National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for metal arc welding

  1. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  2. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size andmore » shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.« less

  4. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  6. Shielded metal arc welding of AISI 4340 alloy steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-115 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for shielded metal arc welding of AISI 4340 alloy steel, in thickness range 0.187 to 2 inch; filler metal is E7018 (F-4, A-1).

  7. Effects of current on droplet generation and arc plasma in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2006-09-01

    In gas metal arc welding (GMAW), a technology using pulsed currents has been employed to achieve the one-droplet-per-pulse (ODPP) metal transfer mode with the advantages of low average currents, a stable and controllable droplet generation, and reduced spatter. In this paper, a comprehensive model was developed to study the effects of different current profiles on the droplet formation, plasma generation, metal transfer, and weld pool dynamics in GMAW. Five types of welding currents were studied, including two constant currents and three wave form currents. In each type, the transient temperature and velocity distributions of the arc plasma and the molten metal, and the shapes of the droplet and the weld pool were calculated. The results showed that a higher current generates smaller droplets, higher droplet frequency, and higher electromagnetic force that becomes the dominant factor detaching the droplet from the electrode tip. The model has demonstrated that a stable ODPP metal transfer mode can be achieved by choosing a current with proper wave form for given welding conditions.

  8. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  9. Electric arc welding gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  10. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  11. DC arc weld starter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campiotti, Richard H. (Tracy, CA); Hopwood, James E. (Oakley, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  12. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  13. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  14. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghomashchi, Reza Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies.

  15. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  16. Electrochemical transfer of oxygen during direct current arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.H.; Frost, R.H.; Olson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Weld metal oxygen content is important for control of weld metal microstructure and notch toughness. Low oxygen contents promote low toughness bainitic structures. Moderate oxygen levels favor a tough acicular ferrite structure, and high oxygen levels promote lower toughness grain boundary and Widmanstaetten side plate structures. The objective of this research was to examine electrochemical oxygen transfer as a function of welding process variables, polarity, and the relative importance of conduction across plasma-metal and slag-metal interfaces for: submerged arc welding (SAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes. SAW and SMAW were made in DCEN and DCEP polarities on structural steel and copper substrates. GTAW were made on steel substrates in DCEN polarity. The experimental results show that both thermochemical and electrochemical reactions are important for oxygen transfer, and that there are differences in the electrochemical reactions at slag-metal and plasma-metal interfaces. Both electrochemical and thermochemical reactions are significant for direct current arc welding processes. The arc plasma acts as an electrolyte for arc welding processes and electrochemical reactions occur at the plasma-metal interface have chemical effects opposite to those at the slag metal interface. This is caused by the fact that only positive ions exist in the arc plasma in large concentrations.

  17. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  18. Weld arc simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  20. Welding arc initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  1. Welding arc initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  2. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn29.5Al0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn29.5Al0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard MgAl intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated AlMgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the MgAl dissimilar joint. - Highlights: Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. The formation of MgAl intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  3. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  4. What makes an electric welding arc perform its required function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correy, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The physics of direct current and alternating current welding arcs, the heat transfer of direct current welding arcs, the characteristics of dc welding and ac welding power supplies and recommendations for the procurement and maintenance of precision power supplies are discussed. (LCL)

  5. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  6. Welding arc gap ionization device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweikhardt, George M.

    1976-01-01

    An alpha emitting isotope is positioned near the tip of a TIG welding electrode so that the alpha radiation can provide an ionized path between the electrode and the workpiece.

  7. Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

  8. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  9. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  10. Microsegregation in high-molybdenum austenitic stainless steel laser beam and gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujanpaeae, V.P.; David, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel with 6% molybdenum (thickness 6 mm) was welded using laser beam (LB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes at various welding speeds. Depending on the welding speed the primary dendrite spacing ranged from 12 to 17 ..mu..m and from 2 to 7 ..mu..m for the GTA and LB welds, respectively. Extensive segregation of molybdenum was observed in the GTA welds. The segregation ratio for molybdenum, C/sub ID//C/sub D/, was found to be 1.9 in the GTA weld, and 1.2 in the LB weld. Distribution of iron, chromium and nickel was found nearly uniform in both welds. A recovered microstructure was observed after a post-weld annealing heat treatment. Annealing had a profound effect on the molybdenum segregation ratio in the laser weld. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) determined by a standard test was 55/sup 0/C for welds made using both processes, whereas it was 75/sup 0/C for the base metal. Upon homogenization the CPT of the laser beam weld increased to the base metal value, while that of the gas tungsten arc weld remained at 60/sup 0/C.

  11. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, S.W.; Olson, D.L.; Burgardt, P.

    1999-02-01

    This investigation characterized the effects of power level and Gaussian heat source size on thermocapillary-induced weld shape and estimated the relative influence of various possible arc phenomena in determining weld shape. Welds made with the CTAW process were compared with similar ones made with a conduction-mode EBW process and the differences were related to arc effects. Evidence of thermocapillary flow was readily apparent in both the GTA welds and the conduction-mode EB welds and was qualitatively similar in both. The similarity between the results obtained with the two processes serves to demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is the dominant factor in heat-to-heat weld shape variability. However, a similar one-to-one correspondence between welds produced with the two processes does not exist. Especially at high power, the EB welds showed stronger thermocapillary convection than the GTA welds. One important arc factor that limits thermocapillary flow in ar welds appears to be an increase in arc size with arc length and arc current. A non-Gaussian arc power distribution in GTAW seems to be most important in limiting the fluid flow. Apparently, the arc power distribution is more nearly rectangular in shape for an argon gas arc. At higher currents, above 200 A, plasma shear force may also be an important contributor to weld shape development. The conduction-mode EB welds demonstrate that thermocapillary flow reversal probably does not occur in welds made with a simple Gaussian heat source. The complex shape behavior is likely a result of an arc effect such as plasma shear.

  12. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  13. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  14. A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

  15. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of nickel to nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2301-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel, NO2200 or NO2201 (P-41) to nickel-copper NO4400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  16. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1302-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper NO4400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  17. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  18. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  19. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  20. Abnormal macropore formation during double-sided gas tungsten arc welding of magnesium AZ91D alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Jun You Guoqiang; Long Siyuan; Pan Fusheng

    2008-08-15

    One of the major concerns during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of cast magnesium alloys is the presence of large macroporosity in weldments, normally thought to occur from the presence of gas in the castings. In this study, a double-sided GTA welding process was adopted to join wrought magnesium AZ91D alloy plates. Micropores were formed in the weld zone of the first side that was welded, due to precipitation of H{sub 2} as the mushy zone freezes. When the reverse side was welded, the heat generated caused the mushy zone in the initial weld to reform. The micropores in the initial weld then coalesced and expanded to form macropores by means of gas expansion through small holes that are present at the grain boundaries in the partially melted zone. Macropores in the partially melted zone increase with increased heat input, so that when a filler metal is used the macropores are smaller in number and in size.

  1. Fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel weld metal at 4 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1984-08-01

    Selection of the welding processess and weld filler metals for fabrication of a large toroidal superconducting magnet is described. Data available in the literature are collected and compared with data generated in this study for three welding processes, shielded metal arc (SMA), gas tungsten arc (GTA), and flux cored arc (FCA) welds had the highest fracture toughness as measured by K/sub Ic/ estimated from J/sub Ic/. The SMA and FCA welds had about the same toughness, below the GTA values but above the average from the literature. The fracture mode for all three processes was typified by ductile dimples. The fracture morphology of the FCA weld specimens was influenced by the solidification substructure, and small particles were found to be nucleation sites for void formation, especially for the GTA welds. All three welding processes were deemed adequate for the intended service and were used to fabricate the large magnet. A trunnion-type turning fixture eliminated the need for welding in the vertical and overhead positions. The GTA process was used for all root passes, and the horizontal welds were filled by the SMA process. Over 80% of the welds were done in the flat position with the FCA process, and its high deposition rate and ease of operation are credited with contributing greatly to the success of the effort.

  2. Analysis of weld metal solidification and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Solidification is a critical phase change occurring during welding that controls weld metal microstructure, properties, and ultimately weldability of alloys. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the solidification theories that relate to castings and rapidly solidified materials. A critical need exists to understand weld pool solidification in the light of these new theories. This paper will describe the solidification behavior of weld pools, incorporating some recent advances in solidification theories. Basic principles from ingot, single crystal, and rapid solidification processes will be used to understand and explain observed weld-metal microstructures. 62 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  4. Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  5. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  6. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  7. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  8. Fusion welding of refractory metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robino, C.V.

    1991-01-01

    The refractory metals of Groups 5B and 6B and their alloys display a variety of unique physical and mechanical characteristics in addition to their high melting points. In turn, these characteristics make these materials strong candidates for severe service and specialized applications. However, these materials also present a variety of challenges with respect to both fabrication weldability and the in-service behavior of weldments, many of which are related to the dominant effects of interstitial impurities. This work reviews current understanding of the physical and joining metallurgy of these metals and their alloys with emphasis on fusion welding. Of specific interest are the role of impurities and alloy chemistry in fabrication and service weldability, the material processing route, eg. vacuum melting vs. powder metallurgy, the importance of welding process procedures and variables, weldment mechanical properties, and fracture behavior. Specific examples from the various alloy systems are used to illustrate general metallurgical and joining characteristics of this class of materials. 34 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Method and device for reducing overpenetration at the start of plasma arc welds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, John M.; Lehmann, John M.; Ryan, Patrick M.

    1998-01-01

    A shim for improving plasma arc weld quality has ends tapered at about 25.degree. and notches at each end roughly centered over the corner between the tapered ends and main body of the shim. The improved shim allows lower starting plasma arc heat input and reduces the occurrence of sagging, or overpenetration, of the weld.

  10. Method and device for reducing overpenetration at the start of plasma arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, J.M.; Lehmann, J.M.; Ryan, P.M.

    2000-03-14

    A shim for improving plasma arc weld quality has ends tapered at about 25{degree} and notches at each end roughly centered over the corner between the tapered ends and main body of the shim. The improved shim allows lower starting plasma arc heat input and reduces the occurrence of sagging, or overpenetration, of the weld.

