Sample records for metal fatigue nanoscience

  1. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE Nanoscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    - consumer electronics, personal care products, clothing, and even solar panels. Nanoscience lies of profound theo- retical insights, advances in scientific in- strumentation, and massive computing power, we

  2. Modeling Metal Fatigue As a Key Step in PV Module Life Time Prediction (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers modeling metal fatigue as a key step in photovoltaic (PV) module lifetime predictions. Described are time-dependent and time-independent case studies.

  3. carleton.ca Nanoscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    range of industries, from construction and aeronautics to vehicle design and biomedicine. Nanoscience pollution. Nanowires have remarkable properties that are useful for storing computer data, while, industry- sponsored labs and political organizations, all of which provide Carleton students with rich

  4. Nanoscience and nanotechnology as seen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    nanoscience to make a `quantum leap' · Analog circuits · Digital circuits· Digital circuits · Quantum circuits2/13/2012 1 Nanoscience and nanotechnology as seen through quantum dots Pat Kambhampati Department science to technology · MRI ­ a good thing! · But where did it come from? ­ Quantum Mechanics (1920's) ­ I

  5. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Model for Metallic Alloys R. C. Dimitriu and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    and aluminium alloys. It appears therefore that a large proportion of the differences in the fatigue crack against iron, aluminium and titanium alloys; it does however require a prior knowledge of the thresholdFatigue Crack Growth Rate Model for Metallic Alloys R. C. Dimitriu and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia

  6. Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rung, Robert; Stewart, Diane, Dahl, Cindy

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve its goals in meeting future clean energy requirements, the United States must develop well trained people, and the steady stream of scientific and technical innovations they produce. Education in the emerging fields of nanoscience is expected to be critical in this endeavor. Access to the basic tools used in understanding nanoscience is lacking in the education environment. The goal of this program was to develop affordable electron microscopes for nanotechnology undergraduate education, student research experiences, and workforce training. The outcome was to complete the development and delivery of tools to education institutions for evaluation. The evaluation of the tools was accomplished under a second DOE funded effort, DE-FG02-06ER64248 “Tools for Nanotechnology Education Development”, and administered by the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) division. The final report from that program is attached to this report as an appendix as a courtesy.

  7. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2014 Royal your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

  8. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2015 Holiday Inn your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

  9. Nanoscience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSRdiodes Quantum dot

  10. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a cooperative venture of the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to encourage and enhance high-impact and high-quality nanoscience and nanotechnology of all types. This first annual report for the JIN summarizes activities beginning in 2001 and ending at the close of fiscal year 2003 and therefore represents somewhat less than two years of activities. Major portions of the JIN resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff scientists and University of Washington (UW) professors. These fellowships were awarded on the basis of applications that included research proposals. JIN co-sponsors an annual Nanoscale Science and Technology Workshop held in Seattle. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of Alaska. The initial JIN agreement recognized that expansion of cooperation beyond UW and PNNL would be highly valuable. Starting in early 2003, efforts were initiated to form a regional communication link called the Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network (N?). In concept, N? is a tool to encourage communication and help identify regional resources and nanoscience and technology activities.

  11. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the inherently interdisciplinary nature of nanoscience and nanotechnology, research in this arena is often significantly enhanced through creative cooperative activities. The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a venture of the University of Washington (UW) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to encourage and enhance high impact and high quality nanoscience and nanotechnology research that leverages the strengths and capabilities of both institutions, and to facilitate education in these areas. This report summarizes JIN award activities that took place during fiscal year 2004 and provides a historical list of JIN awardees, their resulting publications, and JIN-related meetings. Major portions of the JIN efforts and resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by PNNL staff scientists and UW professors. JIN fellowships are awarded on the basis of applications that include research proposals. They have been very successful in expanding collaborations between PNNL and UW, which have led to many excellent joint publications and presentations and enhanced the competitiveness of both institutions for external grant funding. JIN-based interactions are playing a significant role in creating new research directions and reshaping existing research programs at both the UW and PNNL. The JIN also co-sponsors workshops on Nanoscale Science and Technology, four of which have been held in Seattle and one in Richland. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant, Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology, has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of Alaska. The JIN agreement recognizes that cooperation beyond UW and PNNL is highly valuable. Starting in early 2003, efforts were initiated to form a regional communication link called the Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network (N4). In concept, N4 is a tool to encourage communication and help identify regional resources and nanoscience and technology activities.

  12. Advanced Materials / Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    range from superconductors to insulators, from emitters to sensors and from static to THz or even opticO metallic, TiO2 insulator · SrTiO3: insulator, SrTiO3:Nb (0.5 %wt) metallic and superconducting below 900 mCu3O7-d : superconductor high Tc : 93K #12;Composition · Small compositional variations can

  13. Solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    length scales of 2 m, i.e., to less than the critical crack size for failure. Confinement of the damage of magnitude, making these ``designed'' composites as resistant to fatigue dam- age as high-strength steels failure can ensue along a single shear plane with essentially zero macroscopic ductility (6, 7

  14. Modelling the role of non metallic inclusions on the anisotropic fatigue behaviour of forged steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reported as being 35% for 42CrMo4 steel [1] and 15% for a duplex stainless steel [2]. To design a forged steel E. Pessard* , F. Morel, A. Morel, D. Bellett LAMPA (EA1427) Arts et Métiers ParisTech Angers 2, Bd. This study aims at describing the high cycle fatigue response of a forged bainitic steel. This material

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Nanosciences

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  16. Level MSc 2013/14 Nanoscience to Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Level MSc 2013/14 Nanoscience to Nanotechnology MSc Nanoscience to Nanotechnology Coordinator: Dr Nanoscale Structures and Devices 10 Credits Mr. TGG Maffeis/Dr. L Li/Dr. KS Teng EGNM02 Soft Nanotechnology Nano(geno)toxicology 10 Credits Dr. SH Doak EGNM05 Bio-nanotechnology 10 Credits Dr. CJ Wright PM-M23

  17. UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen Cook, managing editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen journal dedicated to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Aspiring authors went through a peer-review process fashioned after professional journals around the country. They gained valuable educational experience

  18. Nanoscience and Nanostructures for Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Nanoscience and Nanostructures for Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels Arthur J. Nozik National Renewable to enhance the power conversion efficiency of solar cells for photovoltaic and solar fuels production of the technological status of nanocrystals and nanostructures for third generation photovoltaic cells and solar fuels

  19. The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology A Look Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology ­ A Look Ahead Robert Kavetsky Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street, Arlington, VA., USA Robert_Kavetsky@onr.navy.mil ABSTRACT The Navy to building the "Navy After Next". The Office of Naval Research provided a leadership role in exploring those

  20. PLEASE JOIN US! NANOSCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY BROWN BAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLEASE JOIN US! NANOSCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY BROWN BAG Friday, 7 November 2008 Noon - 1 pm Columbia Meyyappan Chief Scientist for Exploration Technology, NASA Ames Research Center & IEEE Electron Devices Society Distinguished Lecturer presenting Nanotechnology in Chemical and Bio Sensor Systems Abstract

  1. Real-time, high-resolution study of nanocrystallization and fatigue cracking in a cyclically strained metallic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Cheng-Cai

    Metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit greater elastic limit and stronger resistance to plastic deformation than their crystalline metal counterparts. Their capacity to withstand plastic straining is further enhanced at submicrometer ...

  2. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  3. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  4. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  5. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  6. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  7. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  8. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  10. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruaryMetalControl SystemLight EmittingList of CEN

  12. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruaryMetalControl SystemLight EmittingList of

  13. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruaryMetalControl SystemLight EmittingList ofOrganic

  14. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  15. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

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  16. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Effect on the condition of the metal in A K-300-3.5 turbine owing to multicycle fatigue from participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedeva, A. I.; Zorchenko, N. V.; Prudnikov, A. A.

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect on the condition of the rotor material owing to multicycle fatigue caused by variable stresses during participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation is evaluated using the K-300-23.5 steam turbine as an example. It is shown that during normalized primary frequency regulation the safety factor is at least 50, while during automatic secondary regulation of frequency and power there is essentially no damage to the metal.

  18. CURRICULUM VITAE NanoScience Technology Center Phone: (407)882-2847

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leuenberger, Michael N.

    and Robert E. Cohen RESEARCH INSTERESTS · Polymer Composites for Energy Conversion and Storage · Surface of Chemistry Fax: (407)882-2819 University of Central Florida E-mail: lzhai@mail.ucf.edu http://www.nanoscience.ucf.edu/faculty/zhai.php PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Associate Professor NanoScience Technology Center and the Department of Chemistry

  19. Grain size effects on the fatigue response of nanocrystalline materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanlon, Timothy, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resistance of metals and alloys to fatigue crack initiation and propagation is known to be influenced significantly by grain size. Based on a wealth of experimental results obtained from microcrystalline metals, where ...

  20. Effects of stretching and cycling on the fatigue behavior of polymer-supported Ag thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of stretching and cycling on the fatigue behavior of polymer-supported Ag thin films Gi March 2013 Keywords: Fatigue Thin films Fatigue crack initiation Intergranular failure Ductile fracture on characterizing the mechanical behavior of thin metal films and have observed that metals in thin-film form can

  1. At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission to integrate experimental and computational resources for innovations that support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. As a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission capabilities with various applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Along with in-house staff expertise

  2. Theory and modeling in nanoscience: Report of the May 10-11, 2002Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCurdy, C. William; Stechel, Ellen; Cummings, Peter; Hendrickson, Bruce; Keyes, David

    2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 10 and 11, 2002, a workshop entitled ''Theory and Modeling in Nanoscience'' was held in San Francisco, California, sponsored by the offices of Basic Energy Science and Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the Department of Energy. The Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee and the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee convened the workshop to identify challenges and opportunities for theory, modeling, and simulation in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and additionally to investigate the growing and promising role of applied mathematics and computer science in meeting those challenges. This report is the result of those contributions and the discussions at the workshop.

  3. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE 2012 SEMINAR SERIES PRESENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    irradiation time, concentration of metal containing acid solution. These metallic nanoparticles can be used. Such self- assembled functional nanoparticles on the patterned domain surfaces lead to new applications by the photo-galvanic effect to the posi- tive domain surface and become reduced to metallic nanoparticles

  4. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of works of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano (sub- micro) scale, e

  5. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano scale, e.g., molecular and atomic scales

  6. Nanoscience and Quantum Physics Two-dimensional atomic crystals, best exemplified by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furui, Sadaoki

    Nanoscience and Quantum Physics 22 Two-dimensional atomic crystals, best exemplified by graphene will first discuss the physics and material aspect of graphene. Drawing from our experiences in graphene the doping and dimensionality of the 2D systems are modulated. Two-dimensional materials beyond graphene

  7. NSF Workshop on Emerging Opportunities of Nanoscience to Energy Conversion and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    .J. Nozik Section 3: Nanoscience and Thermoelectric Energy by Alexis R. Abramson Section 4: Nanotechnology: Nanoelectronics for Energy Conversion by Stuart Lindsay Section 6: BioNano Techniques for Energy Applications by T in the following tasks: (i) conversion to electricity of solar energy and/or heat (photo

  8. "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Makes Rapid Progress" here is no question that great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 2001 "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Makes Rapid Progress" here is no question such structures. The applica- tion of nanoscale materials and devices is denoted by the term nanotechnology. It is widely believed that nanotechnology will have an enormous impact on indus- trial technologies

  9. FATIGUE FAILURE OF AN OPEN CELL AND A CLOSED CELL ALUMINIUM ALLOY FOAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    FATIGUE FAILURE OF AN OPEN CELL AND A CLOSED CELL ALUMINIUM ALLOY FOAM A.-M. HARTE, N. A. FLECK reserved. Keywords: Aluminium alloys; Foams; Fatigue; Plastic collapse 1. INTRODUCTION Metallic foams such as aluminium alloy foams show potential for use in ultra-lightweight metallic structures. Recently, a number

  10. 4.3.2 DEVELOPMENT OF MUSEUM EXHIBIT ON NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY Barry Aprison, Museum of Science & Industry, Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.3.2 DEVELOPMENT OF MUSEUM EXHIBIT ON NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY Barry Aprison, Museum is through self-directed, voluntary exploration, the NU- NSEC entered into a partnership with the Museum

  11. Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliron, Delia; Sanili, Babak; Weber-Bargioni, Alex; Xu, Ting

    2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Science at the Theater, June 6th, 2011: Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Alex Weber-Bargioni: How can we see things at the nanoscale? Alex is pioneering new methods that provide unprecedented insight into nanoscale materials and molecular interactions. The goal is to create rules for building nanoscale materials. Babak Sanii: Nature is an expert at making nanoscale devices such as proteins. Babak is developing ways to see these biological widgets, which could help scientists develop synthetic devices that mimic the best that nature has to offer. Ting Xu: How are we going to make nanoscale devices? A future in which materials and devices are able to assemble themselves may not be that far down the road. Ting is finding ways to induce a wide range of nanoscopic building blocks to assemble into complex structures. Delia Milliron: The dividends of nanoscience could reshape the way we live, from smart windows and solar cells to artificial photosynthesis and improved medical diagnosis. Delia is at the forefront of converting fundamental research into nanotechnology. Moderated by Jim DeYoreo, interim director of the Molecular Foundry, a facility located at Berkeley Lab where scientists from around the world address the myriad challenges in nanoscience.

  12. Equipment Contact List Kavli Nanoscience Institute at Caltech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melissa Nils Yahoo kni_ma6 Mask Aligner "Suss 2" Suss MA6 Room 017 Melissa Nils Yahoo kni_ma6 Laser Writer Melissa Yahoo kni-oxinst III-V Metal ICP 380 Oxford Sys 100 / 380 Steven Melissa Yahoo kni-oxinst Oxygen

  13. A Summary of the Fatigue Properties of Wind Turbine Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUTHERLAND, HERBERT J.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. The materials used to construct these machines are subjected to a unique loading spectrum that contains several orders of magnitude more cycles than other fatigue critical structures, e.g., an airplane. To facilitate fatigue designs, a large database of material properties has been generated over the past several years that is specialized to materials typically used in wind turbines. In this paper, I review these fatigue data. Major sections are devoted to the properties developed for wood, metals (primarily aluminum) and fiberglass. Special emphasis is placed on the fiberglass discussion because this material is current the material of choice for wind turbine blades. The paper focuses on the data developed in the U.S., but cites European references that provide important insights.

  14. "Exploring damage management of high performance metallic alloys in critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Fatigue Localized corrosion degrades fatigue performance of high strength aluminum alloys. The expense and Aluminum Alloys Exposure to a moist environment degrades the fatigue resistance of all aluminum alloys"Exploring damage management of high performance metallic alloys in critical systems to develop new

  15. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

  16. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  17. FATIGUE DESIGN CURVES FOR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploringGamma-ray2As atoActFATIGUE DESIGN

  18. Stress-corrosion fatiguecrack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Stress-corrosion fatigue­crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal V. Schroeder 1 , R metallic glass; Amorphous metal; Fatigue; Stress corrosion; Crack growth 1. Introduction In recent years­crack growth resistance [1­5], its corresponding properties in the presence of a corrosive environment have

  19. PREDICTORS OF POST-STROKE FATIGUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Benjamin Yichen

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.4 Fatigue Classifications 10 1.4 Fatigue Scales 12 1.4.1 Previous Fatigue Scales 12 1.4.2 Measuring Chronic Fatigue 14 1.4.3 Measuring Exertion Fatigue 16 1.5 Post-Stroke Fatigue 18 1.6 Contributing Factors to PSF 21 1.6....1 Overview of Potential Factors 21 1.6.2 Aerobic Fitness 22 1.6.3 Physical Impairment 23 1.6.4 Depression 26 vii 1.6.5 Lesion Characteristics 28 1.6.6 Sleep Disorders 30 1.6.7 Medication Side Effects 31 1...

  20. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, Stewart A.; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the %22remaining life%22 of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  1. MECH 491 Mechanical Engineering Design I -Project Description Project Topic: A corrosion fatigue experiment setup design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    Topic: A deformation setup design for testing of small scale metallic materials Project DescriptionProject 1 MECH 491 ­ Mechanical Engineering Design I - Project Description Project Topic: A corrosion fatigue experiment setup design Project Description: It is required for the students to design

  2. BAYESIAN UPDATING OF PROBABILISTIC TIME-DEPENDENT FATIGUE MODEL: APPLICATION TO JACKET FOUNDATIONS OF WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OF WIND TURBINES Benjamin Rocher1,2 , Franck Schoefs1 , Marc François1 , Arnaud Salou2 1 LUNAM Université.rocher@univ-nantes.fr ABSTRACT Due to both wave and wind fluctuation, the metal foundations of offshore wind turbines are highly algorithm. KEYWORDS: Fatigue, Damage, Reliability, Bayesian updating. INTRODUCTION In offshore wind turbines

  3. Auto/Steel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization AutoSteel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  4. Dislocation substructure in fatigued duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, J. (Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France). Lab. de Mecanique de Lille Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno (Czechoslovakia). Academy of Sciences); Degallaix, S. (Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France). Lab. de Mecanique de Lille); Kruml, T. (Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno (Czechoslovakia). Academy of Sciences)

    1993-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyclic plastic straining of crystalline materials results in the formation of specific dislocation structures. Considerable progress in mapping and understanding internal dislocation structures has been achieved by studying single crystal behavior: however, most structural materials have a polycrystalline structure and investigations of polycrystals in comparison to single crystal behavior of simple metals prove to be very useful in understanding more complex materials. There are some classes of materials, however, with complicated structure which do not have a direct equivalent in single crystalline form. Moreover, the specific dimensions and shapes of individual crystallites play an important role both in the cyclic stress-strain response of these materials and in the formation of their interior structure in cyclic straining. Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel, which is a kind of a natural composite, is a material of this type. The widespread interest in the application of duplex steels is caused by approximately doubled mechanical properties and equal corrosion properties, when compared with classical austenitic stainless steels. Fatigue resistance of these steels as well as the surface damage evolution in cyclic straining have been studied; however, much less is known about the internal substructure development in cyclic straining. In this study the dislocation arrangement in ferritic and austenitic grains of the austenitic-ferritic duplex steel alloyed with nitrogen and cyclically strained with two strain amplitudes, is reported and compared to the dislocation arrangement found in single and polycrystals of austenitic and ferritic materials of a similar composition and with the surface relief produced in cyclic plastic straining.

  5. N C M NNebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience University of NebraskaLincoln

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    2. Discovery of the First Metallic Nanocluster: Hollow Gold Nanocages, X.C. Zeng NCMN and Department studying gold's structure at the nanoscale has discovered hollow cage-like structures made of pure gold, UK Royal Society of Chemistry, Science Daily, and Nano Today. Scientists might someday be able

  6. Effects of wear-resistant coatings on the fatigue strength of 4340 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, E.R. [Naval Aviation Depot North Island, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For applications using 4340 steel where hardened surfaces are required in a marine environment, surface coatings are necessary. Coatings that resist corrosion and provide wear resistance generally degrade the fatigue performance of the substrate metal. Shot peening before plating was ineffective in preventing a loss of fatigue life of plated steel bars compared to bare steel test bars which were not shot peened. The maximum residual compressive strength produced by shot peening was measured and was less than the maximum applied tensile stress in fatigue. As-plated electroless nickel has poor sliding wear resistance compared to either electroplated nickel or chromium in sliding wear at a contact stress of 37 Mpa. The tensile strength decreased in proportion to the volume fraction of coating applied to the steel substrate.

  7. Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    into account. In this paper, each human joint is assumed to be controlled by two muscle groups to generate on motor units pattern. They demonstrated the relationship among muscle activation, fatigue and recovery fatigue trend in static working posture (elbow = 90 , shoulder = 30 ), but in dynamic working situation

  8. : runout specimen max : maximum fatigue stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) layer to concrete bridge deck slab was conceived was drawn without runout specimens .) Figure 6 Fatigue fracture surface of (a) UHPFRC, (b) steel rebar (a influenced by fibre distribution and orientation. Fatigue fracture surface of UHPFRC is similar

  9. A Fatigue Approach to Wind Turbine Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Fatigue Approach to Wind Turbine Control Keld Hammerum Kongens Lyngby 2006 #12;Technical to the turbulent nature of wind, the structural components of a wind turbine are exposed to highly varying loads. Therefore, fatigue damage is a major consideration when designing wind turbines. The control scheme applied

  10. On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

  11. Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Panchagade, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines the modeling of thermal fatigue in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) assemblies.

  12. Accelerating Fatigue Testing for Cu Ribbon Interconnects (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T.; Wohlgemuth , J.; Kurtz, S.; Inoue, M.; Sakurai, K.; Shioda, T.; Zenkoh, H.; Miyashita, M.; Tadanori, T.; Suzuki, S.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes fatigue experiments and discusses dynamic mechanical loading for Cu ribbon interconnects.

