert; Paul Richmond

    2012-11-29

    We consider periodic arrays of M2-branes in the ABJM model in the spirit of a circle compactification to D2-branes in type IIA string theory. The result is a curious formulation of three-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in terms of fermions, seven transverse scalars, a non-dynamical gauge field and an additional scalar `dual gluon'. Upon further T-duality on a transverse torus we obtain a non-manifest-Lorentz-invariant description of five-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills. Here the additional scalar field can be thought of as the components of a two-form along the torus. This action can be viewed as an M-theory description of M5-branes on ${\\mathbb T}^3$.

  19. Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems systems April 7, 2010 1 / 35 #12;Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Outline Number and Computational Number Theory Number systems Let R be an integral domain, b R, and N = {n1, . . . , nm} R

  20. ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond mcvision.pdf More Documents &...

  1. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  2. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  3. LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

    1999-03-30

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

  4. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  5. Hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Phase space topology and torus quantization via periodic orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Gekle; Jörg Main; Thomas Bartsch; T. Uzer

    2006-10-02

    A hierarchical ordering is demonstrated for the periodic orbits in a strongly coupled multidimensional Hamiltonian system, namely the hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields. It mirrors the hierarchy of broken resonant tori and thereby allows one to characterize the periodic orbits by a set of winding numbers. With this knowledge, we construct the action variables as functions of the frequency ratios and carry out a semiclassical torus quantization. The semiclassical energy levels thus obtained agree well with exact quantum calculations.

  6. THE BIMODAL METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT z {approx}< 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Fox, A. J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); O'Meara, J. M. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael's College, Vermont, One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Ribaudo, J. [Department of Physics, Utica College, 1600 Burrstone Road, Utica, New York 13502 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We assess the metal content of the cool ({approx}10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) about galaxies at z {approx}< 1 using an H I-selected sample of 28 Lyman limit systems (LLS; defined here as absorbers with 16.2 {approx}< log N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}< 18.5) observed in absorption against background QSOs by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The N{sub H{sub I}} selection avoids metallicity biases inherent in many previous studies of the low-redshift CGM. We compare the column densities of weakly ionized metal species (e.g., O II, Si II, Mg II) to N{sub H{sub I}} in the strongest H I component of each absorber. We find that the metallicity distribution of the LLS (and hence the cool CGM) is bimodal with metal-poor and metal-rich branches peaking at [X/H] {approx_equal} -1.6 and -0.3 (or about 2.5% and 50% solar metallicities). The cool CGM probed by these LLS is predominantly ionized. The metal-rich branch of the population likely traces winds, recycled outflows, and tidally stripped gas; the metal-poor branch has properties consistent with cold accretion streams thought to be a major source of fresh gas for star forming galaxies. Both branches have a nearly equal number of absorbers. Our results thus demonstrate there is a significant mass of previously undiscovered cold metal-poor gas and confirm the presence of metal enriched gas in the CGM of z {approx}< 1 galaxies.

  7. Photobiomolecular metallic particles and films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2003-05-06

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  8. Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

  9. Metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S. (Stony Brook, NY); Mao, Yuanbing (Los Angeles, CA)

    2009-08-18

    The present invention includes pure single-crystalline metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures, and methods of making same. These nanostructures include nanorods and nanoarrays.

  10. Corrosion control of metals by organic coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooij, W.J. van; Bierwagen, G.P.; Skerry, B.S.; Mills, D.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a comprehensive treatment of the entire field of corrosion control of metals, from mechanisms and testing procedures to modification of metal surfaces and interfaces by silanes and plasma techniques. They discuss the new, sophisticated analytical tools, such as Time-of-Flight SIMS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and all materials -- metals, pretreatments, and paint systems. The contents include: (1) Corrosion under organic coatings; (2) Mechanisms of corrosion control by organic coatings; (3) Metal pretreatments; (4) Techniques to study organic coating-metal interfaces; (5) Modification of metal surfaces and interfaces; (6) corrosion testing; (7) Adhesion testing; (8) Paint systems; (9) Conclusions and prospects references.