  11. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of chromium-nickel steel to nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2602-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of 300 series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1) to nickel-copper N04400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  12. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper to nickel-chromium-iron. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper N04400 (P-42) to nickel-chromium-iron N06600 (P-43), in thickness range of 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  13. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  14. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  15. Mechanical properties and microstructures of a magnesium alloy gas tungsten arc welded with a cadmium chloride flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.D.; Liu, L.M. Shen, Y.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-15

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds were prepared on 5-mm thick plates of wrought magnesium AZ31B alloy, using an activated flux. The microstructural characteristics of the weld joint were investigated using optical and scanning microscopy, and the fusion zone microstructure was compared with that of the base metal. The elemental distribution was also investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Mechanical properties were determined by standard tensile tests on small-scale specimens. The as-welded fusion zone prepared using a CdCl{sub 2} flux exhibited a larger grain size than that prepared without flux; the microstructure consisted of matrix {alpha}-Mg, eutectic {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}. The HAZ was observed to be slightly wider for the weld prepared with a CdCl{sub 2} flux compared to that prepared without flux; thus the tensile strength was lower for the flux-prepared weld. The fact that neither Cd nor Cl was detected in the weld seam by EPMA indicates that the CdCl{sub 2} flux has a small effect on convection in the weld pool.

  16. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Thick Section Ni-base Alloys Advanced Modeling and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debroy, Tarasankar; Palmer, Todd; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Hybrid laser-arc welding of nickel-base alloys can increase productivity and decrease costs during construction and repair of critical components in nuclear power plants. However, laser and hybrid welding of nickel-base alloys is not well understood. This project sought to understand the physical processes during hybrid welding necessary to fabricate quality joints in Alloy 690, a Ni- Cr-Fe alloy. This document presents a summary of the data and results collected over the course of the project. The supporting documents are a collection of the research that has been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals along with a report from the partner at the national lab. Understanding the solidification behavior of Alloy 690 is important for knowing the final properties of the weldment. A study was undertaken to calculate the solidification parameters, such as temperature gradient, solidification rate, and cooling rate in Alloy 690 welds. With this information and measured cell and dendrite arm spacings, an Alloy 690 map was constructed to guide process parameter development and interpret fusion zones in later hybrid welds. This research is contained in Solidification Map of a Nickel Base Alloy. The keyhole formed under high laser intensity gives the hybrid welding technique the greater penetration depths compared to arc welding. However, keyhole behavior can form defects in the material, so knowing transient keyhole characteristics is important. With international collaborators, a study was undertaken to validate a new process monitoring tool known as inline coherent imaging (ICI), which is able to measure the keyhole depth with spatial and temporal resolutions on the order of 10 microns and 10 microseconds. ICI was validated for five alloy systems, including Alloy 690. Additionally, the keyhole growth rates at the start of welding were measured with unprecedented accuracy. This research is contained in Real Time Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Keyhole Depth by

  17. Development of an improved GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld temperature monitor fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollar, D.L.

    1990-05-01

    An initial design weld temperature control fixture was implemented into final closure of an electronic assembly in November 1986. Use of this fixture indicated several areas that could be improved. Review of these areas with the process engineer and the weld operator provided the ideas to be incorporated into the new design Phase 2 fixture. Some primary areas of change and improvement included fixture mobility to provide better accessibility to the weld joint area, automatic timed blow cooling of the weld joint, and a feature to assure proper thermocouple placement. The resulting Phase 2 fixture design provided all of the essential weld temperature monitoring features in addition to several significant improvements. Technology developed during this project will pave the way to similar process monitoring of other manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding applications. 9 figs.

  18. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1. Technical report, October 1993-March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weeks, J.L.; Krotz, P.D.; Todd, D.T.; Liaw, Y.K.

    1995-03-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process`s ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  19. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Tianping Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-11-15

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a more regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, {alpha}-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between {alpha}-Mg and {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} in the weld sample and between {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained.

  20. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well asmore » a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.« less

  1. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well as a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.

  2. Laser-ultrasonic inspection of hybrid laser-arc welded HSLA-65 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lvesque, D.; Rousseau, G.; Monchalin, J.-P. [National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, QC (Canada); Wanjara, P.; Cao, X. [National Research Council Canada, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-02-18

    The hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) process is a relatively low heat input joining technology that combines the synergistic qualities of both the high energy density laser beam for deep penetration and the arc for wide fit-up gap tolerance. This process is especially suitable for the shipbuilding industry where thick-gauge section, long steel plates have been widely used in a butt joint configuration. In this study, preliminary exploration was carried out to detect and visualize the welding defects using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Results obtained on 9.3 mm thick butt-welded HSLA-65 steel plates indicated that the laser-ultrasonic SAFT inspection technique can successfully detect and visualize the presence of porosity, lack of fusion and internal crack defects. This was further confirmed by X-ray digital radiography and metallography. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the laser-ultrasonic technology for the automated inspection of hybrid laser-arc welds.

  3. Remote reactor repair: GTA (gas tungsten Arc) weld cracking caused by entrapped helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A repair patch was welded to the wall of a nuclear reactor tank using remotely controlled thirty-foot long robot arms. Further repair was halted when gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds joining type 304L stainless steel patches to the 304 stainless steel wall developed toe cracks in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The role of helium in cracking was investigated using material with entrapped helium from tritium decay. As a result of this investigation, and of an extensive array of diagnostic tests performed on reactor tank wall material, helium embrittlement was shown to be the cause of the toe cracks.

  4. Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

  5. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  6. Direct Observations of Austenite, Bainite and Martensite Formation During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Babu, S; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2004-02-17

    In-situ Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) experiments were performed during stationary gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. These synchrotron-based experiments tracked, in real time, phase transformations in the heat-affected zone of the weld under rapid heating and cooling conditions. The diffraction patterns were recorded at 100 ms intervals, and were later analyzed using diffraction peak profile analysis to determine the relative fraction of ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases in each diffraction pattern. Lattice parameters and diffraction peak widths were also measured throughout the heating and cooling cycle of the weld, providing additional information about the phases that were formed. The experimental results were coupled with a thermofluid weld model to calculate the weld temperatures, allowing time-temperature transformation kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation to be evaluated. During heating, complete austenitization was observed in the heat affected zone of the weld and the kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation were modeled using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach. The results from the 1045 steel weld were compared to those of a 1005 low carbon steel from a previous study. Differences in austenitization rates of the two steels were attributed to differences in the base metal microstructures, particularly the relative amounts of pearlite and the extent of the allotriomorphic ferrite phase. During weld cooling, the austenite transformed to a mixture of bainite and martensite. In situ diffraction was able to distinguish between these two non-equilibrium phases based on differences in their lattice parameters and their transformation rates, resulting in the first real time x-ray diffraction observations of bainite and martensite formation made during welding.

  7. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of CO{sub 2} laser and gas tungsten arc welds of an Al-Li-Cu alloy 2195

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, K.H.; Baeslack, W.A. III; Szabo, A.

    1994-12-31

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys offer an attractive combination of low density and high strength and stiffness and have been the focus of vigorous research for their promising aerospace applications. To achieve the full potential advantages in using these alloys, the integrity of welded joints, both n the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone, must be ensured. In the present study, Weldalite{sup TM} 049 (designated as alloy 2195) with nominal composition of Al-1.0Li-4.0Cu-0.4Mg0.4Ag-0.14Zr (wt%) was welded autogenously using the gas tungsten-arc (GTA) and CO{sub 2} laser beam (LB) welding processes. The average ultimate tensile strengths for as-welded, 160{degrees}C/16 h-aged, and 190{degrees}C/16 h-aged GTA welds were 296.4 MPa, 304.6 MPa, and 336.8 MPa, and corresponded to joint efficiencies of 61.4%, 48.1% and 56.0%, respectively. Porosity was found occasionally in the laser welds and slightly affected the performance of the aluminum weldments. For laser welds, average ultimate tensile strengths and corresponding joint efficiencies for a-welded, 160{degrees}C/16 h-aged, and 190{degrees}C/16 h-aged weldments were 293.2 MPa (60.8%) 305.9 MPa (48.3%), and 331.0 MPa (55.0%), respectively. Scanning electron fractography revealed that failure of the GTA and LB tensile specimens occurred either within the weld metal or along the fusion boundary. The latter was related to the existence of an equiaxed band along the fusion boundary.

  8. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  9. Progress report on a fully automatic Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daumeyer, G.J. III

    1994-12-01

    A plan to develop a fully automatic gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) system that will utilize a vision-sensing computer (which will provide in-process feedback control) is presently in work. Evaluations of different technological aspects and system design requirements continue. This report summaries major activities in the plan`s successful progress. The technological feasibility of producing the fully automated GTAW system has been proven. The goal of this process development project is to provide a production-ready system within the shortest reasonable time frame.

  10. Method for welding beryllium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  11. The role of composition and microstructure gradients on weld metal properties and behavior: Progress report for the period of June 1, 1987 to December 31, 1987. [Fe-Al-Cr-Mn-Ni weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weld metal compositional and microstructural gradients on phase transformations, microstructural stability, and mechanical properties are considered from a fundamental basis in weld metal alloys which are primarily austenitic (e.g., stainless steels). Models which incorporate compositional gradients are developed to predict the resulting weld metal properties. The mechanical properties of weld metals are modeled based on composite theory in which individual weld metal zones are considered as discrete elements within a composite structure. 23 figs.

  12. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  13. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  14. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, Stephen C. (Monroeville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Rapp, Robert A. (Columbus, OH)

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  15. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  17. In-Situ Phase Mapping and Direct Observations of Phase Transformations During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T

    2005-09-13

    In-situ Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments were performed during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. Ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases were identified and quantified in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) from the real time x-ray diffraction data. The results were compiled along with weld temperatures calculated using a coupled thermal fluids weld model to create a phase map of the HAZ. This map shows the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation taking place during weld heating and the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation taking place during weld cooling. Superheating is required to complete the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation, and the amount of superheat above the A3 temperature was shown to vary with distance from the centerline of the weld. Superheat values as high as 250 C above the A3 temperature were observed at heating rates of 80 C/s. The SRXRD experiments also revealed details about the {gamma} phase not observable by conventional techniques, showing that {gamma} is present with two distinct lattice parameters as a result of inhomogeneous distribution of carbon and manganese in the starting pearlitic/ferritic microstructure. During cooling, the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} phase transformation was shown to depend on the HAZ location. In the fine grained region of the HAZ, at distances greater than 2 mm from the fusion line, the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation begins near the A3 temperature and ends near the A1 temperature. In this region of the HAZ where the cooling rates are below 40 C/s, the transformation occurs by nucleation and growth of pearlite. For HAZ locations closer to the fusion line, undercoolings of 200 C or more below the A1 temperature are required to complete the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation. In this region of the HAZ, grain growth coupled with cooling rates in excess of 50 C/s causes the transformation to occur by a bainitic mechanism.