  13. Solder fatigue reduction in point focus photovoltaic concentrator modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, T.D.; Burchett, S.N.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solder fatigue tests have been conducted on point focus photovoltaic concentration cell assemblies to identify a baseline fatigue life and to quantify the fatigue life improvements that result using a copper-molybdenum-copper low-expansion insert between the solar cell and copper heat spreader. Solder microstructural changes and fatigue crack growth were identified using cross sections and ultrasonic scans of the fatigue solder joints. The Coffin-Manson and Total Strain fatigue models for low-cycle fatigue were evaluated for use in fatigue life predictions. Since both of these models require strain calculations, two strain calculation methods were compared: hand-calculated shear strain and a finite element method shear strain. At present, the available theoretical models for low-cycle solder fatigue are limited in their ability to predict failure; consequently, extensive thermal cycling is continuing to define the fatigue life for point focus photovoltaic cell assemblies. 9 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A study of fatigue in drill collars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Joe Robert

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF FATIGUE IN DRILL COLLARS A Thesis by Joe Robert Feeler Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department Member /n/X~l~~ Member Member January 1969 ABSTRACT A Study of Fatigue in Drill Collars.... (January, 1969) Joe R. Fowler, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. P. D. Neiner Fatigue failures of drill collar connectors are presently cost- ing the major oil companies enormous sums of money in ruined equipment and lost time...

  15. CREEP AND CREEP-FATIGUE OF ALLOY 617 WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Jill; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) may be joined to piping or other components by welding. Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a predominant failure mechanism of the IHX1 and thus weldments used in its fabrication will experience varying cyclic stresses interrupted by periods of elevated temperature deformation. These periods of elevated temperature deformation are greatly influenced by a materials’ creep behavior. The nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, is the primary material candidate for a VHTR-type IHX, and it is expected that Alloy 617 filler metal will be used for welds. Alloy 617 is not yet been integrated into Section III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, however, nuclear component design with Alloy 617 requires ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code qualification. The Code will dictate design for welded construction through significant performance reductions. Despite the similar compositions of the weldment and base material, significantly different microstructures and mechanical properties are inevitable. Experience of nickel alloy welds in structural applications suggests that most high temperature failures occur at the weldments or in the heat-affected zone. Reliably guarding against this type of failure is particularly challenging at high temperatures due to the variations in the inelastic response of the constituent parts of the weldment (i.e., weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal) [ref]. This work focuses on the creep-fatigue behavior of nickel-based weldments, a need noted during the development of the draft Alloy 617 ASME Code Case. An understanding of Alloy 617 weldments when subjected to this important deformation mode will enable determination of the appropriate design parameters associated with their use. Specifically, the three main areas emphasized are the performance reduction due to a weld discontinuity in terms of the reduced number of the cycles to failure and whether a saturation in reduced cycle life with increased hold times is observed, the microstructural stability over long cycle times, and finally, the location of the generated weldment data on a creep-fatigue damage diagram (D-diagram).

  16. Damage and fatigue Continuum damage mechanics modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -CLÉS : endommagement, fatigue, métaux, béton, élastomères, roche REGC ­ 10/2006. Geomechanics in energy production, pages 849 to 877 #12;850 REGC ­ 10/2006. Geomechanics in energy production 1. Introduction Continuum

  17. Contact fatigue : life prediction and palliatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, Brett P. (Brett Page), 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fretting fatigue is defined as damage resulting from small magnitude (0.5-50 microns) displacement between contacting bodies where at least one of the bodies has an applied bulk stress. The applicability and limits of a ...

  18. Multiaxial fatigue models for short glass fiber reinforced polyamide. Part II: Fatigue life estimation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -as-moulded (DAM). Post-processing the cyclic response in steady-state allows the comparison of several fatigue to design those components against fatigue failure has become a serious issue during the last years, when giving the best correlation with the number of cycles to failure. The relationship

  19. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Wang, W. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Wang, Y. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Hadfield, M. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Kanematsu, W. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  20. Characterization of Fatigue Cracking and Healing of Asphalt Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xue

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    mixtures using an energy-based mechanistic approach. A controlled-strain repeated direct tension (RDT) test is selected to generate both fatigue cracking and permanent deformation in an asphalt mixture specimen. Fatigue cracking is separated from...

  1. Fatigue behavior of alpha-zirconium phosphate/epoxy nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, Balaji R.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue crack growth in ±-Zirconium phosphate/epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. A new fatigue testing technique was implemented for miniature samples. Two different methods ?strength of materials and Rayleigh-Ritz - were used in determining...

  2. Comparison of fatigue analysis approaches for predicting fatigue lives of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walubita, Lubinda F.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixture fatigue characterization constitutes a fundamental component of HMAC pavement structural design and analysis to ensure adequate field fatigue performance. HMAC is a heterogeneous complex composite material...

  3. Microstructural heterogeneities and fatigue anisotropy of forged steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    procedure are compared to results from self-heating fatigue tests. For specimens orientated at 0 relative of the fatigue strength with the self-heating method has been observed to be correct. For specimens orientated and the fatigue strength drops significantly. For this case, it appears that the self-heating method has

  4. Sparkr Blade Test Centre Fatigue tests of wind turbine blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparkær Blade Test Centre Fatigue tests of wind turbine blades Flapwise fatigue tests of 3 blades wind load. By turning and oscillating the blade in the horzontal direction, an R-ratio of ­1 running at the Sparkær Centre Blade Test Facilities. Fatigue blade tests are performed in order

  5. Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric University MCARE 2012 #12;Outline · Overview of MSU Fatigue Program on Wind Blade MaterialsWind Blade Wind Blade Component Materials Acknowledgements: Sandia National Laboratories/DOE (Joshua Paquette

  6. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the benefit of rail grinding on service life of railroad rails, focusing on failures due to rolling contact fatigue (RCF) at the rail head. Assuming a tangent rail with one-point contact at the running surface, a...

  7. Actuation Fatigue of Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Christopher

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing method was developed to cycle quickly and repeatably Ni60Ti40 (wt. %) SMA specimens through temperature-induced transformation while under constant stress until failure. Previous works have shown fatigue cracks to initiate in or around Ni3...

  8. Quantifying the Thermal Fatigue of CPV Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented to quantify thermal fatigue in the CPV die-attach from meteorological data. A comparative; study between cities demonstrates a significant difference in the accumulated damage. These differences are most; sensitive to the number of larger (?T) thermal cycles experienced for a location. High frequency data (<1/min) may; be required to most accurately employ this method.

  9. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

  10. Crack closure effects on fatigue crack growth thresholds and remaining life in an HSLA steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, J.A.; Mostovoy, S. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering; Chen, L. [Texas Instruments, Attleboro, MA (United States); Yankov, E.Y. [A. Finkl and Sons, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of crack closure on the near-threshold corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior of Mil S-24645 HSLA steel and its weld metal have been investigated in air, ASTM seawater at the free corrosion potential, and ASTM seawater at {minus}0.8V and {minus}1.0V (SCE) using frequencies of 10, 2, and 0.2 Hz, and a stress ratio, R = 0.1. Remaining life, in the presence and absence of crack closure, has been estimated as a function of applied stress range for a structure containing a 3-mm-deep surface semi-elliptical flaw.

  11. Advanced Tools For Characterizing HMA Fatigue Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James Jefferies

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    5 RDT* Test Data??????????????????????... 44 6 DPSE Integration Bands. Adapted from Luo et al. (20)???????. 51 7 RDT* Data Import Correlations????????????????.. 88 8 TxDOT Type C Master Gradation Bands (% Passing by Weight or Volume) (21... with the Calibrated Mechanistic Surface Energy (CMSE) and Revised CMSE (CMSE*) methods. Data analysis procedures for fatigue tests associated with these methods will be included and discussed. Microsoft Excel macro?s developed for the analysis of the data obtained...

  12. Use of CFRP Overlays to Repair Fatigue Damage in Steel Bridge Girders and Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangel, Regan Elisabeth

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage in steel girder bridges built prior to the mid-1980s is common due to distortion-induced fatigue. Different repair techniques have been developed and implemented to retrofit bridges of this era with existing fatigue damage...

  13. assisted fatigue crack: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an ongoing French project financially Boyer, Edmond 270 PREDICTING FATIGUE DURING ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED NON-ISOMETRIC CONTRACTIONS Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  14. anomolous fatigue crack: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACTIONS Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: PREDICTING FATIGUE DURING ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED NON- ISOMETRIC CONTRACTIONS M. SUSAN MARION, Ph were to: (1) develop a...

  15. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual...

  16. Nanoscience by the Weinstock Group at BGU Ira A. Weinstock, Department of Chemistry, Ben Gurion University, 84105 Beer Sheva, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardi, Amichay

    hydrophobic self-assembly and reversible catalysis within metal-oxide framework "nano-reactors". Inorganic-ligand monolayers, shells and hollow vesicles. Using POM clusters (e.g., Fig. 1), we recently provided the first discoveries of inorganic-shell encapsulated Au-thiol nanoparticles and hollow inorganic vesicles (Fig. 3

  17. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  18. Corrosion fatigue in nitrocarburized quenched and tempered steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim Khani, M.; Dengel, D. [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Materials Technology

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate the fatigue strength and fracture mechanism of salt bath nitrocarburized steels, specimens of the steels SAE 4135 and SAE 4140, in a quenched and tempered state, and additionally in a salt bath nitrocarburized and oxidizing cooled state as well as in a polished (after the oxidizing cooling) and renewed oxidized state, were subjected to comparative rotating bending fatigue tests in inert oil and 5 pct NaCl solution. In addition, some of the quenched and tempered specimens of SAE 4135 material were provided with an approximately 50-{mu}m-thick electroless Ni-P layer, in order to compare corrosion fatigue behavior between the Ni-P layer and the nitride layers. Long-life corrosion fatigue tests of SAE 4135 material were carried out under small stresses in the long-life range up to 10{sup 8} cycles with a test frequency of 100 Hz. Fatigue tests of SAE 4140 material were carried out in the range of finite life (low-cycle range) with a test frequency of 13 Hz. The results show that the 5 pct NaCl environment drastically reduced fatigue life, but nitrocarburizing plus oxidation treatment was found to improve the corrosion fatigue life over that of untreated and Ni-P coated specimens. The role of inclusions in initiating fatigue cracks was investigated. It was found that under corrosion fatigue conditions, the fatigue cracks started at cavities along the interfaces of MnS inclusions and matrix in the case of quenched and tempered specimens. The nitrocarburized specimens, however, showed a superposition of pitting corrosion and corrosion fatigue in which pores and nonmetallic inclusions in the compound layer play a predominant role concerning the formation of pits in the substrate.

  19. Collect Available Creep-Fatigue Data and Study Existing Creep-Fatigue Evaluation Procedures for Grade 91 and Hastelloy XR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama; Yukio Tachibana

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of investigation on Task 5 of DOE/ASME Materials Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 5 is to collect available creep-fatigue data and study existing creep-fatigue evaluation procedures for Grade 91 steel and Hastelloy XR. Part I of this report is devoted to Grade 91 steel. Existing creep-fatigue data were collected (Appendix A) and analyzed from the viewpoints of establishing a creep-fatigue procedure for VHTR design. A fair amount of creep-fatigue data has been obtained and creep-fatigue phenomena have been clarified to develop design standards mainly for fast breeder reactors. Following this, existing creep-fatigue procedures were studied and it was clarified that the creep-fatigue evaluation procedure of the ASME-NH has a lot of conservatisms and they were analyzed in detail from the viewpoints of the evaluation of creep damage of material. Based on the above studies, suggestions to improve the ASME-NH procedure along with necessary research and development items were presented. Part II of this report is devoted to Hastelloy XR. Existing creep-fatigue data used for development of the high temperature structural design guideline for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) were collected. Creep-fatigue evaluation procedure in the design guideline and its application to design of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was described. Finally, some necessary research and development items in relation to creep-fatigue evaluation for Gen IV and VHTR reactors were presented.

  20. SANDIA CONTRACTORS REPORT FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA CONTRACTORS REPORT FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND SUBSTRUCTURES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES Abstract ThisreportpresentsthemajorfindingsoftheMontanaStateUniversityCompositeMaterialsFatigue Program from 1997 to 2001, and is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU Composite Materials

  1. Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 3 RiS0-Rr512 Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors during Steady Operation Peter OF WIND TURBINE ROTORS DURING STEADY OPERATION Peter Hauge Madsen, Sten Frandsen, William E. Holley-carrying capacity of a wind turbine rotor with respect to short-term strength and material fatigue are presented

  2. A hot isostatic pressing fabrication technique for particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McRea, Shana Aline

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of composite materials are regulated by the combination of traditional metallic materials with a reinforcing phase. Aluminum alloys are generally chosen as the metallic matrix material due to its low cost, low density, and good structural perfor...- mance. These materials, unlike steel, have finite fatigue life, which is undesirable for certain applications. However, due to the applica- bility of the processing methodology to other metal matrix materials, guidelines for aluminum systems can...

  3. AFM and TEM study of cyclic slip localization in fatigued ferritic X10CrAl24 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man, J. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: man@ipm.cz; Petrenec, M. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Obrtlik, K. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Polak, J. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic force microscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy were applied to the study of surface relief evolution at emerging persistent slip bands (PSBs) in individual grains of ferritic X10CrAl24 stainless steel cycled with constant plastic strain amplitude. Only the combination of both methods can reveal the true shape and fine details of extrusions and intrusions. Quantitative data on the changes of the surface topography of persistent slip markings and on the kinetics of extrusion growth during the fatigue life were obtained. Transmission electron microscopy of surface foils revealed PSBs with the typical, well-known ladder structure. Experimental data on cyclic slip localization in PSBs are compared with those in fcc metals and discussed in terms of vacancy models of surface relief evolution and fatigue crack initiation.

  4. A PROBABILISTIC TWO-SCALE MODEL FOR HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volumes of a dual-phase steel. Keywords Fatigue limits; Weibull model; Microplasticity; Thermomechanics. 1

  5. Fatigue Enhancement in CIDI / HCCI Engine Components

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laser Shock Peening is an innovative technique for introducing deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of metal parts LASER BEAM SHOCK WAVE VAPOR PRESSURE...

  6. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  7. Thermomechanics of damage and fatigue by a phase field model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovambattista Amendola; Mauro Fabrizio

    2014-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper we present an isothermal model for describing damage and fatigue by the use of the Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equation. Fatigue produces progressive damage, which is related with a variation of the internal structure of the material. The G-L equation studies the evolution of the order parameter, which describes the constitutive arrangement of the system and, in this framework, the evolution of damage. The thermodynamic coherence of the model is proved. In the last part of the work, we extend the results of the paper to a non-isothermal system, where fatigue contains thermal effects, which increase the damage of materials.

  8. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  9. Life prediction for bridged fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.N.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the more promising classes of composites touted for high temperature applications, and certainly the most available, is that of relatively brittle matrices, either ceramic or intermetallic, reinforced by strong, aligned, continuous fibers. Under cyclic loading in the fiber direction, these materials develop matrix cracks that often run perpendicular to the fibers, while the fibers remain intact in the crack wake, supplying bridging tractions across the fracture surfaces. The bridging tractions shield the crack tip from the applied load, dramatically reducing the crack velocity from that expected in an unreinforced material subjected to the same value, {Delta}K{sub a}, of the cyclic applied stress intensity factor. An important issue in reliability is the prediction of the growth rates of the bridged cracks. The growth rates of matrix fatigue cracks bridged by sliding fibers are now commonly predicted by models based on the micromechanics of frictional interfaces. However, there exist many reasons, both theoretical and experimental, for suspecting that the most popular micromechanical models are probably wrong in detail in the context of fatigue cracks. Furthermore, a review of crack growth data reveals that the validity of the micromechanics-based predictive model has never been tested and may never be tested. In this paper, two alternative approaches are suggested to the engineering problem of predicting the growth rates of bridged cracks without explicit recourse to micromechanics. Instead, it is shown that the material properties required to analyze bridging effects can be deduced directly from crack growth data. Some experiments are proposed to test the validity of the proposals.

  10. additional thermal fatigue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter 2010-01-01 9 Prediction of Thermal Fatigue in Tooling for Die-casting Copper via Finite Element Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Recent...

  11. The biological versus psychological basis of fatigue in depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coscio, Stacey Aileen

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to attempt to determine if the symptom of fatigue represents a metabolically induced or a perceived component in depressed individuals. Dietary intake patterns were analyzed for 20 depressed individuals to identify...

  12. Fatigue Enhancement of a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nanocomposite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Justin W.

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the present investigation is to study the fatigue characteristics of a woven carbon fiber reinforced polymer which has been modified with either amine or fluorine functionalized carbon nanotubes on the fiber-matrix interface...

  13. Standard test method for creep-fatigue testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of mechanical properties pertaining to creep-fatigue deformation or crack formation in nominally homogeneous materials, or both by the use of test specimens subjected to uniaxial forces under isothermal conditions. It concerns fatigue testing at strain rates or with cycles involving sufficiently long hold times to be responsible for the cyclic deformation response and cycles to crack formation to be affected by creep (and oxidation). It is intended as a test method for fatigue testing performed in support of such activities as materials research and development, mechanical design, process and quality control, product performance, and failure analysis. The cyclic conditions responsible for creep-fatigue deformation and cracking vary with material and with temperature for a given material. 1.2 The use of this test method is limited to specimens and does not cover testing of full-scale components, structures, or consumer products. 1.3 This test method is primarily ...

  14. Drag amplification and fatigue damage in vortex-induced vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage and drag force amplification due to Vortex-Induced-Vibrations (VIV) continue to cause significant problems in the design of structures which operate in ocean current environments. These problems are magnified ...

  15. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The nickel based Alloy 282 is selected for this project because it is one of the leading candidate materials for the high temperature/pressure section of an A-USC steam turbine. The methods developed in the project are expected to be applicable to other metal alloys in similar steam/oxidation environments. The major developments are: ? failure mechanism and microstructural characterization ? atomistic and first principles modeling of crack tip oxygen embrittlement ? modeling of gamma prime microstructures and mesoscale microstructure-defect interactions ? microstructure and damage-based creep prediction ? multi-scale crack growth modeling considering oxidation, viscoplasticity and fatigue The technology developed in this project is expected to enable more accurate prediction of long service life of advanced alloys for A-USC power plants, and provide faster and more effective materials design, development, and implementation than current state-of-the-art computational and experimental methods. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from January 2011 to January 2014.

  16. JAEA Fatigue Analysis of EBR-II Duplex Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. H. Jackson; D. L. Porter; W. R. Lloyd

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work addresses questions brought up concerning the mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth retardation and/or arrest within the nickel bond layer in duplex 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel superheater tubes. Previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) indicated that the nickel bond layer did not function as a crack arrestor during fatigue crack propagation with the exception of one, isolated case involving an exceptionally low fatigue load and a high temperature (400 0C) environment. Since it is atypical for a fatigue crack to propagate from a relatively soft material (the nickel bond layer) to a harder material (the 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel) there has been speculation that the nickel bond layer was hardened in service. Additionally, there are questions surrounding the nature of the fatigue crack propagation within the nickel bond layer; specifically with regard to the presence of voids seen on micrographs of the bond layer and oxidation within the steel along the edge of the nickel bond layer. There is uncertainty as to the effect of these voids and/or oxide barriers with respect to potential fatigue crack arrest.

  17. A View to the FutureBERKELEY LAB 2005/2006 REPORT A Note from the Director / 2 Energy Technologies and Environmental Solutions / 4 Living Systems and Quantitative Biology / 8 Frontiers in Nanoscience / 12 Exploring Matter and Energy in the Universe / 16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    A View to the FutureBERKELEY LAB 2005/2006 REPORT #12;A Note from the Director / 2 Energy Technologies and Environmental Solutions / 4 Living Systems and Quantitative Biology / 8 Frontiers in Nanoscience / 12 Exploring Matter and Energy in the Universe / 16 X-Ray and Ultrafast Science / 20 Advanced

  18. Colloid Science of Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in 2D and 3D Structures. Challenges of Nucleation, Growth, Composition, Particle Shape, Size Control and their Influence on Activity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent breakthroughs in synthesis in nanosciences have achieved control of size and shapes of nanoparticles that are relevant for catalyst design. In this article, we review the advance of synthesis of nanoparticles, fabrication of two and three dimensional model catalyst system, characterization, and studies of activity and selectivity. The ability to synthesize monodispersed platinum and rhodium nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range permitted us to study the influence of composition, structure, and dynamic properties of monodispersed metal nanoparticle on chemical reactivity and selectivity. We review the importance of size and shape of nanoparticles to determine the reaction selectivity in multi-path reactions. The influence of metal-support interaction has been studied by probing the hot electron flows through the metal-oxide interface in catalytic nanodiodes. Novel designs of nanoparticle catalytic systems are discussed.

