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1

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

2

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

3

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

4

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

5

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

6

Specific complexation of metal oxo cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to novel chelating agents for high molecular weight polyvalent metal oxo cations. Specifically, an improved chelating agent and an improved process of chelation is described to recognize specifically metal oxo cations using organic chelating agents that have a functional group to supply donor groups for metal coordination while simultaneously providing a different group to intramolecularly interact with the oxygen of the oxo group. More precisely, the invention relates to tripodal amine carboxylates useful to sequester uranyl and related metal oxo cations in aqueous solution, and is especially suitable for recovering such oxo cations from dilute aqueous solutions, e.g. seawater, mine runoff, processing waste streams, etc.

Raymond, K.N.; Franczyk, T.S.

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

7

Metal-On-Metal Bonding and Rebonding Revisited  

SciTech Connect

Density-functional calculations for a wide variety of metals show that, contrary to the rebonding view of adsorbate bonding, addimers do not have notably longer surface bonds than adatoms, do not reside farther above the surface, and do not meet the rebonding arguments for augmented mobility. Rebonding concepts are found to have some utility in explaining addimer stability.

Bogicevic, A.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

Sastri, Suri A. (Lexington, MA); Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Cooke, Richard A. (Framingham, MA); Litchfield, John K. (Bedford, MA); Smith, Mark B. (Ipswich, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. B. Adams and J. A. Pask, "Fundamentals of Glass-to-Metalapplied glass. The same fundamentals and requirements applyand R. M. Fulrath, "Fundamentals of Glass-to-Metal Bonding:

Pask, J.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Method for joining metal by solid-state bonding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present development is directed to a method for joining metal at relatively low temperatures by solid-state bonding. Planar surfaces of the metal workpieces are placed in a parallel abutting relationship with one another. A load is applied to at least one of the workpieces for forcing the workpieces together while one of the workpieces is relatively slowly oscillated in a rotary motion over a distance of about 1.degree.. After a preselected number of oscillations, the rotary motion is terminated and the bond between the abutting surfaces is effected. An additional load may be applied to facilitate the bond after terminating the rotary motion.

Burkhart, L. Elkin (Oak Ridge, TN); Fultz, Chester R. (Kingston, TN); Maulden, Kerry A. (Knoxville, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Dinuclear Metalloradicals Featuring Unsupported Metal-Metal Bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike the very labile, unobservable radical cations [{l_brace}CpM(CO){sub 3}{r_brace}{sub 2}]{sup {sm_bullet}+} (M = W, Mo), derivatives [{l_brace}CpM(CO){sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){r_brace}{sub 2}]{sup {sm_bullet}+} are stable enough to be isolated and characterized. Experimental and theoretical studies show that the shortened M-M bonds are of order 1 1/2, and that they are not supported by bridging ligands. The unpaired electron is fully delocalized, with a spin density of ca. 45% on each metal atom. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences for support of this work. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The EPR and computational studies were performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. We thank Dr. Charles Windisch for access to his UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer.

van der Eide, Edwin F.; Yang, Ping; Walter, Eric D.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

Feibelman, P.J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

Kubas, G.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d < 5) tend to strongly chemisorb electrophilic molecules; this is a consequence of the manner in which new bonding states are introduced. More electronegative metals (d >> 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems.

Ward, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Technetium Dichloride: A New Binary Halide Containing Metal-Metal Multiple Bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technetium dichloride has been discovered. It was synthesized from the elements and characterized by several physical techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the solid state, technetium dichloride exhibits a new structure type consisting of infinite chains of face sharing [Tc{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}] rectangular prisms that are packed in a commensurate supercell. The metal-metal separation in the prisms is 2.127(2) {angstrom}, a distance consistent with the presence of a Tc {triple_bond} Tc triple bond that is also supported by electronic structure calculations.

Poineau, Frederic; Malliakas, Christos D.; Weck, Philippe F.; Scott, Brian L.; Johnstone, Erik V.; Forster, Paul M.; Kim, Eunja; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Sattelberge, Alfred P. (UNLV); (NWU); (LANL)

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

Technetium dichloride : a new binary halide containing metal-metal multiple bonds.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technetium dichloride has been discovered. It was synthesized from the elements and characterized by several physical techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the solid state, technetium dichloride exhibits a new structure type consisting of infinite chains of face sharing [Tc{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}] rectangular prisms that are packed in a commensurate supercell. The metal-metal separation in the prisms is 2.127(2) {angstrom}, a distance consistent with the presence of a Tc {triple_bond} Tc triple bond that is also supported by electronic structure calculations.

Poineau, F.; Malliakas, C. D.; Weck, P. F.; Scott, B. L.; Johnstone, E. V.; Forster, P. M.; Kim, E.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Czerwinski, K. R.; Sattelberger, A. P. (Materials Science Division); ( OTD-EESA); (Univ. of Nevada at Las Vegas); (LANL); (Northwestern Univ.)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ligand field considerations for the reactivity of high valent metal-oxo complexes and of bimetallic HX splitting photocatalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inorganic molecular complexes are used to probe mechanistic steps in two reaction reactions related to energy storage. The first reaction considered is the O-O bond formation step required for water oxidation to oxygen. ...

Chambers, Matthew Burke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Direct-Coupling O? Bond Forming Pathway in Cobalt Oxide Water Oxidation Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a catalytic mechanism for water oxidation in a cobalt oxide cubane model compound, in which the crucial O–O bond formation step takes place by direct coupling between two CoIV(O) metal oxo groups. Our results are ...

Wang, Lee-Ping

20

Transition metal-catalyzed process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds in a substrate, comprising: reacting an amine with a compound containing at least one carbon-carbon double bond in the presence a transition metal catalyst under reaction conditions effective to form a product having a covalent bond between the amine and a carbon atom of the former carbon-carbon double bond. The transition metal catalyst comprises a Group 8 metal and a ligand containing one or more 2-electron donor atoms. The present invention is also directed to enantioselective reactions of amine compounds with compounds containing carbon-carbon double bonds, and a calorimetric assay to evaluate potential catalysts in these reactions.

Hartwig, John F. (Durham, CT); Kawatsura, Motoi (Chatham, NJ); Loeber, Oliver (New Haven, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; DeWald, A.P.; Chienping Ju; Rigsbee, J.M.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Liquid Metal Bond for Improved Heat Transfer in LWR Fuel Rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A liquid metal (LM) consisting of 1/3 weight fraction each of Pb, Sn, and Bi has been proposed as the bonding substance in the pellet-cladding gap in place of He. The LM bond eliminates the large AT over the pre-closure gap which is characteristic of helium-bonded fuel elements. Because the LM does not wet either UO2 or Zircaloy, simply loading fuel pellets into a cladding tube containing LM at atmospheric pressure leaves unfilled regions (voids) in the bond. The HEATING 7.3 heat transfer code indicates that these void spaces lead to local fuel hot spots.

Donald Olander

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Clad metals by roll bonding for SOFC interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic interconnects have been becoming an increasingly interesting topic in the development in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). High temperature oxidation resistant alloys are currently considered as candidate materials. Among these alloys however, different groups of alloys demonstrate different advantages and disadvantages, and few if any can completely satisfy the stringent requirements for the application. To integrate the advantages and avoid the disadvantages of different groups of alloys, clad metal has been proposed for SOFC interconnect applications and interconnect structures. This paper gives a brief overview of the cladding approach and its applications, and discuss the viability of this technology to fabricate the metallic layered-structure interconnects. To examine the feasibility of this approach, the austenitic Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 and the ferritic stainless steel AL 453 were selected as examples and manufactured into a clad metal. Its suitability as an interconnect construction material was investigated.

Chen, L.; Jha, B; Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Tuning the Metal-Adsorbate Chemical Bond through the Ligand Effect on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuning the Metal-Adsorbate Chemical Bond through the Ligand Effect on Tuning the Metal-Adsorbate Chemical Bond through the Ligand Effect on Platinum Subsurface Alloys Tuesday, July 31, 2012 The ability to design and control the activities of transition metal catalysts, which are scarce in nature and thus expensive, has been of great importance to the development of economical industrial and energy-saving processes. Over the years several methods have been suggested, especially for processes using platinum, which is the most active metal catalyst for many important reactions, including the reduction of oxygen in fuel cells. Figure 1. Figure 1. Schematic representation of Pt subsurface alloys and corresponding shifts in Pt d-band center. Tuning chemical functionality by implementing a ligand effect - in other words, by changing the atomic nearest neighbor environment - is a

25

Metal-and hydrogen-bonding competition during water absorption on Pd(111) and Ru(0001)  

SciTech Connect

The initial stages of water adsorption on the Pd(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces have been investigated experimentally by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy in the temperature range between 40 K and 130 K, and theoretically with Density Functional Theory (DFT) total energy calculations and STM image simulations. Below 125 K water dissociation does not occur at any appreciable rate and only molecular films are formed. Film growth starts by the formation of flat hexamer clusters where the molecules bind to the metal substrate through the O-lone pair while making H-bonds with neighboring molecules. As coverage increases, larger networks of linked hexagons are formed with a honeycomb structure, which requires a fraction of the water molecules to have their molecular plane perpendicular to the metal surface with reduced water-metal interaction. Energy minimization favors the growth of networks with limited width. As additional water molecules adsorb on the surface they attach to the periphery of existing islands, where they interact only weakly with the metal substrate. These molecules hop along the periphery of the clusters at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures they bind to the metal to continue the honeycomb growth. The water-Ru interaction is significantly stronger than the water-Pd interaction, which is consistent with the greater degree of hydrogen-bonded network formation and reduced water-metal bonding observed on Pd relative to Ru.

Tatarkhanov, Mouslim; Ogletree, D. Frank; Rose, Franck; Mitsui, Toshiyuki; Fomin, Evgeny; Rose, Mark; Cerda, Jorge I.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Strong Bond Activation with Late Transition-Metal Pincer Complexes as a Foundation for Potential Catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong bond activation mediated by pincer ligated transiton-metal complexes has been the subject of intense study in recent years, due to its potential involvement in catalytic transformations. This dissertation has focused on the net heterolytic cleavage of B-H and B-B bonds across the N-Pd bond in a cationic (PNP)Pd fragment, the C-H oxidative addition to a (PNP)Ir center and the recent results on the C-H and C-O oxidative addition in reactions of aryl carboxylates with the (PNP)Rh fragment. Transition metal carbene and carbyne complexes are of great interest because of their role in a wide variety of catalytic reactions. Our work has resulted in the isolation of a rhodium(I) difluorocarbene. Reaction of the rhodium difluorocarbene complex with a silylium salt led to the C-F bond cleavage and the formation of a terminal fluorocarbyne complex. Reductive elimination is a critical step of cross coupling reactions. In order to examine the effect of the pincer ligand on the reductive elimination reactions from Rh(III), the first pi-accepting PNP ligand bearing pyrrolyl substituents was prepared and installed onto the rhodium center. Arylhalide (halide = Br, I) oxidative addition was achieved in the presence of donor ligands such as acetonitrile to form stable six-coordinate Rh(III) compounds. The C-O reductive elimination reactions in this system were also explored.

Zhu, Yanjun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Interfacial stress in a carbon-to-metal bond joint under thermal shock loading  

SciTech Connect

The duplex bond joint consisting of a metallic substrate armored with carbon-base materials is a promising candidate configuration for application to high heat flux operations. When a bond joint is subjected to thermal loadings, significant thermal stresses may develop due to mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress intensification occurs near the free surface edge of the interface, sometimes showing singularity. The singular stress fields are critical for understanding the loading nature of the bond interface in a joint system. In this paper, thermal stresses in the bond interface of a carbon-to-molybdenum joint element were investigated. A high heat flux (HHF) pulse was assumed as the reference load history to simulate the thermal shock condition. The thermomechanical behavior was described quantitatively in terms of the stress intensity factor. The stress solutions of the singular field computed by the theoretical approach showed a good agreement with the numerical results of the finite element analysis. The stress intensity factor of the singular stress fields near the free surface edge of the interface showed a time variation similar to that of the bulk stress. The temperature gradient induced by the transient HHF load affected the overall interfacial stress only slightly.

You, J.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems] [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

Quinby, Thomas C. (Kingston, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Stress analysis and failure of the bond interface of a metal matrix component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two dimensional orthotropic thermoelastic finite element algorithm is developed herein, and it is used to evaluate the performance of a metal matrix composite (MMC) structural component provided by G.E. and Battelle Labs. The component consists of a monolithic fitting diffusion bonded onto a MMC laminate. Analyses performed with the finite element algorithm suggest that the bondline between the composite and fitting is the weakest portion of the structure for every combination of material properties and layup considered. It is also shown that residual stresses due to processing as well as three dimensional edge effects are significant and should be considered in further studies. The analysis also indicates the presence of a stress singularity at a sharp comer along the edge of the bondline. As a result. a design modification is proposed in order to eliminate the singularity, thereby improving the component design.

Pamel, Michele Lynn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

Wrenn, Jr., George E. (Clinton, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Synthesis and reactivity of sterically congested metallacyclobutenes and metal-mediated carbon-sulfur bond activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O 120 C C-C Bond Cl L 1. [Ir(cod)Cl] 2 Ir L 2. PPh 3 L = PPh+ (n-2)R 3 P F F C-F Bond Ni(COD) 2 1. PEt 3 F F F Et 3 P 2.by NiEt 2 (bpy) and Ni(COD)(byp) (Scheme 2-4) has been

Vélez, Carmen L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Accelerated lifetime estimation of thermosonic Cu ball bonds on Al metallization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a fast mechanical shear fatigue test technique for the quality assessment of thermosonic ball bonded interconnects was developed to estimate their lifetime behavior. The micro-interconnects were subjected to cyclic shear stress using a ... Keywords: Cu/Al Ball bond, Fatigue, Fracture mechanics, Lifetime, Microelectronic interconnects

A. Lassnig, W. Trasischker, G. Khatibi, B. Weiss, M. Nelhiebel, R. Pelzer

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Mechanistic studies on metal-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanistic studies on copper and palladium-catalyzed C-N bond forming reactions are described. To understand the mechanistic details of these processes, several principles of physical organic chemistry have been employed. ...

Strieter, Eric R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

H-Bond Deletion in a Metal-Assembled Helical Bundle Protein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. F. Wishart and G. L. McLendon J. Phys. Chem. B 102, 9975-9980 (1998) Find paper at ACS Publications Abstract: Transition metal ion-assembled three-helix bundle proteins...

36

Transition Metal Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Multiple Bonds: Exploration of Second Generation Ruthenium Catalysts and Extension to Copper Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalysts provide foundational technology for the development of new materials and can enhance the efficiency of routes to known materials. New catalyst technologies offer the possibility of reducing energy and raw material consumption as well as enabling chemical processes with a lower environmental impact. The rising demand and expense of fossil resources has strained national and global economies and has increased the importance of accessing more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons to useful products. The goals of the research are to develop and understand single-site homogeneous catalysts for the conversion of readily available hydrocarbons into useful materials. A detailed understanding of these catalytic reactions could lead to the development of catalysts with improved activity, longevity and selectivity. Such transformations could reduce the environmental impact of hydrocarbon functionalization, conserve energy and valuable fossil resources and provide new technologies for the production of liquid fuels. This project is a collaborative effort that incorporates both experimental and computational studies to understand the details of transition metal catalyzed C-H activation and C-C bond forming reactions with olefins. Accomplishments of the current funding period include: (1) We have completed and published studies of C-H activation and catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu{l_brace}P(pyr){sub 3}{r_brace}(NCMe)R (pyr = N-pyrrolyl) complexes. While these systems efficiently initiate stoichiometric benzene C-H activation, catalytic olefin hydroarylation is hindered by inhibition of olefin coordination, which is a result of the steric bulk of the P(pyr){sub 3} ligand. (2) We have extended our studies of catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph systems to L = P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt. Thus, we have now completed detailed mechanistic studies of four systems with L = CO, PMe{sub 3}, P(pyr){sub 3} and P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt, which has provided a comprehensive understanding of the impact of steric and electronic parameters of 'L' on the catalytic hydroarylation of olefins. (3) We have completed and published a detailed mechanistic study of stoichiometric aromatic C-H activation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph (L = CO or PMe{sub 3}). These efforts have probed the impact of functionality para to the site of C-H activation for benzene substrates and have allowed us to develop a detailed model of the transition state for the C-H activation process. These results have led us to conclude that the C-H bond cleavage occurs by a {sigma}-bond metathesis process in which the C-H transfer is best viewed as an intramolecular proton transfer. (4) We have completed studies of Ru complexes possessing the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene). One of these systems is a unique four-coordinate Ru(II) complex that catalyzes the oxidative hydrophenylation of ethylene (in low yields) to produce styrene and ethane (utilizing ethylene as the hydrogen acceptor) as well as the hydrogenation of olefins, aldehydes and ketones. These results provide a map for the preparation of catalysts that are selective for oxidative olefin hydroarylation. (5) The ability of TpRu(PMe{sub 3})(NCMe)R systems to activate sp{sup 3} C-H bonds has been demonstrated including extension to subsequent C-C bond forming steps. These results open the door to the development of catalysts for the functionalization of more inert C-H bonds. (6) We have discovered that Pt(II) complexes supported by simple nitrogen-based ligands serve as catalysts for the hydroarylation of olefins. Given the extensive studies of Pt-based catalytic C-H activation, we believe these results will provide an entry point into an array of possible catalysts for hydrocarbon functionalization.

T. Brent Gunnoe

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

Loustau, Marie-Therese (Bordeaux, FR); Verhoog, Roelof (Bordeaux, FR); Precigout, Claude (Lormont, FR)

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite-to-metal bond interface of a wind turbine blade using an acousto-ultrasonic technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acousto-ultrasonic inspection technique was developed to evaluate the structural integrity of the epoxy bond interface between a metal insert and the fiber glass epoxy composite of a wind turbine blade. Data was generated manually as well as with a PC based data acquisition and display system. C-scan imaging using a portable ultrasonic scanning system provided an area mapping of the delamination or disbond due to fatigue testing and normal field operation conditions of the turbine blade. Comparison of the inspection data with a destructive visual examination of the bond interface to determine the extent of the disbond showed good agreement between the acousto-ultrasonic inspection data and the visual data.

Gieske, J.H.; Rumsey, M.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Available Technologies: Metal-Oxo Catalysts for Generating ...  

Clean and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels; Can be used with sea water and other abundant, untreated water sources; ABSTRACT:

40

Metal-Oxo Catalysts for Generating Hydrogen from Water ...  

Clean and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels; Can be used with sea water and other abundant, untreated water sources; Applications and Industries.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chemistry of glass-ceramic to metal bonding for header applications. I. Effect of treatments on Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276 metallic surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Auger electron spectroscopy and depth Auger profiling were used to study the surfaces of Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276. The metal surfaces were processed in the same manner as is presently being used in the manufacturing of glass-ceramic headers. At each step in the process, samples were studied with Auger spectroscopy to determine their resultant elemental surface composition and film thickness. In addition, the effect of a final plasma cleaning operation on the metal surface was examined. The results show that the type and concentration of surface species and the thickness of the surface oxides are dependent on the processing technique.

Kramer, D P; Craven, S M; Schneider, R E; Moddeman, W E; Brohard, D W

1984-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Metal-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions for the Synthesis of Significant Chiral Building Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Morita Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction a carbon-carbon bond forming reaction between an ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl and aldehydes or activated ketones in the presence of a nucleophilic catalyst. The MBH reaction is an atom-economical method of rapid increase of molecular complexity. The development of this process has received considerable attention in recent years. This dissertation presents the development of a new catalytic system for the symmetric and asymmetric MBH reaction. The new system for the racemic version of this reaction was accomplished employing a 1:1:1 ratio of catalytic amounts (10 mol%) of MgI2, TMEDA and DMAP and proved to be highly effective. For the asymmetric version was developed a highly enantio-selective system based on Fu’s planar chiral DMAP derivative (II) with ee´s up to 98%. Abnormal MBH adducts are obtained employing either ethyl 2,3-butadienoate or ethyl propiolate in good yields, in the presence if MgI2 and either a tertiary amine or phosphine as the nucleophile. The ?,?-unsaturated carbonyls where prepared by a modified direct ?- methylenation using paraformaldehyde, diisopropylammonium trifluoroacetate, and catalytic acid or base with excellent yields for several carbonyls compounds. The Negishi cross-coupling reaction is the Pd or Ni-catalyzed stereoselective cross-coupling or organozincs and aryl-, alkenyl-, or alkynyl halides. Enantioselective Negishi cross-coupling of aryl zincs and ?-bromo ketones was accomplished employing a NCN Pincer complex as the catalyst with ee´s up 99%. The required pincer complexes have been prepared by the oxidative addition of pincer ligands with palladium or nickel. Additionally, It has been developed a direct and highly active, (NCN)-Pd catalytic system for the ?-arylation of ketones with a variety of aryl bromides using the air and moisture stable [t-BuPheBox-Me2]PdBr (XVI) as the catalyst. The adducts are obtained in excellent yields (92% average for 20 examples) in only 1 hour using 1 mol% of catalyst loading. Perhaps more importantly, the work described here shows that XVI is highly reactive, highly selective, even on substrates bearing challenging functional groups such alkenes.