  18. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  19. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  20. FUSION WELDING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyman, W.L.; Steinkamp, W.I.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus for the fusion welding of metal pieces at a joint is described. The apparatus comprises a highvacuum chamber enclosing the metal pieces and a thermionic filament emitter. Sufficient power is applied to the emitter so that when the electron emission therefrom is focused on the joint it has sufficient energy to melt the metal pieces, ionize the metallic vapor abcve the molten metal, and establish an arc discharge between the joint and the emitter.

  1. Method for welding beryllium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  2. Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3570 (United States); Todorov, E.; Levesque, S. [Edison Welding Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  3. Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  4. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-06-30

    Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

  5. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  6. Metal vapor plasma behavior during vacuum arc remelting of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Maguire, M.C.; Williamson, R.L. ); Adasczik, C.B. ); Roberts, R.R. ); Strohecker, R. )

    1992-01-01

    A production vacuum arc remelt (VAR) furnace was modified to enable direct viewing of the metal vapor arc and molten electrode tip during melting of 432 mm dia. alloy 718 electrodes into 508 mm dia. ingots. Diffuse and constricted arcing conditions were characterized using high speed cinematography, standard video format, and monochromatic imaging. Constricted arcing was observed while melting electrodes contaminated with oxide slag of the type used for refractory linings in vacuum induction furnaces. Monochromatic imaging was used in visualize the ion distribution in the arc plasma; these images clearly showed whether the arc operated in a diffuse or constricted model. Diffuse arc melting conditions were very similar to those previously reported in the literature for smaller laboratory sized melts.

  7. Metal vapor plasma behavior during vacuum arc remelting of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Maguire, M.C.; Williamson, R.L.; Adasczik, C.B.; Roberts, R.R.; Strohecker, R.

    1992-05-01

    A production vacuum arc remelt (VAR) furnace was modified to enable direct viewing of the metal vapor arc and molten electrode tip during melting of 432 mm dia. alloy 718 electrodes into 508 mm dia. ingots. Diffuse and constricted arcing conditions were characterized using high speed cinematography, standard video format, and monochromatic imaging. Constricted arcing was observed while melting electrodes contaminated with oxide slag of the type used for refractory linings in vacuum induction furnaces. Monochromatic imaging was used in visualize the ion distribution in the arc plasma; these images clearly showed whether the arc operated in a diffuse or constricted model. Diffuse arc melting conditions were very similar to those previously reported in the literature for smaller laboratory sized melts.

  8. High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1999-01-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  9. The role of composition and microstructure gradients on weld metal properties and behavior: Progress report, 1 January 1988--31 December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of weld metal compositional and microstructural gradients on phase transformation, microstructural stability, and mechanical properties are considered from a fundamental basis in weld metal alloys which are primarily austenitic (e.g., stainless steels). Models which incorporate compositional gradients are developed to predict the resulting weld metal properties and behavior. The mechanical properties of weld metal are modeled based on composite theory in which individual weld metal zones are considered as discrete elements within a composite structure. 17 refs., 28 figs.

  10. Performance of high molybdenum superaustenitic stainless steel welds in harsh chloride environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenvall, P.; Liljas, M.; Wallen, B.

    1996-11-01

    Superaustenitic steels are normally welded with nickel-based alloys as filler materials. To clarify the understanding of weld behavior in superaustenitic stainless steels this paper presents the development history of 6Mo and 7Mo steels, and results of laboratory tests and field tests on welds of UNS S31254 (6Mo) and UNS S32654 (7 Mo) in different types of chloride containing environments. The laboratory tests consisted of the well known ferric chloride test (ASTM G 48 Method A). Shielded metal arc welds, gas tungsten arc welds and submerged arc welds in both grades were tested. The critical pitting temperatures were determined and the locations of the attack were noted. Some specimens were sectioned at the position of the attack followed by studies using light optical microscopy. The critical pitting temperatures of the welds in S31254 and S32654 were at normal levels for both grades, i.e., 40--50 C for S31254 and 60--75 C for S32654. The locations of the attack differed depending on the welding process. In shielded metal arc welds the attack was mostly located in the weld metal. In gas tungsten arc welds the attack was predominantly located next to the fusion line. The field tests showed that the behavior of welds and parent metal of superaustenitic stainless steels, as well as of nickel-based alloys, is much dependent on the corrosive environment. In oxidizing chloride solutions, similar results to those of the ferric chloride test, are observed. However, crevice corrosion in the parent material is at a greater risk than pitting corrosion in the welds. In very oxidizing solutions of low chloride concentrations, welds made of nickel-based fillers may corrode faster than the stainless steel base metal due to transpassive uniform corrosion. The opposite situation exists when active uniform corrosion prevails, i.e., welds made of nickel-based fillers corrode less than the stainless steel parent material.

  11. High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardt, David E.; Lee, Steven G.

    1996-01-01

    A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics.

  12. High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardt, D.E.; Lee, S.G.

    1996-08-06

    A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics. 4 figs.

  13. Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L.; McNabb, Jeffrey D.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2003-04-08

    Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

  14. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  15. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

    2010-08-01

    Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

  16. Multi-cathode metal vapor arc ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. One embodiment of the appaatus utilizes a multi-cathode arrangement for interaction with the anode.

  17. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-15

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of JxB propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (T{sub e}) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence T{sub e} of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90 eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density n{sub e} of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4x10{sup 21}-6x10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2x10{sup 6} cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  18. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  19. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  20. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, John D

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  1. Residual stresses in weld overlay tubes: A finite element study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taljat, B.; Zacharia, T.; Wang, X.L.; Keiser, J.R.; Feng, Z.; Jirinec, M.J.

    1997-01-03

    Residual stresses and strains in a tube with circumferential weld overlay were analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The objective of this work was to develop and verify a FE model, to determine the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in the weld overlay tube, and to evaluate the significance of two contributing factors to residual stress: (1) difference in material properties between tube and weld material, and (2) thermal gradients in the weld. An axisymmetric FE model was developed to simulate the circumferential two-layer welding process of alloy 625 overlay on SA210 tube. The first layer was modeled as a gas metal arc welding process with filler metal, whereas the autogenous gas tungsten arc welding process was modeled for the second layer. Neutron diffraction technique was used to experimentally determine residual elastic strains in the weld overlay tube. Comparison with the FE results shows overall good agreement. Both the experimental and FE results show high compressive stresses at the inside tube surface and high tensile stresses in the weld overlay. This suggests that weld overlay may be used to relieve tensile or produce compressive stresses at the inside tube surface, which is significant for applications where crack initiation is found at the root pass of the joining weld.

  2. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.; Sommer, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    The disclosed method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. Such exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extruding beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  3. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Sommer, R.G.

    1985-11-29

    This method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. The exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extrucing beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  4. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron irradiated stainless steel submerged-arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of stainless steel cladding increasing the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws is highly dependent upon the irradiated properties of the cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged-arc, single-wire, oscillating electrode method. Three layers of cladding were applied to provide a cladding thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. There was considerable dilution of the type 309 in the first layer of cladding as a result of excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens for the irradiation study were taken from near the base plate/cladding interface and also from the upper layers of cladding. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to neutron fluences of 2 x 10/sup 23/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding showed a 5 to 40% increase in yield strength accompanied by a slight increase in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing.

  5. Implementation of an Outer Can Welding System for Savannah River Site FB-Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, S.R.

    2003-03-27

    This paper details three phases of testing to confirm use of a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) system for closure welding the 3013 outer container used for stabilization/storage of plutonium metals and oxides. The outer container/lid closure joint was originally designed for laser welding, but for this application, the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process has been adapted. The testing progressed in three phases: (1) system checkout to evaluate system components for operational readiness, (2) troubleshooting to evaluate high weld failure rates and develop corrective techniques, and (3) pre-installation acceptance testing.

  6. The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

    1983-03-28

    The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a JohnsonMehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed Johnson-Mehltype equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  8. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.; Tian, X.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weld pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).

  9. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  10. Direct Observations of the (Alpha to Gamma) Transformation at Different Input Powers in the Heat Affected Zone of 1045 C-Mn Steel Arc Welds Observed by Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2005-03-16

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments have been performed during Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel at input powers ranging from 1000 W to 3750 W. In situ diffraction patterns taken at discreet locations across the width of the heat affected zone (HAZ) near the peak of the heating cycle in each weld show regions containing austenite ({gamma}), ferrite and austenite ({alpha}+{gamma}), and ferrite ({alpha}). Changes in input power have a demonstrated effect on the resulting sizes of these regions. The largest effect is on the {gamma} phase region, which nearly triples in width with increasing input power, while the width of the surrounding two phase {alpha}+{gamma} region remains relatively constant. An analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained across this range of locations allows the formation of austenite from the base metal microstructure to be monitored. After the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, a splitting of the austenite peaks is observed at temperatures between approximately 860 C and 1290 C. This splitting in the austenite peaks results from the dissolution of cementite laths originally present in the base metal pearlite, which remain after the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, and represents the formation of a second more highly alloyed austenite constituent. With increasing temperatures, carbon, originally present in the cementite laths, diffuses from the second newly formed austenite constituent to the original austenite constituent. Eventually, a homogeneous austenitic microstructure is produced at temperatures of approximately 1300 C and above, depending on the weld input power.

  11. Investigation of fracture mechanical behavior of nodular cast iron and welded joints with parent-material-like weld metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, W.; Pusch, G.

    1995-12-31

    The focus of the investigations was the determination of fracture mechanical characteristics and crack resistance curves of the J-Integral and CTOD concept by application of the partial unloading compliance technique and D.C. potential drop technique (four point bend) under static load. The results show a close correlation between crack initiation values as well as crack resistance curves and graphite morphology parameters determined by means of quantitative microstructural analysis where the influence of the matrix (distance of graphite particles) dominates the crack resistance and fracture performance of ferritic nodular cast iron under consideration of the notch effect of graphite particles. SEM in-situ tensile tests showed that due to a beneficial shielding effect of the strength overmatching parent-material-like weld metal (mis-match ratio M = 1.21), cracks positioned directly in the plane of the fusion line did not deviate into the weld metal in spite of its lower toughness compared to that of the parent material. They also showed an unsymmetrical formation of damage in front of the crack tip.