  11. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  12. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  13. THE METALLICITY DEPENDENCE OF THE CEPHEID P – L RELATION IN M101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mager, Violet A.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L., E-mail: mager@susqu.edu, E-mail: barry@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The impact of metallicity on the Cepheid period-luminosity (P – L) relation is investigated using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys V and I images of M101. Variations in the reddening-free Wesenheit parameter (W), which is employed as a proxy for luminosity, are examined as a function of the radial distance from the center of M101 (and thus metallicity). We determine that there is no dependence of the slope on metallicity. However, the intercept is found to depend on metallicity by ?{sub VI} = –0.33 ± 0.12 mag dex{sup –1} and ?{sub VI} = –0.71 ± 0.17 mag dex{sup –1} using 2? and 3? rejection criteria, respectively. Sigma-clipping impacts the derived metallicity dependence, and the 2? criterion applied likely mitigates blending, particularly in the crowded inner regions of M101. A metallicity-corrected distance for M101 is obtained from 619 Cepheids (? = 28.96 ± 0.11), a result that agrees with the recently determined SN Ia distance. The metallicity effects described can be bypassed by working at near and mid-infrared wavelengths (e.g., the Carnegie Hubble Program)

  14. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; et al

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different depositionmore »position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (?N~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.« less

  15. Metal Cooling in Simulations of Cosmic Structure Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton D. Smith; Steinn Sigurdsson; Tom Abel

    2008-01-03

    The addition of metals to any gas can significantly alter its evolution by increasing the rate of radiative cooling. In star-forming environments, enhanced cooling can potentially lead to fragmentation and the formation of low-mass stars, where metal-free gas-clouds have been shown not to fragment. Adding metal cooling to numerical simulations has traditionally required a choice between speed and accuracy. We introduce a method that uses the sophisticated chemical network of the photoionization software, Cloudy, to include radiative cooling from a complete set of metals up to atomic number 30 (Zn) that can be used with large-scale three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Our method is valid over an extremely large temperature range (10 K 10^-4 Zsun, regions of density and temperature exist where gas is both thermally unstable and has a cooling time less than its dynamical time. We identify these doubly unstable regions as the most inducive to fragmentation. At high redshifts, the CMB inhibits efficient cooling at low temperatures and, thus, reduces the size of the doubly unstable regions, making fragmentation more difficult.

  16. Metal - non-metal transition and the second critical point in expanded metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Bobrov; S. A. Trigger; A. G. Zagorodny

    2013-02-16

    Based on the non-relativistic Coulomb model within which the matter is a system of interacting electrons and nuclei, using the quantum field theory and linear response theory methods, opportunity for the existence of the second critical point in expanded metals, which is directly related to the metal--nonmetal transition, predicted by Landau and Zeldovitch, is theoretically justified. It is shown that the matter at the second critical point is in the state of true dielectric with zero static conductivity. The results obtained are in agreement with recent experiments for expanded metals. The existence of the second critical point is caused by the initial multi-component nature of the matter consisting of electrons and nuclei and the long-range character of the Coulomb interaction. (Accepted in PTEP)

  17. Periodic relativity: basic framework of the theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram H. Zaveri

    2014-11-25

    An alternative gravity theory is proposed which does not rely on Riemannian geometry and geodesic trajectories. The theory named periodic relativity (PR) does not use the weak field approximation and allows every two body system to deviate differently from the flat Minkowski metric. PR differs from general relativity (GR) in predictions of the proper time intervals of distant objects. PR proposes a definite connection between the proper time interval of an object and gravitational frequency shift of its constituent particles as the object travels through the gravitational field. PR is based on the dynamic weak equivalence principle which equates the gravitational mass with the relativistic mass. PR provides very accurate solutions for the Pioneer anomaly and the rotation curves of galaxies outside the framework of general relativity. PR satisfies Einstein's field equations with respect to the three major GR tests within the solar system and with respect to the derivation of Friedmann equation in cosmology. This article defines the underlying framework of the theory.