  19. The Zeta Potential of Surface-Functionalized Metallic Nanorod Particles in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, G M; Rose, K A; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Chuang, F S; Sha, M Y; Chakarova, G; Penn, S G

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions, and functionalized with chemical and biological surface coatings, are important elements in basic and applied nanoscience research. Many applications require an understanding of the electrokinetic or colloidal properties of such particles. In this paper we describe the results of experiments to measure the zeta potential of metallic nanorod particles in aqueous saline solutions, including the effects of pH, ionic strength, metallic composition, and surface functionalization state. Particle substrates tested include gold, silver, and palladium monometallic particles as well as gold/silver bimetallic particles. Surface functionalization conditions included 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA), mercaptoethanol (ME), and mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MESA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), as well as MUA layers subsequently derivatized with proteins. Zeta potential data for typical charge-stabilized polystyrene particles are also presented for comparison. Experimental data are compared with theory. The results of these studies are useful in predicting and controlling the aggregation, adhesion, and transport of functionalized metallic nanoparticles within microfluidic devices and other systems.

  20. Enhanced ultrasonic detection of fatigue cracks by laser-induced crack closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    , corrosion, etc. . Sec- ond, it is important to distinguish small fatigue cracks as early as possible after threshold in aluminum, aluminum­ lithium, and titanium alloys.1 For example, extensive multiple-site fatigue

  1. Study of the Fatigue Life of Steel Catenary Risers in Interaction with the Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakhaee, Ali

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The fatigue life of a Steel Catenary Riser (SCR) near its touch-down zone is substantially affected by its interaction with the seabed. Hence, accurate estimate of its fatigue life requires the understanding and realistic modeling of the interaction...

  2. A Model to Predict Work-Related Fatigue Based on Hours of Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model to Predict Work-Related Fatigue Based on Hours of Work Gregory D. Roach, Adam Fletcher, and Drew Dawson ROACH GD, FLETCHER A, DAWSON D. A model to predict work- related fatigue based on hours

  3. Fatigue performance and cyclic softening of F82H, a ferritic martensic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature fatigue performance of F82H has been examined. The fatigue life was determined in a series of strain-controlled tests where the stress level was monitored as a function of the number of accrued cycles. Fatigue lives in the range of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6} cycles to failure were examined. The fatigue performance was found to be controlled primarily by the elastic strain range over most of the range of fatigue lives examined. Only at low fatigue lives did the plastic strain range contribute to the response. However, when the significant plastic strain did contribute, the material showed a tendency to cyclically soften. That is the load carrying capability of the material degrades with accumulated fatigue cycles. The overall fatigue performance of the F82H alloy was found to be similiar to other advanced martensitic steels, but lower than more common low alloy steels which possess lower yield strengths.

  4. Effects of Glass Fabric and Laminate Construction on the Fatigue of Resin Infused Blade Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of Glass Fabric and Laminate Construction on the Fatigue of Resin Infused Blade Materials. Introduction Wind turbine blades experience very high numbers of fatigue cycles varying between tension and wind conditions. The fatigue of composite laminates appropriate for wind turbine blades has been

  5. A continuum damage modelling of quasi-static fatigue strength of plain concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A continuum damage modelling of quasi-static fatigue strength of plain concrete S. H. Maia,b , F of concrete. The approach is based on the framework of continuum damage mechanics where the fatigue model fatigue tests have been performed on a concrete the formulation of which is close to the one used

  6. A Joint-level Model of Fatigue for the Postural Control of Virtual Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    A Joint-level Model of Fatigue for the Postural Control of Virtual Humans Inmaculada Rodríguezb , e. Keywords: human body simulation, posture control, fatigue, computer animation. 1 Introduction Achieving specifically with humans should produce realistic animation in all the sense of the word, including fatigue

  7. Final Report on In-Reactor Creep-Fatigue Deformation Behaviour of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , in-reactor creep- fatigue tests have been performed at strain amplitudes of 0.25 and 0 temperatures of 326K and 323K. For comparison purposes corresponding out-of-reactor creep-fatigue tests were.2 Test module and irradiation rig 6 2.3 In-reactor creep-fatigue tests 7 2.4 Out-of-reactor creep

  8. Sex Differences in Long Bone Fatigue Using a Rat Model Luisa D. Moreno,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldman, Stephen D.

    response to fatigue, we also determined the creep that occurred during the fatigue test. From the creep progress (Fig. 1). Caler and Carter32 studied cortical bone creep behavior during fatigue testing. When adaptation. From these results, we hypothesized that creep was the underlying mechanism that accounted

  9. Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN A simulation methodology for predicting the fatigue life of cast steel components model is developed to reduce the dependence of the fatigue life predictions on the numerical mesh chosen

  10. Fatigue Testing of Abrasive Water Jet Cut Titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.; Williford, Ralph E.

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Memorial Institute as part of its U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 to operate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provides technology assistance to qualifying small businesses in association with a Technology Assistance Program (TAP). Qualifying companies are eligible to receive a set quantity of labor associated with specific technical assistance. Having applied for a TAP agreement to assist with fatigue characterization of Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) cut titanium specimens, the OMAX Corporation was awarded TAP agreement 09-02. This program was specified to cover dynamic testing and analysis of fatigue specimens cut from titanium alloy Ti-6%Al-4%V via AWJ technologies. In association with the TAP agreement, a best effort agreement was made to characterize fatigue specimens based on test conditions supplied by OMAX.

  11. Reliability analysis of fatigue sensitive joints in FPSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, M.L. [Nevesbu, The Hague (Netherlands); Krekel, M. [Bluewater, Hoofddorp (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains a general description and the results of a reliability analysis made for fatigue sensitive joints in an FPSO. The main aim of the analysis was to demonstrate that the inspection program, which was specified based on the IMO resolution, will guarantee an acceptable probability level of fatigue and fracture failure during 20 years of service of the unit. Three approaches have been followed: the SN-approach and the fracture mechanics approach with and without allowance for fracture. The planned inspection program has been taken into account in the third approach. The stress assessment has been based on the spectral analysis corrected for the intermittent wetting effect. A short description of the deterministic analyses which preceded the reliability analysis has been included. It has been demonstrated in the paper that the probability of fatigue and fracture failure in an inspected structure can be assessed and judged by use of the reliability analysis.

  12. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  13. JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE LETTERS J. Nanosci. Lett. 2012, 2: 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    is extensively used in photoelectrochemical applications including photocatalysis and photovoltaics applications. Keywords: Nanostructured TiO2; Solar cells; Photocatalysis; Hydrogen generation; Sol of TiO2 for applications in photovoltaics, photocatalysis, electrochromics, and sensors due to its

  14. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of {approx}4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles ({approx}50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains ({approx}500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer ({approx}20-200 nm) forms at worn regions. No dislocations or extreme temperature increases are found, ruling out plasticity and temperature-assisted mechanisms. The COF reaches a steady-state value of {approx}0.20{+-}0.05 after a short time at an initial value of {approx}0.11{+-}0.01. Plowing tracks are found before the steady-state value of the COF is reached, suggesting only a short adhesive wear regime. This suggests a predominantly abrasive wear mechanism, controlled by fracture, which commences by the first particles created by adhesive wear.

  15. Mental fatigue evaluation by steroid level measurement in Parotid fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Harpal

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Play 1968 Major Subject. : Inc'ustrial Engineering MENTAL FATIGUE EVALUATION BY STEROID LEVEL MEASURLMENT. IN PAROTID FLUID A Thesis by HARPAL SINGH ApproveH as to tyle and. content by: P'hpirman of Committee) (Memb sr ) 1 1 PREFACE Alta...&ough indu trial engineering has had a phenomenal growth rate, a certain basic avenue has not been explored. The avenue 1 am refer- ring to is that of human fatigue and related phenomena. The reasons for this neglect are basically two: (1) Tnvestigation...

  16. Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite element model has been created to quantify the thermal fatigue damage of the CPV die attach. Simulations are used to compare to results of empirical thermal fatigue equations originally developed for accelerated chamber cycling. While the empirical equations show promise when extrapolated to the lower temperature cycles characteristic of weather-induced temperature changes in the CPV die attach, it is demonstrated that their damage does not accumulate linearly: the damage a particular cycle contributes depends on the preceding cycles. Simulations of modeled CPV cell temperature histories provided for direct comparison of the FEM and empirical methods, and for calculation of equivalent times provided by standard accelerated test sequences.

  17. Metals 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  18. Dendritic metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

  19. A combined mode fatigue model for glass reinforced nylon as applied to molded engine cooling fans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.D.; Bennet, M.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of glass reinforced nylon in fatigue inducing environments calls for a new method of stress analysis. With an engine cooling fan, both mean and vibratory stresses need to be examined. Speed cycling can cause tensile fatigue, while vibration can cause flexural fatigue. Since tensile and flexural stresses exist in the fan simultaneously, a combined mode fatigue model is needed. The proposed model is based on high cycle flexural and tensile fatigue strengths, and tensile strength. It relates measurable strain to stress using temperature dependent flexural and tensile moduli, and treats underhood temperature and desired product life as variables.

  20. Computational Nanoscience with NWChem. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examples are given of the scientific literature using NWChem, as well as two case studies: 1) Band gaps in oxides using exact-exchange based exchange-correlation...

  1. Nanoscience Research Internships in Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronshage, Alisa [Executive Board

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NanoBusiness Talent Project Summary Report The NanoBusiness Alliance created the NanoBusiness Talent Program to ensure the future vitality of domestic scientists and entrepreneurs by engaging advanced high school students in cutting-edge nanotechnology development. This program commenced on September 1, 2008 and ran through August 31, 2010 with a very successful group of students. Several of these students went on to Stanford, Harvard and Yale, as well as many other prestigious Universities. We were able to procure the cooperation of several companies over the entire run of the program to voluntarily intern students at their companies and show them the possibilities that exist for their future. Companies ranged from NanoInk and Nanosphere to QuesTek and NanoIntegris all located in northern Illinois. During the 9-week internships, students worked at nanotechnology companies studying different ways in which nanotechnology is used for both commercial and consumer use. The students were both excited and invigorated at the prospect of being able to work with professional scientists in fields that previously may have just been a dream or an unreachable goal. All the students worked closely with mentors from each company to learn different aspects of procedures and scientific projects that they then used to present to faculty, parents, mentors and directors of the program at the end of each year’s program. The presentations were extremely well received and professionally created. We were able to see how much the students learned and absorbed through the course of their internships. During the last year of the program, we reached out to both North Carolina and Colorado high school students and received an extraordinary amount of applications. There were also numerous companies that were not only willing but excited at the prospect to engage highly intelligent high school students and to encourage them into the nanotechnology scientific field. Again, this program increase was highly received and the students were thoroughly engaged. Our program ended August 31, 2010 with our last class of students and their final presentations. From the pilot year to the end presentations, we received hundreds of applications from students excited for the opportunity to work in a scientific field. With our goal of inspiring the newest generation of potential scientists and mathematician, we not only found ourselves overwhelmingly impressed but encouraged that the greatest minds of the future will come from this next generation and many more generations.

  2. Crack Path Selection Fatigue crack path imaged via SEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Crack path selects secondary phases and interface Conclusions ·Nb-Si Alloys tested exhibited toughness phases fail in a brittle manner Fatigue Crack Growth ABSTRACT Advanced aerospace materials continue at high temperatures. An important property of any high temperature aerospace engineering material is its

  3. Selection of Wind Turbine Blade Materials for Fatigue Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selection of Wind Turbine Blade Materials for Fatigue Resistance John Mandell Montana State center to center26 inch center to center #12;Blade Infusion L Lab InfusionLab Infusion #12;Schematic blade laminates Complex structured coupons with ply drops­ Complex structured coupons with ply drops

  4. Ris-R-1168 (EN) Fatigue damage development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    blades for wind turbines, for instance, hybrid designs with glass/carbon fibre reinforced plastics/carbon fibre hybrid laminates Olivia Redon Materials Research Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde are under consideration as the blades are getting larger than 30-40 metres. The tensile fatigue behaviour

  5. Ris-R-1261(EN) Fatigue Degradation and Failure of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such applications are for instance rotor blades in wind turbines, helicopter rotor blades, flywheels for energyRisø-R-1261(EN) Fatigue Degradation and Failure of Rotating Composite Structures ­ Materials Characterisation and Underlying Mechanisms E. Kristofer Gamstedt and Svend Ib Andersen Materials Research

  6. amplitude fatigue test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amplitude fatigue test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Standard practice for...

  7. Variable amplitude fatigue crack growth, experimental results and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a,*, F. Bumbieler b a Laboratory of Mechanics and Technology Cachan, 61, Avenue du Pre´s. Wilson method. This identification was performed for a 0.48%C carbon steel. Then various fatigue crack growth) is required so as to capture the very details of the elastic­plastic cyclic deformation of the mate- rial

  8. Fatigue tests of under-strenghth timber railroad bridge stringers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Christopher Ryan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , experimentally, the fatigue behavior of under-strength timber railroad bridge stringers. The sample group that was tested included nineteen southern pine solid-sawn stringers that were 178 mm (7 in.) wide by 356 mm (14 in.) deep by 4.8 m (16 ft) long...

  9. Fatigue Enhancement of Undersized, Drilled Crack-Arrest Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Gary Gene

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision Manufacturing, Inc. 401 E. High Street, Baldwin City, KS 66006 provided expertise and advice on fabricating the PICK tool and fatigue specimens. Clifford C. Biglow and Steve A. Sanders of Engineering Systems Inc. 923-A Terra Lane, O’Fallon, MO... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------71 Objective -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------74 Development of PICK TOOL ----------------------------------------------------------------------75 Methodology...

  10. Standard test method for creep-fatigue crack growth testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep-fatigue crack growth properties of nominally homogeneous materials by use of pre-cracked compact type, C(T), test specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic forces. It concerns fatigue cycling with sufficiently long loading/unloading rates or hold-times, or both, to cause creep deformation at the crack tip and the creep deformation be responsible for enhanced crack growth per loading cycle. It is intended as a guide for creep-fatigue testing performed in support of such activities as materials research and development, mechanical design, process and quality control, product performance, and failure analysis. Therefore, this method requires testing of at least two specimens that yield overlapping crack growth rate data. The cyclic conditions responsible for creep-fatigue deformation and enhanced crack growth vary with material and with temperature for a given material. The effects of environment such as time-dependent oxidation in enhancing the crack growth ra...

  11. Fatigue in martensitic 100Cr6: Relationship between rolling contact fatigue microstructural transitions and repetitive push testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee-Hyun; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E. J.

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and Materials Transac- tions A 21 (1990) 653–665. [4] H. J. Christ, C. Sommer, H. Mughrabi, A. P. Voskamp, J. M. Beswick, F. Hengerer, Fatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials and Struc- tures 15 (1992) 855–870. [5] A. Warhadpande, F. Sadeghi, M. N...

  12. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,DepartmentEnergyMetalMetal

  13. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

  14. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  15. Predicting the fatigue life of asphalt concrete overlay systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germann, Frederick P

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON CRACK GROWTH IN VISCOELASTIC MATERIALS C'HAPTER V - STATE OF THE ART Effect of Mix Variables on Fatigue and Cracking Resistance in Asphalt Concrete Pavements . Field Performance of Asphalt Overlays with Fabric Summary CHAPTER VI ? MATERIALS... LIFE OF AN ASPHALT OVERLAY CHAPTER X - CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX A. CRACK TIP STRESS ANALYSIS APPENDIX B. CONSTRUCTION OF THE MASTER RESILIENT MODULUS AND MASTER CREEP COMPLIANCE CURVES APPENDIX C. CRACK GROWTH RATES, da...

  16. Final Report on In-Reactor Creep-Fatigue Deformation Behaviour of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5% with holdtimes of 10 and 100s, respectively. For comparison purposes, similar creep-fatigue tests were performed Procedure 5 2.1 Materials 5 2.2 Test module and irradiation rig 5 2.3 In-reactor creep-fatigue tests 6 2Final Report on In-Reactor Creep- Fatigue Deformation Behaviour of a CuCrZr Alloy: COFAT 1 B

  17. Tensile and torsional fatigue of fiber-reinforced composites at cryogenic temperatures. [Superconducting magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.S.; Chim, E.S.M.; Socie, D.F.; Gauchel, J.V.; Olinger, J.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the fundamental fatigue behavior of G-10 grade, glass fiber-reinforced composite laminate in a liquid nitrogen environment is presented. Both uniaxial tensile and pure torsional fatigue failure of the fiber composite are investigated. Cryogenic fatigue degradation of the composite in terms of stiffness reduction, energy dissipation, and cyclic fracture is examined in detail. Influences of loading mode, fiber orientation, surface condition, and geometric variables are studied also. Fatigue damage mechanisms at cryogenic temperatures under various loading conditions are discussed. 29 refs.

  18. High temperature erosion and fatigue resistance of a detonation gun chromium carbide coating for steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quets, J.M.; Walsh, P.N. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Srinivasan, V. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Tucker, R.C. Jr. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium carbide based detonation gun coatings have been shown to be capable of protecting steam turbine components from particle erosion. To be usable, however, erosion resistant coatings must not degrade the fatigue characteristics of the coated components. Recent studies of the fatigue properties of a detonation gun coated martensitic substrate at 538 C (1,000 F) will be presented with an emphasis on its long term performance. This study will show the retention of acceptable fatigue performance of coated substrates into the high cycle regime, and will include a discussion on the mechanism of fatigue.

  19. Mixed Mode Static and Fatigue Crack Growth in Wind Blade Paste Adhesives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , static GIc and mixed mode fracture, and fatigue crack growth resistance. I. Introduction Wind turbine blades are large composite structures which are typically resin infusion molded in sections

  20. The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

  1. Design and fabrication of a bending rotation fatigue test rig for in situ electrochemical analysis during fatigue testing of NiTi shape memory alloy wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelakantan, Lakshman [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Materials, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, 600 036 Chennai (India); Zglinski, Jenni Kristin; Eggeler, Gunther [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Materials, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Frotscher, Matthias [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Materials, 44801 Bochum (Germany); CORTRONIK GmbH, 18119 Rostock-Warnemuende (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current investigation proposes a novel method for simultaneous assessment of the electrochemical and structural fatigue properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) wires. The design and layout of an in situ electrochemical cell in a custom-made bending rotation fatigue (BRF) test rig is presented. This newly designed test rig allows performing a wide spectrum of experiments for studying the influence of fatigue on corrosion and vice versa. This can be achieved by performing ex situ and/or in situ measurements. The versatility of the combined electrochemical/mechanical test rig is demonstrated by studying the electrochemical behavior of NiTi SMA wires in 0.9% NaCl electrolyte under load. The ex situ measurements allow addressing various issues, for example, the influence of pre-fatigue on the localized corrosion resistance, or the influence of hydrogen on fatigue life. Ex situ experiments showed that a pre-fatigued wire is more susceptible to localized corrosion. The synergetic effect can be concluded from the polarization studies and specifically from an in situ study of the open circuit potential (OCP) transients, which sensitively react to the elementary repassivation events related to the local failure of the oxide layer. It can also be used as an indicator for identifying the onset of the fatigue failure.