  12. SF 2001-WLD;CONTRACTOR WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    01-WLD (11-2012) Supersedes (4-2010) Issue CONTRACTOR WELDING, CUTTING, BRAZING P ART 1: CO NT R ACT O R' S E X PO S UR E AS S E S SM ENT Identify what welding, cutting and/or brazing you are doing: (Check box or fill-in type below) Welding Thermal Cutting Brazing (No cadmium filler BAg-1 or BAg- 2; Silver not to exceed 45%) MIG Oxy-acetylene Oxy-acetylene TIG Stick Plasma arc Other Identify the base metal you are welding, cutting or brazing: (Check box or fill-in below) Carbon steel Galvanized

  13. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-09-01

    The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding increased 5 to 40% in yield strength and slightly increased in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing. The type 308 cladding, microstructurally typical of that in reactor pressure vessels, showed very little degradation in either upper-shelf energy or transition temperature due to irradiation. Conversely, the impact properties of the specimens containing the highly diluted type 309 cladding, microstructurally similar to that produced during some off-normal welding conditions in existing reactors, experienced significant increases in transition temperature and drops of up to 50% in upper-shelf energy. The impact energies of the Charpy specimens containing the type 309 layer strongly reflected the amount of the type 309 actually in the specimen, falling into two distinct high- and low-energy populations with the low-energy population corresponding to a higher fraction of type 309 in the specimen.

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Non-Destructive Examination of Dissimilar Metal Welds and Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Deborah A.

    2002-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has conducted research since 1977 in the areas of environmentally assisted cracking and assessment and reliability of non-destructive examination (NDE). Recent occurrences of cracking in Alloy 82/182 welds and Alloy 600 base metal at several domestic and overseas plants have raised several issues relating to both of these areas of NRC research. The occurrences of cracking were identified by the discovery of boric acid deposits resulting from through-wall cracking in the primary system pressure boundary. Analyses indicate that the cracking has occurred due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in Alloy 82/182 welds. This cracking has occurred in two different locations: in hot leg nozzle-to-safe end welds and in control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle welds. The cracking associated with safe-end welds is important due to the potential for a large loss of reactor coolant inventory, and the cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal and welds, particularly circumferential cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal, is important due to the potential for a control rod to eject resulting in a loss of coolant accident. The industry response in the U.S. to this cracking is being coordinated through the Electric Power Research Institute's Materials Reliability Project (EPRI-MRP) in a comprehensive, multifaceted effort. Although the industry program is addressing many of the issues raised by these cracking occurrences, confirmatory research is necessary for the staff to evaluate the work conducted by industry groups. Several issues requiring additional consideration regarding the generic implications of these isolated events have been identified. This paper will discuss the recent events of significant cracking in domestic and foreign plants, discuss the limitations of NDE in detecting SCC, identify deficiencies in information available in this area, discuss the USNRC approach to address these issues, and discuss the

  15. Influence of composition gradients on weld metal creep behavior: An analysis based on laminate composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, I.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of weld metal microsegregation, as altered by post-weld heat treatments, on both low and high temperatures tensile properties were investigated on Monel alloy 400. Flat, all weld metal, tensile specimens were machined from single pass GTA welds and were heat treated in vacuum in the range of 600 C to 1000 C to produce samples with different composition gradients. Short-time tensile tests were run at room temperature and elevated temperature. Long-time constant load creep tests were performed at 500 C. The room temperature mechanical properties of the as-welded specimen and heat treated specimens were similar and thus unaffected by variations in composition gradients. In contrast, at high temperatures the steady state creep rates decreased, rupture strains increased, and rupture lives decreases with increases in heat treatment temperature, that is, with decreases in the amplitudes of composition gradients. The deformation behavior of solidified dendritic structure was modeled based on results obtained on laminate composites of nickel and copper. The laminates, prepared by roll bonding, were annealed to produce controlled composition gradients with dimensions equivalent to those observed in the weld metal. The steady state creep rates of laminate composites decreased with increases in heat treatment time, that is, with decreases in the amplitudes of composition gradients. To rationalize the creep properties of each component in laminate composites, nickel-copper solid solutions having systematic compositional variations were prepared and tested under the same conditions as the laminate composites. The creep rates of nickel-copper solid solutions showed a minimum with nickel composition.

  16. The influence of composition gradients on tensile properties of weld metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, I.D.; Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1988-09-01

    In this study, the effects of weld metal microsegregation, as altered by post-weld heat treatments, on both low and high temperature tensile properties were investigated on an alloy system which exhibits significant segregation of the major alloying elements without complex transformations or precipitation. Monel alloy 400, which consists primarily of nickel and copper, was chosen as a model system. This system is a single phase FCC solid solution at all temperatures, and has a low distribution coefficient, k. On solidification, significant microsegregation occurs with copper segregating to the interdendritic boundaries.

  17. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Khizhnyak, V. I.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2008-02-15

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 {mu}s, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  18. Electrically driven rapidly vaporizing foils, wires and strips used for collision welding and sheet metal forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vivek, Anupam; Daehn, Glenn S; Taber, Geoffrey A; Johnson, Jason R

    2015-05-05

    A method for forming a piece of a sheet metal is performed by positioning a consumable body, made of metal, proximate to the piece of the sheet metal. The consumable body is rapidly vaporized, and the gas pressure generated thereby is directed into the piece of the sheet metal. This results in acceleration of the piece of sheet metal, and it is collided into a stationary body at a velocity, generally in excess of 200 m/s. Depending upon the type of stationary body, the piece of sheet metal is deformed into a predetermined shape or is welded onto the stationary body. The vaporization is accomplished by passing a high current of electricity into the consumable body. The effect of the vaporized metal may be augmented by additional components in the consumable body.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600 and 690 and compatible weld metals in BWRs: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R. A.; McMinn, A.

    1988-07-01

    The relative susceptibilities of alloy 600 and 690 base metals and I-82, I-182, R-127 and R-135 weld metals to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in either pure water or a simulated resin intrusion environment at 288/degree/C were evaluated. Alloy 600, I-182, and I-82 weld metals were susceptible to various degrees of IGSCC in oxygen containing pure water when creviced, and immune to IGSCC when uncreviced. Alloy 690 was immune to IGSCC under all pure water conditions. Alloy 500, alloy 690, I-182, and I-82 were all susceptible to cracking in the simulated resin intrusion environment, although alloy 690 exhibited the greatest resistance to SCC. The high chromium experimental weld alloy were immune to cracking under all conditions examined. The IGSCC susceptibility of seven different weld metals used to weld alloy 600 and A508 were also evaluated in the resin intrusion environment at 288/degree/C. Weldments made with I-625, I-182, and I-82 (GTAW) were the most susceptible, whereas welds made with I-132 were the least susceptible. Most of the weldments failed at the fusion line between the weld metal and the A508 steel, and the SCC susceptibility increased with increasing hardness measured at the fusion line. There was no effect of crevice condition or heat treatment on SCC susceptibility. The SCC susceptibility of Type 316 NG stainless steel welded with R-127, R-135, I-72 and Type 308L weld metals was evaluated in pure water and resin intrusion environments at 288/degree/C. All of the materials were immune to SCC in the pure water environment. In the resin intrusion environment, both the I-72 and R-135 weld metals were immune to SACC, but the R-127 and Type 308L weld metals exhibited SCC. The Type 316 NG stainless steel was susceptible to transgranular SCC in the resin intrusion environment, except when welded with I-72, in which case it was immune. 36 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-03-11

    Described is a manual,portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary coolling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification.

  1. Evaluation of pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloyed stainless steels welds for FGD plants in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, K.K.; Sung, H.J.; Im, C.S.; Hong, I.P.; Kim, D.K.

    1998-12-31

    For successful application of high-alloyed stainless steels for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants, pitting corrosion resistance of arc welds of N-added 6%Mo austenitic stainless steels (UNS N 08367) and super duplex stainless steels (UNS S 32550) made with various filler metals were evaluated using the Green Death solution. For Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) and Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welds of N 08367, Critical Pitting Temperature (CPT) of base metal was 65--70 C, whereas weld made by ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal yielded CPT of 50 C. Welds made by ERNiCrMo-10 or ERNiCrMo-4 filler metals showed CPT of 60--65 C and 65--70C, respectively. For GTA and GMA welds of S 32550, CPT of welds made by ERNiCrMo-3 was 45--50 C, indicating that the filler metal can provide pitting corrosion resistance matching the S 32550 alloy. Thus, a proper pitting corrosion resistance of weldments of high-alloy stainless steels can be achieved by selecting filler metals having at least +10 higher Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number (PRE{sub N}) value than the base metal regardless of the type of arc welding process. The over-alloyed filler metals would compensate preferential segregation of Cr, MO along the dendrite boundary, which made the dendrite core more susceptible to pitting. Nitrogen addition to the GTA welds of N 08367 made with ERNiCrMo-3 failed to improve pitting corrosion resistance, which was attributed to the precipitation of nitrogen in the weld metal in the form of Nb-nitride.

  2. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a

  3. Use of vacuum arc plasma guns for a metal puff Z-pinch system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Baksht, R. B.

    2011-09-15

    The performance of a metal puff Z-pinch system has been studied experimentally. In this type of system, the initial cylindrical shell 4 cm in diameter was produced by ten plasma guns. Each gun initiates a vacuum arc operating between magnesium electrodes. The net current of the guns was 80 kA. The arc-produced plasma shell was compressed by using a 450-kA, 450-ns driver, and as a result, a plasma column 0.3 cm in diameter was formed. The electron temperature of the plasma reached 400 eV at an average ion concentration of 1.85 {center_dot} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The power of the Mg K-line radiation emitted by the plasma for 15-30 ns was 300 MW/cm.

  4. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  5. WELDING METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  6. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  7. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  8. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  9. Nature and evolution of the fusion boundary in ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld metals. Part 1 -- Nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.; Mills, M.J.