  18. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  19. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pasterczyk, James W. (Westmont, IL); Winterer, Markus (Westmont, IL); Krause, Theodore R. (Lisle, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  20. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P.; Schneibel, Joachim H.; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2007-05-01

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  1. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  2. Vector Riemann-Hilbert problem with almost periodic and meromorphic coefficients and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri A. Antipov

    2015-04-21

    The vector Riemann-Hilbert problem is analyzed when the entries of its matrix coefficient are meromorphic and almost periodic functions. Three cases for the meromorphic functions, when they have (i) a finite number of poles and zeros (rational functions), (ii) periodic poles and zeros, and (iii) an infinite number of non periodic zeros and poles, are considered. The first case is illustrated by the heat equation for a composite rod with a finite number of discontinuities and a system of convolution equations; both problems are solved explicitly. In the second case, a Wiener-Hopf factorization is found in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and the exact solution of a mixed boundary value problem for the Laplace equation in wedge is derived. In the last case, the Riemann-Hilbert problem reduces to an infinite system of linear algebraic equations with the exponential rate of convergence. As an example, the Neumann boundary value problem for the Helmholtz equation in a strip with a slit is analyzed.

  3. Paper Number (Assigned by IFPE Staff)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    to the power grid to store energy during periods of high production and low consumption, and release energy during periods of low production and high consumption. Many energy storage technologies exist, including into the electric power grid is important to reducing the consumption of fossil fuels and corresponding greenhouse

  4. Aspects of the mechanics of metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henann, David Lee

    2011-01-01

    Metallic glasses are amorphous materials that possess unique mechanical properties, such as high tensile strengths and good fracture toughnesses. Also, since they are amorphous, metallic glasses exhibit a glass transition, ...

  5. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01

    CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component Materials," LBL-

  6. BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rosa L.

    2013-01-01

    nuclear fuels irradiated to high burnup metallic fissionoxide fuel and observed trails behind metallic 1on thesemetallic fission products arc found attached to of the central void of Lf\\1FBR fuels,

  7. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01

    CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component

  8. Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willis, Richard R. (Cary, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL), Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Benin, Annabelle I. (Oak Forest, IL); Snurr, Randall Q. (Evanston, IL); Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur (Evanston, IL)

    2012-07-24

    The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

  9. Small Ramsey Numbers Stanislaw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    Small Ramsey Numbers Stanislaw P. Radziszowski Department of Computer Science Rochester Institute Ramsey numbers, where the avoided graphs are complete or complete without one edge. Many results per behavior of Ramsey numbers, but rather we concentrate on their specific values. Mathematical Reviews

  10. Ramsey Numbers Involving Cycles Stanislaw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    Ramsey Numbers Involving Cycles Stanislaw P. Radziszowski Department of Computer Science Rochester and data on Ramsey numbers involving cycles. This survey is based on the author's 2009 revi- sion #12 of the Dynamic Survey DS1, "Small Ramsey Numbers", at the Electronic Journal of Combinatorics. Table of Contents

  11. SHARP THRESHOLDS FOR HYPERGRAPH REGRESSIVE RAMSEY NUMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Gyesik

    SHARP THRESHOLDS FOR HYPERGRAPH REGRESSIVE RAMSEY NUMBERS LORENZO CARLUCCI, GYESIK LEE, AND ANDREAS WEIERMANN Abstract. The f-regressive Ramsey number Rreg f (d, n) is the minimum N such that every colouring regressive Ramsey numbers as defined by Kanamori and McAloon. In this paper we classifiy the growth

  12. Motivation Examples Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaak, Garth

    Motivation Examples Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers Jonelle Hook, Garth Isaak Department and Cryptography Jonelle Hook, Garth Isaak Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers #12;Motivation Examples Graph Ramsey-coloring of K13 has a red C5 or a blue K4. Jonelle Hook, Garth Isaak Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers #12

  13. Diagonal Ramsey Numbers in Multipartite Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vuuren, Jan H.

    Diagonal Ramsey Numbers in Multipartite Graphs AP Burger , PJP Grobler , EH Stipp & JH van Vuuren September 17, 2003 Abstract The notion of a graph theoretic Ramsey number is generalised by assuming definition. Some small multipartite Ramsey numbers are found, while upper and lower bounds are established