  2. On a solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strength steels and aluminum alloys. These design strategiesstructural steels and aluminum alloys; specifically, it ishigh-strength steels and aluminum alloys. METHODS DESIGN OF

  3. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  4. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  5. In-situ fatigue damage monitoring using symbolic dynamic filtering of ultrasonic signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    in polycrystalline alloys that are commonly used in aerospace structures. The concept is built upon analytic signal because of the evolving fatigue damage in polycrystalline alloys. Keywords: aircraft structures, fatigue of the most com- monly encountered sources of structural degradation in aerospace structures that are often

  6. A NON-ISOTHERMAL FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH LAW FOR THE A356-T7 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A NON-ISOTHERMAL FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH LAW FOR THE A356-T7 ALUMINUM ALLOY E. Merhy 1,2,3* , L rate, Damage tolerant design, Life time prediction, A356 cast alloy ABSTRACT Fatigue crack growth period in cylinder heads of A356-T7 casting alloy has been found to constitute an important part

  7. November 1998 NREL/SR-500-24379 Fatigue of Composite Material Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No. DE-AC36-83CH10093 #12;Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind TurbineNovember 1998 · NREL/SR-500-24379 Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind Turbine Blade Substructure John F. Mandell, Daniel D. Samborsky, David W. Combs, M. Ethan Scott

  8. The SNL/MSU/DOE Fatigue of Composite Materials Database: Recent Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in three areas are described for wind blade materials in the SNL/MSU/DOE fatigue of composite materials from over 250 materials systems relevant to wind blades, is now formatted in Excel, allowing more of the tensile fatigue sensitivity of various blade materials including laminate in-plane and interlaminar

  9. Comparing Estimates of Wind Turbine Fatigue Loads using Time-Domain and Spectral Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    for edgewise blade loads. NOMENCLATURE f = frequency in Hertz m = material exponent for fatigue mn = nthComparing Estimates of Wind Turbine Fatigue Loads using Time-Domain and Spectral Methods by Patrick Ragan and Lance Manuel REPRINTED FROM WIND ENGINEERING VOLUME 31, NO. 2, 2007 MULTI-SCIENCE PUBLISHING

  10. Environmental effects on fatigue and lifetime predictions for silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Environmental effects on fatigue and lifetime predictions for silica optical fibers M. John optical fiber on the environmental parameters temperature, humidity and pH. It is shown that the stress used by the fiber optics industry provides a good fit to fatigue data for high strength fiber

  11. DEATH BY SMALL FORCES: FAILURE BY FATIGUE IN WAVE-SWEPT MACROALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    cases the intertidal region supports rich communities of organisms, the compositions of which depend through the process of fatigue. Through laboratory tests employing standard techniques from fracture mechanics and fatigue analysis, I found that cracks introduced into flat-bladed macroalgae grow in length

  12. Ego Depletion Is Not Just Fatigue: Evidence From A Total Sleep Deprivation Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    , not fatigue. Keywords: self-regulation, self-control, sleep deprivation, fatigue, aggression A report to show poor self-regulation subsequently. This pattern has been said to support a limited-resource model not. In combination, some of our participants were instructed to use self-regulation to control

  13. Fatigue-crack propagation in Nitinol, a shape-memory and superelastic endovascular stent material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue-crack propagation in Nitinol, a shape-memory and superelastic endovascular stent material A; fatigue; shape-memory; super- elastic INTRODUCTION There has been increasing interest in the biomedical during the 1960s for its shape-memory behavior (Fig. 1).1,2 This effect is a result of an athermal

  14. FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE FATIGUE LIFE OF RUBBER: A LITERATURE SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE FATIGUE LIFE OF RUBBER: A LITERATURE SURVEY W. V. MARS* ADVANCED RESEARCH ENGINEER COOPER TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY, 701 LIMA AVE., FINDLAY, OHIO, 45840 A. FATEMI UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO, TOLEDO, OHIO, 43606 ABSTRACT Many factors are known to influence the mechanical fatigue life of rubber

  15. Fatigue threshold R-curves for predicting reliability of ceramics under cyclic loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue threshold R-curves for predicting reliability of ceramics under cyclic loading J.J. Kruzic for the prediction of reliability in bridging ceramics under cyclic loading conditions based on a fatigue threshold R-curve threshold R-curve may express this crack-size dependence, analogous to the traditional fracture toughness R-curve

  16. Modeling cyclic ratcheting based fatigue life of HSLA steels using crystal plasticity FEM simulations and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    Modeling cyclic ratcheting based fatigue life of HSLA steels using crystal plasticity FEM This paper develops a plastic ratcheting based fatigue failure model for HSLA steels from a combination. It predicts the nucleation of major cracks in the microstruc- ture in ratcheting. Subsequently, the total life

  17. Effect of diaphragmatic fatigue on control of the respiratory muscles during CO sub 2 rebreathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, S.; Lichros, I.; Macklem, P.T. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Montreal Chest Hospital, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors measured respiratory muscle recruitment and ventilation ({dot V}{sub E}) during CO{sub 2} rebreathing before and after diaphragmatic fatigue in normal subjects. Muscle activity was assessed by measuring pleural, abdominal, and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Ppl, Pab, and Pdi, resp). The results showed that (1) there was a progressive increase in Pdi with increasing end-tidal PCO{sub 2} (P{sub ET}CO{sub 2}); the rate of increase was usually greater before than after fatigue, however, in some it was less because of longer operating length and/or passive stretching of the diaphragm due to strong rib cage muscle (RCM) activity induced by fatigue; (2) Pdi increased mainly due to greater fall in Ppl; {Delta}Pab increased little during CO{sub 2} rebreathing or even decreased with P{sub ET}CO{sub 2} over 50-55 mmHg; this pattern was exaggerated by fatigue; (3) at the end of each trial, the ratio {minus}{Delta}Ppl/{Delta}Pab increased by {approximately}140% before and {approximately}850% after fatigue; (4) CO{sub 2} induced expiratory abdominal muscle activity; and (5) as a group, {dot V}{sub E} and its pattern did not change appreciably with fatigue. The authors conclude that RCM are recruited proportionately more than the diaphragm by CO{sub 2} and that diaphragmatic fatigue shifts the central drive from the fatigued diaphragm to TCM to preserve ventilation.

  18. THERMAL FATIGUE AND FAILURE OF ELECTRONIC POWER DEVICE SUBSTRATES. S. Pietranico1&2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - THERMAL FATIGUE AND FAILURE OF ELECTRONIC POWER DEVICE SUBSTRATES. S. Pietranico1&2 , S, avenue du Président Wilson, 94235 Cachan, France Abstract: Electronic power devices used shows that the fatigue life and the reliability of power electronic devices could be optimized using

  19. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F. [Univ. of Michigan, Dearborn, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Fang, H.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Physics Dept.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  20. Mitigation of Fatigue Loads Using Individual Pitch Control of Wind Turbines Based on FAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    Mitigation of Fatigue Loads Using Individual Pitch Control of Wind Turbines Based on FAST Yunqian University, China jiz@seu.edu.cn Abstract-With the increase of wind turbine dimension and capacity, the wind turbine structures are subjected to prominent loads and fatigue which would reduce the lifetime of wind

  1. CONTINUOUS FATIGUE ASSESSMENT OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF VIBRATION SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONTINUOUS FATIGUE ASSESSMENT OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF VIBRATION, Modal decomposition and expansion, Finite Element Model INTRODUCTION Offshore wind turbines are exposed locations along the structure. This is not the case though in monopile offshore wind turbines, where fatigue

  2. Proceeding of Energy Week 1996, ASME APPLICATION OF THE U.S. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TURBINE BLADE LIFETIME PREDICTIONS Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology Sandia National the service lifetime of wind turbine blades using the high-cycle fatigue data base for typical U.S. blade blades. The LIFE2 fatigue analysis code for wind turbines is then used for the fatigue analysis

  3. Eye-Tracking Evolutionary Algorithm to minimize user fatigue in IEC applied to Interactive One-Max problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eye-Tracking Evolutionary Algorithm to minimize user fatigue in IEC applied to Interactive One Computation (IEC) often suffers from user fatigue. In this paper, we present a new technique, totally independent of the domain used, to minimize this fatigue by combining an IEC and an input device. This device

  4. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  5. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François; 10.1080/17452759.2010.504056

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  6. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  7. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  8. Metal Hydrides - Science Needs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with traditions in metal hydride research Metal and Ceramic Sciences Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry Chemical and Biological Sciences Located on campus of Tier...

  9. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  10. amplitude fatigue crack: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rate testing to evaluate the susceptibility of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking CERN Preprints Summary: 1.1 This practice covers procedures for the design,...

  11. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lee, Sung Min [ORNL; Wang, James L [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 10^8 cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and the fatigue index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.

  12. Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

  13. Novel in situ mechanical testers to enable integrated metal surface micro-machines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, David Martin; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate metal and semiconductor micro-systems to perform highly complex functions, such as RF-MEMS, will depend on developing freestanding metal structures that offer improved conductivity, reflectivity, and mechanical properties. Three issues have prevented the proliferation of these systems: (1) warpage of active components due to through-thickness stress gradients, (2) limited component lifetimes due to fatigue, and (3) low yield strength. To address these issues, we focus on developing and implementing techniques to enable the direct study of the stress and microstructural evolution during electrodeposition and mechanical loading. The study of stress during electrodeposition of metal thin films is being accomplished by integrating a multi-beam optical stress sensor into an electrodeposition chamber. By coupling the in-situ stress information with ex-situ microstructural analysis, a scientific understanding of the sources of stress during electrodeposition will be obtained. These results are providing a foundation upon which to develop a stress-gradient-free thin film directly applicable to the production of freestanding metal structures. The issues of fatigue and yield strength are being addressed by developing novel surface micromachined tensile and bend testers, by interferometry, and by TEM analysis. The MEMS tensile tester has a ''Bosch'' etched hole to allow for direct viewing of the microstructure in a TEM before, during, and after loading. This approach allows for the quantitative measurements of stress-strain relations while imaging dislocation motion, and determination of fracture nucleation in samples with well-known fatigue/strain histories. This technique facilitates the determination of the limits for classical deformation mechanisms and helps to formulate a new understanding of the mechanical response as the grain sizes are refined to a nanometer scale. Together, these studies will result in a science-based infrastructure to enhance the production of integrated metal--semiconductor systems and will directly impact RF MEMS and LIGA technologies at Sandia.

  14. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  15. Effect of laser shock processing (LSP) on the fatigue resistance of an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaxin, T.; Yongkang, Z.; Hong, Z.; Chengye, Y.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser shock induced stress wave is described and measured with a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) transducer. A principle for selecting laser parameters is proposed. A small sized laser with a high power is used for Laser Shock Processing (LSP). The fatigue life of the aluminum alloy 2024T62 is greatly improved after LSP. With 95% confidence, the mean fatigue life of LSP specimens is 4.5--9.8 times that of unshocked ones. The fatigue and fracture resistance mechanisms of LSP such as the variation of the surface hardness, the microstructure and the fracture section of specimens before and after LSP are analyzed.

  16. Cement fatigue and HPHT well integrity with application to life of well prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugwu, Ignatius Obinna

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to the cyclic loading and few data sets may not be sufficient to give an adequate description of cement behavior under fatigue loading. Studies were conducted by Kim and Kim 2 on the fatigue behavior of high strength concrete using a type I Portland cement....3: Comparison of Max Stress Levels to Number of Cycles for Different Cement Strengths [2] Antrim 3 conducted fatigue studies on hardened ordinary Portland (type I) cement paste using 2 specimens; one with a high-water cement ratio of 0.7 and another...

  17. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J.D. Achenbach, Structural health monitoring and damagein fatigue, Structural Health Monitoring, 7(1), 37-49, 2008.and J.D. Achenbach, Structural health monitoring and damage

  18. Effect of nano-scale twinning on the fracture, fatigue and wear properties of copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Aparna, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grain refinement in materials has been one of the most common strategies for improving the strength of materials. However this comes at the price of reduced ductility, fracture toughness and stable fatigue crack propagation ...

  19. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

  20. Stochastic Damage Evolution under Static and Fatigue Loading in Composites with Manufacturing Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yongxin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, experimental investigations and theoretical studies on the stochastic matrix cracking evolution under static and fatigue loading in composite laminates with defects are presented. The presented work demonstrates a methodology...

  1. Rolling contact fatigue in martensitic 100Cr6: Subsurface hardening and crack formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee-Hyun; Vegter, R. H.; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E. J.

    2014-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    steels and free-cutting steels Part 17: ball and roller bearing steels, Technical Report 683–17:1999, International Organization for Standardization, 1991. [11] D. Glover, in: Rolling Contact Fatigue Testing of Bearing Steels, volume 771 of ASTM STP...

  2. The effectiveness of floor mats as an intervention for standing fatigue of light fabrication workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Michael Shannon

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field study was conducted in a light fabrication plant to determine the effectiveness of floor mats on reducing the symptoms of standing fatigue. Specific physiological variables measured include skin temperature of the foot, blood pooling...

  3. Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation and glycosaminoglycan loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Robert

    Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation heart valve (BPHV) degeneration, characterized by extracellular matrix deterioration, remod- eling) with glutaraldehyde fixed porcine aortic valve bioprostheses, that the mechanical function of cardiac valve cusps

  4. FATIGUE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FATIGUE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES by Robert B in the Instron and Composite Laboratories toward the end of the experimental research. Finally, special thanks

  5. SciTech Connect: Prediction of the Creep-Fatigue Lifetime of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    approach would be relevant to calculate the remaining useful life to a component like a steam generator that might fail by the creep-fatigue mechanism. Authors: Vivek Agarwal;...

  6. Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber insertions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to evaluate the static and fatigue characteristics of an innovative 3-D glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP materials typically include polymeric foams, balsa wood, light- weight honeycomb structures or FRP shear

  7. Sensitivity Variation on Low Cycle Fatigue Cracks Using Level 4/Method B Penetrant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULWOOD,HARRY; MOORE,DAVID G.

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Aviation Administration's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) is currently conducting experiments with Level 4, Method B penetrant on low cycle fatigue specimens. The main focus of these experiments is to document the affect on penetrant brightness readings by varying inspection parameters. This paper discusses the results of changing drying temperature, drying time, and dwell time of both penetrant and emulsifier on low cycle fatigue specimens.

  8. Fatigue behavior of full-size soild-sawn timber railroad stringers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maingot, Martin Rex

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 . . . . . . . 1 5 , . . . 16 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 21 . . . 21 23 . . . . . . . 24 3. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM Page 3. 1 General Specimen Details . . 3. 2 Experimental Setup 3. 2. 1 Static Loading System. 3. 2. 2 Fatigue Loading System.... . 3. 3 Non-Destructive Evaluation of Timber Specimens. . . . . 3. 3. 1 Grouping of Timber Specimens. 3. 3. 2 Specimen Strength vs. Specimen Stiffness. 3. 4 Testing Procedure 3. 4. 1 Data Acquisition. . 3. 4. 2 Static Testing. 3. 4. 3 Fatigue...

  9. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  10. Influence of fatigue on the nanohardness of NiTiCr-wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frotscher, M. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Young, M. L. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Neuking, K. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Eggeler, G. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing parameters, such as rotational speed and bending radius, have a strong influence on the fatigue life of pseudoelastic NiTi shape-memory alloys during bending rotation fatigue (BRF) experiments [M. F. X. Wagner, Int. J. Mat. Res. 97 (2006), p. 1687-1696. and M. Frotscher, et al., Thermomechanical processing, microstructure and bending rotation fatigue of ultra-fine grained NiTiCr-wires, Proceedings of the International Conference for Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies (SMST 2007), Tsukuba, Japan, ASM International, (2008), p. 149-158.]. Previous studies showed a decrease in the fatigue life for smaller bending radius (i.e. higher equivalent strain) and larger rotational speed. This observation is associated with an increase of dislocation density, the stabilization of stressinduced martensite during cycling, and an increase of the plateau stresses due to self-heating. In the present study, we examine the influence of these fatigue parameters on the nanohardness and shape recovery of pseudoelastic NiTiCr shape-memory alloy wires by nanoindentation. We show that nanoindentation is a suitable method for the characterization of fatigue-related microstructural changes, which affect the mechanical properties.

  11. Fatigue-induced phase formation and its deformation behavior in a cobalt-based superalloy (prop. 2002-090)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Hahn [ORNL; Benson, M. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Saleh, T A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brown, D. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Daymond, M R [Queen's University, Ontario, Canada; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; Stoica, A. D. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Buchanan, R. A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Klarstrom, D L [Haynes International, Inc.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-cycle fatigue behavior of a cobalt-based superalloy was studied in situ using neutron-diffraction experiments. The alloy exhibited stress-induced formation of a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) phase within its parent face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase at ambient temperature under strain-controlled fatigue conditions with a total strain range, {Delta}{var_epsilon} = 2.5%. The (101) hcp peak was first observed during the 12th fatigue cycle under the given conditions following a period during which no hcp phase was detected. Subsequently, the intensity of the hcp peaks increased as fatigue progressed. Furthermore, within a single fatigue cycle, the intensity of the (101) hcp peak decreased during the compression half-cycle and increased again when the specimen was subjected to a subsequent tensile strain. The result suggests that the fcc to hcp transformation is partially reversible within one fatigue cycle.

  12. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  13. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  14. Fabrication procedure effects on fatigue resistance of rib -to-deck welded joints of steel orthotropic bridge decks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Hyoung-Bo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    details of orthotropic steel deck. ” Proc. , Internationalnew approaches to fatigue evaluation of steel bridges. ”International Journal of Steel Structures, KSSC, Vol. 6, No.

  15. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  16. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  17. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  18. Fatigue failure in thin-film polysilicon is due to subcriticalcracking within the oxide layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsem, D.H.; Muhlstein, C.L.; Stach, E.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been established that microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) created from polycrystalline silicon thin-films are subject to cyclic fatigue. Prior work by the authors has suggested that although bulk silicon is not susceptible to fatigue failure in ambient air, fatigue in micron-scale silicon is a result of a ''reaction-layer'' process, whereby high stresses induce a thickening of the post-release oxide at stress concentrations such as notches, which subsequently undergoes moisture-assisted cracking. However, there exists some controversy regarding the post-release oxide thickness of the samples used in the prior study. In this Letter, we present data from devices from a more recent fabrication run that confirm our prior observations. Additionally, new data from tests in high vacuum show that these devices do not fatigue when oxidation and moisture are suppressed. Each of these observations lends credence to the '''reaction-layer'' mechanism. Recent advances in the design of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have increased the demand for more reliable microscale structures. Although silicon is an effective and widely used structural material at the microscale, it is very brittle. Consequently, reliability is a limiting factor for commercial and defense applications. Since the surface to volume ratio of these structural films is very large, classical models for failure modes in bulk materials cannot always be applied. For example, whereas bulk silicon is immune to cyclic fatigue failure thin micron-scale structural films of silicon appear to be highly susceptible. It is clear that at these size scales, surface effects may become dominant in controlling mechanical properties. The main reliability issues for MEMS are stiction, fatigue and wear. Fatigue is important in cases where devices are subjected to a large number of loading cycles with amplitudes below their (single-cycle) fracture stress, which may arise due to vibrations intentionally induced in the structure (i.e. a resonator) or those which arise from the service environment. While the reliability of MEMS has received extensive attention, the physical mechanisms responsible for these failure modes have yet to be conclusively determined. This is particularly true for fatigue, where the mechanisms have been subject to intense debate. Recently we have proposed that the fatigue of micron-scale polysilicon is associated with stress-induced surface oxide thickening and moisture-assisted subcritical cracking in the amorphous SiO{sub 2} oxide layer (''reaction-layer'' fatigue). The mechanism of oxide thickening is as yet unknown, but is likely related to some form of stress-assisted diffusion. Allameh et al. suggest a complementary mechanism involving stress-assisted oxide thickening, caused by dissolution of the surface oxide which forms deep grooves that are sites for crack initiation. Kahn et al. have criticized these mechanisms and proposed that, instead, fatigue is caused by subcritical cracking due to contacting surface asperities in the compressive part of the cycle. To the authors' knowledge, there is no direct experimental observation of such asperity contact. Also, their model cannot explain why micron-scale silicon, and not bulk silicon, is susceptible to fatigue. Moreover, Kahn et al. do not acknowledge the role of stress-induced oxide thickening, which has been observed directly using TEM and indirectly using atomic-force microscope measurements by several investigators, and have questioned whether the materials utilized by Muhlstein et al. and Allameh et al. were representative due to the relatively thick oxide scales. Accordingly, the goal of the present research is to seek a definitive understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for fatigue in polysilicon structural thin-films. Our approach is to combine on-chip testing methods with electron microscopy by fatiguing thin-film samples and observing them, in an unthinned condition, using high-voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVTEM). Two principal results are found from this work: (1

  19. DOE/MSU composite material fatigue database: Test methods, materials, and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials carried out at Montana State University (MSU) over the last seven years. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU composite Materials Fatigue Database. The fatigue testing of composite materials requires the adaptation of standard test methods to the particular composite structure of concern. The stranded fabric E-glass reinforcement used by many blade manufacturers has required the development of several test modifications to obtain valid test data for materials with particular reinforcement details, over the required range of tensile and compressive loadings. Additionally, a novel testing approach to high frequency (100 Hz) testing for high cycle fatigue using minicoupons has been developed and validated. The database for standard coupon tests now includes over 4,100 data points for over 110 materials systems. The report analyzes the database for trends and transitions in static and fatigue behavior with various materials parameters. Parameters explored are reinforcement fabric architecture, fiber content, content of fibers oriented in the load direction, matrix material, and loading parameters (tension, compression, and reversed loading). Significant transitions from good fatigue resistance to poor fatigue resistance are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdowns for selected structural details is also presented. The high frequency database provides a significant set of data for various loading conditions in the longitudinal and transverse directions of unidirectional composites out to 10{sup 8} cycles. The results are expressed in stress and strain based Goodman Diagrams suitable for design. A discussion is provided to guide the user of the database in its application to blade design.