    1999-10-01

    A fundamental investigation of fusion boundary microstructure evolution in dissimilar-metal welds (DMWs) between ferritic base metals and a face-centered-cubic (FCC) filler metal was conducted. The objective of the work presented here was to characterize the nature and character of the elevated-temperature fusion boundary to determine the nucleation and growth characteristics of DMWs. Type 409 ferritic stainless steel and 1080 pearlitic steel were utilized as base metal substrates, and Monel (70Ni-30Cu) was used as the filler metal. The Type 409 base metal provided a fully ferritic or body-centered-cubic (BCC) substrate at elevated temperatures and exhibited no on-cooling phase transformations to mask or disguise the original character of the fusion boundary. The 1080 pearlitic steel was selected because it is austenitic at the solidus temperature, providing an austenite substrate at the fusion boundary. The weld microstructure generated with each of the base metals in combination with Monel was fully austenitic. In the Type 409/Monel system, there was no evidence of epitaxial nucleation and growth as normally observed in homogeneous weld metal combinations. The fusion boundary in this system exhibited random grain boundary misorientations between the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal grains. In the 1080/Monel system, evidence of normal epitaxial growth was observed at the fusion boundary, where solidification and HAZ grain boundaries converged. The fusion boundary morphologies are a result of the crystal structure present along the fusion boundary during the initial stages of solidification. Based on the results of this investigation, a model for heterogeneous nucleation along the fusion boundary is proposed when the base and weld metals exhibit ferritic (BCC) and FCC crystal structures, respectively.

  10. Surface preparation effects on GTA weld shape in JBK-75 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.D.; Robertson, A.M. ); Heiple, C.R. ); Sturgill, P.L.; Jamsay, R.

    1993-02-01

    The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface preparation produced substantial changes in the fusion zone shape and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent depth of fusion (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander resulted from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any increase in depth of fusion. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, increase the surface oxide thickness, and entrap oxide. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension-driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Increased depth of fusion in wire-fed U-groove weld joints also resulted when welding wire with a greater surface oxide thickness was used. Increasing the amount of wire brushing produced even deeper welds. However, a maximum in depth of fusion was observed with further wire brushing, beyond which weld fusion depth decreased.

  11. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Khler, Bernd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  12. Effect of long-term thermal aging on the fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel base and weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, F.F.

    1995-09-27

    Compact tension specimens taken from FFTF primary piping materials (Type 316 stainless steel (SS) and 16-8-2 SS weld metal) and from reactor vessel materials (304 SS and 308 SS weld metal) were heated in laboratory furnaces from 100,000 hours. Fracture toughness testing was performed on these specimens, which are 7.62- and 25.4-mm thick, respectively at the aging temperature (482 and 427 degrees). Results were analyzed with the multiple-specimen method. Thermal aging continues to reduce the fracture toughness of FFTF component materials. Results show that thermal aging has a strong effect on the toughness degradation of weld metals, particularly for 16-8-2 SS weld whose aged/unaged Jc ratio is only 0.31 after 100,000-hour aging. The fracture toughness of the 308 and 16-8-2 SS weld metals fluctuated during 20,000 to 50,000-hour aging but deteriorated as the aging time increased to 100,000 hours; the toughness degradation is significant. Fracture control based on a fracture mechanics approach should be considered

  13. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  14. Method of automatically welding with a non-consumable electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiefer, Joseph H.

    1982-01-01

    A method for maintaining a constant arc gap between the electrode and the weld puddle by controlling the addition of filler wire based on the arc voltage.

  15. Review of Dissimilar Metal Welding for the NGNP Helical-Coil Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John N. DuPont

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding research and development of a new high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that is capable of providing high temperature process heat for industry. The steam generator of the HTGR will consist of an evaporator economizer section in the lower portion and a finishing superheater section in the upper portion. Alloy 800H is expected to be used for the superheater section, and 2.25Cr 1Mo steel is expected to be used for the evaporator economizer section. Dissimilar metal welds (DMW) will be needed to join these two materials. It is well known that failure of DMWs can occur well below the expected creep life of either base metal and well below the design life of the plant. The failure time depends on a wide range of factors related to service conditions, welding parameters, and alloys involved in the DMW. The overall objective of this report is to review factors associated with premature failure of DMWs operating at elevated temperatures and identify methods for extending the life of the 2.25Cr 1Mo steel to alloy 800H welds required in the new HTGR. Information is provided on a variety of topics pertinent to DMW failures, including microstructural evolution, failure mechanisms, creep rupture properties, aging behavior, remaining life estimation techniques, effect of environment on creep rupture properties, best practices, and research in progress to improve DMW performance. The microstructure of DMWs in the as welded condition consists of a sharp chemical concentration gradient across the fusion line that separates the ferritic and austenitic alloys. Upon cooling from the weld thermal cycle, a band of martensite forms within this concentration gradient due to high hardenability and the relatively rapid cooling rates associated with welding. Upon aging, during post weld heat treatment (PWHT), and/or during high temperature service, C diffuses down the chemical potential gradient from the ferritic 2.25Cr 1Mo steel

  16. Characterization of Arc Generated Plasma Interactions with a Liquid Metal Medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, Gregory C.; Martin, Elijah H.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2005-05-15

    Plasma interaction with first wall and interior reactor chamber components is an influencing factor in the design of inertial fusion facilities. The concept of a liquid metal wall, in which a circulating lithium curtain would be used, has been considered in many studies. The interaction of plasmas with moving liquid metals is a complex subject due to the influence of hydrodynamics, evaporation and droplet formation, nucleation and agglomeration of condensed particulates. To gain an understanding of some of the specific details of this interaction an experimental setup of an arc-generated plasma interacting with a liquid lead pool has been designed, constructed and operated. This simulation of the plasma-liquid interaction focuses on the particle condensation of the liquid metal after plasma interaction. The experiment generates transient high-density plasma over 50 {mu}s pulse duration. Plasma characteristics are determined by various diagnostics. A set of collection substrates are arranged to collect nucleated particulates condensing from the evolving plume. Particulate size and distribution are analyzed numerically using digital images.

  17. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  18. Effect of rapid solidification on stainless steel weld metal microstructures and its implications on the Schaeffler diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Reed, R.W.; Hebble, T.L.

    1987-09-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effect of rapid solidification on the weld metal microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and its implication on the ferrite constitution diagram. A wide variety of stainless steels were laser welded at different welding speeds and laser power levels. Results indicate that both weld pool cooling rate and the postsolidification solid state cooling rates have a profound effect on the microstructures. For the steels investigated, the microstructures ranged from duplex austenite (..gamma..) + ferrite (delta) to fully austenitic or fully ferritic. These microstructures were found to be sensitive to both cooling rates and composition. The observed results are rationalized based on rapid solidification theory. This investigation indicates that solidification rates and postsolidification cooling rates have a profound effect on the observed microstructures, thus making it impossible to predict the microstructures of rapidly cooled weld metal from the conventional constitution diagrams. The influence of the observations made in this investigation on the Schaeffler diagram is demonstrated, and possible corrections to the constitution diagram incorporating the cooling rate effects are proposed. 23 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  20. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  1. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-06-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  2. Autoclave test of inertia welded slugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, H.B.

    1986-01-27

    Inertia welding (IW) is being evaluated as an alternative to gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding, for welding Mark 31 slugs. To demonstrate IW, 40 production (GTA) slugs rejected for pinholes and poor bonds were used. After welding, the slugs were autoclave tested. No autoclave failures occurred. (DLC)

  3. Weld microstructure development and properties of precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, J.A. ); Garrison, W.R. Jr. )

    1999-08-01

    The weld microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and solidification cracking susceptibility of three precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels--PH 13-8 Mo, Custom 450 and 15-5 PH--were investigated. Liquid tin quenching of gas tungsten arc welds revealed that all three welds solidified as single-phase ferrite with a high degree of microsegregation. However, during further solidification and cooling almost complete homogenization occurred as a result of solid-state diffusion. The welds in all three alloys exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and generally exhibited tensile and impact properties similar to those of the base metal. However, in almost all cases, the weld Charpy impact energies were somewhat less than those of the base metals. The cracking behavior and mechanical properties are discussed in terms of microstructural evolution.

  4. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  5. Feasibility of correlating V-Cr-Ti alloy weld strength with weld chemistry. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Odom, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of refractory metals such as vanadium are determined to a large extent by the interstitial impurities in the alloy. In the case of welding, interstitial impurities are introduced in the welding process from the atmosphere and by dissolution of existing precipitates in the alloy itself. Because of the necessity of having an ultra-pure atmosphere, a vacuum chamber or a glove box is necessary. In the V-Cr-Ti system, the titanium serves as a getter to control the concentration of oxygen and nitrogen in solid solution in the alloy. In this project the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique was used to detect, measure, and map the spacial distribution of impurity elements in welds in the alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. An attempt was then made to correlate the concentrations and distributions of the impurities with mechanical properties of the welds. Mechanical integrity of the welds was determined by Charpy V-notch testing. Welds were prepared by the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) method. Charpy testing established a correlation between weld impurity concentration and the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Higher concentrations of oxygen resulted in a higher DBTT. An exception was noted in the case of a low-oxygen weld which had a high hydrogen concentration resulting in a brittle weld. The concentrations and distributions of the impurities determined by SIMS could not be correlated with the mechanical properties of the welds. This research supports efforts to develop fusion reactor first wall and blanket structural materials.

  6. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  7. Weld Properties of a Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Brooks; S. H. Goods; C. V. Robino

    2000-08-01

    The all weld metal tensile properties from gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds in free machining austenitic stainless steels have been determined. Ten heats with sulfur contents from 0.04 to 0.4 wt.% and a wide range in Creq/Nieq ratios were studied. Tensile properties of welds with both processes were related to alloy composition and solidification microstructure. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratios and ferrite content, whereas the ductility measured by RA at fracture decreased with sulfur content. Nevertheless, a range in alloy compositions was identified that provided a good combination of both strength and ductility. The solidification cracking response for the same large range of compositions are discussed, and compositions identified that would be expected to provide good performance in welded applications.

  8. Welding techniques for high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gooch, T.G.; Woollin, P.

    1996-11-01

    Factors controlling corrosion resistance of weldments in high alloy austenitic stainless steel are described, with emphasis on microsegregation, intermetallic phase precipitation and nitrogen loss from the molten pool. The application is considered of a range of welding processes, both fusion and solid state. Autogenous fusion weldments have corrosion resistance below that of the parent, but low arc energy, high travel speed and use of N{sub 2}-bearing shielding gas are recommended for best properties. Conventional fusion welding practice is to use an overalloyed nickel-base filler metal to avoid preferential weld metal corrosion, and attention is given to the effects of consumable composition and level of weldpool dilution by base steel. With non-matching consumables, overall joint corrosion resistance may be limited by the presence of a fusion boundary unmixed zone: better performance may be obtained using solid state friction welding, given appropriate component geometry. Overall, the effects of welding on superaustenitic steels are understood, and the materials have given excellent service in welded fabrications. The paper summarizes recommendations on preferred welding procedure.