Bugarin Cervantes, Alejandro

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

New Designs of Rigid Pincer Complexes with PXP Ligands and Late Transition Metals and sp3 C-F Bond Activation with Silylium and Alumenium Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, catalytic C-F bond activation mediated by alumenium and silylium species, improved methods for the synthesis of highly chlorinated carboranes and dodecaborates, new type of P2Si= pincer silylene Pt complexes and PBP pincer Rh complexes are presented. In Chapter II, the design and synthesis of P2Si= and PBP ligand precursors is described. BrC6H4PR2 is shown to be a useful building block for PXP type of ligands with o-arylene backbone. RLi reagents displayed high chemoselectivity towards electrophiles, such as Si(OEt)4 and BX3 (X = Hal). In Chapter III, new chlorination methods to synthesize [HCB11Cl11]- and [B12Cl12]2- are presented. [HCB11Cl11]- was obtained via reactions of Cs[HCB11H11] with SbCl5 or via reactions of Cs[HCB11H11] with Cl2 in acetic acid and triflic acid. Heating Cs2[B12H12] in mixtures of SO2Cl2 and MeCN led to the isolation of Cs2[B12Cl12] in high yield. In Chapter IV, Et2Al[HCB11H5Br6] or Ph3C[HCB11H5Br6] were shown to be robust catalysts for sp3 C-F bond activation with trialkylaluminum as the stoichiometric reagent. Trialkylaluminum compounds were also shown to be able to be used as “clean-up” reagent for the C-F bond activation reactions, which led to ultra high TON for the catalytic reactions. In Chapter V, a series of (TPB)M complexes (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) were synthesized and characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The resulting metal complexes displayed strong dative M?B interaction and unusual tetrahedral geometry for four-coordinate 16? species, due to the cage structure of the ligand. In Chapter VI, (PSiHP)PtCl was synthesized via the reaction of the ligand precursor and Pt(COD)Cl2, which was used to obtain a series of (PSiHP)PtX complexes(X= I, OTf, Me, Ph, Mes). After hydride abstraction by Ph3C[HCB11Cl11], the X ligand (X= I, OTf, Me, Ph) migrated from the Pt center to silicon center to give a cationic pincer silyl species. The migration was not observed when mesityl was used as the X ligand, which resulted in the first known pincer complex with central silylene donor. Our approaches towards PNP pincer boryl Rh complexes were summarized in Chapter VII. (PBPhP)Rh pivalate complex underwent C-Ph bond activation to yield the pivalate-bridging Rh borane complex.

Gu, Weixing

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Yankee bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

Delaney, P. (Bear, Stearns Co. Inc., New York, NY (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermostat Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...A thermostat metal is a composite material (usually in the form of sheet or strip) that consists of two or more materials bonded together, of which one can be a nonmetal. Because the materials bonded together to form the composite differ in

46

Diffusion bonding  

SciTech Connect

1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

Anderson, Robert C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Pre-plated reactive diffusion-bonded battery electrode plaques  

SciTech Connect

A high strength, metallic fiber battery plaque is made using reactive diffusion bonding techniques, where a substantial amount of the fibers are bonded together by an iron-nickel alloy.

Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

Eoff, J.M.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

SOLID STATE BONDING OF THORIUM WITH ALUMINUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for bonding thorium and aluminum by placing clean surfaces of thorium and aluminum in contact with each other and hot pressing the metals together in a protective atmosphere at a temperature of about 375 to 575 deg C and at a pressure of at least 10 tsi to effect a bond.

Storchhelm, S.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

IMPROVED BONDING METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process of bonding aluminum to aluminum without fusion by ultrasonic vibrations plus pressure is described. The surfaces to be bonded are coated with an aqueous solution of alkali metal stearate prior to assembling for bonding. (AEC) O H19504 Present information is reviewed on steady state proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of blood cells in mammals. Data are cited from metabolic tracer studies, autoradiographic studies, cytologic studies, studies of hematopoietic response to radiation injuries, and computer analyses of blood cell production. A 3-step model for erythropoiesis and a model for granulocyte kinetics are presented. New approaches to the study of lymphocytopoiesis described include extracorporeal blood irradiation to deplete lymphocytic tissue without direct injury to the formative tissues as a means to study the stressed system, function control, and rates of proliferation. It is pointed out that present knowledge indicates that lymphocytes comprise a mixed family, with diverse life spans, functions, and migration patterns with apparent aimless recycling from modes to lymph to blood to nodes that has not yet been quantitated. Areas of future research are postulated. (70 references.) (C.H.)

Padgett, E.V. Jr.; Warf, D.H.

1964-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

Efficient Microwave Susceptor Design for Wafer Bonding Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This MSc Thesis demonstrates the use of a novel efficient metallic susceptor for generating controllable and rapid localized heating for low-cost substrate bonding using commercial… (more)

Toossi, Amirali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Diffusion Bonding Aluminium Alloys and Composites: New Approaches and Modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

certain materials. Some oxide films either dissolve in the bulk of the metal or decompose at the bonding temperature (e.g. those of many steels, copper, titanium, tantalum and zirconium), and so metal-to-metal contact can be readily established... to the diffusion bonding of all materials. Diffusion bonding of most metals is conducted under a vacuum of 10-3-10-5 mbar or in an inert atmosphere (normally dry nitrogen, argon or helium) in order to reduce detrimental oxidation of the faying surfaces. Bonding...

Shirzadi Ghoshouni, Amir Abbas

1998-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT for grant DE-FG02-93ER14353 Ă?Â?Ă?Â?"Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Functionalization Catalyzed by Transition Metal Systems"  

SciTech Connect

Alkanes are our most abundant organic resource but are highly resistant to selective chemical transformations. Alkenes (olefins) by contrast are the single most versatile class of molecules for selective transformations, and are intermediates in virtually every petrochemical process as well as a vast range of commodity and fine chemical processes. Over the course of this project we have developed the most efficient catalysts to date for the selective conversion of alkanes to give olefins, and have applied these catalysts to other dehydrogenation reactions. We have also developed some of the first efficient catalysts for carbonylation of alkanes and arenes to give aldehydes. The development of these catalysts has been accompanied by elucidation of the mechanism of their operation and the factors controlling the kinetics and thermodynamics of C-H bond activation and other individual steps of the catalytic cycles. This fundamental understanding will allow the further improvement of these catalysts, as well as the development of the next generation of catalysts for the functionalization of alkanes and other molecules containing C-H bonds.

Alan S. Goldman

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bond-valence methods for pKa prediction. II. Bond-valence, electrostatic, molecular geometry, and solvation effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a previous contribution, we outlined a method for predicting (hydr)oxy-acid and oxide surface acidity constants based on three main factors: bond valence, Me?O bond ionicity, and molecular shape. Here electrostatics calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used to qualitatively show that Me?O bond ionicity controls the extent to which the electrostatic work of proton removal departs from ideality, bond valence controls the extent of solvation of individual functional groups, and bond valence and molecular shape controls local dielectric response. These results are consistent with our model of acidity, but completely at odds with other methods of predicting acidity constants for use in multisite complexation models. In particular, our ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of solvated monomers clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding between (hydr)oxo-groups and water molecules adjusts to obey the valence sum rule, rather than maintaining a fixed valence based on the coordination of the oxygen atom as predicted by the standard MUSIC model.

Bickmore, Barry R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Doud, Darrin

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Essays on corporate bonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three empirical essays on corporate bonds, examining the role of both credit risk and liquidity. In the first chapter, I test the ability of structural models of default to price corporate bonds in ...

Bao, Jack (Jack C.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

AdhesiveBonding.qrk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Manufacturing Technologies Understanding and controlling the factors that affect adhesion is vital for ensuring consistent successful bonding operations. The Manufacturing Science and Technology Center's research into adhesion is focused on achieving a good initial bond and then understanding the mechanisms leading to eventual bond failure. The department is working to understand crack propagation at the interface and has developed a variety of mechanical testing techniques to evalu- ate this failure mode. The factors affecting wetting and formation of the bond (e.g., contamination, surface roughness) are being explored to further our knowledge. In addition to research into adhesion, we bond and join components for our cus- tomers. Researchers have formulated new

57

Private Activity Revenue Bonds (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Private Activity Revenue Bonds are available in the form of both taxable bonds and tax-exempt bonds. Both types of bonds provide access to long-term capital markets for fixed asset financing....

58

Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Do Main Chain Hydrogen Bonds Create Dominant Electron Transfer Pathways?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Main Chain Hydrogen Bonds Create Dominant Electron Transfer Pathways? An Main Chain Hydrogen Bonds Create Dominant Electron Transfer Pathways? An Investigation in Designed Proteins Yongjian Zheng, Martin A. Case, James F. Wishart, and George L. McLendon J. Phys. Chem. B, 107, 7288-7292 (2003). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: We have investigated the contribution of main chain hydrogen bond (H-bond) pathways to the tunneling matrix elements which control electron transfer (ET) rates across an alpha-helical protein matrix. The paradigm system for these investigations is a metal ion-assembled parallel three-helix bundle protein that contains a ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridyl) electron donor and a ruthenium(III) pentammine electron acceptor separated by a direct metal to metal distance of ca. 19 Ă…, requiring tunneling through 15 Ă… of

60

METAL NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH METAL-LIGAND COVALENT BONDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of alkenes. Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 2004.activation. Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 2008.Reactivity. Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 2011.

Kang, Xiongwu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bond Financing Program (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

BFA’s Bond Financing Program offers tax-exempt and taxable bonds for fixed-asset expansion projects. Industrial development revenue bonds can be used by manufacturers for the acquisition,...

62

Solid-State Bonding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Surface preparations studied for diffusion bonding of beryllium...with 3 μm alumina and light oil � Ultrasonic wash for 5 min in 3% Oakite NST aluminum-detergent-distilled

63

Adsorption of propane, isopropyl, and hydrogen on cluster models of the M1 phase of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst possessing the M1 phase structure is uniquely capable of directly converting propane into acrylonitrile. However, the mechanism of this complex eight-electron transformation, which includes a series of oxidative H-abstraction and N-insertion steps, remains poorly understood. We have conducted a density functional theory study of cluster models of the proposed active and selective site for propane ammoxidation, including the adsorption of propane, isopropyl (CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 3}), and H which are involved in the first step of this transformation, that is, the methylene C-H bond scission in propane, on these active site models. Among the surface oxygen species, the telluryl oxo (Te=O) is found to be the most nucleophilic. Whereas the adsorption of propane is weak regardless of the MO{sub x} species involved, isopropyl and H adsorption exhibits strong preference in the order of Te=O > V=O > bridging oxygens > empty Mo apical site, suggesting the importance of TeO{sub x} species for H abstraction. The adsorption energies of isopropyl and H and consequently the reaction energy of the initial dehydrogenation of propane are strongly dependent on the number of ab planes included in the cluster, which points to the need to employ multilayer cluster models to correctly capture the energetics of surface chemistry on this mixed metal oxide catalyst.

Govindasamy, Agalya [University of Cincinnati; Muthukumar, Kaliappan [University of Cincinnati; Yu, Junjun [University of Cincinnati; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Activating unreactive C-H bonds  

SciTech Connect

The procedures tested to attempt to reactivate carbon-hydrogen bonds in completely saturated organic compounds are discussed. Saturated hydrocarbons appear in petroleum, coal, in synthetic fuels produced by liquefaction of coal and other fossil fuels, and in synthetic fuels produced by Fisher-Tropsch chemistry from syngas. Their potential use as feedstocks for the chemical industry requires that the hydrocarbons be functionalized. The use of transition-metal complexes for the 'activation' process is discussed.

Maugh, T.H. II

1983-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bonded Radii and the Contraction of the Electron Density of the Oxygen Atom by Bonded Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The bonded radii for more than 550 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 crystals, determined from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are compared with the effective ionic, ri(M), and crystal radii, rc(M), for metal atoms, M, bonded to O atoms. At odds with the fixed ionic radius of 1.40 Ĺ, assumed for the O atom in the compilation of the ionic radii, the bonded radius for the atom, rb(O), is not fixed but displays a relatively wide range of values as the O atom is progressively polarized by the M-O bonded interactions: as such, rb(O) decreases systematically from 1.40 Ĺ (the Pauling radius of the oxide anion) as bond lengths decrease when bonded to an electropositive atom like sodium, to 0.64 Ĺ (Bragg’s atomic radius of the O atom) when bonded to an electronegative atom like nitrogen. Both rb(M) and rb(O) increase in tandum with the increasing coordination number of the M atom. The bonded radii of the M atoms are highly correlated with both ri(M) and rc(M), but they both depart systematically from rb(M) and become smaller as the electronegativity of the M atom increases and the M-O bond length decreases. The well-developed correlations between both sets of radii and rb(M) testifies to the relative precision of both sets of radii and the fact that both sets are highly correlated the M-O bond 1 lengths. On the other hand, the progressive departure of rb(O) from the fixed ionic radius of the O atom with the increasing electronegativity of the bonded M atom indicates that any compilation of sets of ionic radii, assuming that the radius for the oxygen atom is fixed in value, is problematical and impacts on the accuracy of the resulting sets of ionic and crystal radii thus compiled. The assumption of a fixed O atom radius not only results in a negative ionic radii for several atoms, but it also results in values of rb(M) that are much as ~ 0.6 Ĺ larger than the ri(M) and rc(M) values, respectively, particularly for the more electronegative M atoms. On the other hand, the ionic radii are in closer agreement with rb(M) for the more electropositive atoms. Notwithstanding that ionic radii are typically smaller than bonded radii, particularly for the more electronegative atoms, they have been used with considerable success in understanding and rationalizing problems and properties in crystal chemistry primarily because both ionic and crystal radii are highly correlated on a one-to-one basis with both the bonded radii and the associated M-O bond lengths. The lack of agreement between the effective ionic and crystal radii and the bonded radii for the more shared bonded interactions is ascribed to the progressive increase in the polarization of the O atom by the bonded atoms with a concomitant decrease in its radius, a factor that was neglected in the compilation of ionic and crystal radii for fluorides, oxides, sulfides and nitrides. This accounts for ionic radii for these materials being smaller than the bonded radii for the more electronegative atoms.

Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Photochemical tissue bonding  

SciTech Connect

Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

Redmond, Robert W. (Brookline, MA); Kochevar, Irene E. (Charlestown, MA)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Structural and Functional Elucidation of the Mechanism Promoting Error-prone Synthesis by Human DNA Polymerase [kappa] Opposite the 7,8-Dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine Adduct  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human polymerase kappa (hPol {kappa}) is one of four eukaryotic Y-class DNA polymerases and may be an important element in the cellular response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzo[a]pyrene, which can lead to reactive oxygenated metabolite-mediated oxidative stress. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the activity and specificity of hPol {kappa} bypass opposite the major oxidative adduct 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG). Unlike its archaeal homolog Dpo4, hPol {kappa} bypasses this lesion in an error-prone fashion by inserting mainly dATP. Analysis of transient-state kinetics shows diminished 'bursts' for dATP:8-oxoG and dCTP:8-oxoG incorporation, indicative of non-productive complex formation, but dATP:8-oxoG insertion events that do occur are 2-fold more efficient than dCTP:G insertion events. Crystal structures of ternary hPol {kappa} complexes with adducted template-primer DNA reveal non-productive (dGTP and dATP) alignments of incoming nucleotide and 8-oxoG. Structural limitations placed upon the hPol {kappa} by interactions between the N-clasp and finger domains combined with stabilization of the syn-oriented template 8-oxoG through the side chain of Met-135 both appear to contribute to error-prone bypass. Mutating Leu-508 in the little finger domain of hPol {kappa} to lysine modulates the insertion opposite 8-oxoG toward more accurate bypass, similar to previous findings with Dpo4. Our structural and activity data provide insight into important mechanistic aspects of error-prone bypass of 8-oxoG by hPol {kappa} compared with accurate and efficient bypass of the lesion by Dpo4 and polymerase {eta}.

Irimia, Adriana; Eoff, Robert L.; Guengerich, F.Peter; Egli, Martin; (Vanderbilt)

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Opportunities in Bond Financing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities in Bond Financing Opportunities in Bond Financing James Dack Vice President Alternative Energy Finance Group Stern Brothers & Co. Seattle, WA 98101 Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 2 INTRODUCTION * Stern Brothers, founded in 1917 and headquartered in St. Louis, is an investment banking firm that is focused on project financing (taxable and tax-exempt) for renewable energy, real estate, higher education and healthcare. * Stern's Alternative Energy Finance Group structures and places tax- exempt and taxable debt, and provides financial advisory services for renewable energy projects in the U.S. * Waste-to-energy, second generation biofuels, biochemicals, biomass, solar, wind, landfill gas-to-energy, cogen, CHP, hydro,

70

The Illiquidity of Corporate Bonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the illiquidity of corporate bonds and its asset-pricing implications. Using transactions data from 2003 to 2009, we show that the illiquidity in corporate bonds is substantial, significantly greater ...

Bao, Jack

71

STRIPPING METAL COATINGS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Constitution Diagram for Dissimilar Metal Welds in Alloy Steels and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of Dissimilar Metal Welds During High Temperature Service.

73

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE DIFFUSION BONDING OF TUNGSTEN TO TUNGSTEN UNDER PRESSURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state diffusion bonding of tungsten to tungsten was investigated at temperatures ranging from 1700 to 2600 nif- C, under surface contact pressures up to 3000 psi, while under high vacuum or hydrogen atmosphere. Various interface coatings were employed to promote diffusion, including graphite, oxide, metal slurries, electroplates, direct surface oxidation, and Mo - -W deposits from carbonyl decompositions. Thorough metallurgical bonding was achieved, particularly with the latter two surface coatings, after 2 hours at 2350 nif- C in H/sub 2/ under 1400 psi. Corresponding tensile strengths of 30,000 psi were obtained. Powder-compacted tungsten sheet containing 50 vo1% UO/sub 2/, spray-coated with an outer layer of tungsten, was effectively bonded to itself and to tungsten metal under 2 hour diffusion treatments at 2000 nif- C and moderate pressures of the order of 1000 psi. (auth)

Batista, R.I.; Hanks, G.S.; Murphy, D.J.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effect of Cross Accumulative Roll Bonding Process on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, J. Materials and Processes for Enhanced Performance ... of mechanical properties and optimizing the roll bonding technologies of dissimilar LMCS. ... and Recovery Process of Rare Metals from Oil Desulfurization Spent Catalyst ... Redox Investigation of NiFe2O4 Supported on Al2O3 and Yttria- Stabilized ...

75

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Jeong, Seung Y. (Westmont, IL); Lohan, Dirk (Chicago, IL); Elizabeth, Anne (Chicago, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Genomic analysis of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase genes of Zea mays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductases (OPRs) are enzymes of the octadecanoid pathway which converts linolenic acid to a phytohormone, jasmonic acid. Bioinformatics analysis of ESTs and genomic sequences from available private and public databases revealed that the maize genome encodes eight different OPR genes. This number of maize OPR genes has been independently confirmed by Southern blot analysis and by mapping of individual OPR genes to maize chromosomes using oat maize chromosome addition lines. Survey of massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) assays revealed that transcripts of each OPR gene accumulate differentially in diverse organs of maize plants. This data suggested that individual OPR genes may have a distinct function in development. Similarly, RNA blot analysis revealed that distinct OPR genes are differentially regulated in response to stress hormones, wounding or pathogen infection. ZmOPR1 and ZmOPR2 appear to have important functions in defense responses to pathogens because they are transiently induced by salicylic acid (SA), chitooligosaccharides and by infection with Cochliobolus carbonum, Bipolaris maydis and Fusarium verticillioides and not by wounding. In contrast to these two genes, ZmOPR6 and ZmOPR7/8 are highly induced by wounding and treatments with wound-associated signaling molecules jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid. ZmOPR6 and ZmOPR7/8 are not induced by SA treatments or pathogen infections suggesting their specific involvement in wound-induced defense responses. Possible functions of specific OPR genes are discussed.

Zhang, Jinglan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

Byrne, Stephen C. (Monroeville, PA); Vasudevan, Asuri K. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

Kreider, Kenneth G. (Potomac, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bond Programs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Bond Programs Jump to: navigation, search Bonds allow governments (and corporations) to raise money by borrowing. A few states and local governments have established bond programs to support energy efficiency and renewable energy for government-owned facilities. After a government has raised an authorized sum of money through the sale of bonds, the money collected is used to improve energy efficiency or to install renewable energy systems on government facilities. The bonding authority is usually reimbursed using the energy savings resulting from these projects. [1]

82

Metal Aminoboranes  

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be ...

83

Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Method for vacuum fusion bonding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fusion bonding and alignment fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Spectroscopy at metal cluster surfaces. Annual report, Year 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of our research program is the study of gas phase metal clusters to evaluate their potential to model fundamental interactions present on metal surfaces. To do this, we characterize the chemical bonding present between the component atoms in metal clusters as well as the bonding exhibited by ``physisorption`` on cluster surfaces. Electronic spectra, vibrational frequencies and bond neutral and ionized clusters with a variety of laser/mass spectrometry techniques. We are particularly interested in bimetallic cluster systems, and how their properties compare to those of corresponding pure metal clusters.

Duncan, M.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Metallic carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Bond Pricing with Default Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Bond Issuers Data Range Exxon ARCO Eli Lilly IBM Fordfrom GMM Estimation µ X Exxon ARCO Eli Lilly IBM FordFord RJR Eli Lilly ARCO UAL Exxon Safeway This table reports

Hsu, Jason C.; Saa-Requejo, Jesus; Santa-Clara, Pedro

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Molecular Bond: EMSL's bimonthly newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Email not displaying correctly? View it on the website. The Molecular Bond newsletter banner December 2013 Allison A. Campbell, EMSL Director I'm pleased to share with you the...

90

Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ''Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008'', enacted in October 2008, authorized the issuance of Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) that may be used by state, local and tribal...

91

Reliability of Copper Wire Bonding on Copper Substrate with Tin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suitable bonding conditions, Tin thickness, stage temperature, wire bonding power and bonding time are chosen through wire bonding tests. Peel strength of a ...

92

Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials  

SciTech Connect

Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hot Cracking Study of High Chromium Nickel-Base Filler Metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of Dissimilar Metal Welds During High Temperature Service.

