National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for metal fatigue nanoscience

  1. Fatigue-Resistance Enhancements by Glass-Forming Metallic Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F. X. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jiang, W. H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chiang, C L [National Taiwan Ocean University; Gao, Yanfei [ORNL; Guan, Y F [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chu, J. P. [National Taiwan Ocean University; Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2007-01-01

    Zr-based glass-forming metallic films were coated on a 316L stainless steel and a Ni-based alloy by the magnetron-sputter deposition. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were conducted on those coated materials with the film surface on the tensile side. Results showed that the fatigue life and fatigue-endurance limit of the materials could be considerably improved, and the enhancements vary with the maximum applied stress and the substrate material. Fractographs showed that the film remained well adhered to the substrate even after the severe plastic deformation. Surface-roughness measurements indicated the improvement of the surface finishes due to the deposition of the glass-forming film. Nanoindentation test results suggested that the thin film exhibited both high yield strength and good ductility. The reduction of the surface roughness, good adhesion between the film and the substrate, and the excellent strength and ductility of the glass-forming metallic film are the major factors for the fatigue-resistance enhancements of the coated material. A micromechanical model is developed to illustrate the mechanisms of fatigue-resistance enhancements through the interaction between the amorphous film and the substrate slip bands.

  2. carleton.ca Nanoscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    programs and professors are linked to a wealth of resources, including National Research Council of Canada of disease. It provides more effective ways to collect and store solar energy, as well as measure and control. The combination of these two areas will equip you to understand nanoscience in photonics, electronics, energy

  3. On a solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Johnson, William L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-01-09

    The recent development of metallic glass-matrix composites represents a particular milestone in engineering materials for structural applications owing to their remarkable combinations of strength and toughness. However, metallic glasses are highly susceptible to cyclic fatigue damage and previous attempts to solve this problem have been largely disappointing. Here we propose and demonstrate a microstructural design strategy to overcome this limitation by matching the microstructural length scales (of the second phase) to mechanical crack-length scales. Specifically, semi-solid processing is used to optimize the volume fraction, morphology, and size of second phase dendrites to confine any initial deformation (shear banding) to the glassy regions separating dendrite arms having length scales of {approx} 2 {micro}m, i.e., to less than the critical crack size for failure. Confinement of the damage to such interdendritic regions results in enhancement of fatigue lifetimes and increases the fatigue limit by an order of magnitude making these 'designed' composites as resistant to fatigue damage as high-strength steels and aluminum alloys. These design strategies can be universally applied to any other metallic glass systems.

  4. Effects of plastic constraint on the cyclic and static fatigue behavior of metal/ceramic layered structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Effects of plastic constraint on the cyclic and static fatigue behavior of metal/ceramic layered of metal/ceramic layered structures is examined under cyclic and static loading conditions. Crack-crack growth; Stress-corrosion cracking; Plastic constraint; Alumina; Aluminum 1. Introduction Metal/ceramic

  5. Nanoscience | Argonne National Laboratory

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  6. Mechanisms for fracture and fatigue-crack propagation in a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, C.J.; Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R.O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1999-07-01

    The fracture and fatigue properties of a newly developed bulk metallic glass alloy, Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} (at. pct), have been examined. Experimental measurements using conventional fatigue precracked compact-tension C(T) specimens ({approximately}7-mm thick) indicated that the fully amorphous alloy has a plane-strain fracture toughness comparable to polycrystalline aluminum alloys. However, significant variability was observed and possible sources are identified. The fracture surfaces exhibited a vein morphology typical of metallic glasses, and, in some cases, evidence for local melting was observed. Attempts were made to rationalize the fracture toughness in terms of a previously developed micromechanical model based on the Taylor instability, as well as on the observation of extensive crack branching and deflection. Upon partial or complete crystallization, however, the alloy was severely embrittled, with toughnesses dropping to {approximately}1 MPa {radical}m. Commensurate with this drop in toughness was a marginal increase in hardness and a reduction in ductility (as measured via depth-sensing indentation experiments). Under cyclic loading, crack-propagation behavior in the amorphous structure was similar to that observed in polycrystalline steel and aluminum alloys. Moreover, the crack-advance mechanism was associated with alternating blunting and resharpening of the crack tip. This was evidenced by striations on fatigue fracture surfaces. Conversely, the (unnotched) stress/life (S/N) properties were markedly different. Crack initiation and subsequent growth occurred quite readily, due to the lack of microstructural barriers that would normally provide local crack-arrest points. This resulted in a low fatigue limit of {approximately}4 pct of ultimate tensile strength.

  7. Nanoscience for Energy Technology and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Nanoscience for Energy Technology and Sustainability Research Profile Prof. Park's Professorship issues of future energy & environmen- tal sustainability. Five strategic foci of Prof. Park's group of Energy Technology focuses on fundamental nanoscience for energy and clean technology applications

  8. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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    Research Areas: The Center for Energy Nanoscience performs research to create low cost, high efficiency solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs) by using semiconductor...

  9. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaics The Center for Energy Nanoscience (CEN) synthesizes a variety of semiconductor nanostructure materials to exploit their unique geometrical, electrical, and optical...

  10. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2015 Holiday Inn your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

  11. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2014 Royal your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

  12. Four-point-bending-fatigue behavior of the Zr-based Vitreloy 105 bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Buchanan, R. A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Green, B. A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, G Y [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Horton Jr, Joe A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make a direct comparison between four-point-bending and uniaxial fatigue tests with the Zr{sub 52.5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10.0}Ti{sub 5.0} (at.%) BMG alloy (Vitreloy 105). The fatigue lifetimes in four-point bending were found to be greater than those reported in uniaxial testing. However, the fatigue-endurance limit found in four-point bending was slightly less than that reported for uniaxial fatigue. Thus, the significant differences between fatigue studies in the literature are not likely due to this difference in testing geometry. On the contrary, the fatigue lifetimes were found to be highly dependent upon surface defects and material quality. The four-point-bending-fatigue performance of the Vit 105 alloy was found to be greater than most BMGs and similar to the 300 M high-strength steel and other crystalline alloys in spite of not being 'perfectly amorphous.' Due to the detrimental effects of these inhomogeneities and wear at the supporting pins, this fatigue behavior can be assumed to be a conservative estimate of the potential fatigue performance of a perfectly amorphous and homogeneous BMG.

  13. Solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of magnitude, making these ``designed'' composites as resistant to fatigue dam- age as high-strength steels embrittled on annealing due to structural relaxation and associated loss of free volume, elastic stiffening

  14. Nanoscience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. The Mechanical Test Laboratory provides the highest standards in static and fatigue testing for composites and metals to generate material strength allowables and evaluate material properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Mechanical Test Laboratory provides the highest standards in static and fatigue testing for composites and metals to generate material strength allowables and evaluate material properties. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow

  16. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2004-02-01

    The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a cooperative venture of the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to encourage and enhance high-impact and high-quality nanoscience and nanotechnology of all types. This first annual report for the JIN summarizes activities beginning in 2001 and ending at the close of fiscal year 2003 and therefore represents somewhat less than two years of activities. Major portions of the JIN resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff scientists and University of Washington (UW) professors. These fellowships were awarded on the basis of applications that included research proposals. JIN co-sponsors an annual Nanoscale Science and Technology Workshop held in Seattle. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of Alaska. The initial JIN agreement recognized that expansion of cooperation beyond UW and PNNL would be highly valuable. Starting in early 2003, efforts were initiated to form a regional communication link called the Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network (N?). In concept, N? is a tool to encourage communication and help identify regional resources and nanoscience and technology activities.

  17. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2005-02-01

    Due to the inherently interdisciplinary nature of nanoscience and nanotechnology, research in this arena is often significantly enhanced through creative cooperative activities. The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a venture of the University of Washington (UW) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to encourage and enhance high impact and high quality nanoscience and nanotechnology research that leverages the strengths and capabilities of both institutions, and to facilitate education in these areas. This report summarizes JIN award activities that took place during fiscal year 2004 and provides a historical list of JIN awardees, their resulting publications, and JIN-related meetings. Major portions of the JIN efforts and resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by PNNL staff scientists and UW professors. JIN fellowships are awarded on the basis of applications that include research proposals. They have been very successful in expanding collaborations between PNNL and UW, which have led to many excellent joint publications and presentations and enhanced the competitiveness of both institutions for external grant funding. JIN-based interactions are playing a significant role in creating new research directions and reshaping existing research programs at both the UW and PNNL. The JIN also co-sponsors workshops on Nanoscale Science and Technology, four of which have been held in Seattle and one in Richland. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant, Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology, has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of Alaska. The JIN agreement recognizes that cooperation beyond UW and PNNL is highly valuable. Starting in early 2003, efforts were initiated to form a regional communication link called the Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network (N4). In concept, N4 is a tool to encourage communication and help identify regional resources and nanoscience and technology activities.

  18. Advanced Materials / Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    range from superconductors to insulators, from emitters to sensors and from static to THz or even opticO metallic, TiO2 insulator · SrTiO3: insulator, SrTiO3:Nb (0.5 %wt) metallic and superconducting below 900 mCu3O7-d : superconductor high Tc : 93K #12;Composition · Small compositional variations can

  19. Level MSc 2013/14 Nanoscience to Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Level MSc 2013/14 Nanoscience to Nanotechnology MSc Nanoscience to Nanotechnology Coordinator: Dr Nanoscale Structures and Devices 10 Credits Mr. TGG Maffeis/Dr. L Li/Dr. KS Teng EGNM02 Soft Nanotechnology Nano(geno)toxicology 10 Credits Dr. SH Doak EGNM05 Bio-nanotechnology 10 Credits Dr. CJ Wright PM-M23

  20. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Nanosciences

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  1. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Model for Metallic Alloys R. C. Dimitriu and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    ] expressed the crack growth rate in terms of the elastic modulus, toughness, and ductility: da dN = 32 1 2 1 2 f E(KIc - Kmax) 1 - K KIc 1 K 2 (3) where and are the fatigue ductility exponent and coefficient respectively, E is the elastic modulus, KIc is the critical stress intensity for fracture

  2. Real-time, high-resolution study of nanocrystallization and fatigue cracking in a cyclically strained metallic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Cheng-Cai

    Metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit greater elastic limit and stronger resistance to plastic deformation than their crystalline metal counterparts. Their capacity to withstand plastic straining is further enhanced at submicrometer ...

  3. UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen Cook, managing editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen journal dedicated to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Aspiring authors went through a peer-review process fashioned after professional journals around the country. They gained valuable educational experience

  4. Bunk Fatigue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    The objective of this thesis is to determine fatigue stresses in the stringer to floor beam connections of through plate girder (TPG) and through truss (TT) bridges in order to predict failure. Field observations by the ...

  5. www.ictas.vt.edu Environmental Nanoscience: nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    of the journal Environmental Chemistry published by the CSIRO. Monday, May 4, 2015 2 pm, 310 Kelly Hall #12;www.ictas.vt.edu Environmental Nanoscience: nanomaterials as emerging pollutants and applications of the production and their potential deleterious environmental effects, nanomaterials are an emerging contaminant

  6. The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology A Look Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology ­ A Look Ahead Robert Kavetsky Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street, Arlington, VA., USA Robert_Kavetsky@onr.navy.mil ABSTRACT The Navy to building the "Navy After Next". The Office of Naval Research provided a leadership role in exploring those

  7. Nanoscience and Nanostructures for Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    at lower cost. These approaches and applications are labeled third generation solar photon conversionNanoscience and Nanostructures for Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels Arthur J. Nozik National Renewable to enhance the power conversion efficiency of solar cells for photovoltaic and solar fuels production

  8. Effect on the condition of the metal in A K-300-3.5 turbine owing to multicycle fatigue from participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedeva, A. I.; Zorchenko, N. V.; Prudnikov, A. A.

    2011-09-15

    The effect on the condition of the rotor material owing to multicycle fatigue caused by variable stresses during participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation is evaluated using the K-300-23.5 steam turbine as an example. It is shown that during normalized primary frequency regulation the safety factor is at least 50, while during automatic secondary regulation of frequency and power there is essentially no damage to the metal.

  9. Grain size effects on the fatigue response of nanocrystalline materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanlon, Timothy, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The resistance of metals and alloys to fatigue crack initiation and propagation is known to be influenced significantly by grain size. Based on a wealth of experimental results obtained from microcrystalline metals, where ...

  10. Final technical report for DOE Computational Nanoscience Project: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, P. T.

    2010-02-08

    This document reports the outcomes of the Computational Nanoscience Project, "Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices". It includes a list of participants and publications arising from the research supported.

  11. The Nanoscience Beamline at Diamond, Optical Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reininger, Ruben; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-19

    The main requirement of the Nanoscience Beamline at Diamond is to deliver the highest possible flux at the sample position of a PEEM with a resolving power of about 5000 in the energy range 80-2000 eV. The source of the beamline is a couple of APPLE II helical undulators in tandem that can also be used separately to allow for faster switching of the circular polarization. Based on its versatility, a collimated plane grating monochromator using sagittally focusing elements was chosen to cover the required energy range with three gratings. The operation of this monochromator requires a collimated beam incident on the grating along the dispersion direction. This can be achieved either with a toroid, focusing with its major radius along the non-dispersive direction at the exit slit, or with a sagittal cylinder. The former option uses a sagittal cylinder after the grating to focus the collimated beam at the exit slit. In the latter case, a toroid after the grating is used to focus in both directions at the exit slit. The advantage of the toroid downstream the grating is the higher horizontal demagnification. This configuration fulfills the Nanoscience Beamline's required resolving power but cannot be used to achieve very high resolution due to the astigmatic coma aberration of the toroidal mirror. The focusing at the sample position is performed with a KB pair of plane elliptical mirrors. Assuming achievable values for the errors on all the optical surfaces, the expected spots FWHW in the horizontal and vertical directions are 10 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m, respectively. The calculated photon flux at this spot at 5000 resolving power is >1012 photons/sec between 80 and 1600 eV for linearly polarized light and between 106 and 1200 eV for circularly polarized light. The beamline is expected to be operational in January 2007.

  12. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-23

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A {approx}5 {mu}m ({sigma}) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  13. Theory and modeling in nanoscience: Report of the May 10-11, 2002Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCurdy, C. William; Stechel, Ellen; Cummings, Peter; Hendrickson, Bruce; Keyes, David

    2002-06-28

    On May 10 and 11, 2002, a workshop entitled ''Theory and Modeling in Nanoscience'' was held in San Francisco, California, sponsored by the offices of Basic Energy Science and Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the Department of Energy. The Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee and the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee convened the workshop to identify challenges and opportunities for theory, modeling, and simulation in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and additionally to investigate the growing and promising role of applied mathematics and computer science in meeting those challenges. This report is the result of those contributions and the discussions at the workshop.

  14. "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Makes Rapid Progress" here is no question that great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 2001 "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Makes Rapid Progress" here is no question such structures. The applica- tion of nanoscale materials and devices is denoted by the term nanotechnology. It is widely believed that nanotechnology will have an enormous impact on indus- trial technologies

  15. Mechanism of fatigue in micron-scale films of polycrystalline silicon for microelectromechanical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhlstein, C.L.; Stach, E.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2001-08-02

    Reported nearly a decade ago, cyclic fatigue failure in silicon thin films has remained a mystery. Silicon does not display the room temperature plasticity or extrinsic toughening mechanisms necessary to cause fatigue in either ductile (e.g., metals) or brittle (e.g., ceramics and ordered mintermetallic) materials.

  16. Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliron, Delia; Sanili, Babak; Weber-Bargioni, Alex; Xu, Ting

    2011-06-06

    Science at the Theater, June 6th, 2011: Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Alex Weber-Bargioni: How can we see things at the nanoscale? Alex is pioneering new methods that provide unprecedented insight into nanoscale materials and molecular interactions. The goal is to create rules for building nanoscale materials. Babak Sanii: Nature is an expert at making nanoscale devices such as proteins. Babak is developing ways to see these biological widgets, which could help scientists develop synthetic devices that mimic the best that nature has to offer. Ting Xu: How are we going to make nanoscale devices? A future in which materials and devices are able to assemble themselves may not be that far down the road. Ting is finding ways to induce a wide range of nanoscopic building blocks to assemble into complex structures. Delia Milliron: The dividends of nanoscience could reshape the way we live, from smart windows and solar cells to artificial photosynthesis and improved medical diagnosis. Delia is at the forefront of converting fundamental research into nanotechnology. Moderated by Jim DeYoreo, interim director of the Molecular Foundry, a facility located at Berkeley Lab where scientists from around the world address the myriad challenges in nanoscience.

  17. Fatigue cracking in materials with brittle surface coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suresh, S.; Sugimura, Y.; Ogawa, T. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-07-15

    Ceramic coatings enhance the resistance of metal alloys to wear, oxidation, thermal exposure, corrosion, erosion and delamination in a variety of structural, optical, electrical , electronic and bioengineering applications. Recent experimental work on steel-steel bimaterials has shown that the conditions for the growth or arrest of a fatigue crack, which approaches the interface between the two steels perpendicularly, are determined by whether the crack propagates to the interface from the weaker or the stronger material. Specifically, it is found that as the fatigue crack advances toward the interface from the weaker steel, the interaction of the crack-tip plastic zone with the interface results in the arrest of the crack. However, when the fatigue crack is propagated from the stronger to the weaker steel, crack growth occurs unimpeded through the interface. In this paper, the authors present additional experimental and mechanistic descriptions of fatigue crack growth normal to interfaces. They then apply the mechanisms underlying these experiments to the design of fatigue-resistant surface coatings for alloys. In particular, they demonstrate experimentally that a fatigue crack emanating from the brittle outercoating and advancing into the substrate can be arrested and/or deflected by proper choices of ductile interlayers. Experimental results of fatigue crack profiles and high-cycle fatigue lives are presented for two different coated materials: a steel coated with a Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] layer and a steel coated with a Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] outerlayer and a soft Ni-Al interlayer. The paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of proposed concepts to nitrided titanium alloys.

  18. Experimental study of crack initiation and propagation in high- and gigacycle fatigue in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannikov, Mikhail E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Naimark, Oleg E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    Fatigue (high- and gigacycle) crack initiation and its propagation in titanium alloys with coarse and fine grain structure are studied by fractography analysis of fracture surface. Fractured specimens were analyzed by interferometer microscope and SEM to improve methods of monitoring of damage accumulation during fatigue test and to verify the models for fatigue crack kinetics. Fatigue strength was estimated for high cycle fatigue regime using the Luong method [1] by “in-situ” infrared scanning of the sample surface for the step-wise loading history for different grain size metals. Fine grain alloys demonstrated higher fatigue resistance for both high cycle fatigue and gigacycle fatigue regimes. Fracture surface analysis for plane and cylindrical samples was carried out using optical and electronic microscopy method. High resolution profilometry (interferometer-profiler New View 5010) data of fracture surface roughness allowed us to estimate scale invariance (the Hurst exponent) and to establish the existence of two characteristic areas of damage localization (different values of the Hurst exponent). Area 1 with diameter ?300 ?m has the pronounced roughness and is associated with damage localization hotspot. Area 2 shows less amplitude roughness, occupies the rest fracture surface and considered as the trace of the fatigue crack path corresponding to the Paris kinetics.

  19. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  20. FATIGUE DESIGN CURVES FOR

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  1. Introduction of Functionality, Selection of Topology, and Enhancement of Gas Adsorption in Multivariate Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    in Multivariate Metal-Organic Framework-177 Yue-Biao Zhang, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Nakeun Ko, Weixuan Nie, Hye Jeong National Laboratory, and Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute, Berkeley, California 94720, United States on the qom topology. This topology violates a long-standing thesis where highly symmetric building units

  2. An Evaluation of Impacts in "Nanoscience & nanotechnology:" Steps towards standards for citation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-01-01

    One is inclined to conceptualize impact in terms of citations per publication, and thus as an average. However, citation distributions are skewed, and the average has the disadvantage that the number of publications is used in the denominator. Using hundred percentiles, one can integrate the normalized citation curve and develop an indicator that can be compared across document sets because percentile ranks are defined at the article level. I apply this indicator to the set of 58 journals in the ISI Subject Category of "Nanoscience & nanotechnology," and rank journals, countries, cities, and institutes using non-parametric statistics. The significance levels of results can thus be indicated. The results are first compared with the ISI-Impact Factors, but this Integrated Impact Indicator (I3) can be used with any set downloaded from the (Social) Science Citation Index. The software is made publicly available at the Internet. Visualization techniques are also specified for evaluation by positioning institut...

  3. Final Report. DOE Computational Nanoscience Project DE-FG02-03ER46096: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, Peter [Vanderbilt University] [Vanderbilt University

    2009-11-15

    The document is the final report of the DOE Computational Nanoscience Project DE-FG02-03ER46096: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices. It included references to 62 publications that were supported by the grant.

  4. Ali Fatemi -University of Toledo All Rights Reserved Chapter 2Fatigue Design Methods 1 FATIGUE DESIGN METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    Methods 8 FATIGUE DESIGN CRITERIA (CONT'D) Infinite-Life Design Unlimited safety is the oldest criterion Methods 2 FATIGUE DESIGN METHODS STRATEGIES IN FATIGUE DESIGN FATIGUE DESIGN CRITERIA ANALYSIS Design Methods 7 FATIGUE DESIGN CRITERIA Criteria for fatigue design have evolved from infinite life

  5. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, Stewart A.; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the %22remaining life%22 of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  6. On the influence of mechanical surface treatments*/deep rolling and laser shock peening*/on the fatigue behavior of Ti/6Al/4V at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    corrosion, and in particular to enhance the fatigue strength of highly-stressed metallic components used aircraft components, deep rolling (DR) offers several attractive advantages due to the generation

  7. BAYESIAN UPDATING OF PROBABILISTIC TIME-DEPENDENT FATIGUE MODEL: APPLICATION TO JACKET FOUNDATIONS OF WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OF WIND TURBINES Benjamin Rocher1,2 , Franck Schoefs1 , Marc François1 , Arnaud Salou2 1 LUNAM Université.rocher@univ-nantes.fr ABSTRACT Due to both wave and wind fluctuation, the metal foundations of offshore wind turbines are highly algorithm. KEYWORDS: Fatigue, Damage, Reliability, Bayesian updating. INTRODUCTION In offshore wind turbines

  8. SANDIA CONTRACTORS REPORT FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA CONTRACTORS REPORT FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND SUBSTRUCTURES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES Abstract ThisreportpresentsthemajorfindingsoftheMontanaStateUniversityCompositeMaterialsFatigue Program Fatigue Database. Additions of greatest interest to the database in this time period include environmental

  9. Auto/Steel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization AutoSteel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  10. A Fatigue Approach to Wind Turbine Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Fatigue Approach to Wind Turbine Control Keld Hammerum Kongens Lyngby 2006 #12;Technical to the turbulent nature of wind, the structural components of a wind turbine are exposed to highly varying loads. Therefore, fatigue damage is a major consideration when designing wind turbines. The control scheme applied

  11. On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1999-06-01

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

  12. Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Panchagade, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-02-01

    This presentation outlines the modeling of thermal fatigue in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) assemblies.