  9. Microstructure, hardness profile and tensile strength in welds of AA6013 T6 extrusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guitterez, L.A.; Neye, G.; Zschech, E.

    1996-04-01

    Alloy AA6013 is easily welded by conventional arc welding processes as well as by high-energy-density processes. However, some physical properties, which are inherent to all aluminum alloys, have to be considered during welding. In comparison to steel, the high thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys requires the use of higher heat input for welding. This is realized by a greater welding current during GTAW of aluminum alloys. One of the main problems associated with LBW of aluminum alloys is the high surface reflectivity. In particular, the threshold intensity for the development of a keyhole is much higher for aluminum than for steel. Finally, aluminum alloys, and particularly the heat-treatable alloys, are sensitive to weld cracking. This phenomenon can be avoided by proper filler and base metal alloy selection and adequate filler metal dilution. In order to improve the mechanical integrity of Al-Mg-Si weldments, it would be desirable to study the microstructure of the FZ and of the HAZ, as well as the residual stress distribution. The present study was performed in order to show differences in microstructure, hardness profile and tensile strength of gas tungsten arc (GTA) and laser beam (LB) welded AA6013-T6 extrusions. In addition, grain boundary liquations and hot tearing are discussed.

  10. Plasma effect on weld pool surface reconstruction by shape-from-polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coniglio, N.; Mathieu, A.

    2014-03-31

    The polarimetric state of the thermal radiations emitted by the weld metal contains geometric information about the emitting surface. Even though the analysed thermal radiation has a wavelength corresponding to a blind spectral window of the arc plasma, the physical presence of the arc plasma itself interferes with the rays radiated by the weld pool surface before attaining the polarimeter, thus modifying the geometric information transported by the ray. In the present work, the effect of the arc plasma-surrounding zone on the polarimetric state and propagation direction of the radiated ray is analyzed. The interaction with the arc plasma zone induces a drop in ray intensity and a refraction of ray optical path.

  11. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  12. Arc Position Sensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can be taken of the electric current conduction path within vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces for industries that use specialty metals such as nickel, titanium, and zirconium. ...

  13. Effect of minor chemistry elements on GTA weld fusion zone characteristics of a commercial grade titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marya, S.K.

    1996-06-01

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is the most common technique employed in the fabrication of rolled thin tubes. One of the major manufacturing problems concerns the stability of weld fusion zone on materials from different casts, notwithstanding stringent monitoring of the process parameters -- current, voltage and travel speed. These parameters determine the theoretical weld heat and are expected to control the instantaneous mass of melt. According to the data compiled by Sahoo et al., oxygen is known to reduce the surface tension of most of the metals. However, investigations on the role of minor changes in concentrations of elements like sulphur, oxygen, selenium, bismuth, aluminium, and titanium in steels have very often attributed the cast to cast variations to different temperature gradients of surface tension over the weldpool. To the author`s knowledge, no reported work so far has revealed changing weld profiles in autogeneous mechanized GTA welds on titanium due to minor composition changes.

  14. WELDING PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  15. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads.

  16. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-19

    A method is described for welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads. 7 figs.

  17. Prediction of an arc-tunable Weyl Fermion metallic state in MoxW1-xTe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, Tay-Rong; Xu, Su-Yang; Chang, Guoqing; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Wang, BaoKai; Bian, Guang; Zheng, Hao; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; et al

    2016-02-15

    A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that hosts Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. The Weyl fermions correspond to isolated points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are connected only through the crystal’s boundary by exotic Fermi arcs. The length of the Fermi arc gives a measure of the topological strength, because the only way to destroy the Weyl nodes is to annihilate them in pairs in the reciprocal space. To date, Weyl semimetals are only realized in the TaAs class. Here, we propose a tunable Weyl state in MoxW1₋xTe2 where Weyl nodes are formed by touchingmore » points between metallic pockets. We show that the Fermi arc length can be changed as a function of Mo concentration, thus tuning the topological strength. Lastly,our results provide an experimentally feasible route to realizing Weyl physics in the layered compound MoxW1₋xTe2, where non-saturating magneto-resistance and pressure-driven superconductivity have been observed.« less

  18. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  19. Effect of a copper filler metal on the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welded titanium-stainless steel joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ting, E-mail: fgwangting@163.com [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); Zhang, Binggang, E-mail: zhang_bg@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Feng, Jicai, E-mail: fengjc@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China) [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Tang, Qi, E-mail: tangqi@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Cracking in an electron beam weld of titanium to stainless steel occurred during the cooling process because of internal thermal stress. Using a copper filler metal, a crack free joint was obtained, which had a tensile strength of 310 MPa. To determine the reasons for cracking in the Ti/Fe joint and the function of the copper filler metal on the improvement of the cracking resistance of the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, the microstructures of the joints were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The cracking susceptibilities of the joints were evaluated with microhardness tests on the cross-sections. In addition, microindentation tests were used to compare the brittleness of the intermetallics in the welds. The results showed that the Ti/Fe joint was characterized by continuously distributed brittle intermetallics such as TiFe and TiFe(Cr){sub 2} with high hardness ({approx} 1200 HV). For the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, most of the weld consisted of a soft solid solution of copper with dispersed TiFe intermetallics. The transition region between the weld and the titanium alloy was made up of a relatively soft Ti-Cu intermetallic layer with a lower hardness ({approx} 500 HV). The formation of soft phases reduced the cracking susceptibility of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Fe joint cracked for the brittleness and residual stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Cu/Fe joint with tensile strength of 310 MPa was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu diluted Ti and Fe contents in weld and separated the TiFe{sub 2} into individual blocks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial hard Ti-Fe compounds were replaced by soft Ti-Cu compounds in the weld. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of solid solution of copper formed in the weld.

  20. Effect of multiple repairs in girth welds of pipelines on the mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, O.E.; Hallen, J.M.; Villagomez, A.

    2008-10-15

    This work presents the results of multiple weld repairs in the same area in seamless API X-52 microalloyed steel pipe. Four conditions of shielded metal arc welding repairs and one as-welded specimen of the girth weld were characterized to determine changes in the microstructure, grain size in the heat affected zone, and to evaluate their effect on the mechanical properties of the weld joints. The mechanical properties by means of tension tests, Charpy-V impact resistance and Vickers hardness of the welds were analyzed. The results indicate that significant changes are not generated in the microstructural constituents of the heat affected zone. Grain growth in the heat affected zone at the specimen mid-thickness with the number of repairs was observed. Tensile strength of the weld joints meets the requirement of the API 1104 standard even after the fourth weld repair. Significant reduction in Charpy-V impact resistance with the number of weld repairs was found when the notch location was in the intersection of the fusion line with the specimen mid-thickness. A significant increase in the Vickers hardness of the heat affected zone occurred after the first repair and a gradual decrease in the Vickers hardness occurred as the number of repairs increases.

  1. Roughening and removal of surface contamination from beryllium using negative transferred-arc cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Elliott, K.E.

    1997-12-01

    Negative transferred-arc (TA) cleaning has been used extensively in the aerospace industry to clean and prepare surfaces prior to plasma spraying of thermal barrier coatings. This non-line of sight process can improve the bond strength of plasma sprayed coatings to the substrate material by cleaning and macroscopically roughening the surface. A variation of this cleaning methodology is also used in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding to cathodically clean the surfaces of aluminum and magnesium prior to welding. Investigations are currently being performed to quantify the degree in which the negative transferred-arc process can clean and roughen metal surfaces. Preliminary information will be reported on the influence of processing conditions on roughening and the removal of carbon and other contaminates from the surface of beryllium. Optical, spectral and electrical methods to quantify cleaning of the surface will also be discussed. Applications for this technology include chemical-free precision cleaning of beryllium components.

  2. Weld braze technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanne, Jr., William R.; Kelker, Jr., John W.; Alexander, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    High-strength metal joints are formed by a combined weld-braze technique. A hollow cylindrical metal member is forced into an undersized counterbore in another metal member with a suitable braze metal disposed along the bottom of the counterbore. Force and current applied to the members in an evacuated chamber results in the concurrent formation of the weld along the sides of the counterbore and a braze along the bottom of the counterbore in one continuous operation.

  3. Stress-corrosion crack initiation process for Alloy 182 weld metal in simulated BWR environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-09-01

    For preventing SCC from occurring in the internal structure of materials of the BWR plant, the injection of hydrogen into the core-water so as to reduce the free corrosion potential of the materials were proposed. Because of the lack of basic data of stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR environment on Ni-based alloys in comparison with stainless steels, the slow strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests and the creviced bent-beam (CBB) test were conducted for a sensitized Alloy 182 weld metal in high-purity water environments containing dissolved oxygen (DO) and hydrogen (DH) to varied concentrations at 288 C, and the SCC initiation process were examined. The susceptibility of a material to SCC was discussed in terms of the electrode potential effect, and the effects of impurities of the testing water were examined by adding slightly Na{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}. In high purity waters and in the electrode potential region higher than {minus} 0.2 V vs. SHE, the interdendritic stress-corrosion cracks were observed both in the slow strain-rate test and the creviced bent-beam test. SEM observations of sub-cracks at the specimen surfaces revealed that stress-corrosion cracks were initiated when the oxide film had cracked to under-hundred {micro}m wide, that no such individual cracks could grow per se, but that those micro-cracks which happened to be formed in each other`s vicinity would coalesce into large cracks, one of which made propagated as stress-corrosion cracking, and that the stress-corrosion cracking sensitivity became more acute on addition of impurity. In the electrode potential region lower than 0 V, on the other hand, the stress-corrosion cracks were observed to be initiated at bottoms of corrosion pits formed on the specimen surfaces in the former, whereas both type of stress-corrosion cracks were observed between 0 to {minus}0.2V. No stress-corrosion crack was observed even though much the same corrosion pits in the CBB test at {minus}0.4 V.

  4. A comparison of LBW and GTAW processes in miniature closure welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Burchett, S.N.