  20. Seventh International Conference on Biaxial/Multiaxial Fatigue and Fracture, Berlin, 2004, pp. 329-334 FATIGUE CRACK NUCLEATION AND GROWTH IN FILLED NATURAL RUBBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    -334 FATIGUE CRACK NUCLEATION AND GROWTH IN FILLED NATURAL RUBBER SUBJECTED TO MULTIAXIAL STRESS STATES W.V. Mars1 and A. Fatemi2 1 Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, 701 Lima Ave., Findlay, Ohio 45840, USA 2 crack nucleation and growth in filled natural rubber under a wide range of multiaxial stress

  1. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  2. Density functional theory investigation of 3d, 4d, and 5d 13-atom metal clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piotrowski, Mauricio J.; Piquini, Paulo; Da Silva, Juarez L. F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria 97105-900, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cx. Postal 369, Sao Carlos 13560-970, SP (Brazil)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The knowledge of the atomic structure of clusters composed by few atoms is a basic prerequisite to obtain insights into the mechanisms that determine their chemical and physical properties as a function of diameter, shape, surface termination, as well as to understand the mechanism of bulk formation. Due to the wide use of metal systems in our modern life, the accurate determination of the properties of 3d, 4d, and 5d metal clusters poses a huge problem for nanoscience. In this work, we report a density functional theory study of the atomic structure, binding energies, effective coordination numbers, average bond lengths, and magnetic properties of the 3d, 4d, and 5d metal (30 elements) clusters containing 13 atoms, M{sub 13}. First, a set of lowest-energy local minimum structures (as supported by vibrational analysis) were obtained by combining high-temperature first-principles molecular-dynamics simulation, structure crossover, and the selection of five well-known M{sub 13} structures. Several new lower energy configurations were identified, e.g., Pd{sub 13}, W{sub 13}, Pt{sub 13}, etc., and previous known structures were confirmed by our calculations. Furthermore, the following trends were identified: (i) compact icosahedral-like forms at the beginning of each metal series, more opened structures such as hexagonal bilayerlike and double simple-cubic layers at the middle of each metal series, and structures with an increasing effective coordination number occur for large d states occupation. (ii) For Au{sub 13}, we found that spin-orbit coupling favors the three-dimensional (3D) structures, i.e., a 3D structure is about 0.10 eV lower in energy than the lowest energy known two-dimensional configuration. (iii) The magnetic exchange interactions play an important role for particular systems such as Fe, Cr, and Mn. (iv) The analysis of the binding energy and average bond lengths show a paraboliclike shape as a function of the occupation of the d states and hence, most of the properties can be explained by the chemistry picture of occupation of the bonding and antibonding states.

  3. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  4. Novel Experiments to Characterize Creep-Fatigue Degradation in VHTR Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright; J. A. Simpson; L. J. Carroll; R. N. Wright; T.-L. Sham

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known in energy systems that the creep lifetime of high temperature alloys is significantly degraded when a cyclic load is superimposed on components operating in the creep regime. A test method has been developed in an attempt to characterize creep-fatigue behavior of alloys at high temperature. The test imposes a hold time during the tensile phase of a fully reversed strain-controlled low cycle fatigue test. Stress relaxation occurs during the strain-controlled hold period. This type of fatigue stress relaxation test tends to emphasize the fatigue portion of the total damage and does not necessarily represent the behavior of a component in-service well. Several different approaches to laboratory testing of creep-fatigue at 950°C have been investigated for Alloy 617, the primary candidate for application in VHTR heat exchangers. The potential for mode switching in a cyclic test from strain control to load control, to allow specimen extension by creep, has been investigated to further emphasize the creep damage. In addition, tests with a lower strain rate during loading have been conducted to examine the influence of creep damage occurring during loading. Very short constant strain hold time tests have also been conducted to examine the influence of the rapid stress relaxation that occurs at the beginning of strain holds.

  5. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, S.K. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel.

  6. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Talmage, Mellisa J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

  7. Locking of electric-field-induced non-180 domain switching and phase transition in ferroelectric materials upon cyclic electric fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsia, K Jimmy

    change in piezoelectric coefficients in these materials upon cyclic electric field. © 2003 American of ferroelectric fatigue. One approach is through investiga- tion of the change of the material properties with respect to the cause of ferroelectric fatigue. The change in materials constants usually indicates

  8. 1 INTRODUCTION Flexural fatigue is one of the main failure modes in asphalt mixtures and flexible pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    pavement structures. This means good prediction of a pavement's fatigue life will help to develop and im- prove pavement design procedures. Fatigue resistance and stiffness are two required parameters for pavement design necessary to dimension the pavement structure (layer thickness). European standards (EN

  9. Precipitation and Thermal Fatigue in Ni-Ti-Zr Shape Memory Alloy Thin Films by Combinatorial nanoCalorimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Precipitation and Thermal Fatigue in Ni-Ti-Zr Shape Memory Alloy Thin Films by Combinatorial nano Mongolia University of Technology Hohhot 010051, China Abstract: Thin-film samples of Ni-Ti-Zr shape memory the composition and the stress state of the shape memory phase. Thermal fatigue behavior, induced by thermal

  10. Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium/Copper Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium-phase bonded using copper/niobium/copper interlayers have been investigated at both room and elevated, with failure primarily at the alumina/niobium interfaces. At room temperature, cyclic fatigue-crack propagation

  11. High-Frequency Fatigue Behavior of Woven-Fiber-Fabric-Reinforced Polymer-Derived Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    High-Frequency Fatigue Behavior of Woven-Fiber-Fabric-Reinforced Polymer-Derived Ceramic-Matrix heat exchangers, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic- matrix composites (CFCMCs) will encounter cyclic glass-matrix composite showed that, unlike monolithic ceramics, fatigue life of this composite decreased

  12. FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO ESTIMATE FATIGUE LIVES OF WELDED LAP-SHEAR SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.; Michigan, J.

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full range of stress intensity factor solutions for a kinked crack is developed as a function of weld width and the sheet thickness. When used with the associated main crack solutions (global stress intensity factors) in terms of the applied load and specimen geometry, the fatigue lives can be estimated for the laser-welded lap-shear specimens. The estimations are in good agreement with the experimental data. A classical solution for an infinitesimal kink is also employed in the approach. However, the life predictions tend to overestimate the actual fatigue lives. The traditional life estimations with the structural stress along with the experimental stress-fatigue life data (S-N curve) are also provided. In this case, the estimations only agree with the experimental data under higher load conditions.

  13. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  14. Fatigue properties of die cast zinc alloys for automotive lock applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Goodwin, F.E. (International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle, NC)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 1970’s many automotive lock systems were converted from zinc die casting alloys to engineering plastics for reasons of weight and cost. Recent increases in requirements for precision and security have caused automotive and other lock designers to reconsider zinc alloy die-castings for these applications. To enable this, there is a need for mechanical property data comparable to that of the plastics materials used in these applications. In this work, rotary bending fatigue tests were performed on Alloys 3, 5, ZA-8 and AcuZinc 5 using an R.R. Moore fatigue machine. Testing was performed at 30 Hz and was stopped at 1x107 cycles. The fatigue limit results were compared to data reported in the literature for higher number of cycles and faster rotations.

  15. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  16. Fatigue testing of high-density polyethylene and polycarbonate with crack length measurement using image processing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riemslag, A.C. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Lab. of Materials Science)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new automated method of measuring fatigue cracks in polymers is discussed. The new method is based on a video signal of the crack which is analyzed with image processing techniques. With this technique the crack length is measured every 20 s during a fatigue test. The accuracy of one single measurement is about 0.05 mm, but this can be increased by averaging a large number of measurements. The applied automated data collection and subsequent data processing is discussed in relation to the recommendations given in ASTM E 647, Test method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Rates. The use of the new technique is illustrated on the basis of fatigue tests performed on transparent polycarbonate (PC) and nontransparent polyethylene (PE). The fatigue behavior of PE and PC is briefly discussed.

  17. Corrosion-fatigue behavior of an annealed AISI 1045 carbon steel coated with electroless nickel-phosphorus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pertuz, A.; Chitty, J.A.; Puchi, E.S. (Central Univ. of Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela)); Hintermann, H. (Univ. of Neuchatel (Switzerland). Faculty of Sciences)

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of an industrial electroless nickel-phosphorus deposit on the corrosion-fatigue properties of an annealed AISI 1045 steel has been investigated. For this purpose, three corrosive media were selected: distilled water and two NaCl solutions of different concentration (3 and 5%) in distilled water. Corrosion-fatigue tests were conducted at alternating stress levels ranging between 219 and 329 MPa at a frequency of 50 Hz. The corrosion-fatigue properties of the coated and uncoated substrates are very similar when testing is conducted in salty water. However, for testing in distilled water the corrosion-fatigue properties of coated substrates were diminished in relation to the uncoated material. The fractographic analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed the presence of fatigue marks within the electroless nickel-phosphorus deposit, which indicate that the fracture mechanism of the coating is associated to the cyclic loading of the material.

  18. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    , and laser applications in materials proc- essing, manufacturing and other areas. Dr. Wu is the recipient Institute of Technology (IIT) The Study of Laser-induced Plasma, Laser-Water Interaction, Laser Micromachining and Shock Peening Processes Lasers are unique energy sources that can realize localized, non

  19. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    /07/2010 KOLD-TV - Online View Clip Research from University of Arizona in microelectromechanical systems from homogeneous cell suspensions," scientists writing in the Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, 2010;19(4):752-763). Additional information can be obtained

  20. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    - BASED NANOCOMPOSITES FOR SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCTION AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS In the past three. GRAY Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Department of Chemical and Biological 30 years, most of the work in the photocatalytic field has fo- cused on energy and environmental

  1. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Director, Materials and Surface Engineering Program, National Science Foundation Materials Research at NSF. Cooper is Director of the Materials and Surface Engineering program at the National Science Foundation: An Overview of the Materials and Surface Engineering Program The materials and surface engineering program

  2. RESEARCHARTICLE JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    and characterization of different types of GaN QDs.1­8 Stranski-Krastanov growth of wurtzite GaN/AlN QDs has been to the growth of wurtzite GaN/AlxGa1xN QDs.314 The polar [0001] axis in the above-mentioned QDs is parallel, wurtzite GaN/dielectric QDs have been prepared.8 Despite this large number of reports of fabrication

  3. Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

  4. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    to produce cost-effective dyes for organic solar cells and discuss the preliminary results on the feasibility University--Carbondale Top-Down Approach to Fabricate Organic Dyes for Solar Cells The goal of our research in organic solar cells is to understand the electron excitation and transport processes of solar cell

  5. NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    for sustainable energy A sustainable energy future is one of the major global challenges today pointing for device applications targeting both i) increasing the fraction of energy supply coming from sustainable Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Lisbon, Portugal Linkoping University, Sweden Novel InN-based materials

  6. Investigation of Nanoscience Technologies: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURNS, ALAN R.; MICHALSKE, TERRY A.

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intention of this project was to collaborate with Harvard University in the general area of nanoscale structures, biomolecular materials and their application in support of Sandia's MEMS technology. The expertise at Harvard was crucial in fostering these fundamentally interdisciplinary developments. Areas that were of interest included: (1) nanofabrication that exploits traditional methods (from Si technology) and developing new methods; (2) self-assembly of organic and inorganic systems; (3) assembly and dynamics of membranes and microfluidics; (4) study of the hierarchy of scales in assembly; (5) innovative imaging methods; and (6) hard (engineering)/soft (biological) interfaces. Specifically, we decided to work with Harvard to design and construct an experimental test station to measure molecular transport through single nanopores. The pore may be of natural origin, such as a self-assembled bacterial protein in a lipid bilayer, or an artificial structure in silicon or silicon nitride.

  7. CENT Center for Energy Nanoscience and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    -zinc-tin-sulfide (CZTS) system. Finally, I will describe some results of our work on silicon nanowire photovoltaics

  8. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks |ALooking forEFRCImpact

  9. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks |ALooking

  10. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks |ALookingK-12

  11. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks |ALookingK-12Facilities

  12. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks

  13. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks EFRC 1001 word Poster CEN

  14. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks EFRC 1001 word Poster

  15. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks EFRC 1001 word

  16. Solaris Nanosciences Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolar EnergySolaria Fairway JV Jump

  17. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are here WesternWelcome toAbout CEN is

  18. Materials degradation and fatigue under extreme conditions. Final report, 1 April 1994-31 August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonas, J.

    1997-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This AFOSR URI addressed complex research problems of materials degradation and fatigue in aerospace structures in severe or extreme environments. A better understanding of materials degradation and flaw initiation dynamics was achieved through a multi-disciplinary research program encompassing chemistry, surface physics, materials science and mechanics, both experimental and theoretical. The Subprojects were as follows: (1) Surface Induced Degradation of Fluorocarbon Lubricants; (2) Molecular Tribology of Perfluoroether Lubricants; (3) Fluids, Including Lubricants Under Extreme Conditions of High Pressure/High Temperature and Confinement; (4) Surface Crack Propagation Under Combined Mechanical and High Pressure Fluid Loading; and (5) Lubricant Assisted Fatigue Crack Growth in Ceramics.

  19. Failure by fracture and fatigue in 'NANO' and 'BIO'materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Muhlstein, C.L.; Nalla, R.K.

    2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of nanostructured materials/small-volumestructures and biologi-cal/bio-implantable materials, so-called "nano"and "bio" materials, is currently much in vogue in materials science. Oneaspect of this field, which to date has received only limited attention,is their fracture and fatigue properties. In this paper, we examine twotopics in this area, namely the premature fatigue failure ofsilicon-based micron-scale structures for microelectromechanical systems(MEMS), and the fracture properties of mineralized tissue, specificallyhuman bone.

  20. Transformation Induced Fatigue of Ni-Rich NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Justin Ryan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSFORMATION INDUCED FATIGUE OF NI-RICH NITI SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATORS A Thesis by JUSTIN RYAN SCHICK Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering TRANSFORMATION INDUCED FATIGUE OF NI-RICH NITI SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATORS A Thesis by JUSTIN RYAN SCHICK Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment...

  1. Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenburg, Robert Thomas

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  2. Fatigue analysis of WECS (Wind Energy Conversion System) components using a rainflow counting algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J.; Schluter, L.L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rainflow counting algorithm'' has been incorporated into the LIFE2 fatigue/fracture analysis code for wind turbines. The count algorithm, with its associated pre- and post-count algorithms, permits the code to incorporate time-series data into its analysis scheme. After a description of the algorithms used here, their use is illustrated by the examination of stress-time histories from the Sandia 34-m Test Bed vertical axis wind turbine. The results of the rainflow analysis are compared and contrasted to previously reported predictions for the service lifetime of the fatigue critical component for this turbine. 14 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Simulation and Experiment of Thermal Fatigue in the CPV Die Attach: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEM simulation and accelerated thermal cycling have been performed for the CPV die attach. Trends in fatigue damage accumulation and equivalent test time are explored and found to be most sensitive to temperature ramp rate. Die attach crack growth is measured through cycling and found to be in excellent agreement with simulations of the inelastic strain energy accumulated. Simulations of an entire year of weather data provides for the relative ranking of fatigue damage between four cites as well as their equivalent accelerated test time.

  4. Tensile and fatigue behaviors of printed Ag thin films on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, Gi-Dong; Won, Sejeong; Lee, Soon-Bok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible electronics using nanoparticle (NP) printing has been highlighted as a key technology enabling eco-friendly, low-cost, and large-area fabrication. For NP-based printing to be used as a successive alternative to photolithography and vacuum deposition, stretchability and long term reliability must be considered. This paper reports the stretchability and fatigue behavior of 100 nm thick NP-based silver thin films printed on polyethylene-terephthalate substrate and compares it to films deposited by electron-beam evaporation. NP-based films show stretchability and fatigue life comparable to evaporated films with intergranular fracture as the dominant failure mechanism.

  5. Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenburg, Robert Thomas

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  6. Sensitivity of Solder Joint Fatigue to Sources of Variation in Advanced Vehicular Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlahinos, A.; O'Keefe, M.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates a methodology for taking variation into account in thermal and fatigue analyses of the die attach for an inverter of an electric traction drive vehicle. This method can be used to understand how variation and mission profile affect parameters of interest in a design. Three parameters are varied to represent manufacturing, material, and loading variation: solder joint voiding, aluminum nitride substrate thermal conductivity, and heat generation at the integrated gate bipolar transistor. The influence of these parameters on temperature and solder fatigue life is presented. The heat generation loading variation shows the largest influence on the results for the assumptions used in this problem setup.

  7. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern...

  8. Transition Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism in Metal Oxide Nanoparticles. Transition Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism in Metal Oxide Nanoparticles....

  9. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit between the roof and the attic. · Apply modifications to traditional roofing assembly and roofing roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  10. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  11. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  12. Submitted to the International Journal of Fatigue, June 2005 Revised, May 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    specimen under mechanical cyclic loadings. The results of so-called "heating tests" (i.e., thermal effects [7, 8] or infrared (IR) cameras [2-6]. If the dissipated energy is induced by microplasticity, which-cycle fatigue (HCF) failure is caused by microplasticity, correlation between the two tests (i.e., "heating test

  13. Effects of creatine loading on electromyographic fatigue threshold during cycle ergometry in college-aged women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Abbie E.; Walter, Ashley A.; Herda, Trent J.; Ryan, Eric D.; Moon, Jordan R.; Cramer, Joel T.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 5 days of Creatine (Cr) loading on the electromyographic fatigue threshold (EMGFT) in college-aged women. Fifteen healthy college-aged women (mean ± SD = 22.3 ± 1.7 yrs) volunteered...

  14. Fracture and fatigue resistance of MoSiB alloys for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture and fatigue resistance of Mo­Si­B alloys for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications­Mo3Si­Mo5SiB2 alloys, which utilize a continuous a-Mo matrix to achieve unprecedented room. Introduction For applications such as aerospace engines and power generation, future advancements are limited

  15. Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue Kyu Hun Kim one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. The graphene-coated aerogel exhibits no change , but collapse under stress15 . We fabricated graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels by coating

  16. Damage estimates for European and US sites using the US high-cycle fatigue data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses two high-cycle fatigue data bases, US blade materials and one for European materials the service lifetime of a wind turbine blade sit WISPER load spectrum for northern European sit 19921 and the WISPER protocol load spectrum farm sites. The US data base, developed by Mandell, et al. (1995), contains over 2200 data points that were obtained using coupon testing procedures. These data are used to construct a Goodman diagram that is suitable for analyzing wind turbine blades. This result is compared to the Goodman diagram derived from the European fatigue data base FACT. The LIFE2 fatigue analysis code for wind turbines is then used to predict the service lifetime of a turbine blade subjected to the two loading histories. The results of this study indicate that the WISPER load spectrum from northern European sites significantly underestimates the WISPER protocol load spectrum from a US wind farm site; i.e., the WISPER load spectrum significantly underestimates the number and magnitude of the loads observed at a US wind farm site. Further, the analyses demonstrate that the European and the US fatigue material data bases are in general agreement for the prediction of tensile failures. However, for compressive failures, the two data bases are significantly different, with the US data base predicting significantly shorter service lifetimes than the European data base.

  17. Elevated temperature static fatigue of a Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.; Tortorelli, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Static fatigue tests of a Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite were conducted in four-point bending over a temperature range of 425 to 1,150 C in air at selected stress levels. The composite consisted of a Nicalon cloth with a 0.3 {mu}m graphite interfacial coating and a Forced Chemical Vapor Infiltration (FCVI) SiC matrix composite; samples were tested with or without a final protective SiC seal coat. The results indicated that the fatigue life of the Nicalon-SiC composite decreased with an increase in either applied stresses or test temperatures. However, the composite exhibited a fatigue limit of {approximately} 100 MPa at temperatures < 950 C which decreased to {approximately} 70 MPa at 1,150 C. Both electron microscopy and thermogravimetric studies suggested that the lifetime of the composites was dictated by the oxidation of graphite interfacial layer at temperatures {le} 700 C and by oxidation of graphite coating accompanied by formation of silicate interfacial layer via oxidation of the Nicalon fiber (and the SiC matrix) at temperatures {ge} 950 C. Use of a SiC seal coat effectively retarded the oxidation reactions and increased the lifetime by at least one order of magnitude at 425 C. On the other hand, the SiC seal coat made little (if any) difference in fatigue life at 950 C.

  18. Determination of torsional fatigue life of large turbine generator shafts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placek, R.J.; Williams, R.A.; Adams, S.L.; Klufas, O.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study to develop a methodology for predicting torsional fatigue damage to a turbine generator rotor subjected to transient electrical disturbances. This methodology used torsional properties obtained from constant amplitude tests on one-inch diameter specimens. The predictions were verified with constant amplitude and variable amplitude tests of specimens up to six inches in diameter.