94

Ideally Glassy Hydrogen Bonded Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The axiomatic theory of ideally glassy networks, which has proved effective in describing phase diagrams and properties of chalcogenide and oxide glasses and their foreign interfaces, is broadened here to include intermolecular interactions in hydrogen-bonded polyalcohols such as glycerol, monosaccharides (glucose), and the optimal bioprotective hydrogen-bonded disaccharide networks formed from trehalose. The methods of Lagrangian mechanics and Maxwellian scaffolds are useful at the molecular level when bonding hierarchies are characterized by constraint counting similar to the chemical methods used by Huckel and Pauling. Whereas Newtonian molecular dynamical methods are useful for simulating large-scale interactions for times of order 10 ps, constraint counting describes network properties on glassy (almost equilibrated) time scales, which may be of cosmological order for oxide glasses, or years for trehalose. The ideally glassy network of trehalose may consist of extensible tandem sandwich arrays.

J. C. Phillips

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Interface Constraints on Shear Band Patterns in Bonded Metallic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All FEM results were analyzed on deformed mesh at maximum load. ... Red curves in Figure 3 (a) and (b) represent the shear band patterns on the top surface of ...

96

Low Temperature Sintering Bonding of Metals Using Ag ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High surface energy of the nanoparticles contributes the low temperature sintering ... and Welding Conditions of Monopile and Transition for Offshore Wind Plant.

97

Production test IP-665-A, evaluation of hot-die-sized end bonding processes  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of possible operational limitations of the ALSi bonded e elements and the need for a replacement or alternate fuel fabrication process have been lender way for several years. Recently, one fuel manufacturing process, hot-die-sized diffusion bonding, has been intensely examined and irradiation testing of this new fuel type began in 1963. This production test is one additional step in evaluating the new fuel fabrication process. The objective of this test is to evaluate the effect end-bonding techniques on the irradiation behavior of hot-die-sized diffusion bonded fuel elements. Three types of fuel elements will be used in this test: (1) hot-die-sized diffusion bonded elements which have been end bonded by the resistance heating method; (2) hot-die-sized diffusion bonded elements which have been end bonded by the induction heating method; and (3) standard production AlSi bonded fuel elements. Twelve columns of fuel containing the three element types alternated throughout the columns will be irradiated in the test. Twelve smooth-bore Zircaloy-2 process tubes in the C Reactor will be utilized for this test; consequently, all fuel elements of this test are self-support models. These fuel columns will be irradiated to average exposures of 800 Mwd/t. Examination and measurement of the elements of this test will take place in the 105=C Metal Examination Facility.

Hladek, K.L.

1964-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

(Selective carbon oxygen bond scission during reactions of oxygenates on single crystal catalysts)  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered that the carbon-oxygen bond in methanol can be selectively broken if the surface structure of the platinum catalyst is appropriately tailored. The objective of this project is to determine if variations in surface structure allow one to selectively break C-O and C-H bonds. The decomposition of a wide range of oxygenates on several carefully chosen faces of group VIII metals will be examined to see when C-O bond scission occurs and what new chemistry we can find on stepped surfaces.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

[Selective carbon oxygen bond scission during reactions of oxygenates on single crystal catalysts]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered that the carbon-oxygen bond in methanol can be selectively broken if the surface structure of the platinum catalyst is appropriately tailored. The objective of this project is to determine if variations in surface structure allow one to selectively break C-O and C-H bonds. The decomposition of a wide range of oxygenates on several carefully chosen faces of group VIII metals will be examined to see when C-O bond scission occurs and what new chemistry we can find on stepped surfaces.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fabrication and testing of TAA bonded carbon electrodes. Final report, March 1978 - May 1979  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to evaluate metallated dihydrodibenzo tetraazannulene (TAA) as a primary fuel-cell cathode catalyst where the TAA is covalently bonded to the conductive cathode matrix. Under the program, cobalt TAA was demonstrated to be an active oxygen dissolution reaction catalyst; bonded cobalt TAA was also demonstrated to be stable in a primary fuel cell with performance data obtained for a one month full cell test. Details of some of the key results and achievements are presented. Cobalt TAA bonded to Vulcan XC-72 was shown to be stable in 150/sup 0/C concentrated phosphoric acid for periods of over one month. Cathodes fabricated from cobalt TAA bonded to Vulcan XC-72 were tested in primary fuel cells: preliminary tests showed that bonded-CoTAA has activity similar to platinum on a per weight metal basis; performance of 100 mA/cm/sup 2/ at 650 to 700 mV vs hydrogen was obtained at 110/sup 0/C with oxygen. Bonded-CoTAA catalyzed cathodes were tested in primary fuel cells for periods of up to one month and shown to provide stable performance at 110 to 130/sup 0/C. Bonding of TAA was shown to improve its catalytic performance.

Walsh, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

State Bond Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bonds allow governments (and corporations) to raise money by borrowing. A Bonds allow governments (and corporations) to raise money by borrowing. A few states and local governments have established bond programs to support energy efficiency and renewable energy for government-owned facilities. After a government has raised an authorized sum of money through the sale of bonds, the money collected is used to improve energy efficiency or to install renewable energy systems on government facilities. The bonding authority is usually reimbursed using the energy savings resulting from these projects. [1] State Bond Program Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 7) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Bond Program (New Mexico) State Bond Program New Mexico Schools

105

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bond Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New Mexico's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bonding Act, which became law in April 2005, authorizes up to $20 million in bonds to finance energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements...

106

Secondary Market Taxable Bond Program (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Secondary Market Taxable Bond Program provides tax-exempt interest rate bond financing for real estate and machinery and equipment acquisitions. Up to 90% of the project debt may be financed,...

107

Modeling TLP Bonding in Multicomponent Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... prior to bonding as well as the application of large loads during bonding. .... The profile given in equation (1) is thus appropriate for each of the solutes in the  ...

108

Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation  

SciTech Connect

Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has seen widespread success involves the use of a proximal heteroatom that serves as a directing group for the selective functionalization of a specific C-H bond. In a survey of examples of heteroatom-directed Rh catalysis, two mechanistically distinct reaction pathways are revealed. In one case, the heteroatom acts as a chelator to bind the Rh catalyst, facilitating reactivity at a proximal site. In this case, the formation of a five-membered metallacycle provides a favorable driving force in inducing reactivity at the desired location. In the other case, the heteroatom initially coordinates the Rh catalyst and then acts to stabilize the formation of a metal-carbon bond at a proximal site. A true test of the utility of a synthetic method is in its application to the synthesis of natural products or complex molecules. Several groups have demonstrated the applicability of C-H bond functionalization reactions towards complex molecule synthesis. Target-oriented synthesis provides a platform to test the effectiveness of a method in unique chemical and steric environments. In this respect, Rh-catalyzed methods for C-H bond functionalization stand out, with several syntheses being described in the literature that utilize C-H bond functionalization in a key step. These syntheses are highlighted following the discussion of the method they employ.

Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

109

Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Development of a Dissimilar Metal Foil-to-Substrate Resistance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI P87, A New Filler Material for Dissimilar Metal Welds · Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of ...

112

Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials  

SciTech Connect

Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Silicon-nitride and metal composite  

SciTech Connect

A composite and a method for bonding the composite. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi.sub.2 indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi.sub.2 with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400.degree. C.; and, simultaneously with the heating, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA); Huffsmith, Sarah A. (Urbana, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Bonding, antibonding and tunable optical forces in asymmetric membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that tunable attractive (bonding) and repulsive (anti-bonding) forces can arise in highly asymmetric structures coupled to external radiation, a consequence of the bonding/anti-bonding level repulsion of ...

Hui, Pui-Chuen

115

Method of making cascaded die mountings with springs-loaded contact-bond options  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cascaded die mounting device and method using spring contacts for die attachment, with or without metallic bonds between the contacts and the dies, is disclosed. One embodiment is for the direct refrigerant cooling of an inverter/converter carrying higher power levels than most of the low power circuits previously taught, and does not require using a heat sink.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Adams, Donald J. (Knoxville, TN); Su, Gui-Jia (Knoxville, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN); Coomer, Chester (Knoxville, TN)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

116

Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry primarily for hydrocarbon compounds, but it has been extended to compounds containing transition-metal atoms. Recent findings of aromaticity and antiaromaticy in all-metal clusters have stimulated further researches in describing the chemical bonding, structures, and stability in transition-metal clusters and compounds on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, which are reviewed here. The presence of d-orbitals endows much more diverse chemistry, structure, and chemical bonding to transition-metal clusters and compounds. One interesting feature is the existence of a new type of ?-aromaticity, in addition to ?- and ?-aromaticity that are only possible for main group compounds. Another striking characteristic in the chemical bonding of transition-metal systems is the multi-fold nature of aromaticity, antiaromaticity, or even conflicting aromaticity. Separate sets of counting rules have been proposed for cyclic transition-metal systems to account for the three types of ?-, ?-, and ?-aromaticity/antiaromaticity. The diverse transition-metal clusters and compounds reviewed here indicate that multiple aromaticity and antiaromaticity may be much more common in chemistry than one would anticipate. It is hoped that the current review will stimulate interest in further understanding the structure and bonding, on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, of other known or unknown transition-metal systems, such as the active sites of enzymes or other biomolecules, which contain transition-metal atoms and clusters.

Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Averkiev, Boris B.; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Solid polymer battery electrolyte and reactive metal-water battery  

SciTech Connect

In one implementation, a reactive metal-water battery includes an anode comprising a metal in atomic or alloy form selected from the group consisting of periodic table Group 1A metals, periodic table Group 2A metals and mixtures thereof. The battery includes a cathode comprising water. Such also includes a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a polyphosphazene comprising ligands bonded with a phosphazene polymer backbone. The ligands comprise an aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion and a metal ion carrier portion. The metal ion carrier portion is bonded at one location with the polymer backbone and at another location with the aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion. The invention also contemplates such solid polymer electrolytes use in reactive metal/water batteries, and in any other battery.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative processes; Anode design and operation; Cell fundamentals and ... Hot-rolling technologies; Deformation of materials; Primary metal production.

119

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Locally Determined Program Information Utah Program Type State Bond Program Rebate Amount Locally Determined Under the Utah...

120

Enhanced Diffusional Processes in Wire Bonding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced Diffusional Processes in Wire Bonding ... there is a tremendous need for implementation of thinner wires in wire boning processes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Green Infrastructure Bonds (Hawaii) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

allowing the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism to issue Green Infrastructure Bonds to secture low-cost financing for clean energy installations,...

122

Method of bonding silver to glass and mirrors produced according to this method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for adhering silver to a glass substrate for producing mirrors includes attaining a silicon enriched substrate surface by reducing the oxygen therein in a vacuum and then vacuum depositing a silver layer onto the silicon enriched surface. The silicon enrichment can be attained by electron beam bombardment, ion beam bombardment, or neutral beam bombardment. It can also be attained by depositing a metal, such as aluminum, on the substrate surface, allowing the metal to oxidize by pulling oxygen from the substrate surface, thereby leaving a silicon enriched surface, and then etching or eroding the metal oxide layer away to expose the silicon enriched surface. Ultraviolet rays can be used to maintain dangling silicon bonds on the enriched surface until covalent bonding with the silver can occur. This disclosure also includes encapsulated mirrors with diffusion layers built therein. One of these mirrors is assembled on a polymer substrate.

Pitts, J.R.; Thomas, T.M.; Czanderna, A.W.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Single Molecule Junctions: A Laboratory for Chemistry, Mechanics and Bond Rupture  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous measurement [1] of junction conductance and sustained force in single molecule junctions bridging metal electrodes provides a powerful tool in the quantitative study of the character of molecule-metal bonds. In this talk I will discuss three topics. First, I will describe chemical trends in link bond strength based on experiments and Density Functional Theory based calculations. Second, I will focus on the specific case of pyridine-linked junctions. Bond rupture from the high conductance junction structure shows a requires a force that exceeds the rupture force of gold point contacts and clearly indicates the role of additional forces, beyond the specific N-Au donor acceptor bond. DFT-D2 calculations with empirical addition of dispersion interactions illustrates the interplay between the donor-acceptor bonding and the non-specific van der Waals interactions between the pyridine rings and Au asperities. Third, I will describe recent efforts to characterize the diversity of junction structures realized in break-junction experiments with suitable models for the potential surfaces that are observed. [1] Venkataraman Group, Columbia University.

Hybertsen M. S.

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

Bond Graph Modeling Of Variable Structure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of describing variable structure models in a compact, object--oriented fashion is revisited and analyzed from the perspective of bond graph modeling. Traditionally, bond graphs have always been used to describe continuous-- time physical processes with a fixed structure. Yet, this paper shall demonstrate that bond graphs are equally suitable to describe variable structure models as fixed structure models. Moreover, a bond graph description of variable structure models can teach us a lot about the essential properties of variable structure models, properties that are not easily visible when other modeling approaches are taken. The paper discusses issues related to causality reassignment and conditional index changes as a consequence of switching in a physical system. Keywords: Bond graphs, variable structure system, computational causality, conditional index change, switching, object--oriented modeling, Dymola. INTRODUCTION When the causality strokes were added to the forme...

François E. Cellier; Martin Otter; Hilding Elmqvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Orbital entanglement in bond-formation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the (differential) correlation energy is central to the quantum chemical description of bond-formation and bond-dissociation processes. In order to estimate the quality of single- and multi-reference approaches for this purpose, various diagnostic tools have been developed. In this work, we elaborate on our previous observation [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 3129 (2012)] that one- and two-orbital-based entanglement measures provide quantitative means for the assessment and classification of electron correlation effects among molecular orbitals. The dissociation behavior of some prototypical diatomic molecules features all types of correlation effects relevant for chemical bonding. We demonstrate that our entanglement analysis is convenient to dissect these electron correlation effects and to provide a conceptual understanding of bond-forming and bond-breaking processes from the point of view of quantum information theory.

Boguslawski, Katharina; Barcza, Gergely; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Advances in the Extractive Metallurgy of Selected Rare and Precious Metals" ( 1991 Review of Extractive Metallurgy), J.E. Hoffmann, April 1991, pp. 18-23.

127

Solving the Mystery of the Billion-Dollar Bond, Double Bond | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solving the Mystery of the Billion-Dollar Bond, Double Bond Solving the Mystery of the Billion-Dollar Bond, Double Bond Solving the Mystery of the Billion-Dollar Bond, Double Bond October 26, 2011 - 4:56pm Addthis John Shanklin, biochemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Ed Whittle, research assistant in Shanklin's lab, with a fatty acid molecule model and plant seeds and casings in the foreground. | Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory John Shanklin, biochemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Ed Whittle, research assistant in Shanklin's lab, with a fatty acid molecule model and plant seeds and casings in the foreground. | Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Understanding how proteins exert precise control over double bond

128

Hydrogen Bonding Penalty upon Ligand Binding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ligand binding involves breakage of hydrogen bonds with water molecules and formation of new hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand. In this work, the change of hydrogen bonding energy in the binding process, namely hydrogen bonding penalty, is evaluated with a new method. The hydrogen bonding penalty can not only be used to filter unrealistic poses in docking, but also improve the accuracy of binding energy calculation. A new model integrated with hydrogen bonding penalty for free energy calculation gives a root mean square error of 0.7 kcal/mol on 74 inhibitors in the training set and of 1.1 kcal/mol on 64 inhibitors in the test set. Moreover, an application of hydrogen bonding penalty into a high throughput docking campaign for EphB4 inhibitors is presented, and remarkably, three novel scaffolds are discovered out of seven tested. The binding affinity and ligand efficiency of the most potent compound is about 300 nM and 0.35 kcal/mol per non-hydrogen atom, respectively.

Hongtao Zhao; Danzhi Huang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Nanocrystal-enabled solid state bonding.  

SciTech Connect

In this project, we performed a preliminary set of sintering experiments to examine nanocrystal-enabled diffusion bonding (NEDB) in Ag-on-Ag and Cu-on-Cu using Ag nanoparticles. The experimental test matrix included the effects of material system, temperature, pressure, and particle size. The nanoparticle compacts were bonded between plates using a customized hot press, tested in shear, and examined post mortem using microscopy techniques. NEDB was found to be a feasible mechanism for low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding of like materials, creating bonded interfaces that were able to support substantial loads. The maximum supported shear strength varied substantially within sample cohorts due to variation in bonded area; however, systematic variation with fabrication conditions was also observed. Mesoscale sintering simulations were performed in order to understand whether sintering models can aid in understanding the NEDB process. A pressure-assisted sintering model was incorporated into the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo sintering code. Results reproduce most of the qualitative behavior observed in experiments, indicating that simulation can augment experiments during the development of the NEDB process. Because NEDB offers a promising route to low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding, we recommend further research and development with a goal of devising new NEDB bonding processes to support Sandia's customers.

San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; Puskar, Joseph David; Tikare, Veena; Garcia Cardona, Cristina (San Diego State University, San Diego, CA); Reece, Mark; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Holm, Elizabeth Ann

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Bond graph modeling of centrifugal compressor system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system, active surge control. A novel method of modeling centrifugal compression systems for surge control purposes by using bond graphs is presented. By using the bond graph method, we get a simple description of compression systems based on physical phenomena and it is straight forward to get the dynamic equations. It is demonstrated that several active surge control methods can be represented by the same bond graph. It is also shown how methods for active surge control can be classified using energy flow in terms of upstream energy injection or downstream energy dissipation. A model of a compression system with recycle flow is derived in this work. 1.

Nur Uddin; Jan Tommy Gravdahl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond...

132

Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Acyclic Tertiary Diamines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Search of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in Proton Bridgedand J.A. Gerlt, “The Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in EnzymaticShow That Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds do not Offer a

Khodagholian, Sevana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ultrasonic characterization of interfaces in composite bonds  

SciTech Connect

The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I. [Ohio State University, Edison Joining Technology Center, 1248 Arthur E Adams Drive, Columbus OH 43221 (United States); Cantrell, J. H. [NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 231, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

Industrial Revenue Bond Program (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The District provides below market bond financing to lower the costs of borrowing for qualified capital construction and renovation projects. The program is available to non-profits, institutions,...

135

Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New Guidance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New Guidance from the U.S. Department of Treasury and Internal Revenue Service Title Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB)...

136

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Bond Exemption for Small Biofuels...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Bond Exemption for Small Biofuels Suppliers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Bond Exemption for Small Biofuels Suppliers on Facebook Tweet about...

137

Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds (Utah)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

138

Montana Clean Renewable Energy Bond Act (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Renewable Energy Bond Act (Montana) Montana Clean Renewable Energy Bond Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility StateProvincial Govt Local Government Tribal Government Savings...

139

Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Breakthrough in Improving Osteoporosis Drug Design A Breakthrough in Improving Osteoporosis Drug Design Allaying Structural-Alloy Corrosion Putting the Pressure on MOFs Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Hearing the Highest Pitches Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure AUGUST 8, 2008 Bookmark and Share Schematic shows the topology of π* orbital interactions in the (O2)4 cluster. (Image copyright National Academy of Sciences, PNAS.) Oxygen, the third most abundant element in the cosmos and essential to life on Earth, changes its forms dramatically under pressure, transforming to a solid with spectacular colors. Eventually it becomes metallic and a

140

Earth-Abundant Transition Metal Chemistry: Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production and the Synthesis of High-spin Iron(IV)-oxo Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. E. ; Zhao, X. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, n/E. ; Que, L. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,E. ; Que, L. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,

Bigi, Julian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation, VoL 13, No. 3, 1994 Leaky Guided Wave Propagation Along Imperfectly Bonded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Addison and Sinclair studied the scattering spectra of silicon carbide fibers in titanium metal matrix com Imperfectly Bonded Fibers in Composite Materials Peter B. Nagy ~ Received December 20, 1993; revised July 24, 1994 Leaky guided modes propagating along embedded fibers in a composite material can be used

Nagy, Peter B.

142

Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2012 8, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) Update: New Guidance from the U.S. Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) are federally-subsidized bonds that enable state, tribal, and local government issuers to borrow money to fund a range of energy conservation projects at very attractive borrowing rates over long contract terms. In June 2012, the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published a notice to clarify what constitutes a qualified project for potential issuers of the approximately $2.5 billion of remaining QECB issuance capacity. The guidance addresses two qualified uses of QECB proceeds-how issuers should measure energy use reductions in publicly-owned buildings and what constitutes a green community program.

143

Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

Simmons, Jerry A. (Sandia Park, NM); Weckwerth, Mark V. (Pleasanton, CA); Baca, Wes E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

Sugama, T.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Importance of open-shell effects in adhesion at metal-ceramic interfaces Emily A. Jarvis and Emily A. Carter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Importance of open-shell effects in adhesion at metal-ceramic interfaces Emily A. Jarvis and Emily enhanced adhesion between oxide ceramics and conducting metals via promoting open-shell electronic The need to bond dissimilar materials to one another is pervasive in modern industry and medicine. Metals

Carter, Emily A.

146

Bonded Compliant Seal (BCS) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Applications and Industries. ... the flexible gasket is configured to flex in response to changes in the relative size of the metal part and the ceram ...

147

Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

METAL COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

Seybolt, A.U.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Municipal bond financing of solar energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the laws of municipal bond financing to solar facilities is examined. The type of facilities under consideration are outlined. The general legal principles of municipal securities financing are discussed. The effect of recent decisions applying antitrust liability to municipal corporations is also discussed. Five specific types of municipal bonds are explained. The application of Section 103 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended, to the issuance of municipal bonds for solar facility financing is examined also. Five bond laws of five representative states are examined and whether the eight types of solar facilities under consideration could be financed under such law is discussed. The application of the general legal principle is illustrated. Three hypothetical situations are set forth and common legal issues to be confronted by city officials in proposing such financing are discussed. These issues will be raised in most financings, but the purpose is to examine the common context in which they are raised. It is concluded that if it can be shown that the purpose of the solar facilities to be financed is to benefit the public, all legal obstacles to the use of municipal financing of solar facilities can be substantially overcome.