  13. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lange, C.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  14. A study of fatigue in drill collars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Joe Robert

    1969-01-01

    equipped with -S/N- Fatigue Life Gages, and finally made up to 7, 000 ft-lb of torque. The test connec- tion, now in essence one piece, was filled with water for purposes of crack detection, and installed in the test machine. The test connectors had...A STUDY OF FATIGUE IN DRILL COLLARS A Thesis by Joe Robert Feeler Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department Member /n/X~l~~ Member Member January 1969 ABSTRACT A Study of Fatigue in Drill Collars...

  15. Damage and fatigue Continuum damage mechanics modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -CLÉS : endommagement, fatigue, métaux, béton, élastomères, roche REGC ­ 10/2006. Geomechanics in energy production, pages 849 to 877 #12;850 REGC ­ 10/2006. Geomechanics in energy production 1. Introduction Continuum

  16. "Lyme": Chronic Fatigue Syndrome By Another Name?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbour, AG

    2015-01-01

    chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients in their symptoms,with patients with the diagnosis of CFS. Patrick et al.on historical reference to CFS. Where I think the Patrick et

  17. Contact fatigue : life prediction and palliatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, Brett P. (Brett Page), 1975-

    2002-01-01

    Fretting fatigue is defined as damage resulting from small magnitude (0.5-50 microns) displacement between contacting bodies where at least one of the bodies has an applied bulk stress. The applicability and limits of a ...

  18. PREDICTORS OF POST-STROKE FATIGUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Benjamin Yichen

    2009-01-29

    PURPOSE: Fatigue is a commonly neglected issue despite the high incidence rate reported in people with chronic stroke. It can impact daily functions and quality of life and has been linked with a higher mortality rate after ...

  19. Actuation Fatigue of Shape Memory Alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Christopher

    2012-07-16

    A testing method was developed to cycle quickly and repeatably Ni60Ti40 (wt. %) SMA specimens through temperature-induced transformation while under constant stress until failure. Previous works have shown fatigue cracks ...

  20. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation aims to study the benefit of rail grinding on service life of railroad rails, focusing on failures due to rolling contact fatigue (RCF) at the rail head. Assuming a tangent rail with one-point contact at ...

  1. CREEP AND CREEP-FATIGUE OF ALLOY 617 WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Jill; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2014-08-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) may be joined to piping or other components by welding. Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a predominant failure mechanism of the IHX1 and thus weldments used in its fabrication will experience varying cyclic stresses interrupted by periods of elevated temperature deformation. These periods of elevated temperature deformation are greatly influenced by a materials’ creep behavior. The nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, is the primary material candidate for a VHTR-type IHX, and it is expected that Alloy 617 filler metal will be used for welds. Alloy 617 is not yet been integrated into Section III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, however, nuclear component design with Alloy 617 requires ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code qualification. The Code will dictate design for welded construction through significant performance reductions. Despite the similar compositions of the weldment and base material, significantly different microstructures and mechanical properties are inevitable. Experience of nickel alloy welds in structural applications suggests that most high temperature failures occur at the weldments or in the heat-affected zone. Reliably guarding against this type of failure is particularly challenging at high temperatures due to the variations in the inelastic response of the constituent parts of the weldment (i.e., weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal) [ref]. This work focuses on the creep-fatigue behavior of nickel-based weldments, a need noted during the development of the draft Alloy 617 ASME Code Case. An understanding of Alloy 617 weldments when subjected to this important deformation mode will enable determination of the appropriate design parameters associated with their use. Specifically, the three main areas emphasized are the performance reduction due to a weld discontinuity in terms of the reduced number of the cycles to failure and whether a saturation in reduced cycle life with increased hold times is observed, the microstructural stability over long cycle times, and finally, the location of the generated weldment data on a creep-fatigue damage diagram (D-diagram).

  2. Microstructure-based approach for predicting crack initiation and early growth in metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, James V.; Emery, John M.; Brewer, Luke N.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Puskar, Joseph David; Bartel, Timothy James; Dingreville, Remi P. M.; Foulk, James W., III; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2009-09-01

    Fatigue cracking in metals has been and is an area of great importance to the science and technology of structural materials for quite some time. The earliest stages of fatigue crack nucleation and growth are dominated by the microstructure and yet few models are able to predict the fatigue behavior during these stages because of a lack of microstructural physics in the models. This program has developed several new simulation tools to increase the microstructural physics available for fatigue prediction. In addition, this program has extended and developed microscale experimental methods to allow the validation of new microstructural models for deformation in metals. We have applied these developments to fatigue experiments in metals where the microstructure has been intentionally varied.

  3. NSF Workshop on Emerging Opportunities of Nanoscience to Energy Conversion and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    for Fuel Cells and Batteries by Katsuyo Thornton, John Harb, and Liwei Lin Section 6: Section 5 for the attachment of a wide variety of distinct materials (including metallic particles, proteins, and other-voltaics and thermocouplers), and (ii) storage and release of energy (e.g., fuel cell and battery technology). Rather than

  4. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhili; Yu, Xinghua; Erdman, III, Donald L.; Wang, Yanli; Kelly, Steve; Hou, Wenkao; Yan, Benda; Wang, Zhifeng; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  5. Fatigue behavior of alpha-zirconium phosphate/epoxy nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, Balaji R.

    2006-04-12

    Fatigue crack growth in ±-Zirconium phosphate/epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. A new fatigue testing technique was implemented for miniature samples. Two different methods ?strength of materials and Rayleigh-Ritz - ...

  6. Characterization of Fatigue Cracking and Healing of Asphalt Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xue

    2012-07-16

    Fatigue cracking is one of the most common distresses of asphalt pavements, whereas healing is a counter process to cracking which alleviates cracking damage and extends fatigue life of asphalt pavements. Most of existing ...

  7. A micromechanical model of oxidation effects in SiC/Ti metal matrix composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittig, Laurrie Ann

    1993-01-01

    Residual stresses develop in metal matrix composites (NMC) during cool down from processing temperatures and subsequent thermal fatigue loading due to a material mismatch between the fiber and the matrix. These residual stresses often initiate...

  8. COMPARISON OF FATIGUE BEHAVIOR FOR CENTRIFUGALLY CAST AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    COMPARISON OF FATIGUE BEHAVIOR FOR CENTRIFUGALLY CAST AND KEEL BLOCK CAST STEEL J.J. Gradman1 , R The objective of this research was to determine if location through the wall thickness of centrifugal castings affects fatigue properties and to compare fatigue and monotonic tensile properties of centrifugal castings

  9. Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric University MCARE 2012 #12;Outline · Overview of MSU Fatigue Program on Wind Blade MaterialsWind Blade Wind Blade Component Materials Acknowledgements: Sandia National Laboratories/DOE (Joshua Paquette

  10. Stress-corrosion fatigue-crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphousmetal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-09-21

    Electrochemical and mechanical experiments were conducted to analyze the environmentally-influenced cracking behavior of a bulk amorphous metal, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5. This study was motivated by a scientific interest in mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in an amorphous metal, and by a practical interest in the use of this amorphous metal in applications that take advantage of its unique properties, including high specific strength, large elastic strains and low damping. The objective of the work was to determine the rate and mechanisms of subcritical crack growth in this metallic glass in an aggressive environment. Specifically, fatigue-crack propagation behavior was investigated at a range of stress intensities in air and aqueous salt solutions by examining the effects of loading cycle, stress-intensity range, solution concentration, anion identity, solution de-aeration, and bulk electrochemical potential. Results indicate that crack growth in aqueous solution in this alloy is driven by a stress-assisted anodic reaction at the crack tip. Rate-determining steps for such behavior are reasoned to be electrochemical, stress-dependent reaction at near-threshold levels, and mass transport at higher (steady-state) growth rates.

  11. Cyclic fatigue mechanisms in partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.J.; Wakayama, Shuichi; Kawahara, Masanori; Mai, Y.W.; Kishi, Teruo

    1995-12-31

    Cyclic fatigue crack growth rate and crack resistance curve testing were undertaken on 6 different grades of Mg-PSZ. The width of the transformation zone at the flanks of the cracks was determined using Raman spectroscopy and, combined with R-curve toughening values, used to ascertain the level of crack-tip shielding during cyclic fatigue crack growth and hence the crack-tip stress intensity factor amplitude. By normalizing the crack-tip stress intensity factor amplitude with the intrinsic toughness of the material, it was found that the cyclic fatigue threshold stress intensity factor was independent of the extent of crack-tip shielding and a function of the stress intensity factor at the crack tip. In situ SEM observations of cyclic fatigue revealed crack bridging by uncracked ligaments and the precipitate phase. Under cyclic loading the precipitate bridges were postulated to undergo frictional degradation at the precipitate/matrix interface with the degree of degradation determined by the cyclic amplitude. Acoustic emission testing revealed acoustic emissions at three distinct levels during the loading cycle: firstly, near the maximum applied stress intensity factor caused by crack propagation; secondly, at the mid-range of the applied stress intensity factor attributed to crack closure near the crack tip, presumably as a result of transformation induced dilation; and thirdly, intermittently near the base of the loading cycle as a result of fracture surface contact due to surface roughness at a significant distance behind the crack tip. Crack closure near the crack tip due to dilation is proposed to significantly reduce the crack tip stress intensity factor amplitude and hence the degree of cyclic fatigue.

  12. Effect of CTE on Fatigue Cracking of Stainless Steel Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, E. L.; Mustaleski, T. M.

    2002-01-31

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds. Most cracks were parallel to the weld in the bottom portion of the vessel. Sections were cut out of the vessel containing these cracks and examined using the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the heat affected zone and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depth of those sections examined ranged from about 300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 0.32-cm (0.125-inch). The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the CTE differences between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue whereby crack propagation might have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which is indicative of a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  13. Fracture mechanics analysis of NGV fuel cylinders. Part 2. Metal cylinder liners. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.P.; Hudak, S.J.

    1994-03-01

    Metal-lined composite wrapped cylinders for compressed natural gas (CNG) storage onboard natural gas vehicles (NGV`s) offer the advantage of reduced weight over conventional all-metal cylinders. These cylinders, however, can fail as a result of fatigue crack growth in the metal liners, or by degradation and failure of the composite wrap. This report summarizes a fracture mechanics based assessment of fatigue crack growth of the metal liners. The analysis was performed on a full-wrapped aluminum lined cylinder and a hoop-wrapped steel cylinder.

  14. Growth of metal and semiconductor nanostructures using localized photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelnutt, John A; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J

    2006-03-08

    Our overall goal has been to understand and develop a light-driven approach to the controlled growth of novel metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this photochemical process, bio-inspired porphyrin-based photocatalysts reduce metal salts in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures when exposed to visible light, providing metal nucleation and growth centers. The photocatalyst molecules are pre-positioned at the nanoscale to control the location of the deposition of metal and therefore the morphology of the nanostructures that are grown. Self-assembly, chemical confinement, and molecular templating are some of the methods we are using for nanoscale positioning of the photocatalyst molecules. When exposed to light, each photocatalyst molecule repeatedly reduces metal ions from solution, leading to deposition near the photocatalyst and ultimately the synthesis of new metallic nanostructures and nanostructured materials. Studies of the photocatalytic growth process and the resulting nanostructures address a number of fundamental biological, chemical, and environmental issues and draw on the combined nanoscience characterization and multi-scale simulation capabilities of the new DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Georgia. Our main goals are to elucidate the processes involved in the photocatalytic growth of metal nanomaterials and provide the scientific basis for controlled nanosynthesis. The nanomaterials resulting from these studies have applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, sensors, catalysis, and micromechanical systems. Our specific goals for the past three years have been to understand the role of photocatalysis in the synthesis of dendritic metal (Pt, Pd, Au) nanostructures grown from aqueous surfactant solutions under ambient conditions and the synthesis of photocatalytic porphyrin nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes) as templates for fabrication of photo-active metal-composite nanodevices. The proposed nanoscience concentrates on two thematic research areas: (1) the creation of metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials for realizing novel catalytic phenomena and quantum control, (2) understanding photocatalytic metal deposition processes at the nanoscale especially on photocatalytic porphyrin nanostructures such as nanotubes, and (3) the development and use of multi-scale, multi-phenomena theory and simulation for ionic self-assembly and catalytic processes.

  15. ,"SNL/MSU/DOE COMPOSITE MATERIAL FATIGUE DATABASE"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and details." ,"2.Loading may be static (constant specified displacement rate in mms); fatigue (constant load amplitude" ," to failure, max and min stress (MPa), R-value...

  16. Intergranular Strain Evolution near Fatigue Crack Tips in Polycrystall...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interactions of the inhomogeneous deformation fields in neighboring grains) by neutron diffraction techniques has been performed for the fatigue test of a Ni-based...

  17. Wind Technology Testing Center Acquires New Blade Fatigue Test...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    multimegawatt wind turbine blade flap fatigue test. Addthis Related Articles DOE's New Large Blade Test Facility in Massachusetts Completes First Commercial Blade Tests...

  18. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in...

  19. Fatigue in martensitic 100Cr6: Relationship between rolling contact fatigue microstructural transitions and repetitive push testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee-Hyun; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E. J.

    2014-07-14

    in determining the strain responsible for plastic de- formation in rolling contact fatigue, as well as for appraising the quality of bearing materials employed for bearing elements. Keywords: fatigue, martensite, steel, hardening, strain measurements, hardness... martensitic steels, the yield limit and strain hardening slope are within such ranges [7]. In this context, there is a need to obtain deformation data from stress controlled tests. In this study, a laboratory fatigue testing method is in- troduced to measure...

  20. Reduced complexity of activity patterns in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: a case control study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, C.; Knoop, H.; Popovic, N.; Sharpe, M.; Bleijenberg, G.

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an illness characterised by pervasive physical and mental fatigue without specific identified pathological changes. Many patients with CFS show reduced physical ...

  1. Fatigue of ceramics at elevated temperatures: Microstructural design for optimal performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, R.O.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.F.

    2000-01-01

    D IVISION FATIGUE OF CERAMICS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES:76SF00098. FATIGUE OF CERAMICS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES:silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics offer many advantages,

  2. Collect Available Creep-Fatigue Data and Study Existing Creep-Fatigue Evaluation Procedures for Grade 91 and Hastelloy XR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama; Yukio Tachibana

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of investigation on Task 5 of DOE/ASME Materials Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 5 is to collect available creep-fatigue data and study existing creep-fatigue evaluation procedures for Grade 91 steel and Hastelloy XR. Part I of this report is devoted to Grade 91 steel. Existing creep-fatigue data were collected (Appendix A) and analyzed from the viewpoints of establishing a creep-fatigue procedure for VHTR design. A fair amount of creep-fatigue data has been obtained and creep-fatigue phenomena have been clarified to develop design standards mainly for fast breeder reactors. Following this, existing creep-fatigue procedures were studied and it was clarified that the creep-fatigue evaluation procedure of the ASME-NH has a lot of conservatisms and they were analyzed in detail from the viewpoints of the evaluation of creep damage of material. Based on the above studies, suggestions to improve the ASME-NH procedure along with necessary research and development items were presented. Part II of this report is devoted to Hastelloy XR. Existing creep-fatigue data used for development of the high temperature structural design guideline for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) were collected. Creep-fatigue evaluation procedure in the design guideline and its application to design of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was described. Finally, some necessary research and development items in relation to creep-fatigue evaluation for Gen IV and VHTR reactors were presented.

  3. PARAMETRIC MODELS FOR ESTIMATING WIND TURBINE FATIGUE LOADS FOR DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    1 PARAMETRIC MODELS FOR ESTIMATING WIND TURBINE FATIGUE LOADS FOR DESIGN Lance Manuel1 Paul S-4020 ABSTRACT International standards for wind turbine certification depend on finding long-term fatigue load loads. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Design constraints for wind turbine structures fall into either extreme load

  4. Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 3 RiS0-Rr512 Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors during Steady Operation Peter OF WIND TURBINE ROTORS DURING STEADY OPERATION Peter Hauge Madsen, Sten Frandsen, William E. Holley-carrying capacity of a wind turbine rotor with respect to short-term strength and material fatigue are presented

  5. ICAF Symposium Montral, 13 June 2011 FATIGUE LIFE ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    assessment of useful life for composite aircraft fatigue-critical, flight-critical components and structure process used to produce carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composite aircraft fatigue-critical, flight advances in the technologies which could enable accurate assessment of useful life for composite aircraft

  6. NANOSCIENCE November 19, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Heiner

    demonstrated the highest power conversion efficiencies for both single- and multi-junction cells. However-V solar cells with high efficiencies. Finally, I will discuss the use of this technique towards direct

  7. April 10, 2014- “Workplace Disruptions, Reorganizations, and ‘Change Fatigue’: Can ADR Support Resilience?”

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 10, 2014 - “Workplace Disruptions, Reorganizations, and ‘Change Fatigue’: Can ADR Support Resilience?”

  8. Thermomechanics of damage and fatigue by a phase field model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovambattista Amendola; Mauro Fabrizio

    2014-10-26

    In the paper we present an isothermal model for describing damage and fatigue by the use of the Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equation. Fatigue produces progressive damage, which is related with a variation of the internal structure of the material. The G-L equation studies the evolution of the order parameter, which describes the constitutive arrangement of the system and, in this framework, the evolution of damage. The thermodynamic coherence of the model is proved. In the last part of the work, we extend the results of the paper to a non-isothermal system, where fatigue contains thermal effects, which increase the damage of materials.

  9. Mental fatigue evaluation by steroid level measurement in Parotid fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Harpal

    1968-01-01

    in fatigue, particularly mental fatigue, has arisen because of the concept of system design. Before the system concept of design and development, a piece of machinery was designed and the operator fitted the needs of the machine. But in the system concept... Play 1968 Major Subject. : Inc'ustrial Engineering MENTAL FATIGUE EVALUATION BY STEROID LEVEL MEASURLMENT. IN PAROTID FLUID A Thesis by HARPAL SINGH ApproveH as to tyle and. content by: P'hpirman of Committee) (Memb sr ) 1 1 PREFACE Alta...

  10. 2004-01-0628 Fatigue Life Comparisons of Competing Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    knuckles. In light of the high volume of forged steel vehicle components, the forging process components. Lee(2) evaluated fatigue strength for truck axle housing, crankshaft, leaf spring, torque

  11. Fatigue Enhancement of a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nanocomposite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Justin W.

    2008-08-19

    The primary objective of the present investigation is to study the fatigue characteristics of a woven carbon fiber reinforced polymer which has been modified with either amine or fluorine functionalized carbon nanotubes ...

  12. The biological versus psychological basis of fatigue in depression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coscio, Stacey Aileen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to attempt to determine if the symptom of fatigue represents a metabolically induced or a perceived component in depressed individuals. Dietary intake patterns were analyzed for 20 depressed ...

  13. Standard test method for creep-fatigue testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of mechanical properties pertaining to creep-fatigue deformation or crack formation in nominally homogeneous materials, or both by the use of test specimens subjected to uniaxial forces under isothermal conditions. It concerns fatigue testing at strain rates or with cycles involving sufficiently long hold times to be responsible for the cyclic deformation response and cycles to crack formation to be affected by creep (and oxidation). It is intended as a test method for fatigue testing performed in support of such activities as materials research and development, mechanical design, process and quality control, product performance, and failure analysis. The cyclic conditions responsible for creep-fatigue deformation and cracking vary with material and with temperature for a given material. 1.2 The use of this test method is limited to specimens and does not cover testing of full-scale components, structures, or consumer products. 1.3 This test method is primarily ...

  14. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  15. Fatigue allowances as determined by pulse rate analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Robert Lewis

    1965-01-01

    FATIGUE ALLOWANCES AS DETERMINED BY PULSE RATE ANALYSIS A Thesis By Robert Lewis Street Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas. A&M University in Partial fdlfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January... 1965 Major. Subject: Industrial Engineering FATIGUE ALLONANCES AS DETERMINED BY PULSE RATE ANALYSIS A Thesis By Robert Lewis Street Approved as to style and content by (C a rman of Committee) (Head of Departme and Member) (Member) January 1965...

  16. JAEA Fatigue Analysis of EBR-II Duplex Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. H. Jackson; D. L. Porter; W. R. Lloyd

    2009-07-01

    This work addresses questions brought up concerning the mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth retardation and/or arrest within the nickel bond layer in duplex 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel superheater tubes. Previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) indicated that the nickel bond layer did not function as a crack arrestor during fatigue crack propagation with the exception of one, isolated case involving an exceptionally low fatigue load and a high temperature (400 0C) environment. Since it is atypical for a fatigue crack to propagate from a relatively soft material (the nickel bond layer) to a harder material (the 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel) there has been speculation that the nickel bond layer was hardened in service. Additionally, there are questions surrounding the nature of the fatigue crack propagation within the nickel bond layer; specifically with regard to the presence of voids seen on micrographs of the bond layer and oxidation within the steel along the edge of the nickel bond layer. There is uncertainty as to the effect of these voids and/or oxide barriers with respect to potential fatigue crack arrest.

  17. Comparison of fatigue analysis approaches for predicting fatigue lives of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walubita, Lubinda F.

    2006-08-16

    -1 COMPARISON OF FATIGUE ANALYSIS APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING FATIGUE LIVES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALT CONCRETE (HMAC) MIXTURES A Dissertation by LUBINDA F. WALUBITA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Dissertation by LUBINDA F. WALUBITA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Amy Epps Martin...

  18. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2014-01-20

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The nickel based Alloy 282 is selected for this project because it is one of the leading candidate materials for the high temperature/pressure section of an A-USC steam turbine. The methods developed in the project are expected to be applicable to other metal alloys in similar steam/oxidation environments. The major developments are: ? failure mechanism and microstructural characterization ? atomistic and first principles modeling of crack tip oxygen embrittlement ? modeling of gamma prime microstructures and mesoscale microstructure-defect interactions ? microstructure and damage-based creep prediction ? multi-scale crack growth modeling considering oxidation, viscoplasticity and fatigue The technology developed in this project is expected to enable more accurate prediction of long service life of advanced alloys for A-USC power plants, and provide faster and more effective materials design, development, and implementation than current state-of-the-art computational and experimental methods. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from January 2011 to January 2014.