  14. Diagonal Ramsey Numbers in Multipartite Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vuuren, Jan H.

    Diagonal Ramsey Numbers in Multipartite Graphs AP Burger + , PJP Grobler # , EH Stipp # & JH van Vuuren # September 17, 2003 Abstract The notion of a graph theoretic Ramsey number is generalised as in the classical definition. Some small multipartite Ramsey numbers are found, while upper and lower bounds

  15. Number of peer-reviewed publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·Number of peer- reviewed publications produced per year ·Data accurate as of 02 April 2012 · Number of publications produced per institution (top 10) ·Collaborations counted multiple times · Non-cumulative number of citations received by OER publications per year ·Data accurate as of 02 April 2012 · The work

  16. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2014 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Strategic number 58579551 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Strategic Report For the year ended 30 September 2014

  17. KIAS SEOUL, February 2004 Transcendental Number Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldschmidt, Michel

    ) ­ Introductio in Analysin Infinitorum. Suggests the transcendence of log 1/ log 2 when this number is irrational in Analysin Infinitorum. Suggests the transcendence of log 1/ log 2 when this number is irrational (for this number is irrational (for algebraic 1 and 2). http://www.math.jussieu.fr/miw/ 14 #12;Euler (1748

  18. Number Theory I: Tools and Diophantine Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Henri

    covered by two other books of the author [Coh0] and [Coh1]. The central (although not unique) theme in integers, rational numbers, or more generally in algebraic numbers. This theme is in particular the central of the reader that he or she is familiar with the standard basic theory of number fields, up to and including

  19. Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons Sandi KlavŸzar a,# , Petra Ÿ Zigert a , Ivan hydrocarbon: CL is equal to the minimum number of straight lines required to intersect all hexagons theory; Clar formula; Clar number; Resonance graph; Benzenoid hydrocarbons 1. Introduction Within

  20. Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis Fourier series (periodic phenomena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis · Fourier series (periodic phenomena) · Fourier transform (aperiodic phenomena) · Fast Fourier transform (FFT) The Fourier Transform and its Applications Brad G A powerful analytic tool that has many applications.... #12;Applications of Fourier analysis Periodic

  1. Entrainment control of chaos near unstable periodic orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Mettin

    1996-10-16

    It is demonstrated that improved entrainment control of chaotic systems can maintain periodic goal dynamics near unstable periodic orbits without feedback. The method is based on the optimization of goal trajectories and leads to small open-loop control forces.

  2. NREL: Awards and Honors - Electroexploded Metal Nanopowders

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Nanopowders include catalysis, batteries, microelectronic contacts, lubrication, sinteringwelding, coating substrates for wear or corrosion resistance, and more...

  3. Sintering and ripening resistant noble metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    van Swol, Frank B; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Challa, Sivakumar R

    2013-09-24

    Durable porous metal nanostructures comprising thin metal nanosheets that are metastable under some conditions that commonly produce rapid reduction in surface area due to sintering and/or Ostwald ripening. The invention further comprises the method for making such durable porous metal nanostructures. Durable, high-surface area nanostructures result from the formation of persistent durable holes or pores in metal nanosheets formed from dendritic nanosheets.

  4. Preparation of metal-triazolate frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J; Gandara-Barragan, Felipe; Britt, David K

    2014-10-07

    The disclosure provides for novel metal-triazolate frameworks, methods of use thereof, and devices comprising the frameworks thereof.

  5. Method for plating with metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-08-23

    A method is disclosed of plating hydrous metal oxides on at least one substrate, which method is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrate, and comprises reacting metallic ions in aqueous solution with an appropriate oxidizing agent such as sodium hypochlorite or calcium sulfite with oxygen under suitable conditions of pH and concentration such that oxidation and precipitation of metal oxide are sufficiently slow to allow satisfactory plating of metal oxide on the substrate. 1 fig.

  6. Method for plating with metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH); Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH)

    1994-08-23

    A method of plating hydrous metal oxides on at least one substrate, which method is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrate, and comprises reacting metallic ions in aqueous solution with an appropriate oxidizing agent such as sodium hypochlorite or calcium sulfite with oxygen under suitable conditions of pH and concentration such that oxidation and precipitation of metal oxide are sufficiently slow to allow satisfactory plating of metal oxide on the substrate.