White, S.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermally stable, plastic-bonded explosives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By use of an appropriate thermoplastic rubber as the binder, the thermal stability and thermal stress characteristics of plastic-bonded explosives may be greatly improved. In particular, an HMX-based explosive composition using an oil-extended styrene-ethylenebutylene-styrene block copolymer as the binder exhibits high explosive energy and thermal stability and good handling safety and physical properties.

Benziger, Theodore M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

Hyman, H.H.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method for Producing Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics and for Stabilizing Contaminants Encapsulated therein Utilizing Reducing Agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions is stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

Smith, Don D.

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H){sub 2}L (Cp* = (CH{sub 3}){sub 5}C{sub 5}, L = PPh{sub 3}, Ph = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO){sub 2} to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

Wilkens, M.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Bond Program Provider Revenue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial, natural resources, recreational development or manufacturing purposes. The board of county commissioners of any county or the governing body of any city may approve an exemption of property funded by industrial revenue bonds (IRB's). Some

158

Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Allocation (Missouri) Bond Allocation (Missouri) Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Total Program Cap 2012: $571,015,360 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Bond Program Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development The Private Activity Bond Allocation Program provides low-interest financing through tax-exempt bonds for certain types of projects, including electric and gas utility projects. Eligible applicants include certain state agencies, cities, counties and industrial development authorities

159

Mechanistic aspects of photooxidation of polyhydroxylated molecules on metal oxides.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyhydroxylated molecules, including natural carbohydrates, are known to undergo photooxidation on wide-gap transition-metal oxides irradiated by ultraviolet light. In this study, we examine mechanistic aspects of this photoreaction on aqueous TiO{sub 2}, {alpha}-FeOOH, and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and site-selective deuteration. We demonstrate that the carbohydrates are oxidized at sites involved in the formation of oxo bridges between the chemisorbed carbohydrate molecule and metal ions at the oxide surface. This bridging inhibits the loss of water (which is the typical reaction of the analogous free radicals in bulk solvent) promoting instead a rearrangement that leads to elimination of the formyl radical. For natural carbohydrates, the latter reaction mainly involves carbon-1, whereas the main radical products of the oxidation are radical arising from H atom loss centered on carbon-1, -2, and -3 sites. Photoexcited TiO{sub 2} oxidizes all of the carbohydrates and polyols, whereas {alpha}-FeOOH oxidizes some of the carbohydrates, and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is unreactive. These results serve as a stepping stone for understanding the photochemistry on mineral surfaces of more complex biomolecules such as nucleic acids.

Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. M.; Sevilla, M. D.; Chemerisov, S. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Benedictine Univ.); (Oakland Univ.)

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Various Carbon to Carbon Bond Lengths Inter-related via the Golden Ratio, and their Linear Dependence on Bond Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents the relations between the carbon to carbon bond lengths in the single, double and triple bonds and in graphite, butadiene and benzene. The Golden ratio, which was shown to divide the Bohr radius into two parts pertaining to the charged particles, the electron and proton, and to divide inter-atomic distances into their cationic and anionic radii, also plays a role in the carbon-carbon bonds and in the ionic/polar character of those in graphite, butadiene and benzene. Further, the bond energies of the various CC bonds are shown to vary linearly with the bond lengths.

Raji Heyrovska

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Conservation in Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Energy Conservation in Metals. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and ...

162

Aqueous-phase hydrogenation of acetic acid over transition metal catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol has been carried out in aqueous phase on several metals, with ruthenium being the most active and selective. DFT calculations suggest that the initial CO bond scission yielding acetyl is the key step and that the intrinsic reactivity of the metals accounts for the observed activity.

Olcay, Hakan [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Xu, Lijun [ORNL; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Huber, George [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Bonding in the Superionic Phase of Water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted superionic phase of water is investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34-115 GPa) along the 2000K isotherm. They find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa, a much higher pressure than suggested in prior work. They find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Up to 95 GPa, they find a solid superionic phase characterization by covalent O-H bonding. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-H hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character. In addition, they describe a new metastable superionic phase with quenched O disorder.

Goldman, N; Fried, L E; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

165

Major Business Expansion Bond Program (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expansion Bond Program (Maine) Expansion Bond Program (Maine) Major Business Expansion Bond Program (Maine) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Bond Program Provider Finance Authority of Maine The Major Business Expansion Bond Program provides long-term, credit-enhanced financing up to $25,000,000 at taxable bond rates for businesses creating or retaining at least 50 jobs; up to $10,000,000 is available for businesses which expand their manufacturing services. The bond proceeds may be used to acquire real estate, machinery, equipment, or rehabilitate or expand an existing facility. The interest rate is determined by market forces at the time of the bond sale

166

Pooled Bond Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pooled Bond Program (South Dakota) Pooled Bond Program (South Dakota) Pooled Bond Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Bond Program Provider South Dakota Governor's Office of Economic Development The Pooled Bond Program offered by the Economic Development Finance Authority is designed for capital intensive projects, providing small businesses access to larger capital markets for tax-exempt or taxable bond issuances. Bond proceeds can be used to finance 80 percent of new construction, and 75 percent of new equipment costs, with no greater than 25 percent of the bond proceeds being used for ancillary activities such as

167

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: New Bond Helps Toledo...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Bond Helps Toledo, Ohio, Expand Financing Pool to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: New Bond Helps Toledo, Ohio, Expand Financing Pool on Facebook...

168

Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Bond Program Provider Any interested county or municipality. Limited obligation local government bonds ("special revenue bonds") may be issued for qualified electric energy generation facilities, including those powered by renewables. These bonds generally are secured by the project itself. The taxing power or general credit of the government may not be used to secure the bonds. Local governments may not operate any project

169

Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Bond Program Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRB) are tax-exempt bonds that can be used to stimulate capital investment and job creation by providing private borrowers with access to financing at interest rates that are lower than conventional bank loans. The IRB process involves five separate entities - the borrower, lender, bond attorney, issuer, and WEDC. WEDC allocates the bonding authority or the volume cap for the program under Wis. Stat. §

170

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

171

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multichip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multi chip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

Bernhardt, A.F.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m{sup 2}d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90{degrees}C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young`s modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt.

Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Murphy, C.D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Aniline hydrogenolysis on the Pt(111) single crystal surface: Mechanisms for C-N bond activation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenolysis of C-N bond on transition metals is a crucial step in hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) reactions. Despite the overall complexity of HDN processes, the details of important surface reactions can be characterized using model reactions of organonitrogen compounds on single crystal model catalysts. The structure and reactivity of well characterized aniline monolayers on the Pt(111) surface both in vacuum and in the presence of hydrogen is discussed here. Adsorption and reactions of aniline were studied by Gland and Somorjai on the Pt(111) and Pt(100) surfaces, and more recently by Benziger`s group on the Ni(111) and Ni(100) surfaces. On both Pt and Ni surfaces, aniline {pi} bonds through the aromatic ring with its ring parallel to the substrate surface.

Huang, S.X.; Gland, J.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Fischer, D.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Dept.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Oil prices and government bond risk premiums Herv Alexandre*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices and government bond risk premiums By Hervé Alexandre*º Antonin de Benoist * Abstract : This article analyses the impact of oil price on bond risk premiums issued by emerging economies. No empirical study has yet focussed on the effects of the oil price on government bond risk premiums. We develop

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

Bonding and gap states at GaAs-oxide interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of bonding and possible causes of Fermi level pinning at high mobility-high dielectric constant oxide GaAs:HfO"2 interfaces are discussed. It is argued that these are atoms with defective bonding, rather than states due to the bulk semiconductor ... Keywords: GaAs, bonding, interface

John Robertson; Liang Lin

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A low temperature process of applying high strength metal coatings to a substrate and article produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method of applying a dense (about 99% of theoretical density) metal coating to a substrate using a converging/diverging nozzle to nebulize metal into a plume with uniform mass and thermal fluxes and a metal droplet size distribution of about 5--15 microns. Coatings may be deposited on substrates which thermally degrade at temperatures far below the melting point of the metals deposited thereon. Coated articles having strong mechanical bonds are also disclosed.

Ploger, S.A.; Watson, L.D.

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nondestructive inspection of bonded composite doublers for aircraft  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One major thrust in FAA`s National Aging Aircraft Research Program is to foster new technologies in civil aircraft maintenance. Recent DOD and other government developments in using bonded composite doublers on metal structures support the need for validation of such doubler applications on US certificated airplanes. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft. Primary inspection requirements for these doublers include identifying disbonds between composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the parent aluminum material beneath the double is also a concern. No single NDI method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore we need to know NDI capabilities and limitations. This paper reports on a series of NDI tests conducted on laboratory test structures and on a fuselage section from a retired L-1011. Application of ultrasonics, x-ray, and eddy current to composite doublers and results from test specimens loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are presented in this paper. Development of appropriate inspection calibration standards are also discussed.

Roach, D.; Moore, D.; Walkington, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Bond and Loan Program (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond and Loan Program (Arkansas) Bond and Loan Program (Arkansas) Bond and Loan Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Bond Program Loan Program Provider Department of Finance and Administration The Bond and Loan programs of Arkansas are four programs designed to

183

Tax-Exempt Bond Financing (Delaware) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Financing (Delaware) Bond Financing (Delaware) Tax-Exempt Bond Financing (Delaware) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Delaware Program Type Bond Program Provider Delaware Economic Development Office The Delaware Economic Development Authority provides tax-exempt bond financing for financial assistance to new or expanding businesses, governmental units and certain organizations that are exempt from federal

184

Evaluation of the Role of Water in the H2 Bond Formation by Ni(II)-based Electrocatalysts  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the role of water in the H-H bond formation by a family of nickel molecular catalysts that exhibit high rates for H2 production in acetonitrile solvent. A key feature leading to the high reactivity is the Lewis acidity of the Ni(II) center and pendant amines in the diphosphine ligand that function as Lewis bases, facilitating H-H bond formation or cleavage. Significant increases in the rate of H2 production have been reported in the presence of added water. Our calculations show that molecular water can displace an acetonitrile solvent molecule in the first solvation shell of the metal. One or two water molecules can also participate in shuttling a proton that can combine with a metal hydride to form the H-H bond. However the participation of the water molecules does not lower the barrier to H-H bond formation. Thus these calculations suggest that the rate increase due to water in these electrocatalysts is not associated with the elementary step of H-H bond formation or cleavage, but rather with the proton delivery steps. We attribute the higher barrier in the H-H bond formation in the presence of water to a decrease in direct interaction between the protic and hydridic hydrogen atoms forced by the water molecules. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Jaguar supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Ho, Ming-Hsun; Raugei, Simone; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R. Morris

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Program (Iowa) Bond Program (Iowa) Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Iowa Finance Authority State Iowa Program Type Bond Program Provider Iowa Finance Authority Through its Economic Development Bond Program, the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) issues tax-exempt bonds on behalf of private entities or organizations for eligible purposes. The responsibility for repayment of the bonds rests with the applicant. Neither IFA nor the State of Iowa has

186

Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Missouri Program Type Bond Program Provider Missouri Development Finance Board The Missouri Development Finance Board administers a Single-Issue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bond Program as well as a Taxable Industrial Revenue Bond Program. The Tax-Exempt Program finances (i) the acquisition, construction and equipping of qualified manufacturing production facilities and/or equipment, and (ii) refinances outstanding tax-exempt bonds. It

187

Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio) Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio) Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Institutional Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Bond Program Provider Ohio Air Quality Development Authority The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) administers the Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECB) program in Ohio. QECBs have been used by local governments and public universities to finance the installation of energy conserving equipment in publicly owned buildings. Under a QECB financing package, OAQDA authorizes Air Quality Development Bonds for issuance as a Series A federally tax-exempt bond and a Series B

188

Method for bonding a transmission line to a downhole tool  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for bonding a transmission line to the central bore of a downhole tool includes a pre-formed interface for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. The pre-formed interface includes a first surface that substantially conforms to the outside contour of a transmission line and a second surface that substantially conforms to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. In another aspect of the invention, a method for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool includes positioning a transmission line near the inside wall of a downhole tool and placing a mold near the transmission line and the inside wall. The method further includes injecting a bonding material into the mold and curing the bonding material such that the bonding material bonds the transmission line to the inside wall.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Livermore, CA); Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA); Riddle, Robert A. (Tracy, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Plasma immersion surface modification with metal ion plasma  

SciTech Connect

We describe here a novel technique for surface modification in which metal plasma is employed and by which various blends of plasma deposition and ion implantation can be obtained. The new technique is a variation of the plasma immersion technique described by Conrad and co-workers. When a substrate is immersed in a metal plasma, the plasma that condenses on the substrate remains there as a film, and when the substrate is then implanted, qualitatively different processes can follow, including' conventional' high energy ion implantation, recoil implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam assisted deposition, and metallic thin film and multilayer fabrication with or without species mixing. Multiple metal plasma guns can be used with different metal ion species, films can be bonded to the substrate through ion beam mixing at the interface, and multilayer structures can be tailored with graded or abrupt interfaces. We have fabricated several different kinds of modified surface layers in this way. 22 refs., 4 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Yu, K.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Godechot, X. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA) Societe Anonyme d'Etudes et Realisations Nucleaires (SODERN), 94 - Limeil-Brevannes (France))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of ...

196

Light Metals 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Softcover book: Light Metals 2008 Volume 2: Aluminum Reduction. Hardcover book and CD-ROM: Light Metals 2009 ...

197

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

198

Refractory Metals Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Refractory Metals Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Includes all technical aspects of the science of refractory metals and ...

199

Principal Metals Online  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Principal Metals Online Topic Summary: Principal Metals inventory database. Created On: 2/9/2007 5:41 AM, Topic View:.

200

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Rational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discriminate bonding of metal ions is a challenge to the synthetic chemist and a phenomenon of considerable practical importance.1 An important feature of many technical applications is the specific or preferential binding of a single metal ion in the presence of many metals. Examples range from large-volume uses (e.g. ferric EDTA as a plant food, calcium complexing agents as water softeners or anticaking formulations) to very high technology applications (technetium complexation in radiopharmaceuticals, synthetic metalloenzymes). We are interested in efficient and discriminate binding of actinides for waste stream remediation. Actinides represent a major and long-lived contaminant in nuclear waste. While the separation of actinides from other radioactive components of waste, such as Sr and Cs, is relatively well established, the separation of actinides from each other and in complex solutions (e.g. those found in tank wastes) is not as well resolved. The challenge of designing metal-specific (actinide) ligands is facilitated by examples from nature. Bacteria synthesize Fe(III)-specific ligands, called siderophores, to sequester Fe(III) from the environment and return it to the cell. The similarities between Fe(III) and Pu(IV) (their charge-to-size ratios and acidity), make the siderophores prototypical for designing actinide-specific ligands. The chelating groups present in siderophores are usually hydroxamic acids and catecholamides. We have developed derivatives of these natural products which have improved properties. The catechol derivatives are the 2,3-dihydroxyterephthalamides (TAMs), and 3,4-dihydroxysulfonamides (SFAMs), and the hydroxamic acid derivatives are three isomers of hydroxypyridinones, 1,2- HOPO, 3,2-HOPO, and 3,4-HOPO. All of these ligands are attached to molecular backbones by amides and a very important feature of HOPO and CAM ligands is a strong hydrogen bonds formed between the amide proton and the adjacent phenolic oxygen in the metal complex, thereby enhancing the stability (Figure 1).

Raymond, Kenneth N.

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

203

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

204

The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Fund (Ohio) Bond Fund (Ohio) The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial State/Provincial Govt Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $10 million Program Info Funding Source Ohio Treasurer of State Start Date 1988 State Ohio Program Type Bond Program The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (OEBF) was created in 1988 to promote economic development, create and retain quality jobs and assist governmental operations. The program enables non-profit and for-profit borrowers to access the national capital markets through bonds issued through OEBF. The program is administered by the Ohio Department of Development and financing is provided by the Ohio Treasurer of State.

205

Digital Bond Fact Sheet.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cost-shared effort between industry and cost-shared effort between industry and Cyber Security Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit Cyber Security Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit Bandolier Audit Files for optimizing security configurations and the Portaledge event detection capability for energy control systems Bandolier Audit Files for optimizing security configurations and the Portaledge event detection capability for energy control systems Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Project Lead: Digital Bond Partners: OSIsoft Tenable Network Security PacifiCorp Tennessee Valley Authority Other Participating Vendors: ABB AREVA Emerson Matrikon SNC Telvent Bandolier and Portaledge The Concept Bandolier-The Approach By building configuration audit and attack detection capabilities into tools already

206

Challenges of Using Copper as a Bonding Wire Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its malleability and surface properties, gold as a wire material is ideally suited for the bonding process. However, the cost of gold has increased ...

207

Characterization of Wire Bonds Sujected to Ultrasonic ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Characterization of Wire Bonds Sujected to Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Cycling by Anil Saigal, Peterson Silva, Robert Greif and Michael ...

208

Flip Chip Bonded LEDs for High Thermal Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we present the initial results of the thermal and mechanical properties of the flip chip mounted HBLEDs with various bonding materials. The flip chip ...

209

New Concept of Ultra Low Cost Chemically Bonded Ceramic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, New Concept of Ultra Low Cost Chemically Bonded Ceramic Materials Fabricated From Traditional Fillers and Wastes. Author(s), Henry A.

210

Study on the Bond Mechanism of Vanadium Titano-magnetite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The bond mechanism of vanadium titano-magnetite pellets mixed with coal powder by rotary hearth furnace was studied under the condition of ...

211

Effect of Accumulative Roll Bonding on Plastic Flow Properties of Commercially Pure Zirconium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) has been considered as one of the promising techniques for fabrication of ultra-fine grained (UFG) metallic materials. The ARB process consists of several cycles of cutting, stacking, and rolling of metal sheets, so very high strains can be induced in the material resulting in significant grain refinement and in the formation of UFG microstructures. The ARB technique has been applied to a wide range of metallic materials such as Al and Al alloys, Mg, Fe and steels, Zr, Cu, as well as composite materials. UFG metallic materials processed via ARB show increased strength. Despite a significant body of experimental research into the deformation behaviour of the ARB-processed materials, the fundamentals of their plastic deformation are not fully understood yet. This work focuses on the effect of grain refinement via ARB-processing on the mechanical behavior and on the strain-rate sensitivity of commercially pure Zr (99.8% purity). The mechanical properties of the as-received coarse-grained (CG) and UFG (as-ARB processed) samples were studied at room temperature at two different strain rates. Mechanical strain rate jump tests were performed during tensile deformation to estimate the instantaneous strain-rate sensitivity. The evolution of surface relief during plastic deformation of pure Zr in both CG and UFG conditions was studied. The features of plastic deformation of pure Zr in both CG and UFG conditions are discussed.

Sabirov, I.; Molina-Aldareguia, J. M.; Perez-Prado, M. T. [Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados de Materiales-IMDEA Materials Institute, Madrid (Spain); Jiang, L.; Kassner, M. E. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, CA (United States)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superalloy Surface Treatment Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Method to Improve Superalloy Resistance by Surface Treatment." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview To produce power more efficiently and cleanly, the next generation of power and aero turbines along with other essential components will have to operate at extreme temperatures and pressures. Currently advanced single crystal nickel-based superalloys are used in such extreme environments. Even though these components are coated with a bond

213

Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands  

SciTech Connect

The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

Corrosion of valve metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized. (FS)

Draley, J.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Precious Metals Conversion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precious Metals Conversion Information. The Office of Weights and Measures (OWM) has prepared a Conversion Factors ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

Magel, T.T.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Ceramic to metal seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

FULL ARTICLE Bond-selective imaging of deep tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FULL ARTICLE Bond-selective imaging of deep tissue through the optical window between 1600 and 1850 nm Pu Wang**; 1 , Han-Wei Wang**; 1 , Michael Sturek2 , and Ji-Xin Cheng*; 1; 3 1 Weldon School nm for bond-selective deep tis- sue imaging through harmonic vibrational excitation and acoustic

Cheng, Ji-Xin

220

Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) < Back Eligibility Local Government Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 09/01/2010 (New CREBs Electric Cooperatives Solicitation) Expiration Date 11/01/2010 Program Type Federal Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider U.S. Internal Revenue Service '''''Note: The IRS is not currently accepting applications for New CREB bond volume. The deadline for New CREB applications from electric cooperatives under IRS Announcement 2010-54 expired November 1, 2010. Bond volume for other eligible sectors (government entities and public power providers) was fully allocated in October 2009.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Renewable Energy Project Bond Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Bond Program Project Bond Program Renewable Energy Project Bond Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type State Bond Program Provider Idaho Energy Resources Authority Legislation enacted in Idaho in April 2005 ([http://legislature.idaho.gov/legislation/2005/S1192.html Senate Bill 1192]) allows independent (non-utility) developers of renewable energy projects in the state to request financing from the Idaho Energy Resources Authority, a state bonding authority created in March 2005 by the Environment, Energy and Technology Energy Resources Authority Act (House Bill 106). The authority was created to finance the construction of

222

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

223

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

224

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

225

Bonded multilayer Laue Lens for focusing hard x-rays.  

SciTech Connect

We have fabricated partial Multilayer Laue Lens (MLL) linear zone plate structures with thousands of alternating WSi{sub 2} and Si layers and various outermost zone widths according to the Fresnel zone plate formula. Using partial MLL structures, we were able to focus hard X-rays to line foci with a width of 30 nm and below. Here, we describe challenges and approaches used to bond these multilayers to achieve line and point focusing. Bonding was done by coating two multilayers with AuSn and heating in a vacuum oven at 280-300 C. X-ray reflectivity measurements confirmed that there was no change in the multilayers after heating to 350 C. A bonded MLL was polished to a 5-25 {micro}m wedge without cracking. SEM image analyses found well-positioned multilayers after bonding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a bonded full MLL for focusing hard X-rays.

Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C.M.; Macrander, A.T.; Maser, J.; Kang, H.C.; Yan, H.; Stephenson, G.B.; Advanced Photonics Research Institute; Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

2007-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

New Phases of Hydrogen-Bonded Systems at Extreme Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the behavior of hydrogen-bonded systems under high-pressure and temperature. First principle calculations of formic acid under isotropic pressure up to 70 GPa reveal the existence of a polymerization phase at around 20 GPa, in support of recent IR, Raman, and XRD experiments. In this phase, covalent bonding develops between molecules of the same chain through symmetrization of hydrogen bonds. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations of water at pressures up to 115 GPa and 2000 K. Along this isotherm, we are able to define three different phases. We observe a molecular fluid phase with superionic diffusion of the hydrogens for pressure 34 GPa to 58 GPa. We report a transformation to a phase dominated by transient networks of symmetric O-H hydrogen bonds at 95-115 GPa. As in formic acid, the network can be attributed to the symmetrization of the hydrogen bond, similar to the ice VII to ice X transition.

Manaa, M R; Goldman, N; Fried, L E

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, To{sup R}, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the To{sup R}-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[To{sup R}] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[To{sup M}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} and [Rh({mu}- Cl)(COE)]{sub 2} gives To{sup M}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.2) and To{sup M}RhH({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13}) (3.1) respectively while Tl[To{sup P}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} affords To{sup P}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brřnsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex To{sup M}Rh(H){sub 2}CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary alcohols have been investigated as well. The proposed mechanism is based on the stochiometric reactions of the possible metal and organic intermediates. Primary amines, hypothesized to undergo a similar reaction pathway, have been verified to give dehydrogenative coupling product, imines. In the end, the well-developed neutral tridentate Tpm coordinates to the rhodium bis(ethylene) dimer in the presence of TlPF{sub 6} to give the cationic complex, [TpmRh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}] (5.1). 5.1 serves as the first example of explicit determination of the solid state hapticity, evidenced by X-ray structure, among all the cationic Tpm{sup R}M(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} (Tpm{sup R} = Tpm, Tpm*, M = Rh, Ir) derivatives. The substitution chemistry of this compound has been studied by treating with soft and hard donors. The trimethylphosphine-sbustituted complex activates molecular hydrogen to give the dihydride compound.

Ho, Hung-An

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

228

EVAPORATIVE METAL BONDING OF CM247LC TO KANTHAL APMT John P...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

joining alloys tested, one of which evaporates from the structures. Project Overview * Welding of advanced alloys is not possible because critical structures are destroyed. *...

229

Chip-Package Nano-Structured Copper and Nickel Interconnections with Metallic and Polymeric Bonding Interfaces .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the semiconductor industry racing toward a historic transition, nano chips with less than 45 nm features demand I/Os in excess of 20,000 with multi-core… (more)

Aggarwal, Ankur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance Study of ScepterTM Metal Bond Diamond Grinding Wheel  

SciTech Connect

Advanced ceramics are attractive for many applications in the transportation, energy, military, and industrial markets because they possess properties of high-temperature durability, corrosion resistance, strength, hardness, stiffness, and wear resistance. Unfortunately, these same properties make advanced ceramics more difficult to machine than traditional materials. The reliability and manufacturing costs of advanced ceramic components are significant concerns that must be overcome. Nevertheless, the use of advanced ceramic materials is expected to increase dramatically in new transportation systems in response to more stringent energy conservation and pollution reduction requirements. This study discusses the goals, commercialization plans, phased development, scale-up, testing, and external verification of performance of the innovative grinding wheel that evolved from the project.

Denison, S.K.; Licht, R.W.; McSpadden, S.B., Jr.; Parten, R.J.; Picone, J.W.; Shelton, J.E.

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Performance Study of ScepterTM Metal Bond Diamond Grinding Wheel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced ceramics are attractive for many applications in the transportation, energy, military, and industrial markets because they possess properties of high-temperature durability, corrosion resistance, strength, hardness, stiffness, and wear resistance. Unfortunately, these same properties make advanced ceramics more difficult to machine than traditional materials. The reliability and manufacturing costs of advanced ceramic components are significant concerns that must be overcome. Nevertheless, the use of advanced ceramic materials is expected to increase dramatically in new transportation systems in response to more stringent energy conservation and pollution reduction requirements. This study discusses the goals, commercialization plans, phased development, scale-up, testing, and external verification of performance of the innovative grinding wheel that evolved from the project.

Denison, S.K.; Licht, R.W.; McSpadden, S.B., Jr.; Parten, R.J.; Picone, J.W.; Shelton, J.E.

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Synthesis and reactivity of sterically congested metallacyclobutenes and metal-mediated carbon-sulfur bond activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vollhardt, K. P. C. Angew. Chemie-Intl. Ed. in English 1984,T. ; Hillhouse, G. L. Angew. Chemie Int. Ed. 1994, 33, 1748.T. ; Ishii, A. Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. in Eng. 2010, 49,

Vélez, Carmen L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Ternary metal-rich sulfide with a layered structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary Nb-Ta-S compound is provided having the atomic formula, Nb.sub.1.72 Ta.sub.3.28 S.sub.2, and exhibiting a layered structure in the sequence S-M3-M2-M1-M2-M3-S wherein S represents sulfur layers and M1, M2, and M3 represent Nb/Ta mixed metal layers. This sequence generates seven sheets stacked along the [001] direction of an approximate body centered cubic crystal structure with relatively weak sulfur-to-sulfur van der Waals type interactions between adjacent sulfur sheets and metal-to-metal bonding within and between adjacent mixed metal sheets.

Franzen, Hugo F. (Ames, IA); Yao, Xiaoqiang (Ames, IA)

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Metal Matrix Composites III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2013 ... Ti/Al 6081/Ti foil-foil layup are hot pressed for a lamellar composite structure symmetrically arranged. Inter diffusion bonding between Ti and Al ...

237

WELDING UNUSUAL METALS  

SciTech Connect

Methods of welding including electron beam welding, diffusion bonding, motor-arc welding, and combination methods are discussed. The successful welding and soldering of uranium in different shapes are discussed. (C.J.G.)

Grobecker, D.W.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Wire bond vibration of forward pixel tracking detector of CMS  

SciTech Connect

Wire bonds of the Forward Pixel (FPix) tracking detectors are oriented in the direction that maximizes Lorentz Forces relative to the 4 Tesla field of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Detector's magnet. The CMS Experiment is under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. We were concerned about Lorentz Force oscillating the wires at their fundamental frequencies and possibly fracturing or breaking them at their heels, as happened with the CDF wire bonds. This paper reports a study to understand what conditions break such bonds.

Atac, M.; /Fermilab; Gobbi, B.; /Northwestern U.; Kwan, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Spencer, E.; /Northwestern U.; Sellberg, G.; Pavlicek, V.; /Fermilab

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites · Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic ...

242

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic ...

243

Semi-flexible hydrogen-bonded and non-hydrogen bonded lattice polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the addition of stiffness to the lattice model of hydrogen-bonded polymers in two and three dimensions. We find that, in contrast to polymers that interact via a homogeneous short-range interaction, the collapse transition is unchanged by any amount of stiffness: this supports the physical argument that hydrogen bonding already introduces an effective stiffness. Contrary to possible physical arguments, favouring bends in the polymer does not return the model's behaviour to that comparable to the semi-flexible homogeneous interaction model, where the canonical $\\theta$-point occurs for a range of parameter values. In fact, for sufficiently large bending energies the crystal phase disappears altogether, and no phase transition of any type occurs. We also compare the order-disorder transition from the globule phase to crystalline phase in the semi-flexible homogeneous interaction model to that for the fully-flexible hybrid model with both hydrogen and non-hydrogen like interactions. We show that these phase transitions are of the same type and are a novel polymer critical phenomena in two dimensions. That is, it is confirmed that in two dimensions this transition is second-order, unlike in three dimensions where it is known to be first order. We also estimate the crossover exponent and show that there is a divergent specific heat, finding $\\phi=0.7(1)$ or equivalently $\\alpha=0.6(2)$. This is therefore different from the $\\theta$ transition, for which $\\alpha=-1/3$.

J Krawczyk; AL Owczarek; T Prellberg

2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Precision metal rulers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... precision metal rulers. Our customers include state bureaus of Weights and Measures and departments of Agriculture. We also ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fasteners & Metals Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Fasteners & Metals Program. The Fastener Quality Act (FQA), Public Law 101-592, was ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

TMS Light Metals Publication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following instructions should be used when submitting a manuscript for any TMS Light Metals proceedings volume. INTRODUCTION. Orientation to ...

247

Refractory Metals 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... TMS Structural Materials Division TMS: Refractory Metals Committee. Organizer( s), Omer Dogan, DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory

248

Ultrafast 2D IR anisotropy of water reveals reorientation during hydrogen-bond switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rearrangements of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water are believed to involve rapid and concerted hydrogen bond switching events, during which a hydrogen bond donor molecule undergoes large angle molecular reorientation ...

Ramasesha, Krupa

249

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

PRODUCTION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Bonded Bracket Assmebly for Frameless Solar Panels  

SciTech Connect

In February 2011 the US Department of Energy announced their new Sunshot Initiative. The Sunshot goal is to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75 percent before the end of the decade. The DOE estimated that a total installed cost of $1 per watt for photovoltaic systems would be equivalent to 6���¢/kilowatt hour (kWh) for energy available from the grid. The DOE also estimated that to meet the $1 per watt goal, PV module costs would need to be reduced to $.50 per watt, balance of systems costs would need to be reduced to $.40 per watt, and power electronic costs would need to reach $.10 per watt. To address the BOS balance of systems cost component of the $1 per watt goal, the DOE announced a funding opportunity called (BOS-X) Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reductions. The DOE identified eight areas within the total BOS costs: 1) installation labor, 2) installation materials, 3) installation overhead and profit, 4) tracker, 5) permitting and commissioning, 6) site preparation, 7) land acquisition, 8) sales tax. The BOS-X funding announcement requested applications in four specific topics: Topic 1: Transformational Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Modules Topic 2: Roof and Ground Mount Innovations Topic 3: Transformational Photovoltaic System Designs Topic 4: Development of New Wind Load Codes for PV Systems The application submitted by ARaymond Tinnerman reflected the requirements listed in Topic #2, Roof and Ground Mount Innovations. The goal of topic #2 was to develop technologies that would result in the extreme reduction of material and labor costs associated with applications that require physical connections and attachments to roof and ground mount structures. The topics researched in this project included component cost reduction, labor reduction, weight reduction, wiring innovations, and alternative material utilization. The project objectives included: 1) The development of an innovative quick snap bracket assembly that would be bonded to frameless PV modules for commercial rooftop installations. 2) The development of a composite pultruded rail to replace traditional racking materials. 3) In partnership with a roofing company, pilot the certification of a commercial roof to be solar panel compliant, eliminating the need for structural analysis and government oversight resulting in significantly decreased permitting costs. 4) Reduce the sum of all cost impacts in topic #2 from a baseline total of $2.05/watt to $.34/watt.

Murray, Todd

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs). The TEDB program was established under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and provides Tribes with the authority to issue tax-exempt debt for a wider range of activities to spur job creation and promote economic growth in Indian country. Providing Tribes with the ability to issue tax-exempt debt for a broader scope of activities similar to that available to states and local governments lowers

253

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of carbon bonds under a variety of conditions in general, not just in the liquid. Carbon phase diagram. The properties of the liquid phase have remained unclear because of the...

254

Investigation of bond graphs for nuclear reactor simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling multiphysics nuclear reactor problems using bond graphs. The conventional method of modeling the coupled multiphysics transients in nuclear reactors is operator ...

Sosnovsky, Eugeny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Localized Shear Bands in Explosively Bonded Alloy 718/ Copper ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

copper (with silver content of 0.078 wt %) was cold worked to 40% before bonding. Two plates of Alloy 718 with one plate of copper in between were explosively.

256

Renewable Energy Project Bond Program (Idaho) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Energy Project Bond Program (Idaho) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most recent. Jump...

257

Foreign trade zones and bonded warehouses for luxury goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore and compare the benefits of establishing and operating Foreign Trade Zones (FTZs) and Bonded Warehouses (BWs) for luxury goods in North America, using the case of the distribution network of Ralph Lauren Corporation ...

Petrova, Nadya (Nadya Naydenova)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

Heung, L.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wicks, G.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Financing green development: "climate bonds’ as a solution for institutional investors engagement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines whether ‘climate bonds’ are achieving the desired investment scale to tackle climate change and whether those bonds are being issued with features… (more)

Aguiar, Paulo Ricardo Rua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Financing green development: 'Climate Bonds’ as a solution for institutional investors engagement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines whether ‘climate bonds’ are achieving the desired investment scale to tackle climate change and whether those bonds are being issued with features… (more)

Aguiar, Paulo Ricardo Rua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Wednesday, 28 September 2005 00:00 We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

262

Microstructural Characterization of Bonding Interfaces in Aluminum 3003 Blocks Fabricated by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a process by which hybrid and near-netshaped products can be manufactured from thin metallic tapes. One of the main concerns of UAM is the development of anisotropic mechanical properties. In this work, the microstructures in the bond regions are characterized with optical and electron microscopy. Recrystallization and grain growth across the interface are proposed as a mechanism for the bond formation. The presence of voids or unbonded areas, which reduce the load-bearing cross section and create a stress intensity factor, is attributed to the transfer of the sonotrode texture to the new foil layer. This results in large peaks and valleys that are not filled in during processing. Tensile testing revealed the weld interface strength was 15% of the bulk foil. Shear tests of the weld interfaces showed almost 50% of the bulk shear strength of the material. Finally, optical microscopy of the fracture surfaces from the tensile tests revealed 34% of the interface area was unbonded.

Schick, D. E. [Ohio State University; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Ohio State University; Lippold, John C [ORNL; Hahnlen, R.M. [Ohio State University; Dapino, M.J. [Ohio State University; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Collins, P. [Quad Cities Manufacturing Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

On martingale measures and pricing for continuous bond-stock market with stochastic bond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper studies pricing of stock options for the case when the evolution of the risk-free assets or bond is stochastic. We show that, in the typical scenario, the martingale measure is not unique, that there are non-replicable claims, and that the martingale prices can vary significantly; for instance, for a European put option, any positive real number is a martingale price for some martingale measure. In addition, the second moment of the hedging error for a strategy calculated via a given martingale measure can take any arbitrary positive value under some equivalent measure. Some reasonable choices of martingale measures are suggested, including a measure that ensures local risk minimizing hedging strategy.

Dokuchaev, Nikolai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Effect of bonding and aging temperatures on bond strengths of Cu with 75Sn25In solders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present study, the interaction between thin film Cu and non-eutectic Sn-In is studied. The effects of the bonding and aging temperature on microstructure, IMC formation and also shear strength are investigated by ...

Thompson, Carl V.

265

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, L.T.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals Jump to: navigation, search Name Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals) Place Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan Zip 540-0041 Sector Solar Product Engaged in the steel, engineering, and electronics businesses; works on fuel cell component technology and manufactures silicon wafers for the solar sector. References Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals) is a company located in Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan . References ↑ "Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sumitomo_Metal_Industries_Ltd_Sumitomo_Metals&oldid=351744"

268

FORMING PROTECTIVE FILMS ON METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described of inhibiting the corrosion of ferrous metal by contact with heavy liquid metals such as bismuth and gallium at temperatures above 500 icient laborato C generally by bringing nltrogen and either the metal zirconium, hafnium, or titanium into reactlve contact with the ferrous metal to form a thin adherent layer of the nitride of the metal and thereafter maintaining a fractional percentage of the metal absorbed in the heavy liquid metal in contact with the ferrous metal container. The general purpose for uslng such high boiling liquid metals in ferrous contalners would be as heat transfer agents in liquid-metal-fueled nuclear reactors.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Kammerer, O.F.; Sadofsky, J.; Weeks, J.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Conceptual Design of a MEDE Treatment System for Sodium Bonded Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Unirradiated sodium bonded metal fuel and casting scrap material containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) is stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This material, which includes intact fuel assemblies and elements from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactors as well as scrap material from the casting of these fuels, has no current use under the terminated reactor programs for both facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE), under the Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Treatment Record of Decision (ROD), has determined that this material could be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. A plan is being developed to prepare, package and transfer this material to the DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO), located at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Disposition of the sodium bonded material will require separating the elemental sodium from the metallic uranium fuel. A sodium distillation process known as MEDE (Melt-Drain-Evaporate), will be used for the separation process. The casting scrap material needs to be sorted to remove any foreign material or fines that are not acceptable to the HDPO program. Once all elements have been cut and loaded into baskets, they are then loaded into an evaporation chamber as the first step in the MEDE process. The chamber will be sealed and the pressure reduced to approximately 200 mtorr. The chamber will then be heated as high as 650 şC, causing the sodium to melt and then vaporize. The vapor phase sodium will be driven into an outlet line where it is condensed and drained into a receiver vessel. Once the evaporation operation is complete, the system is de-energized and returned to atmospheric pressure. This paper describes the MEDE process as well as a general overview of the furnace systems, as necessary, to complete the MEDE process.

Carl E. Baily; Karen A. Moore; Collin J. Knight; Peter B. Wells; Paul J. Petersen; Ali S. Siahpush; Matthew T. Weseman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Atomistic Simulations of Bonding, Thermodynamics, and Surface Passivation in Nanoscale Solid Propellant Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering new solid propellant materials requires optimization of several factors, to include energy density, burn rate, sensitivity, and environmental impact. Equally important is the need for materials that will maintain their mechanical properties and thermal stability during long periods of storage. The nanoscale materials considered in this dissertation are proposed metal additives that may enhance energy density and improve combustion in a composite rocket motor. Density Functional Theory methods are used to determine cluster geometries, bond strengths, and energy densities. The ground-state geometries and electron affinities (EAs) for MnxO?: x = 3, 4, y = 1, 2 clusters were calculated with GGA, and estimates for the vertical detachment energies compare well with experimental results. It was found that the presence of oxygen influences the overall cluster moment and spin configuration, stabilizing ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic isomers. The calculated EAs range from 1.29-1.84 eV, which is considerably lower than the 3.0-5.0 eV EAs characteristic of current propellant oxidizers. Their use as solid propellant additives is limited. The structures and bonding of a range of Al-cyclopentadienyl cluster compounds were studied with multilayer quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) methods. The organometallic Al-ligand bonds are generally 55-85 kcal/mol and are much stronger than Al-Al interactions. This suggests that thermal decomposition in these clusters will proceed via the loss of surface metal-ligand units. The energy density of the large clusters is calculated to be nearly 60% that of pure aluminum. These organometallic cluster systems may provide a route to extremely rapid Al combustion in solid rocket motors. Lastly, the properties of COOH-terminated passivating agents were modeled with the GPW method. It is confirmed that fluorinated polymers bind to both Al(111) and Al(100) at two Al surface sites. The oligomers HCOOH, CH3CH2COOH, and CF3CF2COOH chemisorb onto Al(111) with adsorption energies of 10-45 kcal/mol. The preferred contact angle for the organic chains is 65-85 degrees, and adsorption energy weakens slightly with increasing chain length. Despite their relatively weak adsorption energies, fluorinated polymers have elevated melting temperatures, making them good passivation materials for micron-scale Al fuel particles.

Williams, Kristen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Bond Angles for O-H Defects in Sno2 from Polarization Properties of Their Vibrational Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared absorption experiments made with polarized light yield significant insights into the possible structures of one- and two-O-H defects in SnO2 that are produced by thermal annealing treatments. These polarized absorption results reveal that a two-O-H defect must involve symmetry-equivalent O-H sites, and that the axes of both one- and two-O-H defects are 63 - 68 from the c-axis of the rutile structure. These O-H bond angles found by experiment restrict the microscopic defect structures that are possible and suggest structures associated with either a metal atom substituting for Sn, or an interstitial metal atom (such as Sn).

BEKISLI, F [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; FOWLER, W B [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Stavola, M. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Spahr, E. J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Luepke, G [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

Huxford, Theodore J. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Supported metal alloy catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

Barrera, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David C. (Santa Clara, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

278

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

279

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

280

Characterization of Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Characterization of Grit Blasted Metallic Biomaterials by ... The grit blasting, a surface improvement treatment is used to enhance mechanical ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Metal Matrix Composites - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

METAL- MATRIX COMPOSITES UNDER MULTI- AXIAL LOADINGS: M. V. S. Ravisankar ... including the values of the stress exponent and the activation energy.

282

ELECTRON WELDING OF METALS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages and disadvantages of the electron welding of metals are briefly reviewed. Typical apparatuses used for electron welding are described. (J.S.R)

Stohr, J.-A.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for Power Electronics Packaging Applications (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the thermal performance and reliability of bonded interfaces for power electronics packaging applications.

Devoto, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fitzgerald Wtr Lgt & Bond Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fitzgerald Wtr Lgt & Bond Comm Fitzgerald Wtr Lgt & Bond Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Fitzgerald Wtr Lgt & Bond Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 6380 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Industrial Industrial Residential City Residential Residential Rural Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1000/kWh Commercial: $0.1140/kWh Industrial: $0.0817/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

285

Characterization of interfacial bonding using a scanning Kelvin probe  

SciTech Connect

Interfaces play a crucial role in determining the ultimate properties and service life of coating and film materials. However, the characterization and measurement of interfacial bonding, in particular of the local strength, is difficult. The high sensitivity of the electron work function (EWF) to surface conditions has attracted increasing interest in applications of the Kelvin probing technique to investigate the mechanical behavior of materials. In this study, the Kelvin method was used to characterize the interfacial bond formed between pure copper and brass after annealing in argon gas. It was demonstrated that low EWF values, small EWF fluctuations, and narrow fluctuation ranges in interfacial regions corresponded to good bonding. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the EWF and the interfacial strength determined by the microindentation method using a universal microtribometer. The Kelvin probing technique could be a powerful tool for studying the local property and structure of interfaces.