  19. H. J. Sutherland, "Damage Estimates for European and U.S. Sites Using the U.S. High-Cycle Fatigue Data Base," Proceedings of the IEA Fourth Symposium of Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatigue Data Base," Proceedings of the IEA Fourth Symposium of Wind Turbine Fatigue, IEA, Implementing

  20. Multiaxial plasticity and fatigue life prediction in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Coiled tubing is being used increasingly in the oil well drilling and servicing industry. Continuous steel tubing of structural dimensions (up to 89 mm or 3.5 in. in diameter) is wound onto a large-diameter reel for repeated deployment into and out of a well bore. The bending strain range associated with each wrap-unwrap cycle can exceed 3% with lives well below 100 cycles. During constant internal pressure fatigue testing, tubing has been observed to grow in diameter by as much as 30%. This paper describes an analytical model to predict the fatigue behavior of coiled tubing subjected to variable pressure service conditions. The approach utilizes standard low-cycle fatigue data but requires additional experimental results from constant pressure fatigue testing. The algorithm is based on estimates of biaxial ratcheting from an incremental plasticity model using a hybrid associated flow rule, a modified kinematic hardening rule with multiple von Mises yield surfaces, and a specialized limit surface concept. An empirical damage parameter was formulated based on constant pressure fatigue data using mean and fluctuating von Mises equivalent strain components occurring throughout the life of a section of tubing. This parameters is used with the Palmgren-Miner definition of cumulative damage to track damage that is accumulating nonlinearly under constant or variable pressure histories. Modifications to standard incremental plasticity components and implementation assumptions used to apply the model are presented and discussed. The predictive capability of the model is demonstrated relative to data generated under constant and variable pressure histories.

  1. The cognitive performance of patients with multiple sclerosis during periods of high and low fatigue.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parmenter, Brett A.; Denney, Douglas R.; Lynch, Sharon G.

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether multiple sclerosis (MS)-related fatigue affects patients' cognitive performance. Thirty patients who had substantial fatigue in conjunction with MS and who reported marked diurnal variability...

  2. Use of CFRP Overlays to Repair Fatigue Damage in Steel Bridge Girders and Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangel, Regan Elisabeth

    2012-05-31

    Fatigue damage in steel girder bridges built prior to the mid-1980s is common due to distortion-induced fatigue. Different repair techniques have been developed and implemented to retrofit bridges of this era with existing ...

  3. Study of the Fatigue Life of Steel Catenary Risers in Interaction with the Seabed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakhaee, Ali

    2011-02-22

    The fatigue life of a Steel Catenary Riser (SCR) near its touch-down zone is substantially affected by its interaction with the seabed. Hence, accurate estimate of its fatigue life requires the understanding and realistic ...

  4. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  5. STATIC AND FATIGUE PERFORMANCE OF 40 YEAR OLD PRESTRESSED CONCRETE GIRDERS STRENGTHENED WITH VARIOUS CFRP SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATIC AND FATIGUE PERFORMANCE OF 40 YEAR OLD PRESTRESSED CONCRETE GIRDERS STRENGTHENED program aimed at investigating the static and fatigue behavior of 40 year old prestressed concrete bridge girders were tested as control girders (one in static and one in fatigue), while the remaining ten girders

  6. FATIGUE OF 8630 CAST STEEL IN THE PRESENCE OF SHRINKAGE POROSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    FATIGUE OF 8630 CAST STEEL IN THE PRESENCE OF SHRINKAGE POROSITY K.M. Sigl1 , R.A. Hardin2 , R of shrinkage porosity on the mechanical performance of the cast steel. Axial fatigue tests were conducted under.I., and Beckermann, C., "Fatigue of 8630 Cast Steel in the Presence of Shrinkage Porosity," in Proceedings of the 57

  7. Viewpoint Paper Further considerations on the high-cycle fatigue of micron-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    (polysilicon) MEMS comb-drive actuated fatigue resonators (Fig. 1), which are cycled at a constant disViewpoint Paper Further considerations on the high-cycle fatigue of micron-scale polycrystalline is not susceptible to high-cycle fatigue but micron-scale silicon films are. Using polysilicon resonators to deter

  8. Fatigue threshold R-curves for predicting reliability of ceramics under cyclic loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue threshold R-curves for predicting reliability of ceramics under cyclic loading J.J. Kruzic, grain-bridging ceramics, the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold during bridging zone-thickness, fatigue cracks via an accurately measured crack bridging stress profile. Both an alumina ceramic

  9. Final Report on In-Reactor Creep-Fatigue Deformation Behaviour of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , in-reactor creep- fatigue tests have been performed at strain amplitudes of 0.25 and 0 temperatures of 326K and 323K. For comparison purposes corresponding out-of-reactor creep-fatigue tests were.2 Test module and irradiation rig 6 2.3 In-reactor creep-fatigue tests 7 2.4 Out-of-reactor creep

  10. Sex Differences in Long Bone Fatigue Using a Rat Model Luisa D. Moreno,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldman, Stephen D.

    response to fatigue, we also determined the creep that occurred during the fatigue test. From the creep progress (Fig. 1). Caler and Carter32 studied cortical bone creep behavior during fatigue testing. When adaptation. From these results, we hypothesized that creep was the underlying mechanism that accounted

  11. A Joint-level Model of Fatigue for the Postural Control of Virtual Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    A Joint-level Model of Fatigue for the Postural Control of Virtual Humans Inmaculada Rodríguezb , e. Keywords: human body simulation, posture control, fatigue, computer animation. 1 Introduction Achieving specifically with humans should produce realistic animation in all the sense of the word, including fatigue

  12. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    2006-12-01

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of {approx}4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles ({approx}50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains ({approx}500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer ({approx}20-200 nm) forms at worn regions. No dislocations or extreme temperature increases are found, ruling out plasticity and temperature-assisted mechanisms. The COF reaches a steady-state value of {approx}0.20{+-}0.05 after a short time at an initial value of {approx}0.11{+-}0.01. Plowing tracks are found before the steady-state value of the COF is reached, suggesting only a short adhesive wear regime. This suggests a predominantly abrasive wear mechanism, controlled by fracture, which commences by the first particles created by adhesive wear.

  13. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  14. Fracture toughness and crack-resistance curve behavior in metallic glass-matrix composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture toughness and crack-resistance curve behavior in metallic glass-matrix composites M. E of cracks, such as tensile ductil- ity, toughness, and fatigue resistance, can become severely compromised macroscopic ductility,3,4 such that the toughness is far lower than in comparable crystalline alloys

  15. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.

    1998-01-13

    Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steels to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on the fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm significant decreases in fatigue life in water. Unlike the situation with ferritic steels, environmental effects on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on a statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in air and water environments are discussed.

  16. SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH FOR FIBERGLASS LAMINATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fulfillment of the requirements for a doctoral degree at Montana State University, I agree that the Library shall make it available to borrowers under rules of Library. I further agree that copying of this thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fatigue Trends of Fiberglass Laminates

  17. Selection of Wind Turbine Blade Materials for Fatigue Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selection of Wind Turbine Blade Materials for Fatigue Resistance John Mandell Montana State reversed tension-compression. ­ Data used in blade design can be of uncertainData used in blade design can (Power Law Most Common)q ( ) #12;Statistical Confidence Limit Representation, Power Law and Three-ParameterPower

  18. INFLOW AND THE FATIGUE OF THE LIST WIND TURBINE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INFLOW AND THE FATIGUE OF THE LIST WIND TURBINE* Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology response data to characterize the spectrum of loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8m blades is being used as the primary test turbine for this test. This turbine

  19. Fatigue Enhancement of Undersized, Drilled Crack-Stop Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crain, Joshua Sakumura

    2010-04-20

    A common technique used to prevent the propagation of cracks in bridge girders is drilling crack-stop holes at the crack tips. By doing so, stress concentrations at the tip of the cracks are reduced and fatigue life of the ...

  20. Mechanical fatigue and fracture of Nitinol S. W. Robertson*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Mechanical fatigue and fracture of Nitinol S. W. Robertson*1 , A. R. Pelton1 and R. O. Ritchie2 Nitinol, a near equiatomic intermetallic of nickel and titanium, is the most widely known and used shape transformation, Nitinol displays recoverable strains that are more than an order of magnitude greater than

  1. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    toughness (R- In an attempt to enhance the ductility and fracture toughness of curve) and fatigue, they are plagued by poor ductility and toughness candidate material which could be used at significantly higher of the silicidesis severelylimited by their low ductility and poor fracture relatively ductile Mo phase

  2. Standard test method for creep-fatigue crack growth testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep-fatigue crack growth properties of nominally homogeneous materials by use of pre-cracked compact type, C(T), test specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic forces. It concerns fatigue cycling with sufficiently long loading/unloading rates or hold-times, or both, to cause creep deformation at the crack tip and the creep deformation be responsible for enhanced crack growth per loading cycle. It is intended as a guide for creep-fatigue testing performed in support of such activities as materials research and development, mechanical design, process and quality control, product performance, and failure analysis. Therefore, this method requires testing of at least two specimens that yield overlapping crack growth rate data. The cyclic conditions responsible for creep-fatigue deformation and enhanced crack growth vary with material and with temperature for a given material. The effects of environment such as time-dependent oxidation in enhancing the crack growth ra...

  3. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-07-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fatigue design curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping materials in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel in air and LWR environments to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm the significant decrease in fatigue life in water. The environmentally assisted decrease in fatigue life depends both on strain rate and DO content in water. A decrease in strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004%/s decreases fatigue life by a factor of {approx} 8. However, unlike carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. At {approx} 0.004%/s strain rate, reduction in fatigue life in water containing <10 ppb D is greater by a factor of {approx} 2 than in water containing {ge} 200 ppb DO. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on the statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in austenitic stainless steels in air and LWR environments are discussed.

  4. The application of a logic framework for fatigue crack growth analyses to microstructural effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, J.G.; Liu, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    {Delta}K has been widely used to correlate da/dN data. The relation between da/dN and {Delta}K is usually found empirically. However, fatigue crack growth relations can also be derived theoretically. Three fatigue crack growth theories are derived for the state of small scale yielding and plane strain. These three theories constitute a logic framework useful for fatigue crack growth analyses. The application of the logic framework to the analyses of microstructural effects on fatigue crack growth is illustrated. The fatigue crack growth curve of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy has five distinct regions. A fatigue crack grows by crack-tip shear decohesion forming striations and by brittle fractures of particles followed by localized shear decohesion at these microcracks forming dimples. The logic framework helps to relate the fatigue crack growth behaviors in these five regions to the fractures of inclusions and to the resistance of grain boundaries and dispersoids to shear decohesion.

  5. Thermal Cycling on Fatigue Failure of the Plutonium Vitrification Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Jeffrey; Gorczyca, Jennifer

    2009-02-11

    One method for disposition of excess plutonium is vitrification into cylindrical wasteforms. Due to the hazards of working with plutonium, the vitrification process must be carried out remotely in a shielded environment. Thus, the equipment must be easily maintained. With their simple design, induction melters satisfy this criterion, making them ideal candidates for plutonium vitrification. However, due to repeated heating and cooling cycles and differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of contacting materials fatigue failure of the induction melter is of concern. Due to the cost of the melter, the number of cycles to failure is critical. This paper presents a method for determining the cycles to failure for an induction melter by using the results from thermal and structural analyses as input to a fatigue failure model.

  6. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in ceramics: Behavior in overaged and partially-stabilized MgO-zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauskardt, R.H.; Marshall, D.B.; Ritchie, R.O.; Rockwell International Corp., Thousand Oaks, CA; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1988-06-01

    The growth of fatigue cracks under (tension-tension) cyclic loading is unequivocally demonstrated for ceramic materials, based on experiments using compact-tension specimens of a MgO partially-stabilized zirconia (PSZ), heat treated to vary the fracture toughness K{sub c} from {approximately}3 MPa{radical}m (overaged condition) to 16 MPa{radical}m (peak-toughness condition) and tested in inert and moist environments. Analogous to behavior in metals, cyclic fatigue-crack growth rates (over the range 10{sup {minus}11} to 10{sup {minus}5} m/cycle) are found to be a function of the stress-intensity range, environment, fracture toughness and load ratio, and to show evidence of crack closure. Similarly under variable-amplitude cyclic loading conditions, crack-growth rates show transient accelerations following low-high block overloads and transient retardations following high-low block overloads or single tensile overloads, again analogous to behavior commonly observed in ductile meals. Cyclic crack-growth rates are observed at stress intensities as low as 50% of K{sub c}, and are typically some 7 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding stress-corrosion crack-growth rates under sustained-loading conditions. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  7. A View to the FutureBERKELEY LAB 2005/2006 REPORT A Note from the Director / 2 Energy Technologies and Environmental Solutions / 4 Living Systems and Quantitative Biology / 8 Frontiers in Nanoscience / 12 Exploring Matter and Energy in the Universe / 16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    A View to the FutureBERKELEY LAB 2005/2006 REPORT #12;A Note from the Director / 2 Energy Technologies and Environmental Solutions / 4 Living Systems and Quantitative Biology / 8 Frontiers in Nanoscience / 12 Exploring Matter and Energy in the Universe / 16 X-Ray and Ultrafast Science / 20 Advanced

  8. Final Report on In-Reactor Creep-Fatigue Deformation Behaviour of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5% with holdtimes of 10 and 100s, respectively. For comparison purposes, similar creep-fatigue tests were performed Procedure 5 2.1 Materials 5 2.2 Test module and irradiation rig 5 2.3 In-reactor creep-fatigue tests 6 2Final Report on In-Reactor Creep- Fatigue Deformation Behaviour of a CuCrZr Alloy: COFAT 1 B

  9. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  10. Effects of LWR environments on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    SME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A 106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  11. JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE LETTERS J. Nanosci. Lett. 2012, 2: 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    is extensively used in photoelectrochemical applications including photocatalysis and photovoltaics applications. Keywords: Nanostructured TiO2; Solar cells; Photocatalysis; Hydrogen generation; Sol of TiO2 for applications in photovoltaics, photocatalysis, electrochromics, and sensors due to its

  12. Fatigue Life Prediction in Rapid Die Casting - Preliminary Work in View of Current Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuan Huat Ng [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (FKMP), Kolej Universiti Teknologi Tun Hussein Onn (KUiTTHO), P.O.Box 101, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Grote, Karl-Heinrich [Institut fuer Maschinenkonstruktion, Lehrstuhl Konstruktionstechnik, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Baehr, Ruediger [Institut fuer Fertigungstechnik und Qualitaetssicherung, Ur und Umformtechnik, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-05-17

    Numerical simulation technique as a prediction tool is slowly adopted in metal casting industry for predicting design modelling solidification analysis. The reasons for this activity is found in the need to further enhance the geometrical design and mechanical properties of the tool design and the correct prediction methodology to fulfil industrial needs. The present state of numerical simulation capabilities in rapid die casting technologies is reviewed and the failure mode mechanisms of thermal fatigue, aimed at developing a numerical simulation with a systematic design guidance for predicting the thermal cyclic loading analysis and improvement is presented along with several other methods. The economic benefits of a numerical simulation technique in die casting are limited to tool life time, mechanical properties and design guidance. The extensive computer capabilities of a numerical simulation with a systematic design guidance methodology are exploited to provide a solution for flexible design, mechanical properties and mould life time. Related research carried out worldwide by different organisations and academic institutions are discussed.

  13. Stress-corrosion fatigue-crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    Mater 2000; 42: 233 27. Pourbaix M, Atlas of Electrochemicalreactions. In pure form, the Pourbaix diagram predicts that

  14. Contributions to an Improved Oxygen and Thermal Transport Model and Development of Fatigue Analysis Software for Asphalt Pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xin

    2012-02-14

    Fatigue cracking is one primary distress in asphalt pavements, dominant especially in later years of service. Prediction of mixture fatigue resistance is critical for various applications, e.g., pavement design and ...

  15. A unified method for the analysis of nonlinear viscoelasticity and fatigue cracking of asphalt mixtures using the dynamic mechanical analyzer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelo Branco, Veronica Teixeira Franco

    2009-05-15

    Fatigue cracking is one of the primary modes of distress in asphalt pavements that has an important economic impact. Fatigue resistance characterization of an asphalt mixture is a complex issue due to: (i) composite ...

  16. Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at 850°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a significant contributor to the potential factors that limit the useful life of the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) nuclear system.[1] The IHX of a high temperature gas reactor will be subjected to a limited number of transient cycles due to start-up and shut-down operations imparting high local stresses on the component. This cycling introduces a creep-fatigue type of interaction as dwell times occur intermittently. The leading candidate alloy for the IHX is a nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, which must safely operate near the expected reactor outlet temperature of up to 950 °C.[1] This solid solution strengthened nickel-base alloy provides an interesting creep-fatigue deformation case study because it has characteristics of two different alloy systems for which the cyclic behavior has been extensively investigated. Compositionally, it resembles nickel-base superalloys, such as Waspalloy, IN100, and IN718, with the exception of its lower levels of Al. At temperatures above 800 °C, the microstructure of Alloy 617, however, does not contain the ordered ?’ or ?’’ phases. Thus microstructurally, it is more similar to an austenitic stainless steel, such as 316 or 304, or Alloy 800H comprised of a predominantly solid solution strengthened matrix phase with a dispersion of inter- and intragranular carbides. Previous studies of the creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 at 950 °C indicate that the fatigue life is reduced when a constant strain dwell is added at peak tensile strain.[2-5] This results from the combination of faster crack initiation occurring at surface-connected grain boundaries due to oxidation from the air environment along with faster, and intergranular, crack propagation resulting from the linking of extensive interior grain boundary cracking.[3] Saturation, defined as the point at which further increases in the strain-controlled hold time duration no longer decreases the cycle life, has been observed for Alloy 617 at 950 °C at least to the investigated hold times[2,3], as illustrated through a plot of cycles to failure v. hold time in Figure 1. The 950 °C creep-fatigue data set generated by Totemeier and Tian[5] at the 0.3% and 1.0% strain range is consistent in magnitude in terms of the cycles to failure data of that of Carroll et al., however, 0.3% strain range data did not exhibit saturation at hold times of up to 10 min. At 1.0% total strain, saturation in the number of cycles to failure was observed within the investigated peak tensile hold times of up to 10 min[5]. The data of Carroll et al.[2,3] in Figure 1 and Totemeier and Tian[5] is also consistent in magnitude with the data of Rao and coworkers[4] investigated at the 0.6% strain range. It should be noted that saturation in the number of cycles to failure is not present in the data published by Rao and coworkers[4] for tensile hold times of up to 120 min. The latter testing was in a simulated primary-circuit helium gas as opposed to air and a single data point is reported for the longer hold time conditions.

  17. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  18. Nanoscience Research Internships in Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronshage, Alisa

    2013-08-31

    NanoBusiness Talent Project Summary Report The NanoBusiness Alliance created the NanoBusiness Talent Program to ensure the future vitality of domestic scientists and entrepreneurs by engaging advanced high school students in cutting-edge nanotechnology development. This program commenced on September 1, 2008 and ran through August 31, 2010 with a very successful group of students. Several of these students went on to Stanford, Harvard and Yale, as well as many other prestigious Universities. We were able to procure the cooperation of several companies over the entire run of the program to voluntarily intern students at their companies and show them the possibilities that exist for their future. Companies ranged from NanoInk and Nanosphere to QuesTek and NanoIntegris all located in northern Illinois. During the 9-week internships, students worked at nanotechnology companies studying different ways in which nanotechnology is used for both commercial and consumer use. The students were both excited and invigorated at the prospect of being able to work with professional scientists in fields that previously may have just been a dream or an unreachable goal. All the students worked closely with mentors from each company to learn different aspects of procedures and scientific projects that they then used to present to faculty, parents, mentors and directors of the program at the end of each year’s program. The presentations were extremely well received and professionally created. We were able to see how much the students learned and absorbed through the course of their internships. During the last year of the program, we reached out to both North Carolina and Colorado high school students and received an extraordinary amount of applications. There were also numerous companies that were not only willing but excited at the prospect to engage highly intelligent high school students and to encourage them into the nanotechnology scientific field. Again, this program increase was highly received and the students were thoroughly engaged. Our program ended August 31, 2010 with our last class of students and their final presentations. From the pilot year to the end presentations, we received hundreds of applications from students excited for the opportunity to work in a scientific field. With our goal of inspiring the newest generation of potential scientists and mathematician, we not only found ourselves overwhelmingly impressed but encouraged that the greatest minds of the future will come from this next generation and many more generations.