    1995-07-01

    When small electronic components with glass-to-metal seals are closure welded, residual stresses developed in the glass are of concern. If these stresses exceed allowable tensile levels` the resulting weld-induced seal failure may cause the entire component to be scrapped or reworked at substantial cost. Conventional wisdom says the best welding process for these applications is that which provides the least heat input, and that Laser Beam Welding (LBW) provides less heat input than Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. (GTAW); however, other concerns such as weld fit-up, part variability, and material weldability can modify the final choice of a welding process. In this paper we compare the characteristic levels of heat input and the residual stresses generated in the glass seals for the two processes (as calculated by 3D Finite Element Analysis) as a function of heat input and travel speed, and contrast some of the other manufacturing decisions that must be made to choose a production process. The geometry chosen is a standing edge corner weld in a cylindrical container about 20 mm diameter by 35 mm tall. Four metal pins are glassed into the part lid. The stresses calculated to result from continuous wave C0{sub 2} LBW are compared with those that result from GTAW. The total energy required by the laser weld is significantly less than for the equivalent size GTA weld. The energy input required for a given size weld is inversely proportional to the travel speed, but approaches a saturation level as the travel speed increases. LBW travel speeds ranging from 10 mm/sec to 50 mm/sec were examined.

  5. Metallic solutions for pollution control systems behavior of welded and unwelded high alloyed materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupoiron, F.; Audouard, J.P.; Verneau, M.; Charles, J.

    1995-12-01

    Stainless steels and nickel alloys are widely used in pollution control equipment. They provide more reliability and more safety to installations. The increase in the severity of operating conditions has led to the introduction of new types of alloys with improved corrosion resistance, particularly for welded structures. Unwelded and welded high-alloyed stainless steels, including superaustenitic (6 Mo and high nitrogen grades), superduplex and nickel base alloys have been tested in conditions simulating the very corrosive environments of gas cleaning systems: low pH, high temperature and high chloride levels. The results are discussed in terms of technical efficiency and potential applications.

  6. The problem of intermixing of metals possessing no mutual solubility upon explosion welding (Cu-Ta, Fe-Ag, Al-Ta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, B.A.; Ivanov, M.A.; Rybin, V.V.; Elkina, O.A.; Antonova, O.V.; Patselov, A.M.; Inozemtsev, A.V.; Plotnikov, A.V.; Volkova, A.Yu.; Besshaposhnikov, Yu.P.

    2013-01-15

    On the basis of the results obtained for joints of dissimilar metals such as copper-tantalum and iron-silver, the reason of immiscible suspensions mixing upon explosion welding has been cleared out. It has been found that the interface (plain or wavy) is not smooth and contains inhomogeneities, namely, cusps and local melting zones. The role of granulating fragmentation providing partitioning of initial materials as a main channel of input energy dissipation has been revealed. It has been shown that in joints of metals possessing normal solubility the local melting zones are true solutions, but if metals possess no mutual solubility the local melting zones are colloidal solutions. Realization of either emulsion or suspension variant takes place. The results can be used in the development of new joints of metals possessing no mutual solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immiscible pairs Ta/Cu and Fe/Ag are welded successfully by explosive welding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fragmentation provides for partitioning as the main energy dissipation channel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immiscible metals form colloidal solid solutions during solidification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melting and boiling temperatures ratio determines the colloidal solution type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local melting zones being in suspension form enhance welds hardening.

  7. Evaluating the SCC resistance of underwater welds in sodium tetrathionate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.A.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1997-12-01

    The susceptibility of welds to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by the surface residual tensile stresses generated by the typical welding process. However, underwater plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding has been shown to produce compressive surface residual stresses, an encouraging result if repairs of cracked boiling water reactor (BWR) components are to be made without further endangering them to SCC. This program was designed to verify that underwater PTA welds are resistant to SCC and to determine if underwater PTA welding could mitigate SCC in potentially susceptible welds. This was achieved by exposing various welds on solution annealed (SA) and SA + thermally sensitized 304 stainless steel at 25 C in a solution of 1.5 gm/liter of sodium sulfide added to 0.05M sodium tetrathionate, titrated to a pH of 1.25 with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The autogeneous welds were produced using gas tungsten arc (GTA) and plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding under atmospheric conditions, and PTA welding underwater. After 1 hour of sodium tetrathionate exposure, GTA and air PTA welds exhibited SCC while the underwater PTA weld heat affected zones were more resistant. Underwater PTA welds bisecting a GTA weld eliminated the cracking in the GTA weld heat affected zone under certain conditions. The lack of IG cracking in the region influenced by the underwater PTA weld is consistent with the measurement of compressive surface residual stresses inherent to the underwater welding process.

  8. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  9. Surface temperature distribution of GTA weld pools on thin-plate 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Kraus, H.G.

    1995-11-01

    A transient multidimensional computational model was utilized to study gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of thin-plate 304 stainless steel (SS). The model eliminates several of the earlier restrictive assumptions including temperature-independent thermal-physical properties. Consequently, all important thermal-physical properties were considered as temperature dependent throughout the range of temperatures experienced by the weld metal. The computational model was used to predict surface temperature distribution of the GTA weld pools in 1.5-mm-thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond with an earlier experimental study that produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. One of the motivations of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate excellent agreement, thereby verifying the model.

  10. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  11. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, S. L.; Cinson, A. D.; Diaz, A. A.; Anderson, M. T.

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criteria for detection performance.

  12. Welding studies of nickel aluminide and nickel-iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M.L.; David, S.A.; Horton, J.A.; White, C.L.; Liu, C.T.

    1985-08-01

    Because welding is often used during the fabrication of structural components, one of the key issues in the development of nickel aluminides and nickel-iron aluminides for engineering applications is their weldability. The goals of this study were to characterize weldment microstructures and to identify some of the factors controlling weldability of ductile Ni/sub 3/Al alloys. The alloys used in this initial study were Ni/sub 3/Al containing 500 wppm boron and Ni/sub 3/Al containing 10 at. % iron and either 500 wppm or 20 wppm boron. Full-penetration autogenous welds were made in sheet shock by the electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes. The main process variables were travel speed and preheat. The as-welded coupons were examined visually and in detail by the usual optical and electron metallographic methods. Weldments of boron-doped Ni/sub 3/Al were composed of nearly 100% ordered ..gamma..' phase. Weldments of the nickel-iron aluminides were ..gamma..' + ..beta..' phase mixtures, with martensitic ..beta..' distributed interdendritically in the fusion zone and decorating grain boundaries in the heat-affected zone. All welds made in this particular boron-doped Ni/sub 3/Al alloy contained cracks. Weldability improved with the addition of iron, and defect-free welds were made in the nickel-iron aluminides by both EB and GTA welding. Nevertheless, the iron-containing alloys were susceptible to cracking, and their weldability was affected by boron concentration, welding speed, and (for GTA) gas shielding. Defect-free welds were found to have good tensile properties relative to those of the base metal. 34 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Stress-corrosion cracking of Alloys 600 and 690 and weld metals No. 82 and No. 182 in high-temperature water. Interim report. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The relative susceptibilities of Alloys 600 and 690 base metals and I-82 and 182 weld metals to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in pure water at 288/sup 0/C were evaluated. A combination of creviced and non-creviced slow-strain-rate, smooth sustained-load, and precracked fracture mechanics tests were employed in the evaluation. Susceptibility was determined as a function of dissolved oxygen content, degree of sensitization, and crevice condition. The results indicated that Alloy 600, and I-182 and I-82 weld metals were susceptible to various degrees of IGSCC in oxygen containing pure water when creviced, and immune to IGSCC when uncreviced. Alloy 690 was immune to IGSCC under all conditions examined. No correlation was found between the location of IGSCC and the location of maximum grain boundary corrosion in a boiling 25% nitric acid test.

  14. Development of weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, R.; Martinez, D.A.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Ortega, R.E.; Rofer, C.K.; Romero, W.; Stewart, J.; Trujillo, V.L.

    1998-12-31

    Weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers have been designed, fabricated, and tested for the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. ARIES is a processing system used for the dismantlement of the plutonium pits from nuclear weapons. ARIES prepares the extracted-plutonium in a form which is compatible with long-term storage and disposition options and meets international inspection requirements. The processed plutonium is delivered to the canning module of the ARIES line, where it is packaged in a stainless steel container. This container is then packaged in a secondary container for long-term storage. Each of the containers is hermetically sealed with a full penetration weld closure that meets the requirements of the ASME Section IX Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Welding is performed with a gas tungsten arc process in an inert atmosphere of helium. The encapsulated helium in the nested containers allows for leak testing the weld closure and container. The storage package was designed to meet packaging requirements of DOE Standard 3013-96 for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxides. Development of the process parameters, weld fixture, weld qualification, and the welding chambers is discussed in this paper.

  15. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  16. Repair welding of fusion reactor components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, B.A.

    1993-05-15

    Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  17. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheaffer, D.A.; Renzi, R.F.; Tung, D.M.; Schroder, K.

    2000-07-04

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration are disclosed. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100 x 100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  18. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  19. Evaluation of the intermittent GTA cold wire feed weld system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dereskiewicz, J.P.

    1991-08-01

    An intermittent gas tungsten arc cold wire feed process was statistically evaluated to determine the feasibility of applying this process to meet the 0.030-inch weld penetration and peak temperature requirements when unfavorable joint tolerances exist on a subassembly weld. The wire feed system was determined to only slightly benefit the welding process over normal pulsed gas tungsten arc welding using traditional wire feeding capabilities. However, the complexity of this process and extensive welding operator training and qualification does not outweigh the benefits of incorporating this synchronized pulse wire feed system in production. 2 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Mapelli, Carlo

    2013-08-15

    Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. γ′-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and γ″-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of γ″-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type

  1. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub

  2. Inverter-based GTA welding machines improve fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammons, M.

    2000-05-01

    While known as precision process, many fabricators using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process fight several common problems that hinder quality, slow production, frustrate the operator and otherwise prevent the process from achieving its full potential. These include a limited ability to tailor the weld bead profile, poor control of the arc direction and arc wandering, poor arc starting, unstable or inconsistent arcs in the AC mode, high-frequency interference with electronics and tungsten contamination. Fortunately, new GTA welding technology--made possible by advances with inverter-based power sources and micro-processor controls--can eliminate common productivity gremlins. Further, new AC/DC inverter-based GTA power sources provide advanced arc shaping capabilities. As a result, many fabricators adopting this new technology have experienced phenomenal production increases, taken on new types of projects and reduced costs. Most importantly, the operators enjoy welding more.

  3. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  4. Toughened Graphite Electrode for High Heat Electric Arc Furnaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL to melt steel, titanium, and other scrap metal in industrial electric arc furnaces. ... Applications and Industries Electric arc furnace steel manufacturing Steel refinement and ...