  7. Electronic dispersion from long-range atomic ordering and periodic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1115498 Report Number(s): SAND2013-9152C 479790 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: AVS 60th...

  8. CONCAVE LIQUID METAL DIVERTOR FOR SPHERICAL TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    CONCAVE LIQUID METAL DIVERTOR FOR SPHERICAL TOKAMAKS Isak Konkashbaev and Ahmed Hassanein Argonne considered for tokamak divertors in magnetic fusion devices. One of such concepts is the use of liquid metals associated with a liquid metal being in the strong tokamak magnetic field. This is particularly important

  9. Method for the melting of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR)

    1992-01-01

    A method of quantitatively determining the molten pool configuration in melting of metals. The method includes the steps of introducing hafnium metal seeds into a molten metal pool at intervals to form ingots, neutron activating the ingots and determining the hafnium location by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  10. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, L.A.

    1996-08-13

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation of metal-RNA interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, Matthew John

    2005-02-17

    Metal-RNA interactions are important to neutralize the negative charge and aid in correctly folding the RNA. Spectroscopically active metal ions, especially Mn2+, have been used to probe the type of interaction the metal has with RNA. In previous...

  12. Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns Hisn Technical data and operating instructions. For in vitro use only. #12;2 Handling overview Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns - for the purification of proteins with poly-histidine tags Storage conditions Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns can be stored

  13. NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Evelyn

    NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY Kalea Sebesta Department of Applied Mathematics, known as nucleation, in a two component metal alloy. The motivation behind this study is to use component metal alloys. These alloys are seen in material sciences; therefore, understanding

  14. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns Hisn Technical data and operating instructions. For in vitro use only. #12;2 Handling overview Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns - for the purification of proteins with poly-histidine tags Storage conditions Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns can be stored

  15. Metal Biosorption Equilibria in a Ternary System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Metal Biosorption Equilibria in a Ternary System K. H. Chong and B. Volesky* Department of Chemical/Accepted October 4, 1995 Equilibrium metal uptake performance of a biosorbent prepared from Ascophyllum equilibrium sorption data. Application of the multicomponent Langmuir model to describe the three-metal system

  16. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ®® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns Hisn Technical data and operating instructions. For in vitro use only. #12;2 Handling overview Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns - for the purification of proteins with poly-histidine tags Storage conditions Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns can be stored

  17. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals b\\ Inelastic Neutron Scattering tL Bjerrum Moiler #12;BLANK PAGE #12;Riso Report No. 178 Investigation of Magnons in Rare Earth Metals by Inelastic NeutronN LANGF h. a. dec. #12;Contents Page PREFACE 7 I. INTRODUCTION *> 1. Magnetism of Rare Earth Metals 10 2

  19. PROPERTIES, IDENTIFICATION, HEAT TREATMENT OF METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    to be drawn or stretched permanently without rupture or fracture (Figure 2-5). Metals that lack ductility-524 TOUGHNESS Toughness is the ability of a metal to resist fracture plus the ability to resist failure after. For example, if the hardness of a metal is increased, the brittleness usually increases and the toughness

  20. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  1. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates. 1 figure.

  2. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH); Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH)

    1994-12-13

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  3. Stochastic chemical enrichment in metal-poor systems I. Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Karlsson

    2005-04-27

    A stochastic model of the chemical enrichment of metal-poor systems by core-collapse (Type II) supernovae is presented, allowing for large-scale mixing of the enriched material by turbulent motions and cloud collisions in the interstellar medium. Infall of pristine material is taken into account by following the evolution of the gas density in the medium. Analytical expressions were derived for the number of stars enriched by a given number of supernovae, as well as for the amount of mass with which the ejected material from a supernova is mixed before being locked up in a subsequently formed star. It is shown that for reasonable values of the gas density (~0.1 cm-3) and of the supernova rate (~0.25 kpc-3 Myr-1) of the Galactic halo, the resulting metallicity distributions of the extreme Population II stars show a distinct cut-off at [Fe/H] ~= -4. In fact, by assuming no low-mass Population III stars were able to form out of the primordial interstellar medium, the derived fraction of stars below [Fe/H] = -4 is in agreement with observations. Moreover, the probability is high that even the most metal-poor stars observed to date have been enriched by several contributing supernovae. This partly explains the relatively small star-to-star scatter in many chemical-abundance ratios for stars down to [Fe/H] = -4, as recently found in several observational studies. Contribution from the thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae is found to be negligible over almost the entire extremely metal-poor regime. (***abridged***)