  19. RIS-R-1358(EN) Accelerated Fatigue Testing of LM 19.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2003 #12;Abstract A series of 19.1 metre wind turbine blades manufactured by LM Glasfiber A with thermal imaging equipment to determine how an increase in fatigue load affects the blade material FOR STRAIN GAUGES 71 RISØ-R-1358(EN)4 #12;1 Introduction Traditionally a wind turbine blade is tested as part

  20. SOL-XX-XXXX, Samborsky,1 Comparison of Tensile Fatigue Resistance and Constant Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Several Potential Wind Turbine Blade Laminates Daniel D. Samborsky* , Timothy J. Wilson, and John F and potential interest for wind turbine blades, representing three types of fibers: E-glass, WindStrandTM glass are then used to predict the performance under spectrum fatigue loading relative to an earlier material

  1. 2013 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Session Creep/Fatigue Behavior of Resin Infused Biaxial Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /epoxy biaxial (±45o ) fabric laminates typical of shell/web areas of wind blades. Loading conditions were cyclic in the shell. Thus, the biaxial materials must resist the maximum blade strains under static and fatigue loads without failure or softening enough to reduce the blade stiffness or overload adjacent UD material

  2. Presented at 1999 EWEC Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades John F. Mandell and Herbert J. Sutherland* Daniel D. SamborskyPresented at 1999 EWEC Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue Wind Energy Technology Dept. Dept. of Chemical Engineering Sandia National Laboratories Montana State

  3. Author's personal copy Statistical pattern analysis of ultrasonic signals for fatigue damage detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    by laboratory experimentation in real time on a computer-controlled fatigue damage testing apparatus which is equipped with a variety of measuring instruments including an optical travelling microscope of life and expensive equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to develop capabilities for online detection

  4. In: Fatigue Crack Growth... Editor: Alphonse F. Lignelli, pp. 3-48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    fatigue test apparatus, equipped with ultrasonic sensors and an optical microscope, has been used sensing technique that is sensitive to small microstructural changes, robust to measurement noise-state machine that captures the dynamical system behavior by information compression. A computer-controlled

  5. Online fatigue damage monitoring by ultrasonic measurements: A symbolic dynamics approach q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    experimentally validated on a special-purpose test apparatus that is equipped with ultrasonic flaw detectionOnline fatigue damage monitoring by ultrasonic measurements: A symbolic dynamics approach q Shalabh alloy specimens, where the experiments have been conducted under load-controlled constant amplitude sinu

  6. Ionic effects on silica optical fiber strength and models for fatigue V. V. Rondinella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Ionic effects on silica optical fiber strength and models for fatigue V. V. Rondinella M. J. Matthewson Rutgers University, Fiber Optic Materials Research Program P. 0. Box 909, Piscataway, NJ 08855, flaw free silica optical fiber shows significant differences from the bulk material for poorly

  7. Optical fiber reliability implications of uncertainty in the fatigue crack growth model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Optical fiber reliability implications of uncertainty in the fatigue crack growth model G. M. Bubel University Fiber Optic Materials Research Program Ceramic Science and Engineering P.O. Box 909 Piscataway, furthermore, that such flaws can grow in time so that an initially intact silica optical fiber may undergo

  8. 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

  9. Thermo-optical modulation for improved ultrasonic fatigue crack detection in Ti6Al4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    scatterers, such as surface grooves, corrosion pits, coarse grains, etc. that might hide the fatigue crack to grow at unexpectedly high growth rates well below the large-crack threshold in aluminum, aluminum­lithium) and secondary irregulari- ties (e.g. uneven machining, mechanical wear, corrosion, etc.). Second

  10. Investigating the Effects of Corrosion on the Fatigue Life of Welded Steel Attachments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soape, Jack

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of dollars each year for the railroad industry in terms of maintenance and inspection. Since a large number of these bridges are steel and their service life is typically governed by fatigue of welded details, it is important to determine the interactions...

  11. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Carroll; Laura Carroll

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  12. Kinetics of degradation during fatigue and aging of fused silica optical fiber M. John Matthewson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Kinetics of degradation during fatigue and aging of fused silica optical fiber M. John Matthewson; degradation proceeds at an accelerated rate beyond the knee. This behavior leads to shorter lifetimes than predicted from short term data and to strength degradation even in the absence of an applied stress which

  13. Influence of Nonlinear Irregular Waves on the Fatigue Loads of an Offshore Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    it acts as a bottleneck to the realization of offshore wind farms that can compete with traditional energy sources [3]. Currently, offshore wind farms are typically sited in coastal areas with water depths aroundInfluence of Nonlinear Irregular Waves on the Fatigue Loads of an Offshore Wind Turbine Michiel B

  14. A Model to Assess Fatigue at Joint-Level Using the Half-Joint Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    and simulations generated by our animation environment. 1. Introduction The human body is continuously under b Virtual Reality Laboratory. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland In this paper we focus on the modeling and evaluation of performance factors as human fatigue at joint level. We

  15. Fatigue Enhancement of Category E' Detailsin Steel Bridge Girders Using CFRP Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaan, Benjamin Nicolaas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is reduced, resulting in an increased fatigue life of the detail. The CFRP overlays were also designed to be tough enough to resist internal crack growth and delamination due to shear stress from applied loads. Development of the CFRP overlay elements...

  16. Multiaxial stress effects on fatigue behavior of filled natural rubber W.V. Mars a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    Multiaxial stress effects on fatigue behavior of filled natural rubber W.V. Mars a , A. Fatemi b, * a Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, Findlay, OH 45840, USA b Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing in filled natural rubber based on experiments using short thin-walled cylindrical specimens subjected

  17. Oral/Poster Reference: FT242 FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH OF RUBBER UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    Oral/Poster Reference: FT242 FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH OF RUBBER UNDER VARIABLE AMPLITUDE LOADING R. Harbour1 , A. Fatemi1 , W. V. Mars2 1 The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA 2 Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, Findlay, OH, USA ABSTRACT Realistic loading conditions for rubber components are often more

  18. Fatigue and Overloading Behavior of SteelConcrete Composite Flexural Members Strengthened with High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    strengthened with new high modulus carbon fiber-reinforced polymer HM CFRP materials. The behavior of the beams.1061/ ASCE 1090-0268 2007 11:6 659 CE Database subject headings: Fatigue; Composite materials; Fiber carbon FRP CFRP materials for the repair and strength- ening of steel bridges and structures. A number

  19. Fatigue-related Gene-Networks identified in CD14+ cells isolated from HIV infected Patients -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobra, Adrian

    : Genes including the actin cytoskeletal regulatory proteins prokineticin 2 and cofilin 2 along with mitochondrial inner membrane proteins are involved in multiple pathways and were predictors of fatigue status and between 80-100% of persons living with HIV disease complaint of ongoing lack of energy and exhaustion

  20. An analysis of muscle fatigue due to complex tasks and its relation to the strain index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, John-Paul

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strain Index was originally designed to analyze mono-task jobs. An experiment using a grip dynamometer was used to simulate six multiple task jobs to study the effect of complex tasks on localized muscle fatigue and to evaluate six different...

  1. Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} < 60 N (Pm is the maximum magnitude of cyclic load). But at relatively high load levels i.e. P{sub m} > 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

  2. Investigating the Effects of Corrosion on the Fatigue Life of Welded Steel Attachments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soape, Jack

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of dollars each year for the railroad industry in terms of maintenance and inspection. Since a large number of these bridges are steel and their service life is typically governed by fatigue of welded details, it is important to determine the interactions...

  3. Contact fatigue behavior and gas cell thermal wave NDE of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barla, J.R.; Edler, J.P.; Lin, H. [Eaton Corp. R & D, Southfield, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon nitride is being evaluated for potential applications as structural components subjected to contact fatigue loading. A new testing and evaluation methodology for evaluation of Hertzian contact fatigue damage in ceramic materials has been developed and is described. Contact fatigue damage is induced in three test specimens simultaneously. The material investigated is Eaton Corporation`s low cost E - Process Silicon Nitride. Tests were conducted at several Hertzian stress levels to evaluate contact fatigue damage behavior. Gas cell thermal wave NDE was employed to study the induced subsurface damage. Damage behavior was also investigated using optical microscopy. Two specimens were evaluated in detail; one that was tested for 17,400 cycles, P{sub max} = 2700 N and one that was tested for 1 x 10{sup 6} cycles, P{sub max} = 1800 N. The 2700 N specimen has a partial cone crack and contains a small concentration of vertical and shallow horizontal cracks. No evidence of a cone crack was detected on the 1800 N specimen. However, a larger concentration of horizontal microcracks at and just below the surface is present in this specimen, with particle debris in and around the surface contact area. Correlation of the optical microscopy observations with gas cell thermal wave NDE of the subsurface damage in these two specimens is discussed.

  4. AIAA-2003-0692 NEW FATIGUE DATA FOR W IND TURBINE BLADE M ATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 AIAA-2003-0692 NEW FATIGUE DATA FOR W IND TURBINE BLADE M ATERIALS John F. Mandell, Daniel D to the wind turbine industry in several areas: (a) very high cycle S-N data; (b) refined Goodman Diagram; (c the expected cycle range for turbines. While the data cannot be used directly in design due to the specialized

  5. Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiller, Volker

    Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1Culloh Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Although cavitation and refilling cycles could be common in plants, it is unknown whether these cycles weaken the cavitation resistance

  6. Fatigue of aluminium-lithium alloys K. T. Venkateswara Rao and R. O. Ritchie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fatigue of aluminium-lithium alloys K. T. Venkateswara Rao and R. O. Ritchie Aluminium been identified as prime candidates for replacing 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloys currently used characteristics of aluminium-lithium alloys are reviewed in detail with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms

  7. SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES-based Damage Detec- tion (SSDD) method on model structures for an utilization of this approach on offshore wind damage in real size structural components of offshore wind turbines. KEYWORDS : Damage detection

  8. Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with Emphasis of offshore wind turbines Defense: 09.12.2012 2012 - : Structural Engineer in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) 2007 and higher wind speed, and less visual disturbance and noise for offshore wind energy. Offshore wind

  9. Analysis of SNL/MSU/DOE fatigue database trends for wind turbine blade materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandell, John F. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Ashwill, Thomas D.; Wilson, Timothy J. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Sears, Aaron T. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Agastra, Pancasatya (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Laird, Daniel L.; Samborsky, Daniel D. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of trends in fatigue results from the Montana State University program on the fatigue of composite materials for wind turbine blades for the period 2005-2009. Test data can be found in the SNL/MSU/DOE Fatigue of Composite Materials Database which is updated annually. This is the fifth report in this series, which summarizes progress of the overall program since its inception in 1989. The primary thrust of this program has been research and testing of a broad range of structural laminate materials of interest to blade structures. The report is focused on current types of infused and prepreg blade materials, either processed in-house or by industry partners. Trends in static and fatigue performance are analyzed for a range of materials, geometries and loading conditions. Materials include: sixteen resins of three general types, five epoxy based paste adhesives, fifteen reinforcing fabrics including three fiber types, three prepregs, many laminate lay-ups and process variations. Significant differences in static and fatigue performance and delamination resistance are quantified for particular materials and process conditions. When blades do fail, the likely cause is fatigue in the structural detail areas or at major flaws. The program is focused strongly on these issues in addition to standard laminates. Structural detail tests allow evaluation of various blade materials options in the context of more realistic representations of blade structure than do the standard test methods. Types of structural details addressed in this report include ply drops used in thickness tapering, and adhesive joints, each tested over a range of fatigue loading conditions. Ply drop studies were in two areas: (1) a combined experimental and finite element study of basic ply drop delamination parameters for glass and carbon prepreg laminates, and (2) the development of a complex structured resin-infused coupon including ply drops, for comparison studies of various resins, fabrics and pry drop thicknesses. Adhesive joint tests using typical blade adhesives included both generic testing of materials parameters using a notched-lap-shear test geometry developed in this study, and also a series of simulated blade web joint geometries fabricated by an industry partner.

  10. Update and Improve Subsection NH –– Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report described the results of investigation on Task 10 of DOE/ASME Materials NGNP/Generation IV Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 10 is to Update and Improve Subsection NH -- Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods. Five newly proposed promising creep-fatigue evaluation methods were investigated. Those are (1) modified ductility exhaustion method, (2) strain range separation method, (3) approach for pressure vessel application, (4) hybrid method of time fraction and ductility exhaustion, and (5) simplified model test approach. The outlines of those methods are presented first, and predictability of experimental results of these methods is demonstrated using the creep-fatigue data collected in previous Tasks 3 and 5. All the methods (except the simplified model test approach which is not ready for application) predicted experimental results fairly accurately. On the other hand, predicted creep-fatigue life in long-term regions showed considerable differences among the methodologies. These differences come from the concepts each method is based on. All the new methods investigated in this report have advantages over the currently employed time fraction rule and offer technical insights that should be thought much of in the improvement of creep-fatigue evaluation procedures. The main points of the modified ductility exhaustion method, the strain range separation method, the approach for pressure vessel application and the hybrid method can be reflected in the improvement of the current time fraction rule. The simplified mode test approach would offer a whole new advantage including robustness and simplicity which are definitely attractive but this approach is yet to be validated for implementation at this point. Therefore, this report recommends the following two steps as a course of improvement of NH based on newly proposed creep-fatigue evaluation methodologies. The first step is to modify the current approach by incorporating the partial advantages the new method offer, and the second step is to replace the current method by the simplified test approach when it has become technically mature enough. The recommendations are basically in line with the work scope of the Task Force on Creep-Fatigue of the Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design of the Standards Committee of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee Section III.

  11. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  12. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650 degrees C.

  13. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S. [Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri - Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409-0050 (United States)

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented.

  14. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  15. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  16. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  17. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  18. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  19. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  20. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  1. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  2. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  3. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  4. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  5. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal Immobilization, and Catalytic Applications. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

  6. Molten metal reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  7. The effect of environment, chemistry, and microstructure on the corrosion fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Lindsay Beth

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of sulfur on the corrosion fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steel was evaluated under Light Water Reactor (LWR) conditions of 288°C deaerated (less than 5ppb O?) water, to shed light on the accelerating ...

  8. Effect of fiber fabric orientation on the monotonic and fatigue behavior of a continuous fiber ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chawla, N.; Liaw, P.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Lara-Curzio, E.; Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monotonic fast fracture and fatigue behavior of a Nextel{trademark} 312 reinforced SiC matrix composite was investigated. Effect of fabric orientation with respect to the loading axis on the monotonic and fatigue behavior of the composite was examined. Two geometries were investigated: transverse, where fiber fabric is perpendicular to loading direction; and edge-on where the fabric is parallel to the loading axis. The edge-on geometry showed higher flexure strengths than the transverse orientation. The different deformation mechanisms between the edge-on and transverse orientations were due to strong in-plane shearing of the fiber fabric and weak interlaminar shear of the plies, respectively. In cyclic fatigue, stress versus cycles (S-N) curves showed high fatigue endurance limits in both orientations, although the transverse orientation survived more cycles than the edge-on orientation at stresses slightly above the endurance limit.

  9. Simulated Fatigue Damage Index on Mooring Lines of a Gulf of Mexico Truss Spar Determined from Recorded Field Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiecke, Adam Fuller

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . The platform is equipped with an Environmental Platform Response Monitoring System (EPRMS) which records real-time motions, environmental parameters and loads. These measurements were used to hind-cast the platform mooring tensions and estimate fatigue damage...

  10. The effects of laser trimming on the tensile strength and fatigue resistance properties of titanium - 6Al-4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitesel, Dean Adam

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of laser trimming on the tensile strength and fatigue resistance of titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium specimens was investigated. Due to the nature of laser processing, the microstructure of the titanium alloy was altered in an area local...

  11. Fatigue resistance of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures using the calibrated mechanistic with surface energy (CMSE) measurements approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Abebresse, Edward Kwame

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue cracking is one of the fundamental distresses that occur in the life of a Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) pavement. This load induced distress leads to structural collapse of the entire pavement ultimately and can only be remedied...

  12. Fatigue resistance of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures using the calibrated mechanistic with surface energy (CMSE) measurements approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Abebresse, Edward Kwame

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue cracking is one of the fundamental distresses that occur in the life of a Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) pavement. This load induced distress leads to structural collapse of the entire pavement ultimately and can ...

  13. Comptes Rendus des JNC 16 Toulouse 2009 Suivi de l'endommagement en fatigue des composites base de fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a thermoplastic matrix (Polypropylene) reinforced by short fibers (White Hemp and Chènevotte). This article fatigue / White Hemp / Acoustic emission / Stiffness loss/ hysteresis loops. hal-00429719,version1-4Nov

  14. Fatigue Life of Damaged Bridge Deck Panels Strengthened With Carbon Fiber Hongseob Oh, Jongsung Sim, and Christian Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    , Jongsung Sim, and Christian Meyer ABSTRACT To simulate fatigue damage to bridge deck slabs, cyclic loading and recycling of concrete material. ACI Fellow Christian Meyer is a professor in the Department of Civil

  15. The influence of high harmonic force on fatigue life and its prediction via coupled inline-crossflow VIV modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Haining

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) of a flexibly mounted rigid cylinder placed in a flow is a canonical problem of fluid-structure interactions and the study of VIV and the resulting material fatigue is particularly important ...

  16. A unified method for the analysis of nonlinear viscoelasticity and fatigue cracking of asphalt mixtures using the dynamic mechanical analyzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelo Branco, Veronica Teixeira Franco

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A UNIFIED METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF NONLINEAR VISCOELASTICITY AND FATIGUE CRACKING OF ASPHALT MIXTURES USING THE DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYZER A Dissertation by VERONICA TEIXEIRA FRANCO CASTELO BRANCO Submitted to the Office... VISCOELASTICITY AND FATIGUE CRACKING OF ASPHALT MIXTURES USING THE DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYZER A Dissertation by VERONICA TEIXEIRA FRANCO CASTELO BRANCO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  17. Method for forming metal contacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  18. Data collection on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels and weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavassoli, A.A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France); Picker, C.; Wareing, J. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on the influence of low dose 400--550 C irradiation on the mechanical properties of structural steels (Types 304, 316, 316L, 316H and 316L(N) and associated weld metals) at temperatures from 20 C to 750 C, have been compiled from published literature and the results of British, Dutch, French and German laboratories. Properties evaluated include tensile, impact, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue. The preliminary results, which cover the dose range from 0 to 5 displacements per atom (and/or up to 9 appm helium) are presented as comparisons between irradiated and unirradiated control data, covering a range of strength and cyclic properties. The results show that low dose irradiation can have a significant influence on the properties, i.e.: (1) increases in tensile proof strength; (2) reductions in tensile ductility; (3) decreases in impact energy; (4) reductions in creep-rupture strength and ductility; and (5) reductions in creep-fatigue endurance. By considering the influence of irradiation temperature and dose level, the results are rationalized in terms of irradiation hardening and grain boundary embrittlement mechanisms.

  19. High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed Metal/Metal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference...

  20. Prediction of the Creep-Fatigue Lifetime of Alloy 617: An Application of Non-destructive Evaluation and Information Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Richard Wright; Timothy Roney

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively simple method using the nominal constant average stress information and the creep rupture model is developed to predict the creep-fatigue lifetime of Alloy 617, in terms of time to rupture. The nominal constant average stress is computed using the stress relaxation curve. The predicted time to rupture can be converted to number of cycles to failure using the strain range, the strain rate during each cycle, and the hold time information. The predicted creep-fatigue lifetime is validated against the experimental measurements of the creep-fatigue lifetime collected using conventional laboratory creep-fatigue tests. High temperature creep-fatigue tests of Alloy 617 were conducted in air at 950°C with a tensile hold period of up to 1800s in a cycle at total strain ranges of 0.3% and 0.6%. It was observed that the proposed method is conservative in that the predicted lifetime is less than the experimentally determined values. The approach would be relevant to calculate the remaining useful life to a component like a steam generator that might fail by the creep-fatigue mechanism.

  1. Fatigue crack propagation in a quasi one-dimensional elasto-plastic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomás M. Guozden; Eduardo A. Jagla

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue crack advance induced by the application of cyclic quasistatic loads is investigated both numerically and analytically using a lattice spring model. The system has a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, and consists in two symmetrical chains that are pulled apart, thus breaking springs which connect them, and producing the advance of a crack. Quasistatic crack advance occurs as a consequence of the plasticity included in the springs which form the chains, and that implies a history dependent stress-strain curve for each spring. The continuous limit of the model allows a detailed analytical treatment that gives physical insight of the propagation mechanism. This simple model captures key features that cause well known phenomenology in fatigue crack propagation, in particular a Paris-like law of crack advance under cyclic loading, and the overload retardation effect.

  2. Surface Studies of Ultra Strength Drilling Steel after Corrosion Fatigue in Simulated Sour Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ziomek-Moroz; J.A. Hawk; R. Thodla; F. Gui

    2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Unites States predicted 60% growth in energy demand by 2030 makes oil and natural gas primary target fuels for energy generation. The fact that the peak of oil production from shallow wells (< 5000 m) is about to be reached, thereby pushing the oil and natural gas industry into deeper wells. However, drilling to depths greater than 5000 m requires increasing the strength-to weight ratio of the drill pipe materials. Grade UD-165 is one of the ultra- high yield strength carbon steels developed for ultra deep drilling (UDD) activities. Drilling UDD wells exposes the drill pipes to Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and H{sub 2}S-containig corrosive environments (i.e., sour environments) at higher pressures and temperatures compared to those found in conventional wells. Because of the lack of synergism within the service environment, operational stresses can result in catastrophic brittle failures characteristic for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Approximately 75% of all drill string failures are caused by fatigue or corrosion fatigue. Since there is no literature data on the corrosion fatigue performance of UD-165 in sour environments, research was initiated to better clarify the fatigue crack growth (FCGR) behavior of this alloy in UDD environments. The FCGR behavior of ultra-strength carbon steel, grade UD-165, was investigated by monitoring crack growth rate in deaerated 5%NaCl solution buffered with NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and in contact with H{sub 2}S. The partial pressure of H{sub 2}S (p{sub H2S}) was 0.83 kPa and pH of the solution was adjusted by NaOH to 12. The fatigue experiments were performed at 20 and 85 C in an autoclave with surface investigations augmented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In this study, research focused on surface analyses supported by the fatigue crack growth rate measurements. Fig. 1 shows an SEM micrograph of the crack that propagated from the notch in the solution at 20 C. Accumulation of the corrosion products is visible along the crack. The EDX chemical analysis near the crack tip found iron, sulfur and oxygen in the passive layer. The surface of the sample after the fatigue test in the sour environment at 85{sup o}, Fig. 2, C looks different from that fatigued surface at 20 C. The crack propagates across the passive film that covers the surface fairly uniformly. Some spallation of the passive film is observed near the notch. The EDX chemical analysis of the passive film near the crack tip identified mainly iron, carbon and oxygen. It appears that temperature plays a very important role in formation of the passive film. This may be associated with different solubility of H{sub 2}S in the solution, which will be further studied.