Li, W.; Li, D.Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Changchun University, People's Republic of China (130022) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G8 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G6 (Canada)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The genesis of the quantum theory of the chemical bond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An historical overview is given of the relevant steps that allowed the genesis of the quantum theory of the chemical bond, starting from the appearance of the new quantum mechanics and following later developments till approximately 1931. General ideas and some important details are discussed concerning molecular spectroscopy, as well as quantum computations for simple molecular systems performed within perturbative and variational approaches, for which the Born-Oppenheimer method provided a quantitative theory accounting for rotational, vibrational and electronic states. The novel concepts introduced by the Heitler-London theory, complemented by those underlying the method of the molecular orbitals, are critically analyzed along with some of their relevant applications. Further improvements in the understanding of the nature of the chemical bond are also considered, including the ideas of one-electron and three-electron bonds introduced by Pauling, as well as the generalizations of the Heitler-London theory ...

Esposito, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Diffusion bonding resistant valve development for sodium service  

SciTech Connect

Unanticipated functional failures occurred in valves undergoing containment integrity testing for liquid sodium service. The failures resulted from diffusion bonding of the Stellite 6B valve plug to the Type 316 stainless steel (SS) seat. As a result of these failures, a valve development program was undertaken. A modified valve incorporating a Tribaloy 800 plug showed significant improvement in resistance to diffusion bonding but still failed after long term exposure in a closed position. A second modified valve using Tribaloy 800 in both the valve plug and seat successfully resisted diffusion bonding failure. This paper reports the details of the testing and posttest valve examinations. The results of scanning electron microscopy, dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and metallography provide the characteristics of the valve failures. Limitations of the various valve designs are also discussed.

Crandall, D.L.; Low, J.O.; Chung, D.T.; Loop, R.B.

1984-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Business Incentive Loans and Bonds (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Business Incentive Loans and Bonds (Georgia) Business Incentive Loans and Bonds (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Unlimited but generally should not exceed 20% of the asset needs of the company's Gerogia location. Program Info State Georgia Program Type Bond Program Loan Program Provider Georgia Department of Community Affairs The Strategic Industries Loan Fund (SILF) is a program offered by the

289

Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 January 1, 2008 In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. (a) In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. "(a) Definitions.-In this section: "(1) Controlled substance.-The term `controlled substance' has the meaning given that term in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C.

290

Embedded cluster metal-polymeric micro interface and process for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro interface between a polymeric layer and a metal layer includes isolated clusters of metal partially embedded in the polymeric layer. The exposed portion of the clusters is smaller than embedded portions, so that a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an exposed portion of an individual cluster is smaller than a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an embedded portion of the individual cluster. At least half, but not all of the height of a preferred spherical cluster is embedded. The metal layer is completed by a continuous layer of metal bonded to the exposed portions of the discontinuous clusters. The micro interface is formed by heating a polymeric layer to a temperature, near its glass transition temperature, sufficient to allow penetration of the layer by metal clusters, after isolated clusters have been deposited on the layer at lower temperatures. The layer is recooled after embedding, and a continuous metal layer is deposited upon the polymeric layer to bond with the discontinuous metal clusters.

Menezes, Marlon E. (Santa Clara, CA); Birnbaum, Howard K. (Champaign, IL); Robertson, Ian M. (Champaign, IL)

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE DIFFUSION BONDING OF TUNGSTEN TO TUNGSTEN UNDER PRESSURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid state diffusion bonding of tungsten to tungsten was investigated at temperatures ranging from 1700 to 2600 nif- C, under surface contact pressures up to 3000 psi, while under high vacuum or hydrogen atmosphere. Various interface coatings were employed to promote diffusion, including graphite, oxide, and metai slurries, electro-plates, direct surface oxidation, and Mo-W deposits from carbonyl decompositions. Thorough metallurgical bonding was achieved, particularly with the latter two surface coatings, after 2 hours at 2350 nif- C in H/sub 2/ under 1400 psi. Corresponding tensile strengths of 30000 psi were obtained. (auth)

Batista, R.I.; Hanks, G.S.; Murphy, D.J.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Phase equilibrium predictions for polar and hydrogen bonding mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Perturbed-Hard-Chain Theory (PHCT) has been generalized to treat pure compounds and mixtures with polar forces (dipoles and quadrupoles) as well as hydrogen bonding. The generalization to polar compounds is based on the perturbation expansion for anisotropic molecules by Gubbins and coworkers. The effects of hydrogen bonding are taken into account using an approach similar to that of Heidemann and Prausnitz. With these two generalizations, accurate mixture VLE and LLE predictions can be made, even for highly non-ideal systems, using pure component parameters alone. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Donohue, M.D.; Vimalchand, P.; Ikonomou, G.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Porous metallic bodies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

Landingham, R.L.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

Clean Metal Spray Forming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

controlled transfer of liquid metal from the ESR pool to the spray forming system is performed using a ... heating to maintain superheat and avoid freezing of the liquid metal as it flows through the funnel. ... As is the case with all similar cross-.

295

Explosion metal welding  

SciTech Connect

Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community.

Popoff, A.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

1961-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

Plastic Instability during Accumulative Roll Bonding (ARB) of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following this conception Cu-Ni multilayers were prepared with different initial ... Engineering Stored Energy in Ultra Fine Grained Metals Created by Severe ...

300

Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) to Fund a Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) to Fund a Residential Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) to Fund a Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program: Case Study on Saint Louis County, MO Title Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) to Fund a Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program: Case Study on Saint Louis County, MO Publication Type Policy Brief Authors Zimring, Mark Secondary Title Clean Energy Program Policy Brief Publisher LBNL Place Published Berkeley Year of Publication 2011 Pagination 7 Date Published 06/2011 Abstract Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) are federally-subsidized debt instruments that enable state, tribal, and local government issuers to borrow money to fund a range of qualified energy conservation projects. QECBs offer issuers very attractive borrowing rates and long terms, and can fund low-interest energy efficiency loans for home and commercial property owners. Saint Louis County, MO recently issued over $10 million of QECBs to finance the Saint Louis County SAVES residential energy efficiency loan program. The county's experience negotiating QECB regulations and restrictions can inform future issuers.

302

Method of preparation of bonded polyimide fuel cell package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan (Livermore, CA); Graff, Robert T. (Modesto, CA); Bettencourt, Kerry (Dublin, CA)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Simulation of an Electrical Substation Using the Bond Graph Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and especially computer simulation, is a basic tool since it enables engineers to understand how systems work without actually needing to see them. They can learn how they work in different circumstances and optimize their design with considerably ... Keywords: simulation, electrical substations, elements, electricity, bond graph

Gregorio Romero; Jesus Felez; Joaquin Maroto; Jose Manuel Mera

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Exchange of bonded hydrogen in amorphous silicon by deuterium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We show that bonded hydrogen in a-Si:H is readily exchanged by atomic deuterium when exposed to a deuterium plasma discharge. The effective diffusion coefficient for the D,H exchange 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2//sec at 160/sup 0/C, is comparable to that of interstitial hydrogen in c-Si.

Abeles, B.; Yang, L.; Leta, D.P.; Majkrzak, C.F.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Efficient simulation of hybrid systems: A hybrid bond graph approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and efficient simulations facilitate cost-effective design and analysis of large, complex, embedded systems, whose behaviors are typically hybrid, i.e. continuous behaviors interspersed with discrete mode changes. In this paper we present an ... Keywords: component-oriented modeling, dynamic causal assignment, hybrid bond graphs, modeling and simulation environments, simulation of hybrid systems

Indranil Roychoudhury; Matthew J Daigle; Gautam Biswas; Xenofon Koutsoukos

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radiographic study of impact in polymer-bonded explosives  

SciTech Connect

Computer-tomography generated material-density maps from flash x-ray radiographs of the impact of cylinders of mockup polymer-bonded explosive (PBX) striking a steel plate. Comparison of the density fields with computer simulation allowed discrimination of rather complex deformation and flow models for insensitive explosives to be used in further studies of chemical reactions initiated by shock waves.

Fugelso, E.; Jacobson, J.D.; Karpp, R.R.; Jensen, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Component supervision by sensor placement on bond-graph model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The component supervision procedure consists of the comparison of the actual behaviour with the reference behaviour which describes the normal mode. The analytical redundancy has to find relations between known variables of the system. These relations ... Keywords: bond graphs, causal paths, modelling, sensors placement, supervision

M. Khemliche; B. Ould Bouamama; A. Khellaf; M. Mostefaď

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Business Center for Precious Metals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Business Center for Precious Metals Department of Energy Business Center for Precious Metals Becky Eddy National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 Site...

309

Nonferrous Metals Society of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nonferrous Metals Society of China (NFSoc) is a technological organization of scientists and technologists engaged in the nonferrous metals industry.

310

Metal RIE 1: Unaxis 790  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scientific Opportunities / Applications: Physical milling of most metals; Anisotropic etching of metal films; Anisotropic etching of SiO 2 and SiN x. ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1991-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

313

Charged Metallic Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usually in Nuclear Physics the minimum of the liquid drop model (LDM) energy occurs at a mass asymmetry which is different from the minimum of shell correction. Charged metallic clusters are ideal emitters of singly ionized trimers because both LDM and shell correction are reaching a minimum for the same mass asymmetry corresponding to the emission of a charged particle with two delocalized electrons. Maximum dissociation energy (Q-value) is obtained for metallic clusters with high surface tension and low Wigner-Seitz radius (transition metals). The Q-values for spheroidal shapes are much larger than for hemispheroids.

Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Metal Casting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 7   General characteristics of casting processes...Characteristic Casting process Green sand Resin-bonded sand Plaster Lost foam Investment Permanent mold Die Part Material (casting) All All Zn to Cu Al to cast iron All Zn to cast iron Zn to Cu Porosity and voids (a) Câ??E Dâ??E Dâ??E Câ??E E Bâ??C Aâ??C Shape (b) See Fig. 1 for shapes All All...

316

Divalent metal nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

DeVries, Gretchen Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Controlled Metal Photodeposition  

A reliable syntheses of semiconductor-metal heterostructure has been developed to enable application of materials in catalytic, magnetic, and opto-electronic devices, and Iowa State University, The Ames Laboratory's Contractor, is looking for ...

319

General Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... A detailed literature survey indicates that vacuum sintering is able to produce ... In recent years, there is a high demand for light-weight metals foams. ... Each powder mixture's composition is determined by response surface ...

320

Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir Casting Route: Anne Zulfia1; Maman Ajiriyanto1; 1University of Indonesia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Molten metal reactors  

SciTech Connect

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fractal nature of medium-range order in metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atomic structure of metallic glasses has been a long-standing scientific mystery. Unlike crystalline metals, where long-range ordering is established by periodic stacking of fundamental building blocks known as unit cells, a metallic glass has no long-range translational order, although some degrees of short- and medium-range order do exist.1,2,3 Previous studies1,2,3,4 have identified solute-centered clusters, characterized by short-range order (SRO) in favor of unlike bonds, as the fundamental building blocks of metallic glasses. However, how these building blocks are connected or packed to form the medium range order (MRO) remains an open question.1,2,3 Here, based on neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments, we propose a new packing scheme - the self-similar packing of atomic clusters. We show that MRO has the characteristics of a fractal network with a dimension of 2.38, and is described by a power-law correlation function over the medium-range length scale. Our finding provides a new prospective of order in disordered materials and has broad implications for understanding the structure-property relationship in metallic glasses, particularly those involving change in length scales due to phase transformation and mechanical deformation.

Ma, Dong [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Electronic and Geometric Structures of Small Gold Metal Particles: Particles Size Effects and the Relationship to Catalytic Activity  

SciTech Connect

The structure of supported gold nano-particles is affected by the size of the particles. Smaller metal particles have decreased gold - gold bond lengths, a higher d electron count, and have a more reactive d band. The influence of support is negligible compared to that of particle size.

Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Miller, Jeffrey T. [BP Research Center, Naperville, IL 60565-8406 (United States)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Bond County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bond County, Illinois: Energy Resources Bond County, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.902985°, -89.4742177° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.902985,"lon":-89.4742177,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer  

SciTech Connect

Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

Weller, R.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Generalized Integrands and Bond Portfolios: Pitfalls and Counter Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct Zero-Coupon Bond markets driven by a cylindrical Brownian motion in which the notion of generalized portfolio has important flaws: There exist bounded smooth random variables with generalized hedging portfolios for which the price of their risky part is $+\\infty$ at each time. For these generalized portfolios, sequences of the prices of the risky part of approximating portfolios can be made to converges to any given extended real number in $[-\\infty, \\infty].$

Taflin, Erik

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Structures of Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(II) Iodide and Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(III) p-Toluenesulfonate Pentahydrate James F. Wishart, Avi Bino and Henry Taube Inorg. Chem. 25, 3318-3321 (1986) Abstract: The crystal structures of [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] I3 and [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] (CH3C6H4SO3)4°5H2O have been solved to weighted R factors of 0.053 and 0.083, respectively. For the former structure, the space group is Pmma with a = 10.655(2)Å, b = 7.704(1)Å, c = 21.488(3)Å, and Z = 4. The Ru(II)-N(Mepyz) distance of 1.95(1)Å in this complex is the shortest yet reported for a ruthenium(II) to heteroctclic nitrogen bond. A difference of 0.04(1)Å between the cis (2.122(7)Å and 2.136(8)Å) and

331

Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Effect of hydrogen bond cooperativity on the behavior of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four scenarios have been proposed for the low--temperature phase behavior of liquid water, each predicting different thermodynamics. The physical mechanism which leads to each is debated. Moreover, it is still unclear which of the scenarios best describes water, as there is no definitive experimental test. Here we address both open issues within the framework of a microscopic cell model by performing a study combining mean field calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. We show that a common physical mechanism underlies each of the four scenarios, and that two key physical quantities determine which of the four scenarios describes water: (i) the strength of the directional component of the hydrogen bond and (ii) the strength of the cooperative component of the hydrogen bond. The four scenarios may be mapped in the space of these two quantities. We argue that our conclusions are model-independent. Using estimates from experimental data for H bond properties the model predicts that the low-temperature phase diagram of water exhibits a liquid--liquid critical point at positive pressure.

Kevin Stokely; Marco G. Mazza; H. Eugene Stanley; Giancarlo Franzese

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

333

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Method for forming metal contacts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO[sub x] and optionally SO[sub 2] from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe[sup 2+]) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution. 26 figures.

Chang, S.G.T.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

Testing and modeling of diffusion bonded prototype optical windows under ITER conditions  

SciTech Connect

Glass-metal joints are a part of ITER optical diagnostics windows. These joints must be leak tight for the safety (presence of tritium in ITER) and to preserve the vacuum. They must also withstand the ITER environment: temperatures up to 220 deg.C and fast neutron fluxes of {approx}3.10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}.s. At the moment, little information is available about glass-metal joints suitable for ITER. Therefore, we performed mechanical and thermal tests on some prototypes of an aluminium diffusion bonded optical window. Finite element modeling with Abaqus code was used to understand the experimental results. The prototypes were helium leaking probably due to very tiny cracks in the interaction layer between the steel and the aluminium. However, they were all able to withstand a thermal cycling test up to 200 deg. C; no damage could be seen after the tests by visual inspection. The prototypes successfully passed push-out test with a 500 N load. During the destructive push-out tests the prototypes broke at a 6-12 kN load between the aluminium layer and the steel or the glass, depending on the surface quality of the glass. The microanalysis of the joints has also been performed. The finite element modeling of the push-out tests is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments. According to the model, the highest thermal stress is created in the aluminium layer. Thus, the aluminium joint seems to be the weakest part of the prototypes. If this layer is improved, it will probably make the prototype helium leak tight and as such, a good ITER window candidate. (authors)

Jacobs, M. [Flemish Inst. for Technological Research, Mol (Belgium); Van Oost, G. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium); Degrieck, J.; De Baere, I. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium); Gusarov, A. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Mol (Belgium); Gubbels, F. [TNO, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Massaut, V. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Mol (Belgium)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Transition-Metal Hydrides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics A new type of electrochromic hydride material has interesting and unusual properties. Thin Ni-Mg films, for example, are mirror-like in appearance and have very low visible transmittance. On exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films become transparent. The transition is believed to result from formation of nickel magnesium hydride, Mg2NiH4. Switchable mirrors based on rare earth hydrides were discovered in 1996 at Vrije University in the Netherlands, Rare earth-magnesium alloy films were subsequently found to be superior to the pure lanthanides in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity by Philips Laboratories. The newer transition-metal types which use less expensive and less reactive materials were discovered at LBNL. This has now become a very active area of study with a network of researchers.

339

LEVELING METAL COATINGS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

Gage, H.A.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Activation of Noble Metals on Metal-Carbide Surfaces: Novel Catalysts for CO Oxidation, Desulfurization and Hydrogenation Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This perspective article focuses on the physical and chemical properties of highly active catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions generated by depositing noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces. To rationalize structure-reactivity relationships for these novel catalysts, well-defined systems are required. High-resolution photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles periodic density-functional (DF) calculations have been used to study the interaction of metals of Groups 9, 10 and 11 with MC(001) (M = Ti, Zr, V, Mo) surfaces. DF calculations give adsorption energies that range from 2 eV (Cu, Ag, Au) to 6 eV (Co, Rh, Ir). STM images show that Au, Cu, Ni and Pt grow on the carbide substrates forming two-dimensional islands at very low coverage, and three-dimensional islands at medium and large coverages. In many systems, the results of DF calculations point to the preferential formation of admetal-C bonds with significant electronic perturbations in the admetal. TiC(001) and ZrC(001) transfer some electron density to the admetals facilitating bonding of the adatom with electron-acceptor molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, thiophene, etc.). For example, the Cu/TiC(001) and Au/TiC(001) systems are able to cleave both S-O bonds of SO{sub 2} at a temperature as low as 150 K, displaying a reactivity much larger than that of TiC(001) or extended surfaces of bulk copper and gold. At temperatures below 200 K, Au/TiC is able to dissociate O{sub 2} and perform the 2CO + O{sub 2} {yields} 2CO{sub 2} reaction. Furthermore, in spite of the very poor hydrodesulfurization performance of TiC(001) or Au(111), a Au/TiC(001) surface displays an activity for the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS{sub x} catalysts. In general, the Au/TiC system is more chemically active than systems generated by depositing Au nanoparticles on oxide surfaces. Thus, metal carbides are excellent supports for enhancing the chemical reactivity of noble metals.

Rodriguez J. A.; Illas, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Catalysis Without Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Bullock, R. Morris

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

On the behavior of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations for Transition Metal Oxides  

SciTech Connect

Versatile Broensted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP relation is strongly coupled to the adsorbate geometry in the transition state. If it is final state-like the dissociative chemisorption energy can be considered as a descriptor for the dissociation. If it is initial state-like, on the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption energy is not suitable as descriptor for the dissociation. Dissociation of molecules with strong intramolecular bonds belong to the former and molecules with weak intramolecular bonds to the latter group. We show, for the prototype system La-perovskites, that there is a 'cyclic' behavior in the transition state characteristics upon change of the active transition metal of the oxide.

Vojvodic, Aleksandra

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development of a Fluxless Flip Chip Bonding Process for Optical Military Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As military electronics tend to become lighter, smaller, thinner, and lower cost, the use of flip chip technology is becoming more common place to meet system requirements, yet survive environments. This paper explores the development of an optical flip chip application and details the selection/qualification of the substrate. The selected assembly consists of a procured 1x12 Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) die, having 80um diameter eutectic AuSn solder bumps at 250um pitch and flip chip bonded to a .006” thick 99.6% alumina substrate with .006” diameter thru holes and metallized with 500Ĺ WTi, under minimum 2.0-3.0?m (80-120?”) thin film deposited Au. An 8 run, 3 factor, 2 level Full Factorial Design of Experiments (DOE) was completed on procured detector arrays and procured ceramic substrates using the Suss Microtec FC150. The optimum settings for the peak temperature, peak time and final die z-height were selected using the ANOVA results and interaction plots. Additional studies were completed to qualify in-house produced substrates. An epoxy glob-top encapsulant was selected to dissipate stress on the flip chip solder joints and to enhance thermal shock performance.

Girardi, Michael

2007-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Increasing the Strength of Adhesively Bonded Joints by Tapering the Adherends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine blades are often fabricated with composite materials. These composite blades are frequently attached to a metallic structure with an adhesive bond. For the baseline composite-to-steel joint considered in this study, failure typically occurs when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. Previous efforts established that the adhesive peel stresses strongly influence the strength of these joints for both single-cycle and fatigue loading. This study focused on reducing the adhesive peel stresses present in these joints by tapering the steel adherends. Several different tapers were evaluated using finite element analysis before arriving at a final design. To confirm that the selected taper was an improvement to the existing design, the baseline joint and the modified joint were tested in both compression and tension. In these axial tests, the compressive strengths of the joints with tapered adherends were greater than those of the baseline joints for both single-cycle and low-cycle fatigue. In addition, only a minor reduction in tensile strength was observed for the joints with tapered adherends when compared to the baseline joints. Thus, the modification would be expected to enhance the overall performance of this joint.

GUESS,TOMMY R.; METZINGER,KURT E.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

348

Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science  

SciTech Connect

We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

Li, Meng [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Cullen, David A [ORNL; Sasaki, Kotaro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Marinkovic, N. [University of Delaware; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Adzic, Radoslav R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

Boffa, A.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Serpentine metal gasket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallic seal or gasket for use in the joining of cryogenic fluid conduits, the seal or gasket having a generally planar and serpentine periphery defining a central aperture. According to a preferred embodiment, the periphery has at least two opposing elongated serpentine sides and two opposing arcuate ends joining the opposing elongated serpentine sides and is of a hexagonal cross-section.

Rothgeb, Timothy Moore (Norfolk, VA); Reece, Charles Edwin (Yorktown, VA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

Metal halogen electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

1988-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Weld Metal Metallurgical Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of an ongoing series of metallurgical handbooks that are being developed for utility engineers to use in assessing metallurgical characteristics of any given alloy. This report focuses specifically on the weld metal metallurgical characteristics of carbon, low-alloy martensitic, and austenitic stainless steel welds.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ductile transplutonium metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

Conner, W.V.