  4. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  5. Semiconductor to Metal to Half-Metal Transition in Pt-Embedded Zigzag Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Semiconductor to Metal to Half-Metal Transition in Pt-Embedded Zigzag Graphene Nanoribbons Xiaohui properties of Pt-embedded zigzag graphene nanoribbons (Pt-ZGNRs) are investigated using density-functional theory calculations. It is found that Pt-ZGNRs exhibit a semiconductor-metal-half-metal transition

  6. Vapor-Phase Metalation by Atomic Layer Deposition in a Metal-Organic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vapor-Phase Metalation by Atomic Layer Deposition in a Metal- Organic Framework Joseph E. Mondloch introduce a new synthetic strategy capable of metallating MOFs from the gas phase: atomic layer deposition and in some instances host- guest interactions may lead to unstable metal@MOFs. Atomic layer deposition (ALD

  7. METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /. VALENCE INSTABILITIES, superconductivity, electron-phonon and band theory, to name a few. 2. Properties of normal rare earth metals. - Before discussing rare earth valence instabilities, three relevant general features of rare earth metals

  8. Analysis of electromagnetic scattering by nearly periodic structures: an LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, William Arthur; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wilton, Donald R. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Basilio, Lorena I.; Peters, David William; Capolino, F. (University of Houston, Houston, TX)

    2006-10-01

    In this LDRD we examine techniques to analyze the electromagnetic scattering from structures that are nearly periodic. Nearly periodic could mean that one of the structure's unit cells is different from all the others--a defect. It could also mean that the structure is truncated, or butted up against another periodic structure to form a seam. Straightforward electromagnetic analysis of these nearly periodic structures requires us to grid the entire structure, which would overwhelm today's computers and the computers in the foreseeable future. In this report we will examine various approximations that allow us to continue to exploit some aspects of the structure's periodicity and thereby reduce the number of unknowns required for analysis. We will use the Green's Function Interpolation with a Fast Fourier Transform (GIFFT) to examine isolated defects both in the form of a source dipole over a meta-material slab and as a rotated dipole in a finite array of dipoles. We will look at the numerically exact solution of a one-dimensional seam. In order to solve a two-dimensional seam, we formulate an efficient way to calculate the Green's function of a 1d array of point sources. We next formulate ways of calculating the far-field due to a seam and due to array truncation based on both array theory and high-frequency asymptotic methods. We compare the high-frequency and GIFFT results. Finally, we use GIFFT to solve a simple, two-dimensional seam problem.

  9. Reclaiming metallic material from an article comprising a non-metallic friable substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohland, John Raphael (Oregon, OH); Anisimov, Igor Ivanovich (Whitehouse, OH); Dapkus, Todd James (Toledo, OH); Sasala, Richard Anthony (Toledo, OH); Smigielski, Ken Alan (Toledo, OH); Kamm, Kristin Danielle (Swanton, OH)

    2000-01-01

    A method for reclaiming a metallic material from a article including a non-metallic friable substrate. The method comprising crushing the article into a plurality of pieces. An acidic solution capable of dissolving the metallic material is provided dissolving the metallic material in the acidic material to form an etchant effluent. The etchant effluent is separated from the friable substrate. A precipitation agent, capable of precipitating the metallic material, is added to the etchant effluent to precipitate out the metallic material from the etchant effluent. The metallic material is then recovered.