  3. Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

  4. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  5. Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue testing was conducted on Carbon Experimental and Twist-Bend Experimental (CX-100 and TX-100) 9-m wind turbine research blades. The CX-100 blade was designed to investigate the use of a carbon spar cap to reduce weight and increase stiffness while being incorporated using conventional manufacturing techniques. The TX-100 blade used carbon in the outboard portion of the skin to produce twist-bend coupling to passively alleviate aerodynamic loads. In the fatigue tests, the CX-100 blade was loaded by a single hydraulic cylinder while the TX-100 blade was loaded via a hydraulically-actuated resonant loading system called the Universal Resonant Exciter. The blades were outfitted with approximately 30 strain gages as well as displacement and load sensors. Both blades survived to cycle counts sufficient to demonstrate a 20-year operational life. The CX-100 blade failed at approximately 1.6 million cycles because of a buckle and crack that formed and grew just outboard of max-chord. The TX-100 blade failed because of a crack that grew from the termination point of the spar cap at the midspan of the blade. This paper covers the results of the fatigue tests.

  6. Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

  7. A generalized fitting technique for the LIFE2 fatigue analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Research Dept.; Wilson, T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Engineering Research Inst.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of component fatigue lifetime for a wind energy conversion system (WECS) requires that the component load spectrum be formulated in terms of stress cycles. Typically, these stress cycles are obtained from time series data using a cycle identification scheme. As discussed by many authors, the matrix or matrices of cycle counts that describe the stresses on a turbine are constructed from relatively short, representative samples of time series data. The ability to correctly represent the long-term behavior of the distribution of stress cycles from these representative samples is critical to the analysis of service lifetimes. Several techniques are currently used to convert representative samples to the lifetime cyclic loads on the turbine. There has been recently developed a set of fitting algorithms that is particularly useful for matching the body of the distribution of fatigue stress cycles on a turbine component. Fitting techniques are now incorporated into the LIFE2 fatigue/fracture analysis code for wind turbines. In this paper, the authors provide an overview of the fitting algorithms and describe the pre- and post-count algorithms developed to permit their use in the LIFE2 code. Typical case studies are used to illustrate the use of the technique.

  8. Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, JaeKyung [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

  9. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  10. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  11. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  12. Metal alloy identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  13. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal

  14. Nanoscience Discovery AcademyNanoscience Discovery Academy A two-week Science Academy for 9th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston area high schools Students competitively selected What Hands-on exposure to environmental science researchers using nanotechnology to tackle civilization's grand challenges ­ energy, water, environment and Street ________________________________________________________________________ City State Zip 3. E

  15. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  16. The Impact of Thermal Fatigue and Carbidisation on the W Coatings Deposited on CFC tiles for the ITER-like Wall Project at JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Thermal Fatigue and Carbidisation on the W Coatings Deposited on CFC tiles for the ITER-like Wall Project at JET

  17. PREDICTION OF LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE-LIFE BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION. PART 1: 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOY PART 2: ALCLAD 7075-T6/ ALUMINUM ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low-cycle fatigue life of Aluminum sheet alloys by acoustictoughness of structural aluminum alloys. Fracture . Fracturetoughness of structural aluminum alloys, Eng. Fracture Mech.

  18. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those...

  19. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  20. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  1. Speed of Sound in metal Speed of Sound in metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jaehoon

    the metal rod and metal bar. 2. Acquire a metal bar or rod and measure its mass. Use the meter stick and measure and record the length in meters. Use the vernier calipers and measure the other dimensionBar Select the Smart Tool. Position the Smart tool so that the vertical line bisects the pulse. The (x

  2. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  3. Calixarene supported transition metal clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephanie Merac

    2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a series of calix[n]arene polynuclear transition metal and lanthanide complexes. Calix[4]arenes possess lower-rim polyphenolic pockets that are ideal for the complexation of various transition metal ...

  4. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  5. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, L.J.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  6. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  7. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  8. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  9. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cline, C.F.

    1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

  10. Integrated decontamination process for metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

  11. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of...

  12. Spray casting of metallic preforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

  13. Functional Metal Phosphonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Houston Phillipp

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................... 39 12 Zr6 prepared at 205 ?C with HF as a solubilizing agent ................................ 43 13 Layered structure of Zn(O3PC6H4CN)(H2O) and Mn(O3PC6H4CN)(H2O) viewed along the c-axis. The coordinating water molecules are between... acid groups form hydrogen-bonded pairs in in Zn(O3PC6H4CO2H)(H2O) and Mn(O3PC6H4CO2H)(H2O). ..................... 55 15 Inorganic layered structure common to divalent metal phosphonates. Octahedral metal ions are coordinated by five phosphonate...

  14. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  15. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  16. Metal enrichment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schindler; A. Diaferio

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many processes that can transport gas from the galaxies to their environment and enrich the environment in this way with metals. These metal enrichment processes have a large influence on the evolution of both the galaxies and their environment. Various processes can contribute to the gas transfer: ram-pressure stripping, galactic winds, AGN outflows, galaxy-galaxy interactions and others. We review their observational evidence, corresponding simulations, their efficiencies, and their time scales as far as they are known to date. It seems that all processes can contribute to the enrichment. There is not a single process that always dominates the enrichment, because the efficiencies of the processes vary strongly with galaxy and environmental properties.

  17. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  18. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  19. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  20. Structural Safety and Reliability, Corotis et al. (eds), 2001 Swets & Zeitlinger, ISBN 90 5809 197 X Moment-based fatigue load models for wind energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    197 X 1 Moment-based fatigue load models for wind energy systems Steven R. Winterstein & LeRoy M. Veers Sandia National Laboratories, Wind Energy Technology Department, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0708 Keywords: load models, fatigue loads, wind energy, non-Gaussian, moment-based models, long- term, short

  1. Application of bi-linear loglog SN model to strain-controlled fatigue data of aluminum alloys and its effect on life predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    Application of bi-linear log­log S­N model to strain-controlled fatigue data of aluminum alloys­log model is applied to stress amplitude versus fatigue life data of 14 aluminum alloys. It is shown-life curves are discussed. Life predictions of aluminum alloys based on linear and bi-linear models are also

  2. Fatigue analysis of single-span and two-span solid-sawn, creosote-treated southern pine railroad bridge stringers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comardo, Angelique France

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be the preferred method of construction and rehabilitation of timber bridges. To properly assess the fatigue resistance of timber bridge stringers, it was necessary to conduct full-scale fatigue tests on stringer specimens. As part of the Timber Bridge Life...

  3. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

  4. Two-dimensional finite element simulation of fracture and fatigue behaviours of alumina microstructures for hip prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kyungmok; Géringer, Jean; 10.1177/0954411911422843

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulation for fracture and fatigue behaviours of pure alumina microstructures such as those found at hip prostheses. Finite element models are developed using actual Al2O3 microstructures and a bilinear cohesive zone law. Simulation conditions are similar to those found at a slip zone in a dry contact between a femoral head and an acetabular cup of hip prosthesis. Contact stresses are imposed to generate cracks in the models. Magnitudes of imposed stresses are higher than those found at the microscopic scale. Effects of microstructures and contact stresses are investigated in terms of crack formation. In addition, fatigue behaviour of the microstructure is determined by performing simulations under cyclic loading conditions. It is shown that crack density observed in a microstructure increases with increasing magnitude of applied contact stress. Moreover, crack density increases linearly with respect to the number of fatigue cycles within a given con...

  5. Fatigue damage estimate comparisons for northern European and U.S. wind farm loading environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technology Dept.; Kelley, N.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical loading histories associated with wind turbine service environments in northern Europe and within a large wind farm in the continental US were recently compared by Kelley (1995) using the WISPER [Ten Have, 1992] loading standard and its development protocol. In this study, an equivalent load spectrum for a US wind farm was developed by applying the WISPER development protocol to representative service load histories collected from two adjacent turbines operating within a large wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass, California. The results of this study showed that turbines operating in the California wind farm experience many more loading cycles with larger peak-to-peak values for the same mean wind speed classification than their European counterparts. In this paper, the impact of the two WISPER-protocol fatigue-load spectra on service lifetime predictions are used to compare and contrast the impact of the two loading environments with one another. The service lifetime predictions are made using the LIFE2 Fatigue Analysis Code [Sutherland and Schluter, 1989] with the fatigue properties of typical fiber glass composite blade materials. Additional analyses, based on rainflow counted time histories from the San Gorgonio turbines, are also used in the comparisons. In general, these results indicate that the WISPER load spectrum from northern European sites significantly underestimates the WISPER protocol load spectrum from a US wind farm site; i.e., the WISPER load spectrum significantly underestimates the number and magnitude of the loads observed at a US wind farm site. The authors conclude that there are fundamental differences in the two service environments.

  6. Fatigue Crack Propagation from Notched Specimens of 304 SS in elevated Temperature Aqueous Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wire, G. L.; Mills, W. J.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates for 304 stainless steel (304SS) were determined in 24 degree C and 288 degree C air and 288 degree C water using double-edged notch (DEN) specimens of 304 stainless steel (304 SS). Test performed at matched loading conditions in air and water at 288 degree C with 20-6- cc h[sub]2/kg h[sub]2O provided a direct comparison of the relative crack growth rates in air and water over a wide range of crack growth rates. The DEN crack extension ranged from short cracks (0.03-0.25 mm) to long cracks up to 4.06 mm, which are consistent with conventional deep crack tests. Crack growth rates of 304 SS in water were about 12 times the air rate. This 12X environmental enhancement persisted to crack extensions up to 4.06 mm, far outside the range associated with short crack effects. The large environmental degradation for 304 SS crack growth is consistent with the strong reduction of fatigue life in high hydrogen water. Further, very similar environmental effects w ere reported in fatigue crack growth tests in hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). Most literature data in high hydrogen water show only a mild environmental effect for 304 SS, of order 2.5 times air or less, but the tests were predominantly performed at high cyclic stress intensity or equivalently, high air rates. The environmental effect in low oxygen environments at low stress intensity depends strongly on both the stress ratio, R, and the load rise time, T[sub]r, as recently reported for austenitic stainless steel in BWR water. Fractography was performed for both tests in air and water. At 288 degree C in water, the fracture surfaces were crisply faceted with a crystallographic appearance, and showed striations under high magnification. The cleavage-like facets on the fracture surfaces suggest that hydrogen embrittlement is the primary cause of accelerated cracking.

  7. Historical overview on Vacuum suitable Welding and fatigue resistance in Research Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New inventions change the approach of vacuum suitable welding for research purpose. With orbital welding, laser welding and robot welding the possibilities increase to fabricate larger vessels more accurately. Despite this development there is still no perfect understanding on how to avoid virtual leaks and how to make such joints suitable for dynamic stress. By recalling its historical development, it is apparent how welding mistakes began occurring systematically and how to avoid them. With ASDEX-Upgrade as an example, it is shown how the attempt to conduct vacuum suitable welding has decreased the fatigue strength. ITER could repeat the mistakes of ASDEX-Upgrade even for unwanted welding (accidental fusing of joints).

  8. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, B.M. [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)] [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F. [1864 Stadium Road, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)] [1864 Stadium Road, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Judge, A.R., E-mail: arjudge@phhp.ufl.edu [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative soleus is also important for normal locomotion, we further performed a fatigue trial in the soleus and found that the decrease in relative force was greater and more rapid in solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. These data demonstrate that severe cancer cachexia causes profound muscle weakness that is not entirely explained by the muscle atrophy. In addition, cancer cachexia decreases the fatigue resistance of the soleus muscle, a postural muscle typically resistant to fatigue. Thus, specifically targeting contractile dysfunction represents an additional means to counter muscle weakness in cancer cachexia, in addition to targeting the prevention of muscle atrophy.

  9. High temperature fracture and fatigue of ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 6, August 15, 1994--August 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers work done in the first year of our new contract {open_quotes}High Temperature Fracture and Fatigue of Ceramics,{close_quotes} which commenced in August, 1995 as a follow-on from our prior contract {open_quotes}Mechanisms of Mechanical Fatigue in Ceramics.{close_quotes} Our activities have consisted mainly of studies of the failure of fibrous ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) at high temperature; with a little fundamental work on the role of stress redistribution in the statistics of fracture and cracking in the presence of viscous fluids.

  10. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  11. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  12. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQTrending: Metal Oxo

  13. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQTrending: Metal

  14. METALS DESIGN HANDBOOK DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE899 06 Revision 0 METALS

  15. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print

  16. Metal coupled emission process

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergy Metal Organic Heat Carrierscom,

  17. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  18. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  19. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datta, Ravindra (Iowa City, IA); Singh, Ajeet (Iowa City, IA); Halasz, Istvan (Iowa City, IA); Serban, Manuela (Iowa City, IA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  20. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  1. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  2. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  3. Fatigue crack growth of titanium rotor alloys in vacuum and air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClung, R.C.; Lawless, B.H.; Gorelik, M.; Date, C.; Gill, Y.; Piascik, R.S.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhanced life management system for aircraft turbine engine rotors based on probabilistic damage tolerance methods is currently under development by the engine industry and the FAA, with an initial focus on fatigue cracking at hard alpha (HA) defects in titanium. Since HA defects are usually subsurface, any resulting cracks are embedded and hence isolated from the atmosphere (i.e., vacuum-like) for at least some of their life. Fatigue crack growth (GCG) tests have been conducted in vacuum at various temperatures and stress ratios for Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo+Si rotor alloys. A brief study of vacuum levels suggests that pressures of 10{sup {minus}6} Torr are adequate to capture full vacuum effects on FCG rates. Vacuum FCG results are compared with available air data. The vacuum data demonstrate temperature and stress ratio effects comparable to air data. The vacuum and air data exhibit the same growth rates in the upper Paris regime, but apparent thresholds are significantly higher in vacuum than in air.

  4. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  5. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  6. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  7. Magnetic metallic multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hood, R.Q.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

  8. ``Towards Strange Metallic Holography'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Tong, David; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We initiate a holographic model building approach to 'strange metallic' phenomenology. Our model couples a neutral Lifshitz-invariant quantum critical theory, dual to a bulk gravitational background, to a finite density of gapped probe charge carriers, dually described by D-branes. In the physical regime of temperature much lower than the charge density and gap, we exhibit anomalous scalings of the temperature and frequency dependent conductivity. Choosing the dynamical critical exponent z appropriately we can match the non-Fermi liquid scalings, such as linear resistivity, observed in strange metal regimes. As part of our investigation we outline three distinct string theory realizations of Lifshitz geometries: from F theory, from polarized branes, and from a gravitating charged Fermi gas. We also identify general features of renormalization group flow in Lifshitz theories, such as the appearance of relevant charge-charge interactions when z {ge} 2. We outline a program to extend this model building approach to other anomalous observables of interest such as the Hall conductivity.

  9. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  10. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  11. Int. Symposium on Mechanics and Materials, May 9-14, 2010, Greece Fatigue Investigation of Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    . A calculation procedure according to the IIW guideline is brought into discussion to assess the fatigue was issued [5] and a guideline was created [6]. In the last two decades UIT has been further developed is generated by ultrasonic transducer vibrations at the rear end of a freely axially moving needle indenter

  12. Methodology for predicting torsional fatigue life of turbine generator shafts using crack initiation plus propagation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.F.; Williams, R.A.; Wilkening, W.W.; LeFort, P.N.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overall methodology now exists that addresses both crack initiation and propagation in predicting the fatigue life of large turbine generator shafts. It can estimate previous torsional transient damage and predict residual life. In short, this improved methodology allows utilities to determine the availability of turbogenerators with greater confidence.

  13. FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996, ASME, pp. 46-51)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996/MSU database to lifetime prediction as described in Ref. [1]. INTRODUCTION Most U.S. fiberglass wind turbine of unidirectional (0E) and ±45 stranded fabric layers, typical blade materials, vary significantly in tensile

  14. Analytical investigation of the applicability of simplified ratchetting and creep-fatigue rules to a nozzle-to-sphere geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwaltney, R.C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of a nozzle-to-spherical-shell attachment and explores the applicability of simplified ratchetting and creep-fatigue rules to this attachment. A five-cycle inelastic analysis and creep-fatigue damage evaluation was carried out on this component. An elastic analysis also was done to provide input parameters required to apply the various rules and procedures of simplified analysis methods. Ten lines, or critical sections, were chosen for postprocessing to determine the ratchetting strain and creep-fatigue damage at both the inside and outside surfaces. At many of the 20 surface points analyzed, the inelastic analysis results did not develop a constant or decreasing pattern for the incremental strain or damage even after 5 cycles were analyzed. Failure to develop a constant or decreasing pattern was especially prevalent for creep damage. The results of the detailed inelastic analyses at the ten critical sections are compared with the results of elastic evaluations of ratchetting and creep-fatigue damage calculated according to American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case N-47-13.

  15. Enhanced fatigue and aging resistance using reactive powders in the optical fiber buffer coating V. V. Rondinella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Enhanced fatigue and aging resistance using reactive powders in the optical fiber buffer coating V. V. Rondinella M. J. Matthewson P. R. Foy Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Department of small quantities of colloidal silica to the UV- curable polymer coating of fused silica optical fiber

  16. Effect of Loading Mode and Coating on Dynamic Fatigue of Optical Fiber in Two-Point Bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effect of Loading Mode and Coating on Dynamic Fatigue of Optical Fiber in Two-Point Bending Vincenzo V Rondinella*and M. John Matthewson* Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Department of Ceramic is a useful method for investigating the mechanical properties of optical fiber and has several advantages

  17. Stress intensity factors and fatigue growth of a surface crack in a drill pipe during rotary drilling operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stress intensity factors and fatigue growth of a surface crack in a drill pipe during rotary drilling operation Ngoc Ha Daoa, , Hedi Sellamia aMines ParisTech, 35 rue Saint-Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau cedex, France Abstract Drill pipe in a curved section of the drilled well is considered as a rotating

  18. Two-dimensional finite element simulation of fracture and fatigue behaviours of alumina microstructures for hip prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    microstructures for hip prosthesis Kyungmok Kim¹, Bernard Forest¹, Jean Geringer¹* ¹Ecole Nationale Supérieure des and fatigue behaviours of pure alumina microstructures found at hip prosthesis. Finite element models are similar to those found at a slip zone between a femoral head and an acetabular cup of hip prosthesis

  19. Fast evaluation of the fatigue lifetime of rubber-like materials based on a heat build-up protocol and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fast evaluation of the fatigue lifetime of rubber-like materials based on a heat build-up protocol Cedex, France Abstract The temperature of rubber-like materials increases under cyclic loadings, due results. Key words: rubber-like materials, heat build-up, infrared thermography, X-ray micro

  20. 10.1111/j.1460-2695.2007.01143.x Fatigue crack growth of filled rubber under constant and variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    10.1111/j.1460-2695.2007.01143.x Fatigue crack growth of filled rubber under constant and variable Assistant at The University of Toledo, Currently at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, 2Professor, Mechanical Toledo, Ohio 43606, USA, 3Lead Engineer, Research Department, Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, 701 Lima

  1. F A T I G U E 2 0 0 2 HIGH-CYCLE FATIGUE OF BETA TITANIUM ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    F A T I G U E 2 0 0 2 HIGH-CYCLE FATIGUE OF BETA TITANIUM ALLOYS J. O. Peters*+ , G. Lütjering*, R) properties of the high-strength titanium alloys -Cez and Ti-6246 (in two distinctly different + processed and processed conditions) with the conventional + titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (in a + processed condition

  2. Static and Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Static and Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Turbine Blades Subject to Cold Weather Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis by Patricio Andres Lillo experienced in candi- date Canadian wind turbine deployment locations. The thesis then narrows its focus

  3. Micromechanisms of short fatigue crack growth in an Al-Si piston alloy. T.O. Mbuya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    behaviour of a model cast aluminium piston alloy has been investigated. This has been achieved using1 Micromechanisms of short fatigue crack growth in an Al-Si piston alloy. T.O. Mbuya1 , and P frequently observed. These results have been compared with the long crack growth behaviour of the alloy

  4. Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth at Structural Discontinuities and Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. F. W. Brust; Dr. G. M. Wilkowski; Dr. P. Krishnaswamy; Mr. Keith Wichman