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

358

Functional Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of the work described in this dissertation was the incorporation of functionality into metal phosphonates. This was done in one of several ways. The first involved using phosphonate ligands that had covalently attached organic functional groups. In some cases, these ligands undergo reactions during the solvothermal syntheses which can impart new chemical reactivity. Another method used to introduce functionality was to partially or completely substitute metal atoms within phosphonate clusters to create materials which may have interesting magnetic properties. By controlling the way these clusters pack in the solids, their magnetic properties may be able to be augmented. The final method used to impart functionality to metal phosphonates was the incorporation of N-donor and bulky aryl groups into the phosphonate ligands. These influences caused structural variations which exposed potentially active sites within the materials, including both Lewis acidic and basic sites, as well as Bronsted acid sites. The first strategy was employed in the design of tetravalent metal phosphonates which have covalently incorporated bipyridine moieties. The materials are porous so that the bipyridine sites can chelate Pd atoms from solution, which can then be reduced to stable nanoparticles trapped within the phosphonate matrix. This approach was also used in the synthesis of surface-functionalized divalent metal phosphonates which exhibit interesting amine uptake properties. Solvent and cation substitution effects were used to control the packing and connectivity of phosphonate-based clusters. The selective substitution of metal atoms within the clusters may lead to interesting magnetic materials. In other work, N-donor and bulky phosphonates were used to influence the structure of several SnII phosphonates, which resulted in the discovery of a new layered structure type. The effect of the Sn-N interaction on the structures is investigated, and found to have significant effects on the structural units formed and how they pack in the solid state. The work presented herein represents only a small fraction of the rich chemistry of metal phosphonates. Creative researchers will continue to push boundaries and find new and interesting applications for phosphonate-based materials.

Perry, Houston Phillipp

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fuel cell system with separating structure bonded to electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell assembly comprises a separating structure configured for separating a first reactant and a second reactant wherein the separating structure has an opening therein. The fuel cell assembly further comprises a fuel cell comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and an electrolyte interposed between the first and second electrodes, and a passage configured to introduce the second reactant to the second electrode. The electrolyte is bonded to the separating structure with the first electrode being situated within the opening, and the second electrode being situated within the passage.

Bourgeois, Richard Scott (Albany, NY); Gudlavalleti, Sauri (Albany, NY); Quek, Shu Ching (Clifton Park, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Powers, James Daniel (Santa Monica, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ECCENTRIC ROLLING OF POWDER AND BONDING AGENT INTO SPHERICAL PELLETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A machine is described for pelletizing powder and bonding agent into spherical pellets of high density and uniform size. In this device, the material to be compacted is added to a flat circular pan which is moved in a circular orbit in a horizontal plane about an axis displaced from that of the pan's central axis without rotating the pan about its central axis. This movement causes the material contained therein to roll around the outside wall of the container and build up pellets of uniform shape, size, and density.

Patton, G. Jr.; Zirinsky, S.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Influence of MSI (Metal-Support Interactions) and the Solvent in Liquid-Phase Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results were repeatedly obtained that were consistent with a hypothesis proposed at the beginning of this program, i.e., due to Metal-Support Interactions (MSI), unique active sites can be created in the metal-support interfacial region to enhance activity and improve selectivity in certain types of reactions, especially those involving the hydrogenation of carbonyl and unsaturated C=C bonds. Higher turnover frequencies (TOF-molecule/s/site) and increased selectivity for C=O bond versus C=C bond hydrogenation was established in the hydrogenation reactions of: acetone, crotonaldehyde, acetophenone, phenylethanol, acetylcyclohexane, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, phenylacetaldehyde and citral over Pt/TiO{sub 2} MSI catalysts. Higher rates of hydrogenation benzene, toluene and xylene could be obtained over certain supported Pt and Pd catalysts. Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were developed that were active for CO hydrogenation at subambient temperatures. The influence of support and metal crystallite size were established for the adsorption of H{sub 2}, CO and O{sub 2} on families of Pt and Pd catalysts.

Vannice, M. A.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Recipients: The 2001 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

364

Recipients: The 2003 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

365

Recipients: The 2002 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

366

Recipients: The 2004 LMD Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Award, established in 1983, is awarded to the author(s) of a paper published in the ...

367

Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOI: 10.1021/bi101428e Hydrogen Bonding in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase: Electronic Inductive Effects and Hydrogen Bond Coupling †  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Computational studies are performed to analyze the physical properties of hydrogen bonds donated by Tyr16 and Asp103 to a series of substituted phenolate inhibitors bound in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). As the solution pKa of the phenolate increases, these hydrogen bond distances decrease, the associated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts increase, and the fraction of protonated inhibitor increases, in agreement with prior experiments. The quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations provide insight into the electronic inductive effects along the hydrogen bonding network that includes Tyr16, Tyr57, and Tyr32, as well as insight into hydrogen bond coupling in the active site. The calculations predict that the most-downfield NMR chemical shift observed experimentally corresponds to the Tyr16-phenolate hydrogen bond and that Tyr16 is the proton donor when a bound naphtholate inhibitor is observed to be protonated in electronic absorption experiments. According to these calculations, the electronic inductive effects along the hydrogen bonding network of tyrosines cause the Tyr16 hydroxyl to be more acidic than the Asp103 carboxylic acid moiety, which is immersed in a relatively nonpolar environment. When one of the distal tyrosine residues in the network is mutated to phenylalanine, thereby diminishing this inductive effect, the Tyr16-phenolate hydrogen bond becomes longer and the Asp103-phenolate hydrogen bond shorter, as observed in NMR experiments. Furthermore, the calculations suggest that

Philip Hanoian; Paul A. Sigala; Daniel Herschlag; Sharon Hammes-schiffer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

Brown, I.G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Print Monday, 19 December 2011 18:29 While mononuclear, polynuclear, and polymeric metal complexes are most often synthesized by the reaction of a metal precursor and a presynthesized organic ligand, it is also possible to generate the ligand in situ from an easily available organic compound. This approach allows the reactivity of the metal ion to activate a proligand, transforming it through an in situ reaction, sometimes providing coordination compounds with ligands not accessible by conventional organic synthesis. The intense interest in the reactivity of coordinated ligands is mainly due to the necessity of interpreting the mechanisms of homogeneous metal-catalyzed processes, in which a substrate is activated upon its coordination to one or more metal sites. A coordinated oxime group contains three active sites (C, N, O) for reactivity.

371

Metal reduction kinetics in Shewanella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Metal reduction kinetics have been studied in cultures of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria which include the Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Estimation of system parameters from time-series data faces obstructions in ...

Raman Lall; Julie Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, L.J.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals  

SciTech Connect

The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}, YDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}-0.15YO{sub 1.5}), and LDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}- 0.15LaO{sub 1.5}) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals  

SciTech Connect

The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF[sub 2], ThO[sub 2], YDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]-0.15YO[sub 1.5]), and LDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]- 0.15LaO[sub 1.5]) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

METHOD OF PURIFYING URANIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of lmpurities from uranlum metal can be done by a process conslstlng of contacting the metal with liquid mercury at 300 icient laborato C, separating the impunitycontalnlng slag formed, cooling the slag-free liquld substantlally below the point at which uranlum mercurlde sollds form, removlng the mercury from the solids, and recovering metallic uranium by heating the solids.

Blanco, R.E.; Morrison, B.H.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Integrated decontamination process for metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fabrication of metallic glass structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

Cline, C.F.

1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis and testing of adhesively bonded lap joints  

SciTech Connect

Detailed studies of adhesively bonded tubular lap joints subjected to axial loads can be efficiently performed with two-dimensional (2D) finite element analyses. However, three-dimensional (3D) analyses are required to model the bending of tubes and the axial loading of many other shapes such as airfoils. Unfortunately, these 3D analyses require significantly more time and computer resources than 2D analyses. Thus, it is of interest to determine whether some aspects of 3D behavior can be captured with 2D analyses. A series of finite element analyses will show that the shear stress in the adhesive of a tubular or an elliptic lap joint -- due to a bending load -- can be reasonably estimated with a 2D analysis even though the behavior is 3D. After the agreement between 2D and 3D analyses is detailed, preliminary efforts to assess the importance of adhesive geometry at the end of the bond will be discussed. Experimental measurements of the mechanical properties of a structural adhesive used in joint tests will also be presented. Tension, compression, and stress relaxation data for a filled, amine-cured epoxy adhesive will be discussed.

Metzinger, K.E.; Guess, T.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY  

SciTech Connect

Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Detection of Adsorption Sites in Supported Metal Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS) is demonstrated as a new tool to identify the geometry of metal adsorption sites and the orbitals involved in bonding. The type of CO adsorption site on a nanoparticular Pt-Al2O3 catalyst is determined. The orbitals involved in the Pt - CO bonding are identified using theoretical FEFF8.0 calculations. In situ application of HERFD XAS is applicable to a large number of catalytic systems and will provide fundamental insights in structure - performance relationships.

Tromp, Moniek [University of Southampton, School of Chemistry, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for chemical and bioengineering ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Safonova, Olga V.; Glatzel, Pieter [ESRF, Grenoble (France); Groot, Frank M. F. de [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Evans, John [University of Southampton, School of Chemistry, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

Knighton, J.B.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

METAL COATING BATHS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

Robinson, J.W.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spray casting of metallic preforms  

SciTech Connect

A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Recycling Metals for the Environment - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2008 ... This article describes metal production from primary and secondary resources, recovering metals from waste streams and environmental ...

390

Liquid Metal Processing and Casting 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic, Slag and Refractory Reactions with Liquid Metals - Refining, Evaporation and Gas/Metal Reactions - Fundamentals of Reactions involving Liquid ...

391

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Recycling Metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... This article describes metal production from primary and secondary resources, recovering metals from waste streams and environmental ...

392

MESOPOROUS METAL OXIDE MICROSPHERE ELECTRODE COMPOSITIONS AND ...  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The mesoporous metal oxide microsphere ...

393

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

SciTech Connect

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250/sup 0/F and about 700/sup 0/F and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing watersoluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Kalina, T.; Wolfs, D.Y.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

SciTech Connect

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

SciTech Connect

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition are described. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, L.K.

1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

Dr. Ramana Reddy

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Late transition metal bimetallics for photocatalytic hydrogen production, M-X and C-H bond activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadly defined this thesis has focused on the design and study of molecular catalysts that engender multi-electron reactions and photoreactions on small molecule substrates relevant to solar energy conversion. Specifically ...

Esswein, Arthur J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Molecular Mechanism of Metal-Chalcogen Bond Formation in the Synthesis of Colloidal II-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S18 Reaction kinetics of CdSe synthesis in TOPO using Cd(Me)S5. FAB-MS spectrum of the CdSe synthesis in TOPO using Cd-electron micrograph of CdSe and CdS nanocrystals………………….S15

Liu, Haitao; Owen, Jonathan S.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NREL-Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Webinar | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Webinar NREL-Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Topics: Finance Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2009 Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Screenshot References: Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds[1] Logo: Low-Cost Financing with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project for state and local officials, this Webinar described the elements of clean

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Measurement-Based Quantum Computing with Valence-Bond-Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computing that proceeds by sequential measurements of individual spins in an entangled resource state. However, it remains a challenge to produce efficiently such resource states. Would it be possible to generate these states by simply cooling a quantum many-body system to its ground state? Cluster states, the canonical resource states for MBQC, do not occur naturally as unique ground states of physical systems. This inherent hurdle has led to a significant effort to identify alternative resource states that appear as ground states in spin lattices. Recently, some interesting candidates have been identified with various valence-bond-solid (VBS) states. In this review, we provide a pedagogical introduction to recent progress regarding MBQC with VBS states as possible resource states. This study has led to an interesting interdisciplinary research area at the interface of quantum information science and condensed matter physics.

Kwek, Leong Chuan; Zeng, Bei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Interstellar Isomers: The Importance of Bonding Energy Differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present strong detections of methyl cyanide, vinyl cyanide, ethyl cyanide and cyanodiacetylene molecules with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) toward the Sgr B2(N) molecular cloud. Attempts to detect the corresponding isocyanide isomers were only successful in the case of methyl isocyanide for its J(K)=1(0)-0(0) transition, which is the first interstellar report of this line. To determine the spatial distribution of methyl isocyanide, we used archival Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array data for the J(K)=4(K)-3(K) (K=0-3) transitions but no emission was detected. From ab initio calculations, the bonding energy difference between the cyanide and isocyanide molecules is >8500 cm^-1 (>12,000 K). That we detect methyl isocyanide emission with a single antenna (Gaussian beamsize(Omega_B)=1723 arcsec^2) but not with an interferometer (Omega_B=192 arcsec^2), strongly suggests that methyl isocyanide has a widespread spatial distribution toward the Sgr B2(N) region. Thus, large-scale, non-thermal processes in the surrounding medium may account for the conversion of methyl cyanide to methyl isocyanide while the LMH hot core, which is dominated by thermal processes, does not produce a significant amount of methyl isocyanide. Ice analog experiments by other investigators have shown that radiation bombardment of methyl cyanide can produce methyl isocyanide, thus supporting our observations. We conclude that isomers separated by such large bonding energy differences are distributed in different interstellar environments, making the evaluation of column density ratios between such isomers irrelevant unless it can be independently shown that these species are co-spatial.

Anthony J. Remijan; J. M. Hollis; F. J. Lovas; D. F. Plusquellic; P. R. Jewell

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

The metallurgical integrity of the frit vent assembly diffusion bond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVSs) are now being made by Energy Systems at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These CVSs are being made for the US Department of Energy`s (NE-53) General Purpose Heat Source- Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) program, which is to supply electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. A GPHS-RTG has 72 CVSs. Each CVS encapsulates one {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. The helium gas produced from the alpha decay of the {sup 238}Pu is vented through a nominal 0.45-mm-diam hole in the vent cup of each CVS. A frit vent assembly that is electron beam welded over the vent hole allows helium gas to escape but prevents plutonia fines from exiting. The metallurgical integrity of frit vent assemblies produced by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) were compared with those produced earlier by EG&G-Mound Applied Technology, Inc. (EG&G-MAT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken (at magnifications of from 126X to 1,000X) of the starting frit vent powder and the diffusion-bonded powder in finished frit vent assemblies produced by Energy Systems and EG&G-MAT. Frit vent assemblies also were metallographically prepared and visually examined/photographed at magnifications of from 50X to 1,000X. The SEM and metallographic examinations of the particle-to-particle and particle-to-foil component diffusion bonds indicated that the Energy Systems-produced and EG&G-MAT-produced frit vent assemblies have comparable metallurgical integrity. Statistical analysis of the Energy Systems production data shows that the frit vent manufacturing yield is 91%.

Ulrich, G.B. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States). Process Metallurgy Dept.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Micro-Indentation Method for Assessment of TBC Bond Coat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... NETL bond-coated coupons were subjected to cumulative rapid thermal cycling, and after every 100 high temperature thermal cycles, ...

407

Hybrid Two-Dimensional Electronic Systems and Other Applications of sp-2 Bonded Light Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the storage of energy using technologies such as hydrogen,Energy Applications of sp-2 Bonded Materials 5 Hydrogen Storagea hydrogen storage systems’ total gravimetric energy density

Kessler, Brian Maxwell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Molecular bond selective x-ray scattering for nanoscale analysis of soft matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

submitted for publication Molecular bond selective x-rayorbital to a ?* C = C molecular orbital (8). The energy offrom the 1s atomic to ?* molecular orbitals that are

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Draft Surety Bond Rider Associated With Request for Transfer of Licenses Dear Ms. Haney: Purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to request the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) review and approval of a draft surety bond rider for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility. Background On December 30, 2010 (Reference 1), the NRC issued approval of the draft financial assurance instrument with one condition. Prior to the execution of the new surety bond, USEC Inc. (USEC) must submit for review a draft of the entire surety bond. This draft of the new surety bond must state the company that will underwrite the bond. The draft bond should also indicate the following on the line following the State of incorporation: "Surety's qualification in jurisdiction where licensed facility is located. " Also, on February 11, 2011 (Reference 2), the NRC issued Order EA- 11-013 in relation to USEC's request for written consent to transfer materials licenses from USEC to a subsidiary limited liability company (LLC), American Centrifuge Operating, LLC. Condition 1 states "USEC will obtain NRC approval on the revised financial assurance instruments for decommissioning of the Lead Cascade Facility." Discussion As stated within the Decommissioning Funding Plan, USEC presently intends to provide for funding through a surety bond. Enclosure 1 of this letter provides the draft surety bond rider which meets the conditions as specified within References 1 and 2. Action USEC respectfully requests that the NRC complete their review of the enclosed draft surety bond rider for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility by May 20, 2011.

Peter J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

An Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, An Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications. Author(s), Ying ...

411

Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters which promote bonding between particles and b) to determine by what mechanisms the plasticity is enhanced in bulk amorphous metal matrix composites consolidated by ECAE. To accomplish the objectives BAM and AMMCs were produced via ECAE consolidation of Vitreloy 106a (Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3-wt%), ARLloy #1 (Hf71.3Cu16.2Ni7.6Ti2.2Al2.6 -wt%), and both of these amorphous alloys blended with crystalline phases of W, Cu and Ni. Novel instrumented extrusions and a host of postprocessing material characterizations were used to evaluate processing conditions and material properties. The results show that ECAE consolidation at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region gives near fully dense (>99%) and well bonded millimeter scale BAM and AMMCs. The mechanical properties of the ECAE processed BMG are comparable to cast material: Ï�f = 1640 MPa, �µf = 2.3%, E = 80 GPa for consolidated Vitreloy 106a as compared to Ï�f = 1800 MPa, �µf = 2.5%, E = 85 GPa for cast Vitreloy 106, and Ï�f = 1660 MPa, �µf = 2.0%, E = 97 GPa for ARLloy #1 as compared to Ï�f = 2150 MPa, �µf oxides and crystalline phase morphology and chemistry. It is demonstrated that the addition of a dispersed crystalline phase to an amorphous matrix by ECAE powder consolidation increases the plasticity of the amorphous matrix by providing locations for generation and/or arrest of adiabatic shear bands. The ability of ECAE to consolidated BAM and AMMCs with improved plasticity opens the possibility of overcoming the size and plasticity limitations of the monolithic bulk metallic glasses.

Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Metal nanoparticle inks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized silver particles comprise particles comprising silver, a short-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles, and a long-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles. The short-chain capping agent is a first anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at most 10,000, and the long-chain capping agent is a second anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at least 25,000. The stabilized silver particles have a solid loading of metallic silver of at least 50 wt %.

Lewis, Jennifer A. (Urbana, IL); Ahn, Bok Yeop (Champaign, IL); Duoss, Eric B. (Urbana, IL)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

Muetterties, E.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Impact Resistance of Carbon Fiber and Metallic Glass Fiber Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of thin metallic sheets with carbon fiber composite results in a ... Ceramic Textile Composites under In Situ Loading at Ultrahigh Temperatures.

415

Thin films by metal-organic precursor plasma spray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While most plasma spray routes to coatings utilize solids as the precursor feedstock, metal-organic precursor plasma spray (MOPPS) is an area that the authors have investigated recently as a novel route to thin film materials. Very thin films are possible via MOPPS and the technology offers the possibility of forming graded structures by metering the liquid feed. The current work employs metal-organic compounds that are liquids at standard temperature-pressure conditions. In addition, these complexes contain chemical functionality that allows straightforward thermolytic transformation to targeted phases of interest. Toward that end, aluminum 3,5-heptanedionate (Al(hd){sub 3}), triethylsilane (HSi(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or HSiEt{sub 3}), and titanium tetrakisdiethylamide (Ti(N(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}){sub 4} or Ti(NEt{sub 2}){sub 4}) were employed as precursors to aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and titanium nitride, respectively. In all instances, the liquids contain metal-heteroatom bonds envisioned to provide atomic concentrations of the appropriate reagents at the film growth surface, thus promoting phase formation (e.g., Si-C bond in triethylsilane, Ti-N bond in titanium amide, etc.). Films were deposited using a Sulzer Metco TriplexPro-200 plasma spray system under various experimental conditions using design of experiment principles. Film compositions were analyzed by glazing incidence x-ray diffraction and elemental determination by x-ray spectroscopy. MOPPS films from HSiEt{sub 3} showed the formation of SiC phase but Al(hd){sub 3}-derived films were amorphous. The Ti(NEt{sub 2}){sub 4} precursor gave MOPPS films that appear to consist of nanosized splats of TiOCN with spheres of TiO{sub 2} anatase. While all films in this study suffered from poor adhesion, it is anticipated that the use of heated substrates will aid in the formation of dense, adherent films.

Schulz, Douglas L.; Sailer, Robert A.; Payne, Scott; Leach, James; Molz, Ronald J. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States); Sulzer Metco (United States) Inc., Westbury, New York 11590-2724 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

Metallic hydrogen research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm/sup 3/ and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures.

Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

1978-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nonferrous Metal Melting -- Marketing Kit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industrial sector increasingly relies on electric furnaces for nonferrous metal melting due to declining electricity cost, greater use of recycled secondary nonferrous materials, and tightened environmental regulations. This Nonferrous Metal Melting -- Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel perform a progressive analysis of electrotechnology applications in nonferrous metal melting systems. The kit is designed for utility personnel who have limited knowledge of the no...

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Metal-ceramic joint assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Metals Welded and Thickness Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...more sheet metal stampings that do not require gas-tight or liquid-tight joints can be more economically joined by high-speed RSW than by

424

SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

Erickson, G.F.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

425

Primary Metals - Compressor Motors Failing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of four failures of compressor motors for a two stage chiller at a primary metals manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species.

Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Photoionization spectroscopy of ionic metal dimers: LiCu and LiAg  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic spectra are reported for the heteronuclear metal dimers LiCu and LiAg, with resonant one-color two-photon ionization (R2PI). The dimers are produced in a pulsed supersonic molecular beam by laser vaporization of either a copper or silver rod coated with a thin film of vacuum deposited lithium metal. A total of twelve excited electronic states for LiCu and seven for LiAg are observed. Analysis of the vibrational progressions yields ground and excited state vibrational frequencies and dissociation energies for both LiCu and LiAg. In addition, selected vibronic bands are rotationally resolved. This data, together with that obtained by Morse and co-workers for LiCu [J. Chem. Phys. (to be published)], gives bond lengths for LiCu and LiAg (r{sub 0}{sup {double_prime}}=2.26 and 2.41 {Angstrom}, respectively). The bond lengths for LiCu and LiAg are significantly shorter than expected by comparison to the homonuclear diatomics Li{sub 2} and Cu{sub 2} or Ag{sub 2}. Dissociation energies in the heteronuclear dimers are also much greater than the mean of the corresponding homonuclear dimer values. These trends indicate that ionic character plays a leading role in the ground-state bonding. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Brock, L.R.; Knight, A.M.; Reddic, J.E.; Pilgrim, J.S.; Duncan, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Marking the Close analysis in Thai Bond Market Surveillance using association rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the opportunity of employing data mining techniques as a supplement to traditional techniques, such as economic modeling, to detect misconduct in the Thai Bond Market. In the study, association rules are used to detect ''Mark ... Keywords: Association rules, Bond Market Surveillance system, Data mining, Mark the Close analysis, e-Administration

Janjao Mongkolnavin; Sunti Tirapat

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Bond Graph Model of a Vertical U-Tube Steam Condenser Coupled with a Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bond Graph Model of a Vertical U-Tube Steam Condenser Coupled with a Heat Exchanger K. Medjaher1+ A and thus the bottom well acts as a heat exchanger. The storage of hydraulic and thermal energies steam condenser; Heat exchanger; Bond graph 1. Introduction Modern process engineering plants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

431

A new RC bond model suitable for three-dimensional cyclic analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an original model to simulate the bond failure between concrete and reinforcing steel bars. The model was developed to be used in threedimensional analyses within the framework of the Finite Element Method and for general loading ... Keywords: Concrete-Steel bond, Cyclic analysis, Inelastic behavior, Reinforced concrete

LuíS A. M. Mendes; LuíS M. S. S. Castro

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

Brassell, Gilbert W. (13237 W. 8th Ave., Golden, CO 80401); Brugger, Ronald P. (Lafayette, CO)

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

DLTS study of bonded interface in silicon-on-insulator structures annealed in hydrogen atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the comparative Charge Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy study of Si/SiO2 interfaces in silicon-on-insulator structures prepared by wafer bonding and hydrogen slicing and annealed in hydrogen ambient in the temperature range ... Keywords: Si/SiO2 interface, annealing, bonded interface, silicon-on-insulator, traps

I. V. Antonova; J. Stano; O. V. Naumova; V. P. Popov; V. A. Skuratov

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Do Investment Banks' Relationships with Investors Impact Pricing? The Case of Convertible Bond Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the role of repeat interactions between placement agents (investment banks) and investors in the initial pricing of convertible bonds. Under the assumption that attracting repeat investors can reduce search frictions in primary issue ... Keywords: convertible bonds, corporate finance, securities issuance, underpricing

Brian J. Henderson; Heather Tookes

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated H NMR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15 N, 13 C, and 1 H Received 14 February 2003; published 5 November 2003 The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa

Reilly, Anne

436

Joining of superalloy Inconel 600 by diffusion induced isothermal solidification of a liquated insert metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of process variables on the microstructure of transient liquid phase bonded IN 600 using a commercial filler alloy was studied. Microstructural examination of bonded specimens showed that isothermal solidification of the liquated insert occurred during holding at the joining temperatures. In cases where the holding time was insufficient for complete isothermal solidification, the residual liquid transformed on cooling into a centerline eutectic product. The width of the eutectic decreased with increased holding time and an increase in initial gap width resulted in thicker eutectic width in specimens bonded at the same temperature and for equivalent holding times. In addition to the centerline eutectic microconstituent, precipitation of boron-rich particles was observed within the base metal region adjacent to the substrate-joint interface. Formation of these particles appeared to have influenced the rate of solidification of the liquated interlayer during bonding. In contrast to the conventional expectation of an increase in the rate of isothermal solidification with an increase in temperature, a decrease in the rate was observed with an increase in temperatures above 1160 deg. C. This could be related to a decrease in solubility of boron in nickel above the Ni-B eutectic temperature.

Egbewande, A.T.; Chukwukaeme, C. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada); Ojo, O.A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada)], E-mail: ojo@cc.umanitoba.ca

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

METAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for extracting uranium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is presented. A difficulty encountered in solvent extraction operations using an organic extractant (e.g., tributyl phosphate dissolved in kerosene or carbon tetrachloride) is that emulsions sometimes form, and phase separation is difficult or impossible. This difficulty is overcome by dissolving the organic extractant in a molten wax which is a solid at operating temperatures. After cooling, the wax which now contains the extractant, is broken into small particles (preferably flakes) and this wax complex'' is used to contact the uranium bearing solutions and extract the metal therefrom. Microcrystalline petroleum wax and certain ethylene polymers have been found suitable for this purpose.

Lewis, G.W. Jr.; Rhodes, D.E.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Physical Properties of Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Some physical properties of metals at room temperature...0.176 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Tantalum 16.6 0.1391 6.5 54.4 135.0 Technetium 11.5 â?¦ 7.05 50.2 185.0 Tellurium 6.237 0.201 18.2 5.98â??6.02 1â??50 Terbium 8.230 0.1818 10.3 11.1 1150 Thallium 11.872 0.130 28 47 150 Thorium 11.8 0.11308 10.9 77 157 Thulium 9.321 0.1598 13.3 16.9 676 Tin 5.765 0.205 21 62.8 110 Titanium 4.507...

440

Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal oxo bonds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Lengths & Angles - Adenine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adenine Adenine ---------------------------------------------------- Bond or Angle Mean (esd, N) Value ---------------------------------------------------- N1-C2 1.339 (0.009, 48) C2-N3 1.331 (0.009, 48) N3-C4 1.344 (0.006, 48) C4-C5 1.383 (0.007, 48) C5-C6 1.406 (0.009, 48) C6-N1 1.351 (0.007, 48) C5-N7 1.388 (0.006, 48) N7-C8 1.311 (0.007, 48) C8-N9 1.373 (0.008, 48) N9-C4 1.374 (0.006, 48) C6-N6 1.335 (0.008, 48) N9-C1' 1.462 (0.010, 48) C6-N1-C2 118.6 (0.6, 48) N1-C2-N3 129.3 (0.5, 48) C2-N3-C4 110.6 (0.5, 48) N3-C4-C5 126.8 (0.7, 48) C4-C5-C6 117.0 (0.5, 48) C5-C6-N1 117.7 (0.5, 48) C4-C5-N7 110.7 (0.5, 48) C5-N7-C8 103.9 (0.5, 48)

443

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Lengths & Angles - Protonated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protonated Adenine Protonated Adenine ---------------------------------------------------- Bond or Angle Mean (esd, N) Value ---------------------------------------------------- N1-C2 1.357 (0.009, 15) C2-N3 1.305 (0.008, 15) N3-C4 1.356 (0.006, 15) C4-C5 1.378 (0.008, 15) C5-C6 1.403 (0.007, 15) C6-N1 1.359 (0.007, 15) C5-N7 1.379 (0.005, 15) N7-C8 1.312 (0.008, 15) C8-N9 1.373 (0.009, 15) N9-C4 1.365 (0.007, 15) C6-N6 1.320 (0.008, 15) N9-C1' 1.466 (0.009, 15) C6-N1-C2 123.3 (0.6, 15) N1-C2-N3 125.7 (0.6, 15) C2-N3-C4 111.6 (0.4, 15) N3-C4-C5 127.4 (0.6, 15) C4-C5-C6 117.9 (0.5, 15) C5-C6-N1 114.0 (0.4, 15) C4-C5-N7 111.0 (0.3, 15) C5-N7-C8 103.7 (0.4, 15)

444

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Lengths & Angles - Guanine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guanine Guanine ---------------------------------------------------- Bond or Angle Mean (esd, N) Value ---------------------------------------------------- N1-C2 1.373 (0.008, 21) C2-N3 1.323 (0.008, 21) N3-C4 1.350 (0.007, 21) C4-C5 1.379 (0.007, 21) C5-C6 1.419 (0.010, 21) C6-N1 1.391 (0.007, 21) C5-N7 1.388 (0.006, 21) N7-C8 1.305 (0.006, 21) C8-N9 1.374 (0.007, 21) N9-C4 1.375 (0.008, 21) C2-N2 1.341 (0.010, 21) C6-O6 1.237 (0.009, 21) N9-C1' 1.459 (0.009, 21) C6-N1-C2 125.1 (0.6, 21) N1-C2-N3 123.9 (0.6, 21) C2-N3-C4 111.9 (0.5, 21) N3-C4-C5 128.6 (0.5, 21) C4-C5-C6 118.8 (0.6, 21) C5-C6-N1 111.5 (0.5, 21)

445

Diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentration dependence of diffusivity in a multi-component diffusion system makes it complicated to predict the concentration profiles of diffusing species. This so called chemical diffusivity can be expressed as a function of thermodynamic and kinetic data. DICTRA software can calculate the concentration profiles using appropriate mobility and thermodynamic data. It can also optimize the diffusivity data using experimental diffusivity data. Then the optimized diffusivity data is stored as mobility data which is a linear function of temperature. In this work, diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayers is reported. The mobility parameters of Ni-Cu alloy binary systems were optimized using DICTRA/Thermocalc software from the available self-, tracer and chemical diffusion coefficients. The optimized mobility parameters were used to simulate concentration profiles of Ni-Cu diffusion joints using DICTRA/Thermocalc software. The calculated and experimental concentration profiles agreed well at 1100 Degree-Sign C. Agreement between the simulated and experimental profiles was less good at 1050 Degree-Sign C due to the grain boundary contribution to the overall diffusion. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration profiles of Cu in Ni-Cu diffusion joints are modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdiffusion coefficients in Ni-Cu system are optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized interdiffusion coefficients are expressed as mobility parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated profiles are comparable with experimental profiles.

Rahman, A.H.M.E., E-mail: a.rahman@my.und.edu; Cavalli, M.N.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Phosphate-bonded glass cements for geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calcium aluminosilicate glasses were found to react with phosphoric acid in three ways depending upon silica content. Above 55% SiO/sub 2/ they are insoluble while below 50% they dissolve readily. The transition compositions release calcium and aluminum ions and a silica gel phase replaces the glass. Activation energies in the order of 10 kcal/mole are associated with the dissolution. Equilibrium studies in the systems CaO-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, and CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O were made to determine the phases which are stable at 200/sup 0/C in excess water. The CaO system shows hydroxylapatite, monetite and monocalcium orthophosphate are the stable phases. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system contains augelite, berlinite, and a high phosphate aluminum hydrate. The quaternary system shows the above phase plus a lime alumina hydrogarnet and crandallite. Cement made from a glass frit of the composition 45% SiO/sub 2/: 24% CaO: 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a compressive strength of 500 psi after several days in steam at 200/sup 0/C and 800 psi after months in steam. Bonding of cements to mild steel are discussed.

Rockett, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Specificity, flexibility and valence of DNA bonds guide emulsion architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The specificity and thermal reversibility of DNA interactions have enabled the self-assembly of crystal structures, self-replicating materials and colloidal molecules. Grafting DNA onto liquid interfaces of emulsions leads to exciting new architectural possibilities due to the mobility of the DNA ligands and the patches they form between bound droplets. Here we show that the size and number of these adhesion patches (valency) can be controlled. Valence 2 leads to flexible polymers of emulsion droplets, while valence above 4 leads to rigid droplet networks. A simple thermodynamic model quantitatively describes the increase in the patch size with droplet radii, DNA concentration and the stiffness of the tether to the sticky-end. The patches are formed between droplets with complementary DNA strands or alternatively with complementary colloidal nanoparticles to mediate DNA binding between droplets. This emulsion system opens the route to directed self-assembly of more complex structures through distinct DNA bonds with varying strengths and controlled valence and flexibility.

Lang Feng; Lea-Laetitia Pontani; Remi Dreyfus; Paul Chaikin; Jasna Brujic

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Theoretical studies of surface reactions on metals and electronic materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of a variety of adsorbates on Ni have been completed; adsorption energies were determined for CH, CH[sub 2], CH[sub 3], H, NH[sub 3], H[sub 2]O, and C[sub 6]H[sub 6] on Ni(111). A refined calculation of the reaction of methane with Ni was completed. Other studies included H[sub 2] and SiH[sub 4] adsorption/decomposition on Si surfaces, Si-Si dimer bond length, activity energy barriers for reaction of CH[sub 4]and CH[sub 3]F with Si(111). Studies were begun on deposition of C on Ni(111). New directions were explored for reaction of methane with transition metal surfaces; work was completed for a Ni(111) surface containing a substitutional iron atom. Twenty abstracts of papers are presented.

Whitten, J.L.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Wenguang (Elgin, IL); Bailey, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gao, Yuan (Brewer, ME)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Sturcken, E.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) - zeta potentials and isoelectric points - for metal oxides, including SiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one - on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fedkin, Mark V [ORNL; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis  

SciTech Connect

Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) zeta potentials and isoelectric points for metal oxides, including SiO2, SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fedkin, Mark V. [Pennsylvania State University; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of the specimens: One was the formation of two well-crystallized phases, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)] and sodium vanadium sulfate hydrate [Na{sub 2}V(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},4H{sub 2}O], as the reaction products in the cement bodies; the other factor reflected the dense microstructure developed by the growth of these crystalline reaction products. Accordingly, the CBCs derived from these by-products have a high potential for use as remediating material for hazardous heavy metal-contaminated soils, as rapid-setting repair patching and filling materials for damaged roadways and bridge decks, and also as binders in precast concrete products, such as blocks, slabs, and pipes.

SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

2002-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Recipient: 1997 LMD Light Metals Technical Service Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. Recipient: 1997 LMD Light Metals Technical Service Award. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's Light Metals Division Light Metals Technical ...

455

Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that ...

Levin, Michael

456

Method for controlled hydrogen charging of metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for controlling hydrogen charging of hydride forming metals through a window of a superimposed layer of a non-hydriding metal overlying the portion of the hydride forming metals to be charged.

Cheng, Bo-Ching (Fremont, CA); Adamson, Ronald B. (Fremont, CA)

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

457

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Lengths & Angles - Uracil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uracil Uracil ---------------------------------------------------- Bond or Angle Mean (esd, N) Value ---------------------------------------------------- N1-C2 1.381 (0.009, 46) C2-N3 1.373 (0.007, 46) N3-C4 1.380 (0.009, 46) C4-C5 1.431 (0.009, 46) C5-C6 1.337 (0.009, 46) C6-N1 1.375 (0.009, 46) C2-O2 1.219 (0.009, 46) C4-O4 1.232 (0.008, 46) N1-C1' 1.469 (0.014, 46) C6-N1-C2 121.0 (0.6, 46) N1-C2-N3 114.9 (0.6, 46) C2-N3-C4 127.0 (0.6, 46) N3-C4-C5 114.6 (0.6, 46) C4-C5-C6 119.7 (0.6, 46) C5-C6-N1 122.7 (0.5, 46) N1-C2-O2 122.8 (0.7, 46) N3-C2-O2 122.2 (0.7, 46) N3-C4-O4 119.4 (0.7, 46) C5-C4-O4 125.9 (0.6, 46) C6-N1-C1' 121.2 (1.4, 46) C2-N1-C1' 117.7 (1.2, 46

458

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Lengths & Angles - Thymine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thymine Thymine ---------------------------------------------------- Bond or Angle Mean (esd, N) Value ---------------------------------------------------- N1-C2 1.376 (0.008, 50) C2-N3 1.373 (0.008, 50) N3-C4 1.382 (0.008, 50) C4-C5 1.445 (0.009, 50) C5-C6 1.339 (0.007, 50) C6-N1 1.378 (0.007, 50) C2-O2 1.220 (0.008, 50) C4-O4 1.228 (0.009, 50) C5-M5 1.496 (0.006, 50) N1-C1' 1.473 (0.014, 50) C6-N1-C2 121.3 (0.5, 50) N1-C2-N3 114.6 (0.6, 50) C2-N3-C4 127.2 (0.6, 50) N3-C4-C5 115.2 (0.6, 50) C4-C5-C6 118.0 (0.6, 50) C5-C6-N1 123.7 (0.6, 50) N1-C2-O2 123.1 (0.8, 50) N3-C2-O2 122.3 (0.6, 50) N3-C4-O4 119.9 (0.6, 50) C5-C4-O4 124.9 (0.7, 50) C4-C5-M5 119.0 (0.6, 50)

459

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Lengths & Angles - Protonated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protonated Cytosine Protonated Cytosine ---------------------------------------------------- Bond or Angle Mean (esd, N) Value ---------------------------------------------------- N1-C2 1.381 (0.007, 17) C2-N3 1.384 (0.007, 17) N3-C4 1.353 (0.006, 17) C4-C5 1.413 (0.005, 17) C5-C6 1.346 (0.006, 17) C6-N1 1.365 (0.007, 17) C2-O2 1.212 (0.006, 17) C4-N4 1.315 (0.007, 17) N1-C1' 1.483 (0.015, 17) C6-N1-C2 121.7 (0.5, 17) N1-C2-N3 114.7 (0.7, 17) C2-N3-C4 125.3 (0.7, 17) N3-C4-C5 117.6 (0.5, 17) C4-C5-C6 118.4 (0.5, 17) C5-C6-N1 122.2 (0.5, 17) N1-C2-O2 123.4 (0.7, 17) N3-C2-O2 121.9 (0.5, 17) N3-C4-N4 119.5 (0.7, 17) C5-C4-N4 123.0 (0.8, 17) C6-N1-C1' 121.2 (0.9, 17) C2-N1-C1' 116.9 (1.0, 17

460

ADSORPTION AND BONDING OF BUTANE AND PENTANE ON THE Pt(111) CRYSTAL SURFACES. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN TREATMENTS AND DEUTERIUM PREADSORPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADSORPTION AND BONDING OF BUTANE AND PENTANE ON THE .Pt(111)ADSORPTION AND BONDING OF BUTANE AND PENTANE ON THE Pt(lll)adsorption characteristics of butane and pentane on the (

Salmeron, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides  

SciTech Connect

A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

Dimitrov, Vesselin, E-mail: vesselin@uctm.edu [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria)] [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Study of Hydrogen Bonding in Small Water Clusters with Density Functional Theory Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unique characteristics of hydrogen bonding have left our understanding of liquid water far from complete in terms of its structure and properties. In order to better describe the hydrogen bond in water, we seek to understand the electronic states which show sensitivity to hydrogen bonding. We investigate the structure of unoccupied valence states by performing X-ray Absorption calculations on water clusters using Density Functional Theory. For each water cluster, studying how valence electronic structure is perturbed by changes in the local hydrogen bonding environment facilitates our description of the hydrogen bond. Also in this framework, we move toward a depiction of local structures in liquid water by comparison to experimental X-ray absorption spectra. We find consistent localization along internal bonds in the electronic structures of pre- and post-edge states for single-donor species. In addition, we propose a molecular orbital bonding-antibonding picture to explain this directional localization from dimer calculations, and show that the pre- and post-edge spectral regions have a resulting relationship.

Wendlandt, Johanna; /Wisconsin U., Madison /SLAC, SSRL

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W [ORNL; Chen, Banghao [ORNL; Jiao, Jian [ORNL; Parsons, Williams [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

APPARATUS FOR HIGH PURITY METAL RECOVERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for preparing high purity metal such as uranium, plutonium and the like from an impure mass of the same metal. The apparatus is arranged so that the impure metal is heated and swept by a stream of hydrogen gas bearing a halogen such as iodine. The volatiie metal halide formed is carried on to a hot filament where the metal halide is decomposed and the molten high purity metal is collected in a rceeiver below

Magel, T.T.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

1983-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stohl, Frances V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

[Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activities on Pi and Ni surfaces]: Summary  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes research applied to chemical bond activation studies. Topics summarized include: Carbon nitrogen bonds experimentation with aniline on Ni(111), Mi(100), and Pt(111) surfaces; carbon sulfur bonds experimentation with methanethiol, phenylthiol, and dimethyl disulfide on Pt(111) and Ni(111) surfaces; carbon-carbon bonds experimentation on Ni(100), Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces; and in-situ fluorescence yield near edge spectroscopy.

Gland, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar...

471

Industrial Ecology and Metal Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Topic Title: Powerpoint: Industrial Ecology and Metal Production Topic Summary: Metal extraction is on the the most Earth-intrusive industrial ...

472

BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metallic Inclusions in Uranium Dioxide", LBL-11117 (1980).in Hypostoichiornetric Uranium Dioxide 11 , LBL-11095 (OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa L. Yang and

Yang, Rosa L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Metals Thin-Films Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Metals Thin-Films Information at NIST. Metals Thin-Films Information at NIST. (the links below are a compilation ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recycling Metals Using the MOCVD Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Secondly, the volatile metal organic compound is purified by fractional distillation. Thirdly, the purified metal organic compound is decomposed ...

475

Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society .... The Oxidation Behavior of an FeCo-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 700C.

476

Molten Metal Safety Approach through a Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Molten Metal explosion or splash is a major risk encountered in the ... In-Line Salt-ACD: A Chlorine–Free Technology for Metal Treatment.

477

About Rare Earth Metals | Ames Laboratory  

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About Rare Earth Metals About Rare Earth Metals What Are Rare Earths? Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center The Ames Process for Purification of Rare...