  10. Electrochemistry, Photoelectrochemistry And Photoelectron Spectroscopy Of Nanostructured Metal Oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Södergren, S

    1997-01-01

    Electrochemistry, Photoelectrochemistry And Photoelectron Spectroscopy Of Nanostructured Metal Oxides

  11. NEUTRAL-BEAM PLASMA SOURCE METAL-ARC PROTECTION CIRCUIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deVries, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    e r . METAL ARCS IN PLASMAS Metal-arcs in plasma sources are1981 NEUTRAL-BEAM PLASMA SOURCE METAL-ARC PROTECTION CIRCUIT48 NEUTRAL-BEAM PLASMA SOURCE METAL-ARC PROTECTION CIRCUIT*

  12. FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Jo s eph A.OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Joseph A.and glass-to-metal or ceramic-to-metal seals. Both physical

  13. Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject R: Medicine T: Technology U: Military Science Z: Bibliography. Library Science. Information

  14. Process for reducing series resistance of solar cell metal contact systems with a soldering flux etchant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyle, R. T. (Lakewood, CO); Barrett, Joy M. (Eldorado Springs, CO)

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for substantially reducing the series resistance of a solar cell having a thick film metal contact assembly thereon while simultaneously removing oxide coatings from the surface of the assembly prior to applying solder therewith. The process includes applying a flux to the contact assembly and heating the cell for a period of time sufficient to substantially remove the series resistance associated with the assembly by etching the assembly with the flux while simultaneously removing metal oxides from said surface of said assembly.

  15. Classical Propagation of Light in Spatio-Temporal Periodic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrov, B S; Findikoglu, A T; Bishop, A R; Kostadinov, I Z

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media where the dielectric constants undergo rapid temporal periodic modulation. Both spatially homogeneous and periodic media are studied. Fast periodic temporal modulation of the dielectric constant of a homogeneous medium leads to existence of photonic band-gap like phenomena. In the presence of both spatial and tem- poral periodicity the electromagnetic spectrum is described in a four-dimensional cube, defining an effective Brillouin zone. In the case of incommensurability between space and time periodicities, completely dispersed point spectra exist.

  16. Volume 11, Number 6 29 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regime, with Ra 2 × 1024 (Ra/Rat 0.02), corresponding to a superadiabatic density variation of Dr of Earth and other terrestrial worlds; metallized hydrogen gas in Jupiter and Saturn; and ionic fluids. The conversion of kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy is known as dynamo action. The kinetic energy needed

  17. Synthesis of transition metal carbonitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Munir, Zuhair A. R. (Davis, CA); Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam (Davis, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Transition metal carbonitrides (in particular, titanium carbonitride, TiC.sub.0.5 N.sub.0.5) are synthesized by a self-propagating reaction between the metal (e.g., titanium) and carbon in a nitrogen atmosphere. Complete conversion to the carbonitride phase is achieved with the addition of TiN as diluent and with a nitrogen pressure .gtoreq.0.6 MPa. Thermodynamic phase-stability calculations and experimental characterizations of quenched samples provided revealed that the mechanism of formation of the carbonitride is a two-step process. The first step involves the formation of the nonstoichiometric carbide, TiC.sub.0.5, and is followed by the formation of the product by the incorporation of nitrogen in the defect-structure carbide.

  18. Direct metal brazing to cermet feedthroughs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-29

    An improved method for brazing metallic components to a cermet surface in an alumina substrate eliminates the prior art metallized layer over the cermet via and adjoining alumina surfaces. Instead, a nickel layer is applied over the cermet surface only and metallic components are brazed directly to this nickel coated cermet surface. As a result, heretofore unachievable tensile strength joints are produced. In addition, cermet vias with their brazed metal components can be spaced more closely in the alumina substrate because of the elimination of the prior art metallized alumina surfaces.

  19. Direct electrochemical reduction of metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Gourishankar, Karthick (Downers Grove, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A method of controlling the direct electrolytic reduction of a metal oxide or mixtures of metal oxides to the corresponding metal or metals. A non-consumable anode and a cathode and a salt electrolyte with a first reference electrode near the non-consumable anode and a second reference electrode near the cathode are used. Oxygen gas is produced and removed from the cell. The anode potential is compared to the first reference electrode to prevent anode dissolution and gas evolution other than oxygen, and the cathode potential is compared to the second reference electrode to prevent production of reductant metal from ions in the electrolyte.

  20. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, C.; Hoogendoom, S.; Hudson, B.; Prince, J.; Teichert, K.; Wood, J.; Chase, K.

    2007-01-30

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.