  19. NANOSCIENCE COLLOQUIUM DOUBLE FEATURE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Heiner

    -space (Q179), Fysicum Modern Architectures for III-V Multi-Junction Solar Cells Frank Dimroth, Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: III-V multi-junction solar cells are currently investigated to further increase the efficiency of todays GaInP/GaInAs/Ge multi- junction solar

  20. Prospects of Nanoscience with Nanocrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Manna, Liberato; Cabot, Andreu; Hens, Zeger; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Kagan, Cherie R.; Klimov, Victor I.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Reiss, Peter; Milliron, Delia J.; et al

    2015-01-22

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs, i.e., crystalline nanoparticles) have become an important class of materials with great potential for applications ranging from medicine to electronic and optoelectronic devices. Today's strong research focus on NCs has been prompted by the tremendous progress in their synthesis. Impressively narrow size distributions of just a few percent, rational shape-engineering, compositional modulation, electronic doping, and tailored surface chemistries are now feasible for a broad range of inorganic compounds. Furthermore, the performance of inorganic NC-based photovoltaic and lightemitting devices has become competitive to other state-of-the-art materials. Semiconductor NCs hold unique promise for near- and mid-infrared technologies, where verymore »few semiconductor materials are available. On a purely fundamental side, new insights into NC growth, chemical transformations, and self-organization can be gained from rapidly progressing in situ characterization and direct imaging techniques. New phenomena are constantly being discovered in the photophysics of NCs and in the electronic properties of NC solids. In our Nano Focus, we review the state of the art in research on colloidal NCs focusing on the most recent works published in the last 2 years.« less

  1. Prospects of nanoscience with nanocrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Manna, Liberato; Cabot, Andreu; Hens, Zeger; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Kagan, Cherie R.; Klimov, Victor I.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Reiss, Peter; Milliron, Delia J.; et al

    2015-01-22

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs, i.e., crystalline nanoparticles) have become an important class of materials with great potential for applications ranging from medicine to electronic and optoelectronic devices. Today’s strong research focus on NCs has been prompted by the tremendous progress in their synthesis. Impressively narrow size distributions of just a few percent, rational shape-engineering, compositional modulation, electronic doping, and tailored surface chemistries are now feasible for a broad range of inorganic compounds. The performance of inorganic NC-based photovoltaic and light-emitting devices has become competitive to other state-of-the-art materials. Semiconductor NCs hold unique promise for near- and mid-infrared technologies, where very fewmore »semiconductor materials are available. On a purely fundamental side, new insights into NC growth, chemical transformations, and self-organization can be gained from rapidly progressing in situ characterization and direct imaging techniques. New phenomena are constantly being discovered in the photophysics of NCs and in the electronic properties of NC solids. In this Nano Focus, we review the state of the art in research on colloidal NCs focusing on the most recent works published in the last 2 years.« less

  2. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  3. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  4. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  5. A MODIFIED ENERGY-BASED LOW CYCLE FATIGUE MODEL FOR EUTECTIC SOLDER ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei

    the component and the board. Fatigue failure of solder joints is recognized as a major cause of failure was carefully ground on fine SiC paper and polished using 1 m diamond paste. Afterwards, the fatigue specimens tests were conducted on a servo-valve-controlled electro-hydraulic testing machine newly designed by MTS

  6. Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines *"f~-9,a, ,.*,. ,^__.c #12;Issued by Sandia National-0089 Unlimited Release Printed June 1999 On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines by Herbert J. Sutherland Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0708 Abstract Modern wind turbines

  7. Mixed Mode Static and Fatigue Crack Growth in Wind Blade Paste Adhesives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Mixed Mode Static and Fatigue Crack Growth in Wind Blade Paste Adhesives Daniel D. Samborsky, static GIc and mixed mode fracture, and fatigue crack growth resistance. I. Introduction Wind turbine, then adhesively bonded together. The large size coupled with cost constraints result in bond lines at least

  8. Mechanics and mechanisms of fatigue damage and crack growth in advanced materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Mechanics and mechanisms of fatigue damage and crack growth in advanced materials R.O. Ritchie*, C 94720-1760, USA Abstract The mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in ceramics and intermetallics growth is considered to be a mutual competition between intrinsic mechanisms of crack advance ahead

  9. Abstract--Despite growing interest in the behavior of electromyographic signals during muscle fatigue, few studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    Abstract--Despite growing interest in the behavior of electromyographic signals during muscle fatigue, few studies investigate fatigue recovery. In this work, we use surface electromyographic signals for each experimental group: 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours. Surface electromyographic signals were acquired

  10. Mitigation of Fatigue Loads Using Individual Pitch Control of Wind Turbines Based on FAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    Mitigation of Fatigue Loads Using Individual Pitch Control of Wind Turbines Based on FAST Yunqian University, China jiz@seu.edu.cn Abstract-With the increase of wind turbine dimension and capacity, the wind turbine structures are subjected to prominent loads and fatigue which would reduce the lifetime of wind

  11. Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN A simulation methodology for predicting the fatigue life of cast steel components with shrinkage porosity is developed and validated through comparison with previously performed measure- ments

  12. A stochastic model of fatigue crack propagation under variable-amplitude loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    -space model of fatigue crack propagation under variable-amplitude loading. The (non-stationary) statistic. Introduction Fatigue crack analysis is an essential tool for life prediction and maintenance of machinery/strain) factor b a constant model parameter larger than 1 (I 10) d increment operator DS eective stress range W 2

  13. Fatigue-crack growth properties of thin-walled superelastic austenitic Nitinol tube for endovascular stents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue-crack growth properties of thin-walled superelastic austenitic Nitinol tube Nitinol has found widespread application in the manufacture of small-scale biomedical devices of defects on such lifetimes. Unfortunately, frac- ture mechanics studies on fatigue in Nitinol are scarce

  14. Fatigue-Crack Growth Behavior in the Superelastic and Shape-Memory Alloy Nitinol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue-Crack Growth Behavior in the Superelastic and Shape-Memory Alloy Nitinol A.L. McKELVEY and R.O. RITCHIE This article presents a study of fatigue-crack propagation behavior in Nitinol, a 50Ni, and constitutive behavior on crack-growth rates in NiTi.* NITINOL is a thermoelastic alloy with a composition

  15. An Energy Based Fatigue Life Prediction Framework for In-Service Structural Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ozaltun; M. H.H. Shen; T. George; C. Cross

    2011-06-01

    An energy based fatigue life prediction framework has been developed for calculation of remaining fatigue life of in service gas turbine materials. The purpose of the life prediction framework is to account aging effect caused by cyclic loadings on fatigue strength of gas turbine engines structural components which are usually designed for very long life. Previous studies indicate the total strain energy dissipated during a monotonic fracture process and a cyclic process is a material property that can be determined by measuring the area underneath the monotonic true stress-strain curve and the sum of the area within each hysteresis loop in the cyclic process, respectively. The energy-based fatigue life prediction framework consists of the following entities: (1) development of a testing procedure to achieve plastic energy dissipation per life cycle and (2) incorporation of an energy-based fatigue life calculation scheme to determine the remaining fatigue life of in-service gas turbine materials. The accuracy of the remaining fatigue life prediction method was verified by comparison between model approximation and experimental results of Aluminum 6061-T6. The comparison shows promising agreement, thus validating the capability of the framework to produce accurate fatigue life prediction.

  16. Fatigue of polycrystalline silicon for MEMS applications: Crack growth and stability under resonant loading conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhlstein, C.L.; Howe, R.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2001-12-05

    Although bulk silicon is not known to exhibit susceptibility to cyclic fatigue, micron-scale structures made from silicon films are known to be vulnerable to degradation by fatigue in ambient air environments, a phenomenon that has been recently modeled in terms of a mechanism of sequential oxidation and stress-corrosion cracking of the native oxide layer.

  17. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F. [Univ. of Michigan, Dearborn, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Fang, H.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Physics Dept.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  18. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François

    2009-01-01

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  19. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François; 10.1080/17452759.2010.504056

    2010-01-01

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  20. Composite metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  1. Composite metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1998-04-14

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  2. Deformation and fatigue behavior of hot dip galvanized coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camurri, Carlos P. [University of Concepcion, Department of Materials Engineering, Edmundo Larenas 270, Casilla 160-C, Correo 3, Concepcion (Chile)]. E-mail: ccamurri@udec.cl; Benavente, Raul G. [University of Concepcion, Department of Materials Engineering, Edmundo Larenas 270, Casilla 160-C, Correo 3, Concepcion (Chile); Roa, Isidoro S. [University of Concepcion, Department of Materials Engineering, Edmundo Larenas 270, Casilla 160-C, Correo 3, Concepcion (Chile); Carrasco, Claudia C. [University of Concepcion, Department of Materials Engineering, Edmundo Larenas 270, Casilla 160-C, Correo 3, Concepcion (Chile)

    2005-09-15

    This paper reports on the results of a study of the effect of static and dynamic stresses on hot dip galvanized coatings on SAE 1020 steel substrates. Galvanizing was performed using baths maintained at 450 deg. C, the zinc containing 0.16% Ti and 0.02% Fe and with Al and Ni in the ranges 0-0.20% and 0-0.30%, respectively. Static three-point bend tests were conducted with applied stresses in the range 428-790 MPa. Dynamic bend-fatigue tests involved stresses in the range 228-578 MPa at a cyclic frequency of 0.25 Hz for up to 700 cycles. The total crack density in the coatings was measured before and after the tests using light optical and electron microscopy. The results showed that the crack density increased as the applied stress increased and crack propagation was promoted perpendicular to the substrate. The number of cycles had no effect on the crack density and propagation at stresses lower than 386 MPa. At higher stresses the number of applied cycles contributed only to crack propagation. It was concluded that the best bath composition for preventing fatigue crack propagation is one that minimized the formation of thinner brittle layers in the galvanized coatings.

  3. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Ti-1100 at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.C.; Nicholas, T.

    1995-12-31

    Effects of temperature, frequency, and cycles with superimposed hold times are evaluated in Ti-1100 in order to study the complex creep-fatigue-environment interactions in this material. Crack growth rate tests conducted at cyclic loading frequency of 1.0 Hz show that raising the temperature from 593 to 650 C has only a slightly detrimental effect on crack growth rate, although these temperatures produce growth rates significantly higher than at room temperature. From constant {Delta}K tests, the effects of temperature at constant frequency show a minimum crack growth rate at 250 C. From the minimum crack growth rate at 250 C, the crack growth rate increases linearly with temperature. Increases in frequency at constant temperatures of 593 and 650 C produce a continuous decrease in growth rate in going from 0.001 to 1.0 Hz, although the behavior is primarily cycle dependent in this region. Tests at 1.0 Hz with superimposed hold times from 1 to 1,000 s are used to evaluate creep-fatigue-environment interactions. Hold times at maximum load are found to initially decrease and then increase the cyclic crack growth rate with increasing duration. This is attributed to crack-tip blunting during short hold times and environmental degradation at long hold times. Hold times at minimum load show no change in growth rates, indicating that there is no net environmental degradation to the bulk material beyond that experienced during the baseline 1 Hz cycling.

  4. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  5. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to changeNovemberEnergyMessage fromMetal

  6. Crack initiation in smooth fatigue specimens of austenitic stainless steel in light water reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    The fatigue design curves for structural materials specified in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves; however, recent test data illustrate the detrimental effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Certain loading and environmental conditions have led to test specimen fatigue lives that are significantly shorter than those obtained in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environments on crack initiation and crack growth of austenitic SSs are presented. Block loading was used to mark the fracture surface to determine crack length as a function of fatigue cycles in water environments, Crack lengths were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for decreased fatigue life in LWR environments is discussed, and crack growth rates in the smooth fatigue specimens are compared with existing data from studies of crack growth rates.

  7. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, R.V.; Parida, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441 having a marginally lower lithium content, compared to 80xx and 20xx series Al-Li alloys is presented in this paper. This investigation was conducted on single edge tension--SE(T)--specimens, under constant amplitude as well as under MiniLCA flight spectrum loading with the specific objective of determining the effects of stress ratio, orientation, thickness and cladding. Three thicknesses were considered: 1.2 mm(clad and unclad), 2.0 mm(clad and unclad) and 8.0 mm unclad. Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at stress ratios of {minus}0.3, 0.1 and 0.7. Testing was performed under ambient conditions and along three orientations, namely L-T, T-L and L+45 degrees. Crack growth characteristics of this alloy are compared with that of BS:L73 (2014-T4 equivalent) for assessing the possibility of replacing BS:L73. Significant effect of stress ratio on crack growth rate was observed in all thicknesses. However, in case of 1.2 and 2.0 mm thick sheets, the effect was minimal at intermediate-crack growth regime. The orientation of the specimen does not adversely affect the fatigue crack growth behavior of 8.0 mm and 2.0 mm thick specimens. However, for 1.2 mm unclad sheet crack growth resistance in L-T direction was found to be superior to that along T-L direction. In majority of test cases considered, no significant effect was observed on crack growth rate due to thickness or cladding. Crack growth characteristics of Al-Li alloy 1441 and Al-Cu alloy BS:L73 under constant amplitude as well as MiniLCA spectrum loading are similar in the low and intermediate-crack growth rate regime. Based on these observations, it is felt that this Al-Li alloy has the potential for future aerospace applications.

  8. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, K.L. He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%–0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: • The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. • TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. • The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. • The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  9. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Adam F. (Los Angeles, CA); Vajo, John J. (West Hills, CA); Cumberland, Robert W. (Malibu, CA); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Salguero, Tina T. (Encino, CA)

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  10. Residual stress relief due to fatigue in tetragonal lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D. A.; Mori, T. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Comyn, T. P. [Institute for Materials Research, Woodhouse Lane, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ringgaard, E. [Meggitt Sensing Systems, Hejreskovvej 18A, 3490 Kvistgaard (Denmark); Wright, J. P. [ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2013-07-14

    High energy synchrotron XRD was employed to determine the lattice strain {epsilon}{l_brace}111{r_brace}and diffraction peak intensity ratio R{l_brace}200{r_brace}in tetragonal PZT ceramics, both in the virgin poled state and after a bipolar fatigue experiment. It was shown that the occurrence of microstructural damage during fatigue was accompanied by a reduction in the gradient of the {epsilon}{l_brace}111{r_brace}-cos{sup 2} {psi} plot, indicating a reduction in the level of residual stress due to poling. In contrast, the fraction of oriented 90 Degree-Sign ferroelectric domains, quantified in terms of R{l_brace}200{r_brace}, was not affected significantly by fatigue. The change in residual stress due to fatigue is interpreted in terms of a change in the average elastic stiffness of the polycrystalline matrix due to the presence of inter-granular microcracks.

  11. Fatigue Enhancement of Category E' Detailsin Steel Bridge Girders Using CFRP Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaan, Benjamin Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite overlay elements were developed to improve the fatigue performance of Category E' steel details. By increasing the stiffness of the detail with the CFRP overlay, the stress demand at the weld...

  12. Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation and glycosaminoglycan loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Robert

    Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation heart valve (BPHV) degeneration, characterized by extracellular matrix deterioration, remod- eling) with glutaraldehyde fixed porcine aortic valve bioprostheses, that the mechanical function of cardiac valve cusps

  13. Rolling contact fatigue in martensitic 100Cr6: Subsurface hardening and crack formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee-Hyun; Vegter, R. H.; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E. J.

    2014-04-13

    Rolling contact fatigue tests on 100Cr6 steel were carried out with a ball-on-rod tester. Microstructural damage was manifested by gradual hardness changes under the subsurface, and microcracks formed adjacent to inclusions; both being evidence...

  14. Mitigating Wind-Induced Fatigue in Steel Traffic Signal Support Structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieghaus, Kyle T

    2015-05-26

    Traffic signal structures undergo wind-induced vibrations that result in fatigue damage accumulation and reduced service life. Mast arms have failed and required removal while in service. A dual experimental and analytical modeling approach is taken...

  15. The high cycle fatigue and fracture behavior of aluminum alloy 7055

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivatsan, T.S.; Anand, S.; Sriram, S.; Narendra, N. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, the results of a recent study on the high-cycle fatigue and fracture behavior of aluminum alloy 7055 is presented and discussed. Specimens of the alloy, in the T7751 temper, were cyclically deformed over a range of stress amplitudes at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Increase in test temperature was found to have a detrimental influence on cyclic fatigue life of the specimens machined in the transverse orientation. Temperature was found to have little influence on fatigue life of the longitudinal specimens. No major change in macroscopic fracture mode was observed with direction of testing. Cyclic fracture, on a microscopic scale, revealed features reminiscent of both ductile and brittle mechanisms. The microscopic fracture behavior was a function of test temperature. The mechanisms governing cyclic fatigue response are discussed in light of the mutually interactive influences of microstructural effects, matrix deformation characteristics and test temperature.

  16. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    and J.D. Achenbach, Structural health monitoring and damagein fatigue, Structural Health Monitoring, 7(1), 37-49, 2008.and J.D. Achenbach, Structural health monitoring and damage

  17. Stochastic Damage Evolution under Static and Fatigue Loading in Composites with Manufacturing Defects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yongxin

    2012-07-16

    In this dissertation, experimental investigations and theoretical studies on the stochastic matrix cracking evolution under static and fatigue loading in composite laminates with defects are presented. The presented work ...

  18. The Impact of Cognitive Fatigue on Age-Related Differences in Neuromuscular Function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shortz, Ashley

    2015-07-27

    As the population of adults aged 65 and above is rapidly growing, it is crucial to identify physical and cognitive limitations pertaining to daily living. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of cognitive fatigue ...

  19. Fatigue behavior of full-size soild-sawn timber railroad stringers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maingot, Martin Rex

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Timber Bridge Life Extension Program sponsored by the Association of American Railroads (AAR), the objective of this thesis is to investigate the fatigue behavior of large solid-sawn timber beams. Specifically, ...

  20. The effects of asphalt binder oxidation on hot mix asphalt concrete mixture rheology and fatigue performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Sung Hoon

    2009-06-02

    Asphalt oxidation causes major changes to binder properties and is hypothesized to be a major contributor to age-related pavement failure such as fatigue cracking. Extensive laboratory aging research has been done to assess ...

  1. The effectiveness of floor mats as an intervention for standing fatigue of light fabrication workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Michael Shannon

    1996-01-01

    A field study was conducted in a light fabrication plant to determine the effectiveness of floor mats on reducing the symptoms of standing fatigue. Specific physiological variables measured include skin temperature of the ...

  2. Characterization and Modeling of Transformation Induced Fatigue of Shape Memory Alloy Actuators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertacchini, Olivier Walter

    2011-02-22

    The main focus of this research is the transformation induced fatigue behavior of shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators undergoing thermally induced martensitic phase transformation. The recent development of aerospace ...

  3. The effect of SAS shoes on standing fatigue in light fabrication workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Lee Norman

    1996-01-01

    A field study was conducted on light fabrication workers who worked 12-hour shifts to determine the effect of a high quality shoe, such as a SAS shoe, on standing fatigue. Nine participants (five male, four female) were ...

  4. Transformation Induced Fatigue of Ni-Rich NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Actuators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Justin Ryan

    2011-02-22

    In this work the transformation induced fatigue of Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) was investigated. The aerospace industry is currently considering implementing SMA actuators into new applications. However, before ...

  5. Development of criteria for fatigue repairs in bridge girders damaged by out-of-plane distortion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Scott David

    1994-01-01

    Numerous highway bridge girders across the United States have experienced fatigue cracking due to repetitive out-of-plane distortion at unstiffened web gaps caused by poorly designed diaphragm connection details. Due to ...

  6. An analysis of muscle fatigue due to complex tasks and its relation to the strain index 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, John-Paul

    2009-06-02

    The Strain Index was originally designed to analyze mono-task jobs. An experiment using a grip dynamometer was used to simulate six multiple task jobs to study the effect of complex tasks on localized muscle fatigue and ...

  7. ‘A Weariness of the Flesh’: Towards a Theology of Boredom and Fatigue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardley, Kenneth Jason

    2012-01-01

    This essay follows two impulses: Jean-Yves Lacoste’s suggestion that philosophy and theology should speak about boredom and about fatigue, just as they do about anguish or joy, and the Swiss theologian Karl Barth’s contention ...

  8. REPAIR OF BRIDGE STEEL GIRDERS DAMAGED BY DISTORTION-INDUCED FATIGUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemdar, Fatih

    2011-12-31

    This study investigates the repair of steel bridge girders damaged by distortion-induced fatigue. The study is presented in three parts. The first part describes finite element modeling techniques used to evaluate the ...

  9. An Analytical Evaluation of Distortion-Induced Fatigue in Steel Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassel, Heidi L.

    2011-02-04

    Multi-girder steel bridges designed prior to the mid-1980's, have developed cracks due to distortion-induced fatigue. An analytical evaluation was conducted to better understand the effects of bridge configurations and ...

  10. Repair of Steel Bridge Girders Damaged by Distortion-Induced Fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagati, Amr Daniel

    2012-08-31

    Several studies have identified distortion-induced fatigue as the leading cause of cracks in steel bridges built prior to the mid-1980s. Experimental and computer simulations of 914-mm (36-in.) deep girder-cross frame ...

  11. Mechanisms of microstructural damage during rolling contact fatigue of bearing steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, JeeHyun

    2014-04-08

    Bearings are employed in a number of applications under extremely demanding conditions. During long operation times, the material undergoes rolling contact fatigue where microstructural damage manifests as dark-etching regions and white...

  12. Neuroimaging abnormalities, neurocognitive function, and fatigue in patients with hepatitis C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    fatigue in patients with hepatitis C April D. Thames, PhDamong a sample of adults with hepatitis C virus (HCV). WeControl and Prevention: Hepatitis C Information for Health

  13. SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES damage in real size structural components of offshore wind turbines. KEYWORDS : Damage detection, Offshore wind turbines, Numerical response simulation. INTRODUCTION Offshore wind turbines are exposed

  14. Effect of nano-scale twinning on the fracture, fatigue and wear properties of copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Aparna, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Grain refinement in materials has been one of the most common strategies for improving the strength of materials. However this comes at the price of reduced ductility, fracture toughness and stable fatigue crack propagation ...

  15. Analytical and Experimental Investigation for Distortion-Induced Fatigue in Steel Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Amanda

    2013-08-31

    Distortion-induced fatigue has been extensively studied; however, retrofit techniques currently used are expensive and/or time consuming to implement. These retrofit techniques primarily fall into two categories--stiffening or softening the weak web...

  16. Analytical Investigation of Repair Methods for Fatigue Cracks in Steel Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Temple

    2012-08-31

    Numerous retrofits have been used to stop distortion-induced fatigue cracks from initiating and propagating in steel bridges. Some decrease stiffness in the web gap region to transfer the load path to an area of higher stiffness, while others...

  17. Webinar: Impacts of Impurities on Hydrogen Assisted Fatigue Crack Growth in Structural Steels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Impacts of Impurities on Hydrogen Assisted Fatigue Crack Growth in Structural Steels" on Tuesday, January 12, from 12 to 1 p.m. EST.

  18. Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2003-10-03

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

  19. Creep-fatigue of High Temperature Materials for VHTR: Effect of Cyclic Loading and Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celine Cabet; L. Carroll; R. Wright; R. Madland

    2011-05-01

    Alloy 617 is the one of the leading candidate materials for Intermediate Heat eXchangers (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Furthermore, the anticipated IHX operating temperature, up to 950°C, is in the range of creep so that creep-fatigue interaction, which can significantly increase the fatigue crack growth, may be one of the primary IHX damage modes. To address the needs for Alloy 617 codification and licensing, a significant creep-fatigue testing program is underway at Idaho National Laboratory. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times up to 1800s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% and 0.6% in air at 950°C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The creep-fatigue tests resulted in failure times up to 1000 hrs. Fatigue resistance was significantly decreased when a hold time was added at peak stress and when the total strain was increased. The fracture mode also changed from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Changes in the microstructure were methodically characterized. A combined effect of temperature, cyclic and static loading and environment was evidenced in the targeted operating conditions of the IHX. This paper This paper reviews the data previously published by Carroll and co-workers in references 10 and 11 focusing on the role of inelastic strain accumulation and of oxidation in the initiation and propagation of surface fatigue cracks.

  20. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  1. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  2. COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    4, 1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACESAND METAL COMPLEXES Earl L. Muetterties December 1979 TWO-10308 COORDINATION CHEt1ISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL

  3. Fatigue and strain hardening of simulated case microstructure in carburized steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaccone, M.A.; Krauss, G.

    1988-01-01

    Tension, compression, and cyclic stress-strain testing were used to evaluate the effect of retained austenite on high and low cycle fatigue of Cr-Mo-Ni alloy steels containing 0.8 pct C to simulate the high carbon case of carburized steels. In low cycle fatigue, cracks develop at austenite grain boundaries early during tensile and cyclic loading. Propagation of these cracks is stabilized in specimens which contain large amounts of retained austenite which dynamically forms martensite by strain-induced transformation. Without sufficient austenite, incipient cracks are not effectively stabilized, and low cycle fatigue life is reduced. In high cycle fatigue, insufficient strain accumulates for the activation of strain-induced martensite, and large amounts of retained austenite are not as beneficial as in low cycle fatigue. Microstructures with 30--35 volume percent retained austenite and fine mixtures of martensite and austenite which contribute to high elastic limits appear to be the most satisfactory for good high and low cycle fatigue resistance. 18 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. High-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy forging at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Demura, Masahiko; Matsuoka, Saburo; Sunakawa, Hideo

    2014-01-27

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn Extra Low Interstitial (ELI) alloy forging were investigated at low temperatures. The high-cycle fatigue strength at low temperatures of this alloy was relatively low compared with that at ambient temperature. The crystallographic orientation of a facet formed at a fatigue crack initiation site was determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method in scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fatigue crack initiation mechanism and discuss on the low fatigue strength at low temperature. Furthermore, in terms of the practical use of this alloy, the effect of the stress ratio (or mean stress) on the high-cycle fatigue properties was evaluated using the modified Goodman diagram.