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsection ASME NH high temperature design procedure does not admit crack-like defects into the structural components. The US NRC identified the lack of treatment of crack growth within NH as a limitation of the code and thus this effort was undertaken. This effort is broken into two parts. Part 1, summarized here, involved examining all high temperature creep-fatigue crack growth codes being used today and from these, the task objective was to choose a methodology that is appropriate for possible implementation within NH. The second part of this task, which has just started, is to develop design rules for possible implementation within NH. This second part is a challenge since all codes require step-by-step analysis procedures to be undertaken in order to assess the crack growth and life of the component. Simple rules for design do not exist in any code at present. The codes examined in this effort included R5, RCC-MR (A16), BS 7910, API 579, and ATK (and some lesser known codes). There are several reasons that the capability for assessing cracks in high temperature nuclear components is desirable. These include: (1) Some components that are part of GEN IV reactors may have geometries that have sharp corners - which are essentially cracks. Design of these components within the traditional ASME NH procedure is quite challenging. It is natural to ensure adequate life design by modeling these features as cracks within a creep-fatigue crack growth procedure. (2) Workmanship flaws in welds sometimes occur and are accepted in some ASME code sections. It can be convenient to consider these as flaws when making a design life assessment. (3) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and inspection methods after fabrication are limited in the size of the crack or flaw that can be detected. It is often convenient to perform a life assessment using a flaw of a size that represents the maximum size that can elude detection. (4) Flaws that are observed using in-service detection methods often need to be addressed as plants age. Shutdown inspection intervals can only be designed using creep and creep-fatigue crack growth techniques. (5) The use of crack growth procedures can aid in examining the seriousness of creep damage in structural components. How cracks grow can be used to assess margins on components and lead to further safe operation. After examining the pros and cons of all these methods, the R5 code was chosen as the most up-to-date and validated high temperature creep and creep fatigue code currently used in the world at present. R5 is considered the leader because the code: (1) has well established and validated rules, (2) has a team of experts continually improving and updating it, (3) has software that can be used by designers, (4) extensive validation in many parts with available data from BE resources as well as input from Imperial college's database, and (5) was specifically developed for use in nuclear plants. R5 was specifically developed for use in gas cooled nuclear reactors which operate in the UK and much of the experience is based on materials and temperatures which are experienced in these reactors. If the next generation advanced reactors to be built in the US used these same materials within the same temperature ranges as these reactors, then R5 may be appropriate for consideration of direct implementation within ASME code NH or Section XI. However, until more verification and validation of these creep/fatigue crack growth rules for the specific materials and temperatures to be used in the GEN IV reactors is complete, ASME should consider delaying this implementation. With this in mind, it is this authors opinion that R5 methods are the best available for code use today. The focus of this work was to examine the literature for creep and creep-fatigue crack growth procedures that are well established in codes in other countries and choose a procedure to consider implementation into ASME NH. It is very important to recognize that all creep and creep fatigue crack growth procedures that are part of high temperature

  5. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  6. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (Evans, GA); Imrich, Kenneth J. (Grovetown, GA)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  7. Metal-carbon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, A.A.; Hettich, R.L.; Jin, Changming; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tuinman, A.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafine particles formed by XeCl laser photolysis of M(CO){sub 6}, M = V, Cr, Mo, and W, have been analyzed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry and other techniques. Novel metal carbide clusters, (MoC{sub 4}){sub n}, n = 1 {minus} 4 and (WC{sub 4}){sub m}, m = 1 {minus} 8, were detected and studied. The material produced by photolysis of V(CO){sub 6} shows a series of vanadium-oxygen clusters, V{sub x}O{sub 2x+2}, x = 2 {minus} 10. No clusters of any type were detected in the photolysis product of Cr(CO){sub 6}. Structures based on the experimental evidence are proposed and discussed in light of their chemical reactivity.

  8. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Wenguang (Elgin, IL); Bailey, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gao, Yuan (Brewer, ME)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  9. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  10. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  11. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  12. Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals by Brian Ross Maddox Electron correlation can affect profound changes transition in a transition metal monoxide. iv #12;The lanthanides (the 4f metals also known as rare-earths

  13. Modeling the glass forming ability of metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, Justin Lee

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compositions without rare earth metals in the Fe-Cr-Mo-C-B-Wsmall percentages of rare earth metals as the oxide formingmore, often containing rare earth metals, are among the best

  14. Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara Department of Physics, University to the distinction between normal metals and insulators: the superconducting ``metal'' with delocalized qua- siparticle excitations and the superconducting ``insulator'' with localized quasiparticles. We describe

  15. Cosmic metal production and the mean metallicity of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Calura; F. Matteucci

    2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    By means of detailed chemo-photometric models for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies, we evaluate the cosmic history of the production of chemical elements as well as the metal mass density of the present-day universe. We then calculate the mean metal abundances for galaxies of different morphological types, along with the average metallicity of galactic matter in the universe (stars, gas and intergalactic medium). For the average metallicity of galaxies in the local universe, we find Z_gal= 0.0175, i.e. close to the solar value. We find the main metal production in spheroids (ellipticals and bulges) to occur at very early times, implying an early peak in the metal production and a subsequent decrease. On the other hand, the metal production in spirals and irregulars is always increasing with time. We perform a self-consistent census of the baryons and metals in the local universe finding that, while the vast majority of the baryons lies outside galaxies in the inter-galactic medium (IGM), 52 % of the metals (with the exception of the Fe-peak elements) is locked up in stars and in the interstellar medium. We estimate indirectly the amount of baryons which resides in the IGM and we derive its mean Fe abundance, finding a value of X_Fe,IGM=0.05 X_Fe,sun. We believe that this estimate is uncertain by a factor of 2, owing to the normalization of the local luminosity function. This means that the Fe abundance of 0.3 solar inferred from X-ray observations of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is higher than the average Fe abundance of the inter-galactic gas in the field.

  16. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  17. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  18. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  19. Fatigue life estimation program for Part 23 airplanes, `AFS.FOR`

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaul, S.K.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce to the general aviation industry a computer program which estimates the safe fatigue life of any Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 23 airplane. The algorithm uses the methodology (Miner`s Linear Cumulative Damage Theory) and the various data presented in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Report No. AFS-120-73-2, dated May 1973. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 language and is executable on a desk top personal computer. The program prompts the user for the input data needed and provides a variety of options for its intended use. The program is envisaged to be released through issuance of a FAA report, which will contain the appropriate comments, instructions, warnings and limitations.

  20. Fatigue flaw growth assessment and inclusion of stratification to the LBB assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samohyl, P.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the LBB requires also fatigue flaw growth assessment. This analysis was performed for PWR nuclear power plants types VVER 440/230, VVER 440/213c, VVER 1000/320. Respecting that these NPP`s were designed according to Russian codes that differ from US codes it was needed to compare these approaches. Comparison with our experimental data was accomplished, too. Margins of applicability of the US methods and their modifications for the materials used for construction of Czech and Slovak NPP`s are shown. Computer code accomplishing the analysis according to described method is presented. Some measurement and calculations show that thermal stratifications in horizontal pipelines can lead to additive loads that are not negligible and can be dangerous. An attempt to include these loads induced by steady-state stratification was made.

  1. Fatigue-crack growth correlations for design and analysis of stainless steel components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, L.A.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively large collection of fatigue-crack growth results for annealed Types 304 and 316 stainless steels over a wide range of temperature was processed and analyzed in a consistent way. Only data that satisfied the criteria of ASTM E647-82 was retained and used in the statistical treatments that followed. Linear least-squares regression equations and 95% confidence intervals were fitted through the results for each material/temperature set. The regression results (and their associated limits of validity) provide useful equations for the analysis of structural components. Overlap (or the lack of overlap) of the confidence intervals was employed as a criterion as to whether the results for Types 304 and 316 should be separated into discrete sets, and on this basis it was concluded that the two alloys should be treated separately. 38 references, 16 figures, 1 table.

  2. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  3. Gamma prime embrittlement and thermal fatigue cracking of a hydrogen reformer burner end

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, O.C.; Mack, N.C. [Amoco Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into the premature failure of an Alloy 800HT (UNS N08811) oxygen-gas mixer water jacketed end is discussed. Detailed metallurgical analyses showed that gamma prime [Ni{sub 3} (Al, Ti)] embrittlement and thermal fatigue cracking led to eventual leakage. The reduced lif e of the Alloy 800HT (UNS N08811) replacement (problems after only a year) was traced to its higher Al + Ti content (1.1%) compared to Alloy 800H (0.6% Al + Ti) which lasted over two years. While higher aluminum and titanium levels improve high temperature creep and stress rupture properties, both are sigma formers and, at levels > 0.6%, tend to form gamma prime with nickel. The choice of alternative metallurgies requires careful considerations of physical, mechanical and thermal properties as well as an understanding of complex stresses and stress distributions.

  4. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction on Multifunctional Pd Catalysts. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction...

  5. Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials In addition to the DOE making a final...

  6. Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar...

  7. Dialogue essais-modle pour l'interprtation des liens entre mesure d'auto-chauffement sous chargement cyclique et fatigue polycyclique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chargement cyclique et fatigue polycyclique Model-experiment dialogue to link self-heating under cyclic. It is based on the using of self-heating measurements under cyclic loadings. The validation of this approach

  8. Dialogue essais-modle pour l'interprtation des liens entre mesure d'auto-chauffement sous chargement cyclique et fatigue polycyclique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chargement cyclique et fatigue polycyclique Model-experiment dialogue to link self-heating under cyclic of self-heating measurements under cyclic loadings. The validation of this approach is obtained

  9. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    the majority of the land and maintained a social hierarchy that created a vast wealth disparity between the peasants and the church and upper classes. The Church?s feudal ownership of the land meant that it had power over the peasants, limiting social... manifest itself in metal culture. It may further 16 be suggested that the socio-economic climate from which metal culture developed has analogous threads to 16th century French feudal society. While feudalism and capitalism differ, both French...

  10. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  11. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  12. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  13. Metal-sensing layer-semiconductor and metal-sensing layer-metal heterostructure gas sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Li, Zheng; Fonash, S.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely sensitive gas sensors can be fabricated using heterostructures of the form metal-sensing layer-semiconductor or metal-sensing layer-metal. These structures are heterostructure diodes which have the barrier controlling transport at least partially located in the sensing layer. In the presence of the gas species to be detected, the electrical properties of the sensing layer evolve, resulting in a modification of the barrier to electric current transport and, hence, resulting in detection due to changes in the current-voltage characteristics of the device. This type of sensor structure is demonstrated using the Pd/Ti-O/sub x/Ti heterostructure hydrogen detector.

  14. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

  15. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  16. Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.; Kneisel, P.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area. 4 figs.

  17. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  18. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  19. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  20. Maskless laser writing of microscopic metallic interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a metal pattern on a substrate is disclosed. The method includes depositing an insulative nitride film on a substrate and irradiating a laser beam onto the nitride film, thus decomposing the metal nitride into a metal constituent and a gaseous constituent, the metal constituent remaining in the nitride film as a conductive pattern. 4 figs.

  1. Maskless laser writing of microscopic metallic interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a metal pattern on a substrate. The method includes depositing an insulative nitride film on a substrate and irradiating a laser beam onto the nitride film, thus decomposing the metal nitride into a metal constituent and a gaseous constituent, the metal constituent remaining in the nitride film as a conductive pattern.

  2. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  3. TRANSITION DE MOTT METAL-INSULATOR TRANSITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TRANSITION DE MOTT METAL-INSULATOR TRANSITIONS IN TRANSITION METAL OXIDES by D. B. McWHAN, A. MENTH oxydes de metaux de transition on observe une transition d'isolant a metal puis de metal a isolant de type Mott lorsque l'on augmentelenombre d'electrons d. Danslesysthe(V1-~Cr~)203une transition de Mott

  4. Metal nanoparticles as a conductive catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal nanocluster composite material for use as a conductive catalyst. The metal nanocluster composite material has metal nanoclusters on a carbon substrate formed within a porous zeolitic material, forming stable metal nanoclusters with a size distribution between 0.6-10 nm and, more particularly, nanoclusters with a size distribution in a range as low as 0.6-0.9 nm.

  5. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Yu (Saline, MI); Banerjee, Debasish (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  6. Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapati R. (Yorktown, VA); Kneisel, Peter (Williamsburg, VA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area.

  7. Molten metal injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA); Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Bigler, Nicolas (Morin Heights, CA); Arnaud, Guy (Riviere-Beaudette, CA)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a molten metal injector system including a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and a molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal having a metal oxide film surface. The bottom side of the mold faces the holder furnace. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The injector projects into the holder furnace and is in fluid communication with the mold cavity. The injector includes a piston positioned within a piston cavity defined by a cylinder for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace and injecting the molten metal into the mold cavity under pressure. The piston and cylinder are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder further includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity. The molten metal intake is located below the metal oxide film surface of the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. A method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity of a casting mold is also disclosed.

  8. Anaerobic microbial remobilization of coprecipitated metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for solubilizing coprecipitated metals. Metals in waste streams are concentrated by treatment with an iron oxide coprecipitating agent. The coprecipitated metals are solubilized by contacting the coprecipitate with a bacterial culture of a Clostridium species ATCC 53464. The remobilized metals can then be recovered and recycled. 4 figs.

  9. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  10. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  11. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

  12. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  13. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  14. INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, D.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal.

  15. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  16. Methods for reducing the loss of metal in a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are provided for reducing loss of metal from a metal vapor laser by collecting metal present outside the hot zone of the laser and introducing or confining it in the hot zone.

  17. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  18. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  19. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  20. Metal volatilization and separation during incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T.C.; Chu, H.W.; Hopper, J.R. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified risks from a thermal treatment process. Fundamental research leading to better understanding of their behavior and improved control of their emissions is greatly needed. This paper reports studies on metal volatilization and separation during incineration. Metal volatilization studies were carried out in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, the dynamic volatilization characteristics of various metals during the combustion of metal-containing wood pellets were investigated in a high-temperature electric furnace. In addition to uncontrolled volatilization, the potential of employing chemical additives to bind metals and prevent them from volatilizing during combustion was also investigated. The second experiment involved the investigation of metal volatilization characteristics during the thermal treatment of metal-contaminated clay in a fluidized bed unit. The metal species tested in both experiments were compounds of lead and cadmium. Metal capture/separation studies were also carried out in two separate experiments. The first involved the use of sorbents in the combustion chamber to capture metals during the fluidized bed incineration of metal-containing wood pellets. The second experiments, however, employed sorbents to absorb metal vapors in a fluidized-bed waste-heat boiler. The objective of both the experiments is to characterize the metal absorption efficiency associated with the processes.

  1. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  2. Variations in gear fatigue life for different wind turbine braking strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNiff, B.P. (Second Wind, Inc., Somerville, MA (USA)); Musial, W.D. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Errichello, R. (GEARTECH, Albany, CA (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of gearbox failures have occurred in the wind industry in a relatively short period, many because service loads were underestimated. High-torque transients that occur during starting and stopping are difficult to predict and may be overlooked in specifying gearbox design. Although these events comprise a small portion of total load cycles, they can be the most damaging. The severity of these loads varies dramatically with the specific configuration of the wind turbine. The large number of failures in Danish-designed Micon 65 wind turbines prompted this investigation. The high-speed and low-speed shaft torques were measured on a two-stage helical gearbox of a single Micon 65 turbine. Transient events and normal running loads were combined statistically to obtain a typical annual load spectrum. The pitting and bending fatigue lives of the gear teeth were calculated by using Miner's rule for four different high-speed shaft brake configurations. Each breaking scenario was run for both a high- and a low-turbulence normal operating load spectrum. The analysis showed increases in gear life by up to a factor of 25 when the standard high-speed shaft brake is replaced with a dynamic brake or modified with a damper. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Turbulence descriptors for scaling fatigue loading spectra of wind turbine structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The challenge for the designer in developing a new wind turbine is to incorporate sufficient strength in its components to safely achieve a 20- or 30-year service life. To accomplish this, the designer must understand the load and stress distributions (in a statistical sense at least) that the turbine is likely to encounter during its operating life. Sources of loads found in the normal operating environment include start/stop cycles, emergency shutdowns, the turbulence environment associated with the specific site and turbine location, and extreme or ``rare`` events that can challenge the turbine short-term survivability. Extreme events can result from an operational problem (e.g., controller failure) or violent atmospheric phenomena (tornadic circulations, strong gust fronts). For the majority of the operating time, however, the character of the turbulent inflow is the dominant source of the alternating stress distributions experienced by the structural components. Methods of characterizing or scaling the severity of the loading spectra (or the rate of fatigue damage accumulation) must be applicable to a wide range of turbulent inflow environments -- from solitary isolation to the complex flows associated with multi-row wind farms. The metrics chosen must be related to the properties of the turbulent inflow and independent of the nature of local terrain features.

  4. Fatigue cracking of a bare steel first wall in an inertial confinement fusion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Abbott, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Havstad, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunne, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial confinement fusion power plants will deposit high energy X-rays onto the outer surfaces of the first wall many times a second for the lifetime of the plant. These X-rays create brief temperature spikes in the first few microns of the wall, which cause an associated highly compressive stress response on the surface of the material. The periodicity of this stress pulse is a concern due to the possibility of fatigue cracking of the wall. We have used finite element analyses to simulate the conditions present on the first wall in order to evaluate the driving force of crack propagation on fusion-facing surface cracks. Analysis results indicate that the X-ray induced plastic compressive stress creates a region of residual tension on the surface between pulses. This tension film will likely result in surface cracking upon repeated cycling. Additionally, the compressive pulse may induce plasticity ahead of the crack tip, leaving residual tension in its wake. However, the stress amplitude decreases dramatically for depths greater than 80–100 ?m into the fusion-facing surface. Crack propagation models as well as stress-life estimates agree that even though small cracks may form on the surface of the wall, they are unlikely to propagate further than 100 ?m without assistance from creep or grain erosion phenomena.

  5. The crystallography of fatigue crack initiation in Incoloy-908 and A-286 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenn, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue crack initiation in the austenitic Fe-Ni superalloys Incoloy-908 and A-286 is examined using local crystallographic orientation measurements. Results are consistent with sharp transgranular initiation and propagation occurring almost exclusively on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes in Incoloy-908 but on a variety of low index planes in A-286. This difference is attributed to the influence of the semicoherent grain boundary {eta} phase in A-286. Initiation in each alloy occurred both intergranularly and transgranularly and was often associated with blocky surface oxide and carbide inclusions. Taylor factor and resolved shear stress and strain crack initiation hypotheses were tested, but despite an inconclusive suggestion of a minimum required {l_brace}111{r_brace} shear stress, none of the hypotheses were found to convincingly describe preferred initiation sites, even within the subsets of transgranular cracks apparently free from the influence of surface inclusions. Subsurface inclusions are thought to play a significant role in crack initiation. These materials have applications for use in structural conduit for high field superconducting magnets designed for fusion energy use.

  6. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni interlayer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. Crack growth tests at a range of ?K were also performed on specimens machined from the shell of the superheater. In all conditions the presence of the Ni interlayer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the interlayer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous interlayer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-interlayer interface.

  7. Approximating Metal-Insulator Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Danieli; K. Rayanov; B. Pavlov; G. Martin; S. Flach

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate metal-insulator transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-Andre model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  8. Metallization and insulization during impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the large strains produced by hypervelocity impacts can be expected to produce dramatic changes in the chemical bonding (electronic structures) of materials. This will change the mechanical behavior towards increased ductility when a semiconductor is compressed until it becomes metallic; and towards increased brittleness when a transition metal is expanded so as to localize its d-band electrons. Both isotropic compression (expansion) and shear strains can cause these transformations. Critical deformation criteria are given based on the observed cubic to tetragonal transformations in compressed semiconductors.

  9. Laser photodeposition of refractory metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, R.; Boyer, P.K.; Mahan, J.E.; Collins, G.J.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the deposition of the refractory metals chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten through the laser-induced gas-phase photolysis of their respective hexacarbonyls. A copper, hollow cathode laser was used at ultraviolet wavelengths matched to peaks in the absorption spectra of the carbonyl molecules. Localized room-temperature metal deposition was achieved by focusing the beam into a cell containing the carbonyl gas and helium as a buffer. No major differences were noted for deposition on a polished silicon wafer, a thermally oxidized silicon wafer, and a quartz flat.

  10. Photobiomolecular metallic particles and films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  11. Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

  12. Metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S. (Stony Brook, NY); Mao, Yuanbing (Los Angeles, CA)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes pure single-crystalline metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures, and methods of making same. These nanostructures include nanorods and nanoarrays.

  13. Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K; Fetcenko, M

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 µm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  14. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  15. SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

  16. Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    develop alternatives to the precious metal catalysts by using relatively inexpensive, earth-abundant metals. The chemical complexities of the more common metals have made this...

  17. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Schneibel, Joachim H. (Knoxville, TN); Pint, Bruce A. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  18. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  19. The 2008 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience: Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    - ture. Carbon nano- tubes are atomically well-defined, cylindri- cal structures that are hollow inside), 1-D (carbon nano- tubes), or 0-D (bucky- ball) structures (Figure 1).6,8 Each of the above carbon- lic, and carbon nano- tubes are uniquely me- tallic or semiconducting, de- pending on their struc

  20. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tijana Rajh

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology ? an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.