  5. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of...

  6. Fatigue failure in thin-film polysilicon is due to subcriticalcracking within the oxide layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsem, D.H.; Muhlstein, C.L.; Stach, E.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-01-11

    It has been established that microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) created from polycrystalline silicon thin-films are subject to cyclic fatigue. Prior work by the authors has suggested that although bulk silicon is not susceptible to fatigue failure in ambient air, fatigue in micron-scale silicon is a result of a ''reaction-layer'' process, whereby high stresses induce a thickening of the post-release oxide at stress concentrations such as notches, which subsequently undergoes moisture-assisted cracking. However, there exists some controversy regarding the post-release oxide thickness of the samples used in the prior study. In this Letter, we present data from devices from a more recent fabrication run that confirm our prior observations. Additionally, new data from tests in high vacuum show that these devices do not fatigue when oxidation and moisture are suppressed. Each of these observations lends credence to the '''reaction-layer'' mechanism. Recent advances in the design of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have increased the demand for more reliable microscale structures. Although silicon is an effective and widely used structural material at the microscale, it is very brittle. Consequently, reliability is a limiting factor for commercial and defense applications. Since the surface to volume ratio of these structural films is very large, classical models for failure modes in bulk materials cannot always be applied. For example, whereas bulk silicon is immune to cyclic fatigue failure thin micron-scale structural films of silicon appear to be highly susceptible. It is clear that at these size scales, surface effects may become dominant in controlling mechanical properties. The main reliability issues for MEMS are stiction, fatigue and wear. Fatigue is important in cases where devices are subjected to a large number of loading cycles with amplitudes below their (single-cycle) fracture stress, which may arise due to vibrations intentionally induced in the structure (i.e. a resonator) or those which arise from the service environment. While the reliability of MEMS has received extensive attention, the physical mechanisms responsible for these failure modes have yet to be conclusively determined. This is particularly true for fatigue, where the mechanisms have been subject to intense debate. Recently we have proposed that the fatigue of micron-scale polysilicon is associated with stress-induced surface oxide thickening and moisture-assisted subcritical cracking in the amorphous SiO{sub 2} oxide layer (''reaction-layer'' fatigue). The mechanism of oxide thickening is as yet unknown, but is likely related to some form of stress-assisted diffusion. Allameh et al. suggest a complementary mechanism involving stress-assisted oxide thickening, caused by dissolution of the surface oxide which forms deep grooves that are sites for crack initiation. Kahn et al. have criticized these mechanisms and proposed that, instead, fatigue is caused by subcritical cracking due to contacting surface asperities in the compressive part of the cycle. To the authors' knowledge, there is no direct experimental observation of such asperity contact. Also, their model cannot explain why micron-scale silicon, and not bulk silicon, is susceptible to fatigue. Moreover, Kahn et al. do not acknowledge the role of stress-induced oxide thickening, which has been observed directly using TEM and indirectly using atomic-force microscope measurements by several investigators, and have questioned whether the materials utilized by Muhlstein et al. and Allameh et al. were representative due to the relatively thick oxide scales. Accordingly, the goal of the present research is to seek a definitive understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for fatigue in polysilicon structural thin-films. Our approach is to combine on-chip testing methods with electron microscopy by fatiguing thin-film samples and observing them, in an unthinned condition, using high-voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVTEM). Two principal results are found from this work: (1

  7. Effects of material and loading variables on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  8. Fabrication procedure effects on fatigue resistance of rib -to-deck welded joints of steel orthotropic bridge decks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Hyoung-Bo

    2010-01-01

    International Orthotropic Bridge Conference (CD-ROM),fatigue evaluation of steel bridges. ” International Journalfor the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge rehabilitation. ” Journal of

  9. Methods for fatigue testing off-road bicycle handlebars based on assembly effects using two different stem designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenna, Sean P; Hill, Michael R; Hull, Maury L

    2003-01-01

    AND EVALUATION [2] “Trek Bicycle Corp. Announces Recall ofSafety Requirements for Bicycles, International Organizationfor Fatigue Testing Off-Road Bicycle Handlebars Based on

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    (NIST) IEA Annex on Materials for Transportation Applications (ORNL) IEA ­ Rolling Contact Fatigue (ORNL

  11. Metals and Ceramics Division Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Standards IEA ­ Rolling Contact Fatigue (ORNL) IEA Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research

  12. Heavy metal biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  13. Novel Experiments to Characterize Creep-Fatigue Degradation in VHTR Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright; J. A. Simpson; L. J. Carroll; R. N. Wright; T.-L. Sham

    2013-10-01

    It is well known in energy systems that the creep lifetime of high temperature alloys is significantly degraded when a cyclic load is superimposed on components operating in the creep regime. A test method has been developed in an attempt to characterize creep-fatigue behavior of alloys at high temperature. The test imposes a hold time during the tensile phase of a fully reversed strain-controlled low cycle fatigue test. Stress relaxation occurs during the strain-controlled hold period. This type of fatigue stress relaxation test tends to emphasize the fatigue portion of the total damage and does not necessarily represent the behavior of a component in-service well. Several different approaches to laboratory testing of creep-fatigue at 950°C have been investigated for Alloy 617, the primary candidate for application in VHTR heat exchangers. The potential for mode switching in a cyclic test from strain control to load control, to allow specimen extension by creep, has been investigated to further emphasize the creep damage. In addition, tests with a lower strain rate during loading have been conducted to examine the influence of creep damage occurring during loading. Very short constant strain hold time tests have also been conducted to examine the influence of the rapid stress relaxation that occurs at the beginning of strain holds.

  14. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Martin L.; Talmage, Mellisa J.; McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K

    2006-10-01

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

  15. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  16. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  17. Effect of Loading Mode and Coating on Dynamic Fatigue of Optical Fiber in Two-Point Bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    and hence on the reliability of the bending technique. This paper presents dynamic fatigue results usingEffect of Loading Mode and Coating on Dynamic Fatigue of Optical Fiber in Two-Point Bending Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0909 Tho-point bending

  18. Proceeding of Energy Week 1996, ASME APPLICATION OF THE U.S. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceeding of Energy Week 1996, ASME APPLICATION OF THE U.S. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE TO WIND the service lifetime of wind turbine blades using the high-cycle fatigue data base for typical U.S. blade materials developed by Mandell, et al. (1995). The first step in the analysis is to normalize the data base

  19. Evolution of crack-tip transformation zones in superelastic Nitinol subjected to in situ fatigue: A fracture mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Evolution of crack-tip transformation zones in superelastic Nitinol subjected to in situ fatigue, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA b Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA c Nitinol of a growing fatigue crack (100 cycles in situ) in superelastic Nitinol. The results provide some surprising

  20. Role of Microstructure in Promoting Fracture and Fatigue Resistance in Mo-Si-B Alloys J. J. Kruzic*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    -Si-B based alloys is presented. Fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth properties are measured at 25º to impart some ductility and fracture resistance to a three phase microstructure also containing Mo3SiRole of Microstructure in Promoting Fracture and Fatigue Resistance in Mo-Si-B Alloys J. J. Kruzic

  1. Mixed-Mode, High-Cycle Fatigue-Crack Growth Thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    and control of failure due to high cycle fatigue (HCF) in turbine engine components is currently one and Engineering University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1760 ABSTRACT: There are few experimental results-cycle fatigue-crack growth thresholds with crack size and shape are reported for a Ti-6Al-4V turbine blade alloy

  2. A numerical method for predicting the bending fatigue life of NiTi and stainless steel root canal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    A numerical method for predicting the bending fatigue life of NiTi and stainless steel root canal. A numerical method for predicting the bending fatigue life of NiTi and stainless steel root canal instruments­titanium alloy (NiTi) and stainless steel (SS) endodontic files using finite element analysis. Methodology

  3. Fatigue of 8630 cast steel in the presence of K. M. Sigl{, R. A. Hardin, R. I. Stephens and C. Beckermann*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Fatigue of 8630 cast steel in the presence of porosity K. M. Sigl{, R. A. Hardin, R. I. Stephens- to macroscopic levels were cast from 8630 steel. Monotonic and fatigue properties were obtained to determine the effect of porosity on the mechanical performance of the cast steel. Axial fatigue tests were conducted

  4. Mixed-mode, high-cycle fatigue-crack growth thresholds in I. A comparison of large-and short-crack behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of turbine engine components to failure from high-cycle fatigue (HCF), i.e., the rapid propagation of fatigue are known to exist at speci®c fatigue-critical locations within the turbine engine com- ponents Engineering, University of California, 463 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1760, USA Received 27 December 1999

  5. Effects of microstructure on mixed-mode, high-cycle fatigue crack-growth thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    O D U C T IO N The control of failures owing to high-cycle fatigue (HCF) in turbine-engine for such HCF failures. Indeed, there are many fatigue-critical locations within the turbine engine where- ing HCF failures in turbine engines, it is critical that fatigue crack-growth thresholds are well

  6. Inuence of foreign-object damage on crack initiation and early crack growth during high-cycle fatigue of Ti6Al4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    ; Ti±6Al±4V 1. Introduction The high-cycle fatigue (HCF) of aircraft gas-turbine engine components has-cycle fatigue of Ti±6Al±4V J.O. Peters, R.O. Ritchie * Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering of small surface fatigue cracks in a Ti±6Al±4V alloy, processed for typical turbine blade applications

  7. Simulation and Experiment of Thermal Fatigue in the CPV Die Attach: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-05-01

    FEM simulation and accelerated thermal cycling have been performed for the CPV die attach. Trends in fatigue damage accumulation and equivalent test time are explored and found to be most sensitive to temperature ramp rate. Die attach crack growth is measured through cycling and found to be in excellent agreement with simulations of the inelastic strain energy accumulated. Simulations of an entire year of weather data provides for the relative ranking of fatigue damage between four cites as well as their equivalent accelerated test time.

  8. Failure by fracture and fatigue in 'NANO' and 'BIO'materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Muhlstein, C.L.; Nalla, R.K.

    2003-12-19

    The behavior of nanostructured materials/small-volumestructures and biologi-cal/bio-implantable materials, so-called "nano"and "bio" materials, is currently much in vogue in materials science. Oneaspect of this field, which to date has received only limited attention,is their fracture and fatigue properties. In this paper, we examine twotopics in this area, namely the premature fatigue failure ofsilicon-based micron-scale structures for microelectromechanical systems(MEMS), and the fracture properties of mineralized tissue, specificallyhuman bone.

  9. Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenburg, Robert Thomas

    1982-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  10. METAL NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH METAL-LIGAND COVALENT BONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Xiongwu

    2012-01-01

    Formation of catalytic metal-molecule contacts. Science,of Organotransition Metal Compounds. Advances inof highly monodisperse metal nanoparticles. Journal of the

  11. Creep-fatigue criteria and inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggles, M.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ogata, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1994-02-01

    The ever increasing demand for safety requires that stringent and conservative methodology be developed for design and analysis of reactor components. At present modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for construction of steam generators in fast breeder reactors. Therefore high-temperature material properties and extensive insight into deformation behavior and creep-fatigue life are required to develop design guidelines for use of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in actual plant components. However, existing information on creep-fatigue and deformation response of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is insufficient, and further experimental and modeling efforts are needed. A joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the United States and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan was started in 1991 to investigate the inelastic behavior of and to develop creep-fatigue criteria for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. The current program focuses on uniaxial and biaxial fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue tests. Results of this effort are presented in this report. Section 2 introduces the test material and experimental arrangement. Uniaxial exploratory deformation tests and unified constitutive equations for inelastic analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are presented in Sections 3 and 4, respectively. Axial fatigue and creep-fatigue test results are discussed in Section 5. Section 6 is devoted to constant stress creep tests. Biaxial fatigue and creep-fatigue tests are described in Section 7. Progress in creep-fatigue life evaluation is reported in Section 8.

  12. Effect of composition and processing on the thermal fatigue and toughness of high performance die steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.F.; Wang, Y.; Schwam, D.

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this study was to improve average die life by optimizing die steel composition and the die processing. Four different steels, K,Q,C and Premium Grade H-13 have been investigated for thermal fatigue resistance and toughness. Optimum heat treatment processing has been determined for each steel with respect to austenitizing temperature and tempering conditions. The effect of the quenching rate on the thermal fatigue resistance and toughness of the die steels and the effect of Electro-Discharge Machining (EDM) on the thermal fatigue resistance were also determined. The immersion thermal fatigue specimen developed at CWRU was used to determine the thermal fatigue resistance as characterized by the two parameters of average maximum crack length and total crack area. The Charpy V-notch impact test was used over a -100{degrees}F to 450{degrees}F testing temperature range to evaluate the toughness and the brittle-ductile transition behavior. K steel has been identified as superior in performance compared to Premium Grade H-13. Q and C provide lower toughness and thermal fatigue resistance than H-13. Faster cooling rates provide higher thermal fatigue resistance and toughness. Higher austenitizing temperatures such as 1925{degrees}F compared to 1875{degrees}F provide better thermal fatigue resistance, but lower austenitizing temperatures of 1875{degrees}F provide better toughness. Higher hardness improves thermal fatigue resistance, but reduces toughness. A minimum of Rc 46 hardness is desired for aluminum die casting dies. EDM reduces the thermal fatigue resistance compared to conventional machining operations. When the EDM process of multiple small steps of decreasing energy and post-EDM treatments are employed, the effect can be reduced to a very slight amount. Preliminary evidence of the superior performance of the K steel has been provided by ongoing field testing of inserts in multiple cavity dies.

  13. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  14. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  15. Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions Print Monday, 19 December 2011 18:29 While mononuclear, polynuclear, and polymeric metal complexes are most often...

  16. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  17. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-10-11

    A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  18. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  19. Intergranular Strain Evolution near Fatigue Crack Tips in Polycrystalline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in high-temperature applications. (JournalMetals

  20. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  1. Modeling cyclic ratcheting based fatigue life of HSLA steels using crystal plasticity FEM simulations and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    Modeling cyclic ratcheting based fatigue life of HSLA steels using crystal plasticity FEM of results from experiments and finite element simulations using crystal plasticity constitutive relations the simulated results with experiments. A crystal plasticity based FEM (CPFEM) model is used in this paper

  2. AIAA-2003-0692 NEW FATIGUE DATA FOR W IND TURBINE BLADE M ATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 AIAA-2003-0692 NEW FATIGUE DATA FOR W IND TURBINE BLADE M ATERIALS John F. Mandell, Daniel D the expected cycle range for turbines. While the data cannot be used directly in design due to the specialized AND RESULTS Introduction Composite wind turbine blade materials may experience between 108 to 109 significant

  3. High-cycle fatigue and durability of polycrystalline silicon thin lms in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    High-cycle fatigue and durability of polycrystalline silicon thin ®lms in ambient air C. First, silicon-based ®lms are still the dominant structural material for micromachines. Second of MEMS components are critical in this maturing ®eld. The silicon-based ®lms commonly used in micromecha

  4. Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with Emphasis of offshore wind turbines Defense: 09.12.2012 2012 - : Structural Engineer in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) 2007 sector. Wind is one of the most rapidly growing renewable energy sources, as it is clean

  5. Influence of Nonlinear Irregular Waves on the Fatigue Loads of an Offshore Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Influence of Nonlinear Irregular Waves on the Fatigue Loads of an Offshore Wind Turbine Michiel B-mail: michiel van.der.meulen@siemens.com Abstract. In order to make offshore wind power a cost effective load calculations by using a more advanced model for wave kinematics. As offshore wind turbines

  6. Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue Kyu Hun Kim one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. The graphene-coated aerogel exhibits no change , but collapse under stress15 . We fabricated graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels by coating

  7. CONTINUOUS FATIGUE ASSESSMENT OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF VIBRATION SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONTINUOUS FATIGUE ASSESSMENT OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF VIBRATION Wind turbines are exposed to continuous wind and wave excitation that leads to high periodic stresses initiations and propagations. The continuous monitoring of the Wind Turbine is of utmost importance in order

  8. 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

  9. Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber insertions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber testing a b s t r a c t This paper presents the findings of a research program that was undertaken to evaluate the effective elastic modulus, shear modulus and degree of composite interaction of the panels

  10. November 1998 NREL/SR-500-24379 Fatigue of Composite Material Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 1998 · NREL/SR-500-24379 Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative Blade Substructure NREL Technical Monitors: Richard Osgood and Walt Musial John F. Mandell, Daniel D University (MSU) under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) sponsorship from August 1991 through

  11. Stress dependent activation entropy for dynamic fatigue of pristine silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Stress dependent activation entropy for dynamic fatigue of pristine silica optical fibers Y. S Subcritical crack growth in fused silica is treated as a stress assisted chemical reaction between water the stress reduces the energy barrier of the activated complex by affecting both the activation enthalpy

  12. Role of oxide thickening in fatigue crack initiation in LIGA nickel MEMS thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Wanliang

    Role of oxide thickening in fatigue crack initiation in LIGA nickel MEMS thin films W.L. Shan a 2012 Accepted 16 October 2012 Available online 24 October 2012 Keywords: LIGA Ni MEMS thin films Oxide micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) structures. & 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1

  13. Biomaterials 27 (2006) 19882000 Fatigue and life prediction for cobalt-chromium stents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterials 27 (2006) 1988­2000 Fatigue and life prediction for cobalt-chromium stents: A fracture of testing to failure. This is typically achieved using one of two ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials

  14. Biomaterials 26 (2005) 11951204 Mechanistic aspects of in vitro fatigue-crack growth in dentin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert O.

    2005-01-01

    Biomaterials 26 (2005) 1195­1204 Mechanistic aspects of in vitro fatigue-crack growth in dentin J,13]. These notches are often the ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2004.04.051 ÃCorresponding

  15. Author's personal copy An equivalent strain/CoffineManson approach to multiaxial fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    prediction in superelastic Nitinol medical devices Amanda Runciman a,b , David Xu a,b , Alan R. Pelton c, Berkeley, CA, USA b Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA, USA c Nitinol Accepted 24 March 2011 Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Medical devices Nitinol Fatigue Life

  16. Fatigue-crack propagation in Nitinol, a shape-memory and superelastic endovascular stent material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue-crack propagation in Nitinol, a shape-memory and superelastic endovascular stent material A Nitinol. Specifically, the objective of this work was to study the effect of environ- ment on cyclic crack of Nitinol endovascular stents. The material selected for this study was heat treated

  17. Fatigue-Life Computational Analysis for the Self-Expanding Endovascular Nitinol Stents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Fatigue-Life Computational Analysis for the Self-Expanding Endovascular Nitinol Stents M. Grujicic-expanding endovascular stents made of Nitinol (a Ni-Ti intermetallic compound possessing superelastic and shape, Nitinol, stents 1. Introduction The main objective of the present study is to investigate computationally

  18. Mechanism of fatigue in micron-scale films of polycrystalline silicon for microelectromechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    the past decade, microelectromechanical systems MEMS and the enabling technologies of surface micromaMechanism of fatigue in micron-scale films of polycrystalline silicon for microelectromechanical. During this pe- riod of rapid innovation, a vast array of MEMS applications have emerged and many

  19. Slow-Time Changes in Human EMG Muscle Fatigue States Are Fully Represented in Movement Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chelidze, David

    from the kinematic data. Nonlinear analysis of kinematic features was shown to be essential nonlinear PSW-based analysis of kinematic data was shown to adequately predict all EMG-based individual-based analysis of strictly kinematic time series data directly predicted all of the local muscle fatigue trends

  20. Torsion Property and Cyclic Fatigue Fracture Behavior of Nickel-Titanium Endodontic Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    -Titanium rotary instruments. In 1999, HaïKel[2] studied engine-driven rotary NiTi endodontic instruments and Engineering Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China 2 School of Materials Science and Engineering Abstract. The torsion property and rotary fatigue fracture behavior of Smart® K file and R reamer made

  1. EFFECT OF VISCOUS GRAIN BRIDGING ON CYCLIC FATIGUE-CRACK GROWTH IN MONOLITHIC CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    EFFECT OF VISCOUS GRAIN BRIDGING ON CYCLIC FATIGUE-CRACK GROWTH IN MONOLITHIC CERAMICS AT ELEVATED crack under cyclic loading conditions at elevated temperatures in high-toughness, monolithic ceramics the frequency and temperature sensitivity not gen- erally observed in ceramics at room temperature. Solutions

  2. A Model to Assess Fatigue at Joint-Level Using the Half-Joint Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    and simulations generated by our animation environment. 1. Introduction The human body is continuously under b Virtual Reality Laboratory. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland In this paper we focus on the modeling and evaluation of performance factors as human fatigue at joint level. We

  3. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  4. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  5. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  6. Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Fractogel® Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC) Resins and Cartridges Tools for His·Tag® Fusion-MACTM Cartridges #12;2 Novagen · Fractogel Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC) Resins Ni-MACTM , Co-MACTM and u-MACTM Metal Affinity Chromatography (MAC) Resins and Cartridges HI Ni2+ Ni2+ Ni2+ HISHISHI SHISHISHIS Ni2

  7. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit a cost benefit analysis and choose the most efficient and cost effective modification. Metal or shingle roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  8. Update and Improve Subsection NH –– Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama

    2009-10-26

    This report described the results of investigation on Task 10 of DOE/ASME Materials NGNP/Generation IV Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 10 is to Update and Improve Subsection NH -- Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods. Five newly proposed promising creep-fatigue evaluation methods were investigated. Those are (1) modified ductility exhaustion method, (2) strain range separation method, (3) approach for pressure vessel application, (4) hybrid method of time fraction and ductility exhaustion, and (5) simplified model test approach. The outlines of those methods are presented first, and predictability of experimental results of these methods is demonstrated using the creep-fatigue data collected in previous Tasks 3 and 5. All the methods (except the simplified model test approach which is not ready for application) predicted experimental results fairly accurately. On the other hand, predicted creep-fatigue life in long-term regions showed considerable differences among the methodologies. These differences come from the concepts each method is based on. All the new methods investigated in this report have advantages over the currently employed time fraction rule and offer technical insights that should be thought much of in the improvement of creep-fatigue evaluation procedures. The main points of the modified ductility exhaustion method, the strain range separation method, the approach for pressure vessel application and the hybrid method can be reflected in the improvement of the current time fraction rule. The simplified mode test approach would offer a whole new advantage including robustness and simplicity which are definitely attractive but this approach is yet to be validated for implementation at this point. Therefore, this report recommends the following two steps as a course of improvement of NH based on newly proposed creep-fatigue evaluation methodologies. The first step is to modify the current approach by incorporating the partial advantages the new method offer, and the second step is to replace the current method by the simplified test approach when it has become technically mature enough. The recommendations are basically in line with the work scope of the Task Force on Creep-Fatigue of the Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design of the Standards Committee of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee Section III.

  9. Analysis of SNL/MSU/DOE fatigue database trends for wind turbine blade materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandell, John F. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Ashwill, Thomas D.; Wilson, Timothy J. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Sears, Aaron T. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Agastra, Pancasatya (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Laird, Daniel L.; Samborsky, Daniel D. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2010-12-01

    This report presents an analysis of trends in fatigue results from the Montana State University program on the fatigue of composite materials for wind turbine blades for the period 2005-2009. Test data can be found in the SNL/MSU/DOE Fatigue of Composite Materials Database which is updated annually. This is the fifth report in this series, which summarizes progress of the overall program since its inception in 1989. The primary thrust of this program has been research and testing of a broad range of structural laminate materials of interest to blade structures. The report is focused on current types of infused and prepreg blade materials, either processed in-house or by industry partners. Trends in static and fatigue performance are analyzed for a range of materials, geometries and loading conditions. Materials include: sixteen resins of three general types, five epoxy based paste adhesives, fifteen reinforcing fabrics including three fiber types, three prepregs, many laminate lay-ups and process variations. Significant differences in static and fatigue performance and delamination resistance are quantified for particular materials and process conditions. When blades do fail, the likely cause is fatigue in the structural detail areas or at major flaws. The program is focused strongly on these issues in addition to standard laminates. Structural detail tests allow evaluation of various blade materials options in the context of more realistic representations of blade structure than do the standard test methods. Types of structural details addressed in this report include ply drops used in thickness tapering, and adhesive joints, each tested over a range of fatigue loading conditions. Ply drop studies were in two areas: (1) a combined experimental and finite element study of basic ply drop delamination parameters for glass and carbon prepreg laminates, and (2) the development of a complex structured resin-infused coupon including ply drops, for comparison studies of various resins, fabrics and pry drop thicknesses. Adhesive joint tests using typical blade adhesives included both generic testing of materials parameters using a notched-lap-shear test geometry developed in this study, and also a series of simulated blade web joint geometries fabricated by an industry partner.

  10. Fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor environments : mechanism and prediction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    1998-01-27

    Section 111 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be shorter than those in air by a factor of {approx}70. The crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments are presented. Decreases in fatigue life of these steels in high-dissolved-oxygen water are caused primarily by the effect of environment on growth of short cracks < 100 {micro}m in depth. The material and loading parameters that influence fatigue life in LWR environments are defined. Fatigue life is decreased significantly when five conditions are satisfied simultaneously, viz., applied strain range, service temperature, dissolved oxygen in water, and S content in steel are above a threshold level, and loading strain rate is below a threshold value. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue life of these steels in LWR environments. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve is evaluated.

  11. Backward and forward modes guided by metal-dielectric-metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backward and forward modes guided by metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguides Arthur R. Davoyan by metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguides Arthur R. Davoyan,a Ilya V. Shadrivov,a Sergey I.davoyan@gmail.com Abstract. We revisited the problem of the existence of plasmonic modes guided by metal- dielectric-metal

  12. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650 degrees C.

  13. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S. [Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri - Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409-0050 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented.

  14. High Metallicity LGRB Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, J F; Levesque, E M; Kewley, L J; Tanvir, N R; Levan, A J; Patel, S K; Misra, K; Huang, K -H; Reichart, D E; Nysewander, M; Schady, P

    2015-01-01

    We present our imaging and spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of two dark long bursts with anomalously high metallicities, LGRB 051022 and LGRB 020819B, which in conjunction with another LGRB event with an optical afterglow comprise the three LGRBs with high metallicity host galaxies in the Graham & Fruchter (2013) sample. In Graham & Fruchter (2013), we showed that LGRBs exhibit a strong and apparently intrinsic preference for low metallicity environments (12+log(O/H) & redshift. This is surprising: even among a preselected sample of high metallicity LGRBs, were the metal aversion to remain in effect for these objects, we would expect their metallicity to still be lower than the typical metallicity for the galaxies at that luminosity and redshift. Therefore we deduce that it...

  15. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royer, L.T.

    1987-03-20

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  16. Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

  17. Density functional theory investigation of 3d, 4d, and 5d 13-atom metal clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piotrowski, Mauricio J.; Piquini, Paulo; Da Silva, Juarez L. F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria 97105-900, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cx. Postal 369, Sao Carlos 13560-970, SP (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    The knowledge of the atomic structure of clusters composed by few atoms is a basic prerequisite to obtain insights into the mechanisms that determine their chemical and physical properties as a function of diameter, shape, surface termination, as well as to understand the mechanism of bulk formation. Due to the wide use of metal systems in our modern life, the accurate determination of the properties of 3d, 4d, and 5d metal clusters poses a huge problem for nanoscience. In this work, we report a density functional theory study of the atomic structure, binding energies, effective coordination numbers, average bond lengths, and magnetic properties of the 3d, 4d, and 5d metal (30 elements) clusters containing 13 atoms, M{sub 13}. First, a set of lowest-energy local minimum structures (as supported by vibrational analysis) were obtained by combining high-temperature first-principles molecular-dynamics simulation, structure crossover, and the selection of five well-known M{sub 13} structures. Several new lower energy configurations were identified, e.g., Pd{sub 13}, W{sub 13}, Pt{sub 13}, etc., and previous known structures were confirmed by our calculations. Furthermore, the following trends were identified: (i) compact icosahedral-like forms at the beginning of each metal series, more opened structures such as hexagonal bilayerlike and double simple-cubic layers at the middle of each metal series, and structures with an increasing effective coordination number occur for large d states occupation. (ii) For Au{sub 13}, we found that spin-orbit coupling favors the three-dimensional (3D) structures, i.e., a 3D structure is about 0.10 eV lower in energy than the lowest energy known two-dimensional configuration. (iii) The magnetic exchange interactions play an important role for particular systems such as Fe, Cr, and Mn. (iv) The analysis of the binding energy and average bond lengths show a paraboliclike shape as a function of the occupation of the d states and hence, most of the properties can be explained by the chemistry picture of occupation of the bonding and antibonding states.

  18. Proceedings of WindPower 95, AWEA, Washington, D.C., 1995. FATIGUE DAMAGE ESTIMATE COMPARISONS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of WindPower 95, AWEA, Washington, D.C., 1995. FATIGUE DAMAGE ESTIMATE COMPARISONS," Proceedings of WindPower `95, AWEA, Washington, DC, March, 1995, pp. 177-186. * This work is supported

  19. Fatigue failure in thin-film polycrystalline silicon is due to subcritical cracking within the oxide layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    the oxide layer D. H. Alsem Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California SiO2 oxide layer "reaction-layer" fatigue .1,7,8,18 The mechanism of oxide thickening is as yet

  20. The effects of laser trimming on the tensile strength and fatigue resistance properties of titanium - 6Al-4V 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitesel, Dean Adam

    1994-01-01

    The effect of laser trimming on the tensile strength and fatigue resistance of titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium specimens was investigated. Due to the nature of laser processing, the microstructure of the titanium alloy ...

  1. Fatigue resistance of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures using the calibrated mechanistic with surface energy (CMSE) measurements approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Abebresse, Edward Kwame

    2006-10-30

    Fatigue cracking is one of the fundamental distresses that occur in the life of a Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) pavement. This load induced distress leads to structural collapse of the entire pavement ultimately and can ...

  2. FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996, ASME, pp. 46-51)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996/MSU database to lifetime prediction as described in Ref. [1]. INTRODUCTION Most U.S. fiberglass wind turbine

  3. The effect of environment, chemistry, and microstructure on the corrosion fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Lindsay Beth

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sulfur on the corrosion fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steel was evaluated under Light Water Reactor (LWR) conditions of 288°C deaerated (less than 5ppb O?) water, to shed light on the accelerating ...

  4. The influence of high harmonic force on fatigue life and its prediction via coupled inline-crossflow VIV modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) of a flexibly mounted rigid cylinder placed in a flow is a canonical problem of fluid-structure interactions and the study of VIV and the resulting material fatigue is particularly important ...

  5. UTILIZING ON-CHIP TESTING AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TO STUDY FATIGUE AND WEAR IN POLYSILICON STRUCTURAL FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    and fatigue are important factors in determining the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS properties of the material. The main reliability issues for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). While the reliability of MEMS has received extensive attention, the physical mechanisms responsible

  6. Fatigue analysis of stringer to floor beam connections in through plate girder and through truss railroad bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Leslie Virginia

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to determine fatigue stresses in the stringer to floor beam connections of through plate girder (TPG) and through truss (TT) bridges in order to predict failure. Field observations by the Association of American...

  7. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  8. Polyacidic multiloading metal extractants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, R. J.; Campbell, J.; Henderson, D.K.; Henry, D. C. R.; Swart, R. M.; Tasker, P. A.; White, F. J.; Wood, J. L.; Yellowlees, L. J

    2008-01-01

    Novel polynucleating, di- and tri-acidic ligands have been designed to increase the molar and mass transport efficiencies for the recovery of base metals by solvent extraction.

  9. Prediction of the Creep-Fatigue Lifetime of Alloy 617: An Application of Non-destructive Evaluation and Information Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Richard Wright; Timothy Roney

    2014-08-01

    A relatively simple method using the nominal constant average stress information and the creep rupture model is developed to predict the creep-fatigue lifetime of Alloy 617, in terms of time to rupture. The nominal constant average stress is computed using the stress relaxation curve. The predicted time to rupture can be converted to number of cycles to failure using the strain range, the strain rate during each cycle, and the hold time information. The predicted creep-fatigue lifetime is validated against the experimental measurements of the creep-fatigue lifetime collected using conventional laboratory creep-fatigue tests. High temperature creep-fatigue tests of Alloy 617 were conducted in air at 950°C with a tensile hold period of up to 1800s in a cycle at total strain ranges of 0.3% and 0.6%. It was observed that the proposed method is conservative in that the predicted lifetime is less than the experimentally determined values. The approach would be relevant to calculate the remaining useful life to a component like a steam generator that might fail by the creep-fatigue mechanism.

  10. Surface Studies of Ultra Strength Drilling Steel after Corrosion Fatigue in Simulated Sour Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ziomek-Moroz; J.A. Hawk; R. Thodla; F. Gui

    2012-05-06

    The Unites States predicted 60% growth in energy demand by 2030 makes oil and natural gas primary target fuels for energy generation. The fact that the peak of oil production from shallow wells (< 5000 m) is about to be reached, thereby pushing the oil and natural gas industry into deeper wells. However, drilling to depths greater than 5000 m requires increasing the strength-to weight ratio of the drill pipe materials. Grade UD-165 is one of the ultra- high yield strength carbon steels developed for ultra deep drilling (UDD) activities. Drilling UDD wells exposes the drill pipes to Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and H{sub 2}S-containig corrosive environments (i.e., sour environments) at higher pressures and temperatures compared to those found in conventional wells. Because of the lack of synergism within the service environment, operational stresses can result in catastrophic brittle failures characteristic for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Approximately 75% of all drill string failures are caused by fatigue or corrosion fatigue. Since there is no literature data on the corrosion fatigue performance of UD-165 in sour environments, research was initiated to better clarify the fatigue crack growth (FCGR) behavior of this alloy in UDD environments. The FCGR behavior of ultra-strength carbon steel, grade UD-165, was investigated by monitoring crack growth rate in deaerated 5%NaCl solution buffered with NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and in contact with H{sub 2}S. The partial pressure of H{sub 2}S (p{sub H2S}) was 0.83 kPa and pH of the solution was adjusted by NaOH to 12. The fatigue experiments were performed at 20 and 85 C in an autoclave with surface investigations augmented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In this study, research focused on surface analyses supported by the fatigue crack growth rate measurements. Fig. 1 shows an SEM micrograph of the crack that propagated from the notch in the solution at 20 C. Accumulation of the corrosion products is visible along the crack. The EDX chemical analysis near the crack tip found iron, sulfur and oxygen in the passive layer. The surface of the sample after the fatigue test in the sour environment at 85{sup o}, Fig. 2, C looks different from that fatigued surface at 20 C. The crack propagates across the passive film that covers the surface fairly uniformly. Some spallation of the passive film is observed near the notch. The EDX chemical analysis of the passive film near the crack tip identified mainly iron, carbon and oxygen. It appears that temperature plays a very important role in formation of the passive film. This may be associated with different solubility of H{sub 2}S in the solution, which will be further studied.

  11. Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

    2014-09-01

    A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation in a quasi one-dimensional elasto-plastic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomás M. Guozden; Eduardo A. Jagla

    2012-06-27

    Fatigue crack advance induced by the application of cyclic quasistatic loads is investigated both numerically and analytically using a lattice spring model. The system has a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, and consists in two symmetrical chains that are pulled apart, thus breaking springs which connect them, and producing the advance of a crack. Quasistatic crack advance occurs as a consequence of the plasticity included in the springs which form the chains, and that implies a history dependent stress-strain curve for each spring. The continuous limit of the model allows a detailed analytical treatment that gives physical insight of the propagation mechanism. This simple model captures key features that cause well known phenomenology in fatigue crack propagation, in particular a Paris-like law of crack advance under cyclic loading, and the overload retardation effect.

  13. Stress-relaxation and fatigue behaviour of synthetic brow-suspension materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Kyung-Ah; Shipley, Rebecca J.; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Rayment, Andrew W.; Best, Serena M.; Cameron, Ruth E.; Salam, Tahrina; Rose, Geoffrey E.; Ezra, Daniel G.

    2014-11-12

    Salamc, Geoffrey E. Rosec, Daniel G. Ezrac aDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE, UK bDepartment of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, University... increasing strain rate has been reported to result in increasing peak force (Ching et al. 2000; Nilsson 1982). Each sample was stretched at ×6 faster rate for fatigue tests than for stress-relaxation or preconditioning tests, thereby resulting...

  14. Initiation mechanisms and fatigue growth of internal delaminations in graphite/epoxy cross-ply laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiou, Ioannis Theodorou

    1986-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . 10 3. Photograph of the test station. . 12 4, Photograph of the MTS biaxial extensometer mounted on a uniaxial laminate specimen. . 13 5. (a) Cross, (b) Longitudinal, and (c) Slant sections subjected to microscopic observation. . 15 6. A... and Research Obgective. . . . CHAPTER II. TENSION-TENSION UNIAXIAL FATIGUE TEST. . . 2. 1 Laminate Fabrication & Specimen Preparation. . 2. 2 Test Station Description. 2. 3 Damage Documentation in the Specimen Interior. . . 2. 4 Testing Procedure...

  15. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. It is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known for aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  16. Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, JaeKyung [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28

    This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

  17. Fatigue failure of regenerator screens in a high frequency Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, D.R.; Alger, D.L.; Moore, T.J.; Sheuermann, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    Failure of Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) regenerator screens was investigated. After several hours of operation the SPDE was shut down for inspection and upon removal of the regenerator screens, debris of an unknown origin was discovered along with considerable cracking of the screens in localized areas. Metallurgical analysis of the debris determined it to be cracked-off-deformed pieces of the 41 pm thickness Type 304 stainless steel wire screen. Scanning electron microscopy of the cracked screens revealed failures occurring at wire crossovers and fatigue striations on the fracture surface of the wires. Thus, the screen failure can be characterized as a fatigue failure of the wires. The crossovers were determined to contain a 30 percent reduction in wire thickness and a highly worked microstructure occurring from the manufacturing process of the wire screens. Later it was found that reduction in wire thickness occurred because the screen fabricator had subjected the screen to a light cold-roll process after weaving. Installation of this screen left a clearance in the regenerator allowing the screens to move. The combined effects of the reduction in wire thickness, stress concentration (caused by screen movement), and highly worked microstructure at the wire crossovers led to the fatigue failure of the screens.

  18. Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue testing was conducted on Carbon Experimental and Twist-Bend Experimental (CX-100 and TX-100) 9-m wind turbine research blades. The CX-100 blade was designed to investigate the use of a carbon spar cap to reduce weight and increase stiffness while being incorporated using conventional manufacturing techniques. The TX-100 blade used carbon in the outboard portion of the skin to produce twist-bend coupling to passively alleviate aerodynamic loads. In the fatigue tests, the CX-100 blade was loaded by a single hydraulic cylinder while the TX-100 blade was loaded via a hydraulically-actuated resonant loading system called the Universal Resonant Exciter. The blades were outfitted with approximately 30 strain gages as well as displacement and load sensors. Both blades survived to cycle counts sufficient to demonstrate a 20-year operational life. The CX-100 blade failed at approximately 1.6 million cycles because of a buckle and crack that formed and grew just outboard of max-chord. The TX-100 blade failed because of a crack that grew from the termination point of the spar cap at the midspan of the blade. This paper covers the results of the fatigue tests.

  19. Control of corrosion-fatigue in NGV fuel cylinders. Topical report, January 1987-August 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudak, S.J.; Birring, A.S.; Bartlett, M.L.; Hanley, J.J.

    1990-02-01

    Natural gas vehicle (NGV) fuel cylinders are periodically recertified using hydrostatic testing. However, the procedure is costly, and of questionable value for the detection of corrosion-fatigue cracking, the most serious form of cylinder degradation. The present program examines the feasibility of an improved recertification procedure based on in-service acoustic emissions (AE) monitoring of cracks during cylinder refueling, combined with fracture mechanics testing and analysis to determine the optimum inspection period, the level of detectability required, and the cylinder retirement criteria. Laboratory experiments were used to measure the corrosion-fatigue and fracture resistance of several cylinder steels, as well as to provide basic information on AE sources. A comparison of the latter information with the background noise obtained during cylinder refueling was used to demonstrate the feasibility of the AE procedure. An analytical fracture mechanics model for corrosion-fatigue crack growth in the cylinders was also developed and used, together with the measured materials' properties, to predict cylinder life as a function of crack size, operating pressure, and environment. Conditions for leak-before-break of the cylinder were also examined. Areas requiring additional work are defined, including the important task of determining the minimum AE-detectable crack size in actual cylinders.

  20. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behaviormore »of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.« less

  1. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05

    Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern carnivalesque play...

  2. Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Main Group Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Based Frameworks with Open Metal Sites In previous work, weClusters Introduction Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)abundant choice of metal ions and clusters, numerous organic

  3. Metallic nanowire networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-11-06

    A metallic nanowire network synthesized using chemical reduction of a metal ion source by a reducing agent in the presence of a soft template comprising a tubular inverse micellar network. The network of interconnected polycrystalline nanowires has a very high surface-area/volume ratio, which makes it highly suitable for use in catalytic applications.

  4. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  5. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  6. Metallization of electronic insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Uribe, Francisco A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An electroplated element is formed to include an insulating substrate, a conducting polymer polymerized in situ on the substrate, and a metal layer deposited on the conducting polymer. In one application a circuit board is formed by polymerizing pyrrole on an epoxy-fiberglass substrate in a single step process and then electrodepositing a metal over the resulting polypyrrole polymer. No chemical deposition of the metal is required prior to electroplating and the resulting layer of substrate-polymer-metal has excellent adhesion characteristics. The metal deposition is surprisingly smooth and uniform over the relatively high resistance film of polypyrrole. A continuous manufacturing process is obtained by filtering the solution between successive substrates to remove polymer formed in the solution, by maintaining the solution oxidizing potential within selected limits, and by adding a strong oxidant, such as KMnO.sub.4 at periodic intervals to maintain a low sheet resistivity in the resulting conducting polymer film.

  7. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LED Nanowire LEDs GaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs) are a key technology for high brightness LEDs. Although already successful commercially, fundamental physical and device...

  8. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or enable JavaScript if it is disabled in your browser. esearchers describe the motivation and advantages for using organic materials for solar photovoltaics and overview the...

  9. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Photovoltaic Materials and Devices image The efficiencies of organic photovoltatic (OPV) cells have increased sharply over recent years, reaching 8%, or roughly half the...

  10. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    for sustainable energy A sustainable energy future is one of the major global challenges today pointing for device applications targeting both i) increasing the fraction of energy supply coming from sustainable properties (effective mass, concentration and mobility) of InN films by the unique Optical Hall effect

  11. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Materials Analysis (CEMMA) Nanobiophysics Core (Dornsife) Department of Chemistry Instrumentation Facility (Dornsife) Photonics Center Cleanroom and Nanofabrication Facility...

  12. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (JSC) exceeds 16 mAcm2, which is among the highest values reported for a C60-based BHJ solar cell, albeit at a comparatively low VOC. A generalized structure-function...

  13. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials and condensed matter physics, including: the electronic properties of crystalline and amorphous solids and their dependence on the atomic structure; the physics and...

  14. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic alloys provide a new route for improved efficiency all-organic solar cells CEN Researcher Barry Thompson has demonstrated an alternative approach to broaden the absorption...

  15. A JOURNAL DEDICATED TO NANOSCIENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Peng

    * Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell UniVersity, Ithaca, New York 14853 Received March 29 (SWNTs), have gained wide applications, such as in nanoelectronics, sensing, catalysis, and energy from the super-resolution imaging approach,28-36 offers an alternative to study electrochemical

  16. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (QD) and nanopore materials have the potential to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of solar cells for clean power generation by exploiting new physical phenomena and...

  17. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Photovoltaics The efficiencies of organic photovoltatic (OPV) cells have increased sharply over recent years, reaching 8%, or roughly half the efficiency of commercial...

  18. Advanced Materials & NanoSciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Heriot-Watt, Paisley, St Andrews, Strathclyde, and the joint Chemistry Research School

  19. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LEDs. image Hz field profile for a photonic crystal micro-cavity. Large polarization and piezoelectric fields present in InGaN GaN material structures present in typical...

  20. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    . The silica coating increased the number of reac- tive surface hydroxyl groups for the introduction of amine increased largely by conjugation of the oxa-diamide chelator with surface amine groups. Morphology

  1. Investigation of Nanoscience Technologies: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURNS, ALAN R.; MICHALSKE, TERRY A.

    2001-11-01

    The intention of this project was to collaborate with Harvard University in the general area of nanoscale structures, biomolecular materials and their application in support of Sandia's MEMS technology. The expertise at Harvard was crucial in fostering these fundamentally interdisciplinary developments. Areas that were of interest included: (1) nanofabrication that exploits traditional methods (from Si technology) and developing new methods; (2) self-assembly of organic and inorganic systems; (3) assembly and dynamics of membranes and microfluidics; (4) study of the hierarchy of scales in assembly; (5) innovative imaging methods; and (6) hard (engineering)/soft (biological) interfaces. Specifically, we decided to work with Harvard to design and construct an experimental test station to measure molecular transport through single nanopores. The pore may be of natural origin, such as a self-assembled bacterial protein in a lipid bilayer, or an artificial structure in silicon or silicon nitride.

  2. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Organic Inorganic PV Organic photovoltaic (OPV) based solar cells are of interest because organic systems provide the possibility of an easily processed and inexpensive...

  3. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. Improving open circuit potential in hybrid P3HT:CdSe bulk heterojunction solar cells via colloidal tert-butylthiol ligand exchange ACS Nano, 6(5), 4222-30 (2012). DOI:...

  4. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at USC. USC Dornsife College of Letters Arts and Sciences Freshman Seminar The global energy crisis: how to make sense of it all Stephen Bradforth USC Viterbi School of...

  5. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    University--Carbondale Top-Down Approach to Fabricate Organic Dyes for Solar Cells The goal of our research in organic solar cells is to understand the electron excitation and transport processes of solar cell to produce cost-effective dyes for organic solar cells and discuss the preliminary results on the feasibility

  6. The impact of nanoscience on heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Alexis T.

    2003-03-03

    Most catalysts consist of nanometer-sized particles dispersed on a high-surface area support. Advances in characterization methods have led to a molecular level understanding of the relationships between nanoparticle properties and catalytic performance. Together with novel approaches to nanoparticle synthesis, this knowledge is contributing to the design and development of new catalysts.

  7. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and One Word Challenge" poster at the 2013 EFRC PI meeting Title: Using all of the Energy from the Sun to Make Power Authors: P. Daniel "Dan" Dapkus and Michelle Povinelli...

  8. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have reached 100% across the visible spectrum. They are very attractive as solid state lighting sources, which have both high efficiency and low cost. White emitting OLEDs...

  9. Solaris Nanosciences Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin Jump to: navigation, search Name:Solaris

  10. Nanoscience and Technology | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxide capture CS SeminarsNREL PrivateEnergyNST

  11. NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemistry and Nanoscience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12Working with Us ...Your team is superb.Chemistry

  12. A reaction-layer mechanism for the delayed failure of micron-scale polycrystalline silicon structural films subjected to high-cycle fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhlstein, C.L.; Stach, E.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2001-11-01

    A study has been made of high-cycle fatigue in 2um thick structural films of n+- type, polycrystalline silicon for MEMS applications.

  13. H. J. Sutherland, "Frequency Domain Analysis of the Fatigue Loads on Typical Wind Turbine Blades," J. of Solar Energy Engineering, Transactions of ASME, Vol. 118, November, 1996,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ," J. of Solar Energy Engineering, Transactions of ASME, Vol. 118, November, 1996, pp. 204 Energy Technology Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87107 ABSTRACT The fatigue analysis

  14. Metal nanodisks using bicellar templates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A

    2013-12-03

    Metallic nanodisks and a method of making them. The metallic nanodisks are wheel-shaped structures that that provide large surface areas for catalytic applications. The metallic nanodisks are grown within bicelles (disk-like micelles) that template the growth of the metal in the form of approximately circular dendritic sheets. The zero-valent metal forming the nanodisks is formed by reduction of a metal ion using a suitable electron donor species.

  15. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  16. Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Frebel

    2008-02-13

    The abundance patterns of metal-poor stars provide us a wealth of chemical information about various stages of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In particular, these stars allow us to study the formation and evolution of the elements and the involved nucleosynthesis processes. This knowledge is invaluable for our understanding of the cosmic chemical evolution and the onset of star- and galaxy formation. Metal-poor stars are the local equivalent of the high-redshift Universe, and offer crucial observational constraints on the nature of the first stars. This review presents the history of the first discoveries of metal-poor stars that laid the foundation to this field. Observed abundance trends at the lowest metallicities are described, as well as particular classes of metal-poor stars such as r-process and C-rich stars. Scenarios on the origins of the abundances of metal-poor stars and the application of large samples of metal-poor stars to cosmological questions are discussed.

  17. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  18. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  19. EXELFS of Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Y.; Alamgir, F.M.; Schwarz, R.B.; Jain, H.; Williams, D.B.

    1999-11-30

    The feasibility of using extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS) obtained from {approximately}1 nm regions of metallic glasses to study their short-range order has been examined. Ionization edges of the metallic glasses in the electron energy-loss spectrum (EELS) have been obtained from PdNiP bulk metallic glass and Ni{sub 2}P polycrystalline powder in a transmission electron microscope. The complexity of EXELFS analysis of L- and M-ionization edges of heavy elements (Z>22, i.e. Ni and Pd) is addressed by theoretical calculations using an ab initio computer code, and its results are compared with the experimental data.

  20. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  1. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  2. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  3. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  4. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  5. Determining worst-case fatigue thresholds for grain-bridging ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruzic, J.J.; Yuan, R.; Cannon, R.M.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-01-01

    bridging silicon carbide ceramic," Acta Mater. , 46 (2) 17.of R-curve behavior in ceramic/metal composites," Actastresses and R-curves in ceramic/metal composites," J. Eur.

  6. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue S-N curves for carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data indicate significant decreases in fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments when five conditions are satisfied simultaneously: applied strain range, temperature, dissolved oxygen in the water, and S content of the steel are above minimum threshold levels, and loading strain rate is below a threshold value. Only moderate decrease in fatigue life is observed when any one of these conditions is not satisfied. This paper presents several methods that have been proposed for evaluating the effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue S-N curves for carbon and low-alloy steels. Estimations of fatigue lives under actual loading histories are discussed.

  7. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  8. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  9. METALS DESIGN HANDBOOK DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9 06 Revision 0 METALS DESIGN HANDBOOK DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States...

  10. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  11. Molten metal reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  12. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  13. Thermally tolerant multilayer metal membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of a Group IVB or Group VB metal sandwiched between two layers of a Group VIIIB metal selected from the group consisting of palladium, platinum, nickel, rhodium, iridium, cobalt, and alloys thereof, and a non-continuous layer of a metal chalcogenide upon one layer of the Group VIIIB metal is disclosed together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture using such a composite membrane and a process for forming such a composite metal membrane.

  14. Historical overview on Vacuum suitable Welding and fatigue resistance in Research Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    New inventions change the approach of vacuum suitable welding for research purpose. With orbital welding, laser welding and robot welding the possibilities increase to fabricate larger vessels more accurately. Despite this development there is still no perfect understanding on how to avoid virtual leaks and how to make such joints suitable for dynamic stress. By recalling its historical development, it is apparent how welding mistakes began occurring systematically and how to avoid them. With ASDEX-Upgrade as an example, it is shown how the attempt to conduct vacuum suitable welding has decreased the fatigue strength. ITER could repeat the mistakes of ASDEX-Upgrade even for unwanted welding (accidental fusing of joints).

  15. A Strategically Timed Verbal Task Improves Performance and Neurophysiological Alertness During Fatiguing Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atchley, Paul; Chan, Mark; Gregersen, Sabrina

    2013-08-06

    , fatigue inducing, drives which are more typical for motor carrier operators, military operations, or long-distance recreational drives. Second, improved performance was measured primarily by lateral vehicle control. While maintaining a stable lane... sounded if driving speed exceeded 125.53 km/h. Data collection began at the 0.600 km mark and ended at the 177.600 km mark. Data was divided into 9 blocks of 19.733 km. Braking events occurred in the first, fourth, seventh and ninth block of the drive...

  16. Fatigue fracture of thin plates under tensile and transverse shear stresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viz, M.J.; Zehnder, A.T.; Bamford, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Crack growth in thin sheets loaded under tension and transverse shear is studied experimentally and the mechanics of such problems are reviewed. A small scale yielding approach is adopted that describes the crack tip fields using a combination if Kirchhoff plate theory and plane stress elasticity. Techniques for calculating the relevant stress intensity factors are presented and validated with results from six test cases. Fatigue crack growth rates are measured using a double-edge notch test specimen configuration loaded in tension and torsion. A geometrically nonlinear finite element computation is used to determine the stress intensity factors as functions of axial load, torque, and crack length.

  17. Effects of creatine loading on electromyographic fatigue threshold during cycle ergometry in college-aged women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Abbie E.; Herda, Ashley A.; Herda, Trent J.; Ryan, Eric D.; Moon, Jordan R.; Cramer, Joel T.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    @ou.edu; Joel T Cramer - jcramer@ou.edu; Jeffrey R Stout* - jrstout@ou.edu * Corresponding author Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 5 days of Creatine (Cr) loading on the electromyographic fatigue threshold (EMGFT) in college...-aged women. Fifteen healthy college-aged women (mean ± SD = 22.3 ± 1.7 yrs) volunteered to participate in this double-blind, placebo- controlled study and were randomly placed into either placebo (PL – 10 g of flavored dextrose powder; n = 8) or creatine (Cr...

  18. Tensile creep of soil-cement and its relationship to fatigue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Youngsoo

    1985-01-01

    , D(t) = De + Dz x t . As a result, he was able to exPress the crack velocity explicitly and show the crack growth parameters, A and n in Paris' law, in terms of the creep parameters and material properties. A more detailed review of his theory...TENSILE CREEP OF SOIL-CEMENT AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO FATIGUE A Thesis YOUNGSOO KIM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major...

  19. Low-Cycle-Fatigue Behavior of Copper Materials and Their Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogoFeet)LowCycle-Fatigue Behavior of Copper

  20. J. F. Mandell, D. D. Samborsky, and H. J. Sutherland, "Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades", 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Mandell, D. D. Samborsky, and H. J. Sutherland, "Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades", 1999 EWEC, Nice, France, March 1-5, 1999. Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of Composite Materials for Wind

  1. Peroxotitanates for Biodelivery of Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, David; Elvington, M.

    2009-02-11

    Metal-based drugs are largely undeveloped in pharmacology. One limiting factor is the systemic toxicity of metal-based compounds. A solid-phase, sequestratable delivery agent for local delivery of metals could reduce systemic toxicity, facilitating new drug development in this nascent area. Amorphous peroxotitanates (APT) are ion exchange materials with high affinity for several heavy metal ions, and have been proposed to deliver or sequester metal ions in biological contexts. In the current study, we tested a hypothesis that APT are able to deliver metals or metal compounds to cells. We exposed fibroblasts (L929) or monocytes (THP1) to metal-APT materials for 72 h in vitro, then measured cellular mitochondrial activity (SDH-MTT method) to assess the biological impact of the metal-APT materials vs. metals or APT alone. APT alone did not significantly affect cellular mitochondrial activity, but all metal-APT materials suppressed the mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts (by 30-65% of controls). The concentration of metal-APT materials required to suppress cellular mitochondrial activity was below that required for metals alone, suggesting that simple extracellular release of the metals from the metal-APT materials was not the primary mechanism of mitochondrial suppression. In contrast to fibroblasts, no metal-APT material had a measurable effect on THP1 monocyte mitochondrial activity, despite potent suppression by metals alone. This latter result suggested that 'biodelivery' by metal-APT materials may be cell type-specific. Therefore, it appears that APT are plausible solid phase delivery agents of metals or metal compounds to some types of cells for potential therapeutic effect.

  2. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  3. Method for forming metal contacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  4. High temperature fracture and fatigue of ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 6, August 15, 1994--August 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.

    1996-04-01

    This report covers work done in the first year of our new contract {open_quotes}High Temperature Fracture and Fatigue of Ceramics,{close_quotes} which commenced in August, 1995 as a follow-on from our prior contract {open_quotes}Mechanisms of Mechanical Fatigue in Ceramics.{close_quotes} Our activities have consisted mainly of studies of the failure of fibrous ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) at high temperature; with a little fundamental work on the role of stress redistribution in the statistics of fracture and cracking in the presence of viscous fluids.

  5. High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed Metal/Metal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference...

  6. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauerle, James E. (Plum Borough, PA); Reed, William H. (Monroeville, PA); Berkey, Edgar (Murrysville, PA)

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  7. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  8. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirgazi, Hadi, E-mail: Hadi.pirgazi@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent (Belgium); Ghodrat, Sepideh, E-mail: s.ghodrat@tudelft.nl [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Kestens, Leo A.I., E-mail: leo.kestens@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: • Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. • Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. • Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. • Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. • It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  9. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Totemeier; D.M. Wachs; D.L. Porter

    2008-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and impact tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni layer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Impact tests were performed at temperatures from –50 to 400°C; cracks propagating from the V-notch were arrested by delamination at the bond layer for all tests with one exception at –50°C. Fatigue crack growth tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. In all conditions the presence of the Ni bond layer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the layer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous bond layer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-nickel interface.

  10. Fatigue evaluation in maintenance and assembly operations by digital human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Bo; Guillaume, François; 10.1007/s10055-010-0156-8

    2010-01-01

    Virtual human techniques have been used a lot in industrial design in order to consider human factors and ergonomics as early as possible. The physical status (the physical capacity of virtual human) has been mostly treated as invariable in the current available human simulation tools, while indeed the physical capacity varies along time in an operation and the change of the physical capacity depends on the history of the work as well. Virtual Human Status is proposed in this paper in order to assess the difficulty of manual handling operations, especially from the physical perspective. The decrease of the physical capacity before and after an operation is used as an index to indicate the work difficulty. The reduction of physical strength is simulated in a theoretical approach on the basis of a fatigue model in which fatigue resistances of different muscle groups were regressed from 24 existing maximum endurance time (MET) models. A framework based on digital human modeling technique is established to realiz...

  11. Metal-optic and Plasmonic Semiconductor-based Nanolasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhani, Amit

    2012-01-01

    of Metals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .coupled Metal-optic Nanocavities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .dependent quality factors Q metal for good conduc- tors.

  12. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  13. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  14. Metallic carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  15. Fast Rotation vs. Metallicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronaldo Levenhagen; Nelson Vani Leister; Juan Zorec; Yves Fremat

    2005-09-07

    Fast rotation seems to be the major factor to trigger the Be phenomenon. Surface fast rotation can be favored by initial formation conditions such as metal abundance. Models of fast rotating atmospheres and evolutionary tracks are used to determine the stellar fundamental parameters of 120 Be stars situated in spatially well-separated regions to imply there is between them some gradient of metallicity. We study the effects of the incidence of this gradient on the nature of the studied stars as fast rotators.

  16. Catalysis Without Precious Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2010-11-01

    Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Metal alloy identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  18. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Fabricated Metals Sector (NAICS 332) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS...

  19. Locating experiential richness in doom metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    as Trouble) (1984), Metal Blade. Witchfinder General.Death Penalty (1982), Heavy Metal Records.the Balinese Death/ Thrash Metal Scene. ” Popular Music 22,

  20. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-01

    Structural Evolution in Metal Oxide/Semiconductor Colloidalasymmetric one-sided metal-tipped semiconductor nanocrystalGrowth of Magnetic-Metal- Functionalized Semiconductor Oxide

  1. Proceedings of WindPower 95, AWEA, Washington, D.C., 1995. FATIGUE DAMAGE ESTIMATE COMPARISONS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico N.D. Kelley Wind Technology Division NationalProceedings of WindPower 95, AWEA, Washington, D.C., 1995. FATIGUE DAMAGE ESTIMATE COMPARISONS FOR NORTHERN EUROPEAN AND U.S. WIND FARM LOADING ENVIRONMENTS H.J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology Department

  2. Static and Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Static and Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis by Patricio Andres Lillo experienced in candi- date Canadian wind turbine deployment locations. The thesis then narrows its focus

  3. Staring at a computer screen for hours at a time can result in fatigue, eyestrain, headaches and other problems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    and clarity. The computer should be placed at right angles to any windows. Light from windows either aheadStaring at a computer screen for hours at a time can result in fatigue, eyestrain, headaches make computer use more comfortable for your eyes. These are signs of eye problems that can be caused

  4. Int. Symposium on Mechanics and Materials, May 9-14, 2010, Greece Fatigue Investigation of Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    31st Int. Symposium on Mechanics and Materials, May 9-14, 2010, Greece Fatigue Investigation Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece 2 School of Pedagogical and Technological Education, 14121 N. Heraklion, Athens, Greece 3 Technological Educational Institution of Serres, 62124

  5. Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium/Copper Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Interfacial fracture toughness and cyclic temperatures, and assessed in terms of interfacial chemistry and microstructure. The mean interfacial fracture

  6. High-Frequency Fatigue Behavior of Woven-Fiber-Fabric-Reinforced Polymer-Derived Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    heat exchangers, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic- matrix composites (CFCMCs) will encounter cyclic glass-matrix composite showed that, unlike monolithic ceramics, fatigue life of this composite decreased. The emphasis of processing research in the ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) area has increasingly shifted from

  7. HIGH-TEMPERATURE FRACTURE AND FATIGUE RESISTANCE OF A DUCTILE b-TiNb REINFORCED g-TiAl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    are in part aimed at improving their low room-temperature ten- sile ductility and fracture toughness, bothHIGH-TEMPERATURE FRACTURE AND FATIGUE RESISTANCE OF A DUCTILE b-TiNb REINFORCED g the fracture toughness of g-TiAl, even at high temperatures, from about 12 to H40 MPa m1/2 , although

  8. High-cycle fatigue of nickel-base superalloy Rene 104 (ME3): Interaction of microstructurally small cracks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of turbine engine failures in aircraft. In this work, we consider the feasibility of using grain-cycle fatigue (HCF) in turbine engine components represents a problem of considerable importance for civilian. In conventional gas-turbine engines, the highest temperature components are invariably made of nickel

  9. Short and Large Crack, Mixed-Mode Fatigue-Crack Growth Thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    and control of failures due to high cycle fatigue (HCF) in turbine engine components is currently one, Dr. J. P. Campbell and Professor R. O. Ritchie2 Department of Materials Science and Engineering-crack growth thresholds with crack size and shape are reported for a Ti-6Al-4V turbine blade alloy, heat

  10. High-Cycle Fatigue of Nickel-Based Superalloy ME3 at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures: Role of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert O.

    periods, possibly within a single flight segment. Conse- quently, HCF-critical turbine-engine components of Grain-Boundary Engineering YONG GAO, MUKUL KUMAR, R.K. NALLA, and R.O. RITCHIE High-cycle fatigue (HCF-frequency cyclic loading, remains a principal cause of failures in gas-turbine propul- sion systems. In this work

  11. Metal working lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andress, H.J.; Davis, R.H.; Schick, J.W.

    1981-08-11

    A lubricant concentrate for use in metal processing comprises a sulfur compound such as a sulfurized olefin or sulfurized mineral oil and an ester prepared from a fatty acid having 12 to 40 carbon atoms or the dimer thereof or a polyalkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride and a hydroxyl-containing amine.

  12. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, William V. (Boulder, CO)

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  13. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  14. The erosion of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, David Richard

    1980-10-21

    The study of the erosion of metallic surfaces by solid particles has been an area of dispute recently (1980) especially concerning the importance of target melting as a mechanism for the removal of material. In addition, erosion by particles at a...

  15. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  16. Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth at Structural Discontinuities and Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. F. W. Brust; Dr. G. M. Wilkowski; Dr. P. Krishnaswamy; Mr. Keith Wichman

    2010-01-27

    The subsection ASME NH high temperature design procedure does not admit crack-like defects into the structural components. The US NRC identified the lack of treatment of crack growth within NH as a limitation of the code and thus this effort was undertaken. This effort is broken into two parts. Part 1, summarized here, involved examining all high temperature creep-fatigue crack growth codes being used today and from these, the task objective was to choose a methodology that is appropriate for possible implementation within NH. The second part of this task, which has just started, is to develop design rules for possible implementation within NH. This second part is a challenge since all codes require step-by-step analysis procedures to be undertaken in order to assess the crack growth and life of the component. Simple rules for design do not exist in any code at present. The codes examined in this effort included R5, RCC-MR (A16), BS 7910, API 579, and ATK (and some lesser known codes). There are several reasons that the capability for assessing cracks in high temperature nuclear components is desirable. These include: (1) Some components that are part of GEN IV reactors may have geometries that have sharp corners - which are essentially cracks. Design of these components within the traditional ASME NH procedure is quite challenging. It is natural to ensure adequate life design by modeling these features as cracks within a creep-fatigue crack growth procedure. (2) Workmanship flaws in welds sometimes occur and are accepted in some ASME code sections. It can be convenient to consider these as flaws when making a design life assessment. (3) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and inspection methods after fabrication are limited in the size of the crack or flaw that can be detected. It is often convenient to perform a life assessment using a flaw of a size that represents the maximum size that can elude detection. (4) Flaws that are observed using in-service detection methods often need to be addressed as plants age. Shutdown inspection intervals can only be designed using creep and creep-fatigue crack growth techniques. (5) The use of crack growth procedures can aid in examining the seriousness of creep damage in structural components. How cracks grow can be used to assess margins on components and lead to further safe operation. After examining the pros and cons of all these methods, the R5 code was chosen as the most up-to-date and validated high temperature creep and creep fatigue code currently used in the world at present. R5 is considered the leader because the code: (1) has well established and validated rules, (2) has a team of experts continually improving and updating it, (3) has software that can be used by designers, (4) extensive validation in many parts with available data from BE resources as well as input from Imperial college's database, and (5) was specifically developed for use in nuclear plants. R5 was specifically developed for use in gas cooled nuclear reactors which operate in the UK and much of the experience is based on materials and temperatures which are experienced in these reactors. If the next generation advanced reactors to be built in the US used these same materials within the same temperature ranges as these reactors, then R5 may be appropriate for consideration of direct implementation within ASME code NH or Section XI. However, until more verification and validation of these creep/fatigue crack growth rules for the specific materials and temperatures to be used in the GEN IV reactors is complete, ASME should consider delaying this implementation. With this in mind, it is this authors opinion that R5 methods are the best available for code use today. The focus of this work was to examine the literature for creep and creep-fatigue crack growth procedures that are well established in codes in other countries and choose a procedure to consider implementation into ASME NH. It is very important to recognize that all creep and creep fatigue crack growth procedures that are part of high temperature

  17. 9 Metal to Non-metal Transitions in Solids and on Surfaces studied using Photoemission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    9 Metal to Non-metal Transitions in Solids and on Surfaces studied using Photoemission Spectroscopy of the electrical properties of a material between those of a metal and those of a non-metal (be it semiconducting metal to non-metal transitions. (Thephrase `metal to non-metal transition' is used in this paper

  18. Reversible Bending Fatigue Test System for Investigating Vibration Integrity of Spent Nuclear Fuel during Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L; Flanagan, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading during road or rail shipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve the understanding of the impacts on SNF integrity due to vibration loading, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet the nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety and security of spent nuclear fuel storage and transport operations. The ORNL developed test system can perform reversible-bending fatigue testing to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The testing apparatus is also designed to meet the challenges of hot-cell operation, including remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, in-situ test specimen deformation measurement, and implementation of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. The system contains a U-frame set-up equipped with uniquely designed grip rigs, to protect SNF rod and to ensure valid test results, and use of 3 specially designed LVDTs to obtain the in-situ curvature measurement. A variety of surrogate test rods have been used to develop and calibrate the test system as well as in performing a series of systematic cyclic fatigue tests. The surrogate rods include stainless steel (SS) cladding, SS cladding with cast epoxy, and SS cladding with alumina pellets inserts simulating fuel pellets. Testing to date has shown that the interface bonding between the SS cladding and the alumina pellets has a significant impact on the bending response of the test rods as well as their fatigue strength. The failure behaviors observed from tested surrogate rods provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying failure mechanisms of the SNF surrogate rod under vibration which has not been achieved previously. The newly developed device is scheduled to be installed in the hot-cell in summer 2013 to test high burnup SNF.

  19. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, L.J.

    1982-09-20

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  20. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  1. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1986-01-01

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  2. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  3. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  4. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  5. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  6. Impact of metal-modified AFM tips on the fluorescence of single nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, Universität

    Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitätsstra�e 25, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany ABSTRACT The influence, alloys, sizes and shapes, giving insight into the related energy transfer processes and quenching rearrangements8-10 . The basic concept of mechanical approaches is the usage of a small transducer attached

  7. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  8. Testing Controls to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory are designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. This paper describes testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control methods. The controller uses independent blade pitch to regulate the turbine's speed in Region 3, mitigate the effects of shear across the rotor disk, and add active damping to the tower's first fore-aft bending mode. Additionally, a separate generator torque control loop is designed to add active damping to the tower's first side-side mode and the first drivetraintorsion mode. This paper discusses preliminary implementation and field tests of this controller in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Also included are preliminary comparisons of the performance of this controller to results from a typical baseline Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller designed with just Region 3 speed regulation as the goal.

  9. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-03-07

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  10. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-04-02

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  11. Spray casting of metallic preforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

  12. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  13. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  14. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  15. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

  16. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  17. COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

  18. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / TransformingTransuranic Waste RetrievalTrending: Metal Oxo

  19. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / TransformingTransuranic Waste RetrievalTrending: Metal

  20. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions | National NuclearProbingProbing metal solidification

  1. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSS A-ZTravisTrending: Metal

  2. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSSTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds

  3. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSSTrending: Metal Oxo

  4. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices inPrincipalFirm Exchange . . .Probing metal

  5. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  6. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  7. Theory manual for FAROW version 1.1: A numerical analysis of the Fatigue And Reliability Of Wind turbine components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WUBTERSTEUBMSTEVEB R.; VEERS,PAUL S.

    2000-01-01

    Because the fatigue lifetime of wind turbine components depends on several factors that are highly variable, a numerical analysis tool called FAROW has been created to cast the problem of component fatigue life in a probabilistic framework. The probabilistic analysis is accomplished using methods of structural reliability (FORM/SORM). While the workings of the FAROW software package are defined in the user's manual, this theory manual outlines the mathematical basis. A deterministic solution for the time to failure is made possible by assuming analytical forms for the basic inputs of wind speed, stress response, and material resistance. Each parameter of the assumed forms for the inputs can be defined to be a random variable. The analytical framework is described and the solution for time to failure is derived.

  8. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datta, Ravindra (Iowa City, IA); Singh, Ajeet (Iowa City, IA); Halasz, Istvan (Iowa City, IA); Serban, Manuela (Iowa City, IA)

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  9. Degenerate doping of metallic anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody A; Zeller, Robert A; Johnson, Paul B; Switzer, Elise E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the invention relate to an electrochemical cell comprising: (i) a fuel electrode comprising a metal fuel, (ii) a positive electrode, (iii) an ionically conductive medium, and (iv) a dopant; the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the metal fuel is oxidized at the fuel electrode and the dopant increases the conductivity of the metal fuel oxidation product. In an embodiment, the oxidation product comprises an oxide of the metal fuel which is doped degenerately. In an embodiment, the positive electrode is an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, wherein during discharge mode, oxygen is reduced at the air electrode. Embodiments of the invention also relate to methods of producing an electrode comprising a metal and a doped metal oxidation product.

  10. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  11. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  12. REVERSIBLE METAL-TO-METAL METHYL TRANSFER IN n5-CYCLOPENTADIENYL(TRIPHENYLPHOSPHINE)DIMETHYLCOBALT(III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryndza, Henry E.

    2013-01-01

    transfer between transition metals which is assisted by aJournal of the American Chemical Society REVERSIBLE METAL-TO-METAL METHYL TRANSFER IN n 5-CYCLOPENTAOIENYL(

  13. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  14. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  15. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  16. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  17. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  18. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  19. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  20. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  1. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  2. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  3. Heavy metal movement in metal-contaminated soil profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenbin; Shuman, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Heavy metal movement in soil profiles is a major environmental concern because even slow transport through the soil may eventually lead to deterioration of groundwater quality. In this study, three metal-contaminated soil (Fuquay, Dothan, and Clarendon) were selected from cropland were a high-metal flue dust had been applied annually for 6 years to raise soil pH, with application ending 4 years before sampling. One uncontaminated soil (Tifton) from the same physiographic area was also sampled as a control. Soil samples were collected in 15-cm increments from the surface to 105 cm in depth. Total contents of Zn, Cd, and Pb in the soils samples were determined. To better understand metal movement in relation to metal fractions in the soil profile, soil samples were also extracted sequentially for exchangeable (EXC), organic matter (OM), Mn oxide (MNO), amorphous Fe oxide (AFEO), crystalline Fe oxide (CFEO), and residual (RES) fractions. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  5. Non-Destructive Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints Non-Destructive Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  6. Histological Features of Pseudotumor-like Tissues From Metal-on-Metal Hips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Pat; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Nelson, Scott; Takamura, Karren; Smet, Koen; Amstutz, Harlan C.

    2010-01-01

    Fayyazi A, Flury R, Windler M, Koster G, Lohmann CH. Metal-on-metal bearings and hyper- sensitivity in patients withthe acetabular com- ponent and metal ion levels in metal-on-

  7. On the effect of deep-rolling and laser-peening on the stress-controlled low- and high-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-6Al-4V at elevated temperatures up to 550?C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, IAltenberger, RKNalla, YSano LWagner, RO

    2013-01-01

    high-cycle fatigue in a turbine engine Ti–6Al–4V alloy. Int.surface treatment in the turbine engine industry, although

  8. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2006-12-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni interlayer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. Crack growth tests at a range of ?K were also performed on specimens machined from the shell of the superheater. In all conditions the presence of the Ni interlayer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the interlayer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous interlayer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-interlayer interface.

  9. Rolling contact fatigue in high vacuum using ion plated nickel-copper-silver solid lubrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2011-01-15

    Ion plated, nickel-copper-silver coated steel ball bearings that were tested in rolling contact fatigue (RCF) experiments in high vacuum are presented in this article. ANSI T5 ball bearings were coated with approximately 10 nm of nickel-copper followed by 100 nm of silver using a dc ion plating process. The balls were then tested for RCF in vacuum in the 10{sup -7} Torr range at 130 Hz rotational speed and at 4.1 GPa Hertzian contact stress. The significance of this work is in the extension of RCF testing to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application using silver as a lubricant instead of oil. The effects of pressure and voltage on the ion plating process were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy and RCF life testing in UHV. Test results with a ball size of 5/16 in. in UHV show that deposition at voltages greater than 2.5 kV shortens the RCF life and introduces a unique failure mode. Voltage and pressure fluctuations during the deposition process result in significant thickness monitor measurement errors as well. A regulator control scheme that minimizes the process pressure overshoot is also simulated.

  10. Fatigue cracking of a bare steel first wall in an inertial confinement fusion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R. M.; Abbott, R. P.; Havstad, M. A.; Dunne, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion power plants will deposit high energy X-rays onto the outer surfaces of the first wall many times a second for the lifetime of the plant. These X-rays create brief temperature spikes in the first few microns of the wall, which cause an associated highly compressive stress response on the surface of the material. The periodicity of this stress pulse is a concern due to the possibility of fatigue cracking of the wall. We have used finite element analyses to simulate the conditions present on the first wall in order to evaluate the driving force of crack propagation on fusion-facing surface cracks. Analysis results indicate that the X-ray induced plastic compressive stress creates a region of residual tension on the surface between pulses. This tension film will likely result in surface cracking upon repeated cycling. Additionally, the compressive pulse may induce plasticity ahead of the crack tip, leaving residual tension in its wake. However, the stress amplitude decreases dramatically for depths greater than 80–100 ?m into the fusion-facing surface. Crack propagation models as well as stress-life estimates agree that even though small cracks may form on the surface of the wall, they are unlikely to propagate further than 100 ?m without assistance from creep or grain erosion phenomena.

  11. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  12. The crystallography of fatigue crack initiation in Incoloy-908 and A-286 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenn, C.R. |

    1996-12-01

    Fatigue crack initiation in the austenitic Fe-Ni superalloys Incoloy-908 and A-286 is examined using local crystallographic orientation measurements. Results are consistent with sharp transgranular initiation and propagation occurring almost exclusively on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes in Incoloy-908 but on a variety of low index planes in A-286. This difference is attributed to the influence of the semicoherent grain boundary {eta} phase in A-286. Initiation in each alloy occurred both intergranularly and transgranularly and was often associated with blocky surface oxide and carbide inclusions. Taylor factor and resolved shear stress and strain crack initiation hypotheses were tested, but despite an inconclusive suggestion of a minimum required {l_brace}111{r_brace} shear stress, none of the hypotheses were found to convincingly describe preferred initiation sites, even within the subsets of transgranular cracks apparently free from the influence of surface inclusions. Subsurface inclusions are thought to play a significant role in crack initiation. These materials have applications for use in structural conduit for high field superconducting magnets designed for fusion energy use.

  13. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (Evans, GA); Imrich, Kenneth J. (Grovetown, GA)

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  14. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  16. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  17. Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals or Breaking the Irreducible Concentration Barrier R. Pitt Technologies for Urban Stormwater Conducted by the University of Alabamay y from 1999 to 2003 · Examined the characteristics and treatability of stormwater heavy metals at selected source areas and at outfalls. · Conducted

  18. Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

    1980-01-01

    Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

  19. Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals by Brian Ross Maddox Electron correlation can affect profound changes transition in a transition metal monoxide. iv #12;The lanthanides (the 4f metals also known as rare-earths

  20. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    2011-11-29

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  1. Metal-binding polymesr as chelating agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadi, Zahra

    2011-04-11

    , high affinity binding of toxic metals by these functionalized hydrogels offers potential applications in waste water treatment and may enable applications in acute metal poisoning. Finally, a unique synthetic methodology using similar metal chelating...

  2. Metal-directed protein self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgado. Eric N.

    2010-01-01

    F. A. 2010. Evolution of metal selectivity in templatedR. J. , Tezcan, F. A. 2010. Metal-Directed Protein Self-B. , Tezcan, F. A. 2010. Metal templated design of protein

  3. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    by Energetic Condensation of Metal Plasmas André AndersD: Appl. Phys. (2006) Metal plasmas for the fabrication ofA review is provided covering metal plasma production, the

  4. Metal-templated assembly of protein cages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huard, Dustin Johnathen Edward

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 2. Generation of Metal-Responsive HuHF Buildingprotein interactions through metal coordination: Assembly ofSalgado, E.N. , et al. , Metal-mediated self-assembly of

  5. Modeling the glass forming ability of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, Justin Lee

    2007-01-01

    compositions without rare earth metals in the Fe-Cr-Mo-C-B-Wsmall percentages of rare earth metals as the oxide formingmore, often containing rare earth metals, are among the best

  6. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  7. MECS 2006 - Fabricated Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Fabricated Metals More Documents & Publications Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Cement MECS 2006 - Glass...

  8. Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar...

  9. Thermodynamics of metallic systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamics of metallic systems Many thermodynamics properties of metallic systems are not readily available through experimental measurements or widely available databases...

  10. BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rosa L.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic Inclusions in Uranium Dioxide", LBL-11117 (1980).in Hypostoichiornetric Uranium Dioxide 11 , LBL-11095 (OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa L. Yang and

  11. Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials including light-weight complex hydrides, destabilized binary hydrides, intermetallic hydrides,...

  12. Light metal explosives and propellants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Lowell L.; Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Nuckolls, John H.; Pagoria, Phillip F.; Viecelli, James A.

    2005-04-05

    Disclosed herein are light metal explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants (LME&Ps) comprising a light metal component such as Li, B, Be or their hydrides or intermetallic compounds and alloys containing them and an oxidizer component containing a classic explosive, such as CL-20, or a non-explosive oxidizer, such as lithium perchlorate, or combinations thereof. LME&P formulations may have light metal particles and oxidizer particles ranging in size from 0.01 .mu.m to 1000 .mu.m.

  13. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  14. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  15. Nucleosynthesis in Metal-Free and Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Zhong Qian

    2008-07-04

    There have been a number of important recent developments in theoretical and observational studies of nucleosynthesis, especially regarding nucleosynthetic sources at low metallicities. Those selected for discussion here include the origin of Li6, the primary production of N, the s-process, and the supernova sources for three groups of metals: (1) C to Zn with mass numbers A<70, (2) Sr to Ag with A~90-110, and (3) r-process nuclei with A~130 and above.

  16. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  17. EROSION MECHANISM IN DUCTILE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., Robert

    2013-01-01

    England. Mayvflle, fL A. , "Mechanism of fV1aterial RemovalSubmitted to WEAR EROSION MECHANISM IN DUCTILE METALS Robertmetals. ace and erosion rate mechanism is a signifi- mic in

  18. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  19. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A. C.; Riley, L. A.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Ban, C.; Gillaspie, D. T.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-05-01

    This summarizes NREL's FY09 battery materials research activity in developing metal oxide nanostructured anodes to enable high-energy, durable and affordable li-ion batteries for HEVs and PHEVs.

  20. Development of the Non-Destructive Evaluation System Using an Eddy Current Probe for Detection of Fatigue Damage in a Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, M. [Department of Computer and Control Engineering, Oita National College of Technology, 1666 Maki, Oita, 870-0152 (Japan); Yakushiji, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oita National College of Technology, 1666 Maki, Oita, 870-0152 (Japan); Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita, 870-1192 (Japan)

    2006-03-06

    The non-destructive evaluation system which is developed using an eddy current probe to evaluate fatigue damage in an austenitic stainless steel is reported in this paper. This probe is composed of the ferrite core and two pick-up coils connected differentially. The eddy current induced by the excitation coil is disarranged by nonuniform distribution of electromagnetic characteristics due to fatigue damage. The structural function of the eddy current probe proposed, enable to detect the eddy current disarrangement by fatigue damage. This probe detects the change of electromagnetic characteristics in the direction of X. In this paper, SUS304, a austenitic stainless steel was used as the sample. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the probe clearly depends on the number of stress cycles.

  1. Metal-sensing layer-semiconductor and metal-sensing layer-metal heterostructure gas sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Li, Zheng; Fonash, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Extremely sensitive gas sensors can be fabricated using heterostructures of the form metal-sensing layer-semiconductor or metal-sensing layer-metal. These structures are heterostructure diodes which have the barrier controlling transport at least partially located in the sensing layer. In the presence of the gas species to be detected, the electrical properties of the sensing layer evolve, resulting in a modification of the barrier to electric current transport and, hence, resulting in detection due to changes in the current-voltage characteristics of the device. This type of sensor structure is demonstrated using the Pd/Ti-O/sub x/Ti heterostructure hydrogen detector.

  2. This paper is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. COMPOSITE MATERIALS FATIGUE ISSUES IN WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the United States. COMPOSITE MATERIALS FATIGUE ISSUES IN WIND TURBINE BLADE CONSTRUCTION John F. Mandell studies of composite laminates of interest for wind turbine blade construction. In addition to the primary requirements of stiffness, strength, and ease of processing, wind blade materials must withstand severe fatigue

  3. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  4. Effects of Glass-Forming Metallic Film on the Fatigue Behavior of C-2000 Ni-Based Alloy , C. L. Chiang1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yanfei

    the propagation of shear bands is confined in order to prevent catastrophic failure, which thus motivates us region (T), the control of the nanocrystallization and amorphization could be realized [2]. Recently as the substrate material. The superalloy samples with geometry of 3 × 3 × 25 mm3 were ground with a 800-grit sand

  5. Progress Letter Report on Bending Fatigue Test System Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study (Out-of-cell fatigue testing development - Task 2.4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Cox, Thomas S [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    Vibration integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel in transportation remains to be a critical component of US nuclear waste management system. The structural evaluation of package for spent fuel transportation eventually will need to see if the content or spent fuel is in a subcritical condition. However, a system for testing and characterizing such spent fuel is still lacking mainly due to the complication involved with dealing radioactive specimens in a hot cell environment. Apparently, the current state-of-the-art in spent fuel research and development is quite far away from the delivery of reliable mechanical property data for the assessment of spent fuels in the transport package evaluation. Under the sponsorship of US NRC, ORNL has taken the challenge in developing a robust testing system for spent fuel in hot cell. An extensive literature survey was carried out and unique requirements of such testing system were identified. The U-frame setup has come to the top among various designs examined for reverse bending fatigue test of spent fuel rod. The U-frame has many features that deserve mentioned here: Easy to install spent fuel rod in test; Less linkages than in conventional bending test setup such as three-point or four-point bending; Target the failure mode relevant to the fracture of spent fuel rod in transportation by focusing on pure bending; The continuous calibrations and modifications resulted in the third generation (3G) U-frame testing setup. Rigid arms are split along the LBB axis at rod sample ends. For each arm, this results in a large arm body and an end piece. Mating halves of bushings were modified into two V-shaped surfaces on which linear roller bearings (LRB) are embedded. The rod specimen is installed into the test fixture through opening and closing slide end-pieces. The 3G apparently has addressed major issues of setup identified in the previous stage and been proven to be eligible to be further pursued in this project. On the other hand, the purchase of universal testing machine or Bose dual LM2 TB was completed and the testing system was delivered to ORNL in August 2012. The preliminary confirmation of the system and on-site training were given by Bose field engineer and regional manager on 8/1-8/2/2012. The calibration of Bose testing system has been performed by ORNL because the integration of ORNL setup into the Bose TestBench occurred after the installation. Major challenge with this process arose from two aspects: 1) the load control involves two load cells, and 2) U-frame setup itself is a non-standard specimen. ORNL has been able to implement the load control through Cycle Indirect along with pinning the U-frame setup. Two meetings with ORNL hot-cell group (November 2012 and January 2013) were held to discuss the potential issues with both epoxy mounting of rigid sleeve and U-frame setup. Many suggestions were provided to make the procedure friendlier to the manipulator in hot cell. Addressing of these suggestions resulted in another cycle of modifications of both vise mold and setup. The initial meeting with ORNL I&C group occurred in November 2012 with regard to the Bose cable modification and design of central panel to integrate the cables and wires. The first round of cable modification and central panel fabrication was completed in February 2012. The testing with the modified cables exhibited substantial noises and the testing system was not shown to be stable. It was believed the cross talk was responsible to the noise, and a central panel with a better grounding and shielding was highly recommended. The central panel has been re-designed and fabricated in March 2013. In the subsequent period, the ORNL made substantial effort to debug the noises with the load cell channel, and to resolve the noises and nonlinearity with RDP LVDTs related to the integration of RDP LVDTs to Bose system. At the same time, ORNL has completed the verification tests of Bose test system, including cycle tests under reversal bending in load control, bending tests under monotonic load, and cycle test

  6. Metal detector technology data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, L.K.; Gallo, L.R.; Murray, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    The tests described in this report were conducted to obtain information on the effects target characteristics have on portal type metal detector response. A second purpose of the tests was to determine the effect of detector type and settings on the detection of the targets. Although in some cases comparison performance of different types and makes of metal detectors is found herein, that is not the primary purpose of the report. Further, because of the many variables that affect metal detector performance, the information presented can be used only in a general way. The results of these tests can show general trends in metal detection, but do little for making accurate predictions as to metal detector response to a target with a complex shape such as a handgun. The shape of an object and its specific metal content (both type and treatment) can have a significant influence on detection. Thus it should not be surprising that levels of detection for a small 100g stainless steel handgun are considerably different than for detection of the 100g stainless steel right circular cylinder that was used in these tests. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Molten metal injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA); Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Bigler, Nicolas (Morin Heights, CA); Arnaud, Guy (Riviere-Beaudette, CA)

    2003-04-01

    Disclosed is a molten metal injector system including a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and a molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal having a metal oxide film surface. The bottom side of the mold faces the holder furnace. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The injector projects into the holder furnace and is in fluid communication with the mold cavity. The injector includes a piston positioned within a piston cavity defined by a cylinder for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace and injecting the molten metal into the mold cavity under pressure. The piston and cylinder are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder further includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity. The molten metal intake is located below the metal oxide film surface of the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. A method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity of a casting mold is also disclosed.

  8. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  9. Maskless laser writing of microscopic metallic interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1995-10-17

    A method of forming a metal pattern on a substrate is disclosed. The method includes depositing an insulative nitride film on a substrate and irradiating a laser beam onto the nitride film, thus decomposing the metal nitride into a metal constituent and a gaseous constituent, the metal constituent remaining in the nitride film as a conductive pattern. 4 figs.

  10. Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.; Kneisel, P.

    1995-12-26

    A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area. 4 figs.

  11. Anaerobic microbial remobilization of coprecipitated metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-10-11

    A process is provided for solubilizing coprecipitated metals. Metals in waste streams are concentrated by treatment with an iron oxide coprecipitating agent. The coprecipitated metals are solubilized by contacting the coprecipitate with a bacterial culture of a Clostridium species ATCC 53464. The remobilized metals can then be recovered and recycled. 4 figs.

  12. Metal nanoparticles as a conductive catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-03

    A metal nanocluster composite material for use as a conductive catalyst. The metal nanocluster composite material has metal nanoclusters on a carbon substrate formed within a porous zeolitic material, forming stable metal nanoclusters with a size distribution between 0.6-10 nm and, more particularly, nanoclusters with a size distribution in a range as low as 0.6-0.9 nm.

  13. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  14. METAL IONS: Physiological function and Pathological rle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    METAL IONS: Physiological function and Pathological rôle #12;METAL IONS ARE ESSENTIAL CELL COMPONENTS At least one-third of all proteins encoded in the human genome contain metal ions They can easily of biological processes Their ionization state influences how easily metal can get into cells (e.g.: Fe++ cross

  15. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns Hisn #12;E. coli cell lysates containing a recombinant Hisn-tagged protein were purified using Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns and competitor products. The Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns were pre- loaded with different metal ions

  16. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  17. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  18. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  19. All-Angle Negative Refraction for Surface Plasmon Waves Using a Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    All-Angle Negative Refraction for Surface Plasmon Waves Using a Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structure, California 94305, USA (Received 16 September 2005; published 24 February 2006) We show that a metal-dielectric-metal structure can function as a negative refraction lens for surface plasmon waves on a metal surface

  20. Characterization and prioritization of mining-related metal sources with metal loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Characterization and prioritization of mining- related metal sources with metal loading tracer-related metal sources with metal loading tracer dilution tests, and a review of regulations and mine restoration by Professor Joseph N. Ryan Metal-mining associated wastes in the Lefthand Creek watershed in Boulder County