  5. Role of welding parameters in determining the geometrical appearance of weld pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacevic, R.; Cao, Z.N.; Zhang, Y.M.

    1996-10-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is developed to describe the fluid flow and heat transfer in weld pools. Both full penetration and free deformation of the top and bottom weld pool surfaces are considered. Temperature distribution and fluid flow field are obtained. In order to analyze the influence of welding parameters on the geometrical appearance of weld pools, a normalized model is developed to characterize the geometrical appearance of weld pools. It is found that welding current can significantly affect the geometrical shape. When welding current increases, the curvature of the pool boundary at the trailing end increases. The effect of the welding speed on the geometrical appearance is slight, although its influence on the pool size is great. In the interest range of arc length (from 1 mm to 4 mm), the arc length can affect both the size and the shape of the weld pool. However, compared with the welding current and speed, its influences are much weaker, GTA welding experiments are performed to verify the validity of the numerical models. The appearance of weld pools was obtained by using machine vision and a high-shutter speed camera. It is found that the calculated results have a good agreement with the experimental ones.

  6. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  7. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  8. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-07-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  9. Effects of irradiation temperature on Charpy and tensile properties of high-copper, low upper-shelf, submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Berggren, R.G.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents analyses of the Charpy impact and tensile test data, including adjustments for irradiation temperature and fluence normalization which make possible comparison of the irradiation sensitivity of the different welds. Analyses revealed dependence of yield and ultimate strength on irradiation temperature {minus}0.8 MPA/{degrees}C, respectively. Similarly, the Charpy impact energy changes due to irradiation temperature were {minus}0.5{degrees}C/{degrees}C for transition shift and {minus}0.05 J/{degrees}C for upper-shelf energy decrease. After adjustment to an irradiation temperature of 288{degrees}C and normalization to a fluence of 8 {times} 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2} percentage increases in yield strength due to irradiation ranged from about 21 to 35% while those for ultimate strength ranged from about 13 to 20%. The Charpy transition temperature shifts ranged from 59 to 123{degrees}C while the postirradiation upper-shelf energies ranged from 58 to 79 J.

  10. Welding development for V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, G.M.; King, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    Welds have been produced and characterized using the gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding processes. Thin sheet (0.75 mm) welds were made with three levels of interstitial contamination, and hardness and tensile properties were found to be strongly affected by oxygen pickup. Thick-section (6 mm) welds have been produced using both processes, and no embrittlement is experienced when high purity atmosphere is maintained. Metallographic examination shows a narrow, but coarse grained, heat affected zone for the GTA welds. Transition joint welding development between vanadium alloy and stainless steel has shown encouraging results.

  11. Final Assessment of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2014-03-24

    PNNL conducted a technical assessment of the NDE issues and protocols that led to missed detections of several axially oriented flaws in a steam generator primary inlet dissimilar metal weld at North Anna Power Station, Unit 1 (NAPS-1). This particular component design exhibits a significant outside-diameter (OD) taper that is not included as a blind performance demonstration mock-up within the industry’s Performance Demonstration Initiative, administered by EPRI. For this reason, the licensee engaged EPRI to assist in the development of a technical justification to support the basis for a site-specific qualification. The service-induced flaws at NAPS-1 were eventually detected as a result of OD surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the dissimilar metal weld. A total of five axially oriented flaws were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference. The field volumetric examination that was conducted at NAPS-1 was a non-encoded, real-time manual ultrasonic examination. PNNL conducted both an initial assessment, and subsequently, a more rigorous technical evaluation (reported here), which has identified an array of NDE issues that may have led to the subject missed detections. These evaluations were performed through technical reviews and discussions with NRC staff, EPRI NDE Center personnel, industry and ISI vendor personnel, and ultrasonic transducer manufacturers, and laboratory tests, to better understand the underlying issues at North Anna.

  12. Welding apparatus and methods for using ultrasonic sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Johnson, John A.; Larsen, Eric D.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    2006-08-22

    A welding apparatus using ultrasonic sensing is described and which includes a movable welder having a selectively adjustable welding head for forming a partially completed weld in a weld seam defined between adjoining metal substrates; an ultrasonic assembly borne by the moveable welder and which is operable to generate an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward the partially completed weld, and is further reflected from same; and a controller electrically coupled with the ultrasonic assembly and controllably coupled with the welding head, and wherein the controller receives information regarding the ultrasonic signal and in response to the information optimally positions the welding head relative to the weld seam.

  13. Weld failure detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  14. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  15. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  16. Cathodic ARC surface cleaning prior to brazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dave, V. R.; Hollis, K. J.; Castro, R. G.; Smith, F. M.; Javernick, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface cleanliness is one the critical process variables in vacuum furnace brazing operations. For a large number of metallic components, cleaning is usually accomplished either by water-based alkali cleaning, but may also involve acid etching or solvent cleaning / rinsing. Nickel plating may also be necessary to ensure proper wetting. All of these cleaning or plating technologies have associated waste disposal issues, and this article explores an alternative cleaning process that generates minimal waste. Cathodic arc, or reserve polarity, is well known for welding of materials with tenacious oxide layers such as aluminum alloys. In this work the reverse polarity effect is used to clean austenitic stainless steel substrates prior to brazing with Ag-28%Cu. This cleaning process is compared to acid pickling and is shown to produce similar wetting behavior as measured by dynamic contact angle experiments. Additionally, dynamic contact angle measurements with water drops are conducted to show that cathodic arc cleaning can remove organic contaminants as well. The process does have its limitations however, and alloys with high titanium and aluminum content such as nickel-based superalloys may still require plating to ensure adequate wetting.

  17. Weld pool development during GTA and laser beam welding of Type 304 stainless steel; Part I - theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M. ); Debroy, T. )

    1989-12-01

    A computational and experimental study was carried out to quantitatively understand the influence of the heat flow and the fluid flow in the transient development of the weld pool during gas tungsten arc (GTA) and laser beam welding of Type 304 stainless steel. Stationary gas tungsten arc and laser beam welds were made on two heats of Type 304 austenitic stainless steels containing 90 ppm sulfur and 240 ppm sulfur. A transient heat transfer model was utilized to simulate the heat flow and fluid flow in the weld pool. In this paper, the results of the heat flow and fluid flow analysis are presented.

  18. Welding the four most popular aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, B.

    1994-02-01

    The fact that business is good in aluminum welding is a sure sign that more manufacturers and fabricators are using GMA and GTA welding to build new products out of this lightweight nonferrous metal. Among the most widely specified weldable grades are Alloys 6061, 5083, 5052 and 5454. A rundown on these four alloys, including properties and selected applications, is provided. Any company working with aluminum for the first time needs to know something about these four alloys. Alloys of copper-magnesium-silicon combination, of which 6061 is one, are heat-treatable. The three 5XXX series alloys, on the other hand, are nonheat-treatable. According to P.B. Dickerson, consultant, Lower Burrell, Pa., 5083, because of its high magnesium content, is the easiest of the four alloys to arc weld. Dickerson put the cut-off point in weldability at 3.5% magnesium. To prevent cracking, he added, both 6061 and 5052 require much more filler metal than do the other two alloys. Alloy 6061 consists of 0.25Cu, 0.6Si, 1.0Mg, and 0.20Cr. The main applications for 6061 aluminum are structural, architectural, automotive, railway, marine and pipe. It has good formability, weldability, corrosion resistance and strength. Although the 6XXX series alloys are prone to hot cracking, this condition can be readily overcome by correct choice of joint design and electrode. The most popular temper for 6061 is T6, although the -T651, -T4, and -F temper are also popular. The -T651 temper is like a -T6 temper, only it has received some final stretch hardening. The -T4 temper has been solution heat-treated and quenched. The -F temper is in the as-fabricated condition.

  19. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  20. In-Depth and ion image analysis of minor and trace constituents in V{endash}Cr{endash}Ti alloy welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odom, R.W.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes application of dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to the study of the chemistry of welds in V{endash}Cr{endash}Ti alloys and presents preliminary data on the distribution of minor and trace elements (H, C, N, O, P, S, and Cl) in welds produced by gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam techniques. The motivation for this research is to develop techniques that determine correlations between the concentration and distribution of trace elements in alloy metal welds and the physical properties of the weld. To this end, quantitative SIMS techniques were developed for N, O, and S analysis in vanadium alloy welds using an ion implantation/relative sensitivity factor methodology. The data presented in this paper demonstrates that trace compositions and distributions of selected welds correlate, at least qualitatively, with such properties as microhardness and tensile elongation. This data support continuing these investigations to develop microanalysis methods which quantitatively correlate weld composition with mechanical properties. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  1. Proposed GTA welding specification and acceptance criteria for the MC4163

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwiatkowski, J.J.

    1991-04-12

    This specification documents the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process and production weld acceptance criteria requirements for the MC4163. This document is written specifically to apply to the welds on the MC4163 and is not to be used as a general gas tungsten arc welding specification. All sections of this specification must be complied with unless specifically exempted in writing. There are a total of five welds with three different joint designs required to fabricate the MC4163. In the order of fabrication they are (1) initiator closure disc, (2) nozzle to case girth welds, two and, (3) nozzle closure disc welds, two. This specification will only address the nozzle to case girth welds and the nozzle closure disc welds.

  2. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Second year technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, B.A.

    1993-05-15

    Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  3. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  4. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  5. Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-11-30

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encom¬passes primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

  6. A comparative study of the SSC resistance of a novel welding process IEA with SAW and MIG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natividad, C. . E-mail: consnatividad@yahoo.com.mx; Salazar, M. . E-mail: salazarm@imp.mx; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Perez, R.

    2007-08-15

    The Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance of X65 weldments produced by Indirect Electric Arc, Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) processes were evaluated in a NACE solution saturated with H{sub 2}S at 25 deg. C, 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C using Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) and electrochemical measurements. Weldments produced by the Indirect Electric Arc presented the best Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance at 25 deg. C. This behavior is attributed to the microstructural modification of the weld bead from ferrite in a needlelike form to a fine grain microstructure, which was not observed at 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C. In addition, the hydrogen permeation flux increased with the temperature, this result is associated with the ferrite phase. The electrochemical results show a decrease of the trapping sites for the atomic hydrogen on this weldment. This behavior has not been observed for the other welding processes due to their microstructure (a typical columnar growth of coarse grain)

  7. WELDING TORCH

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  8. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Mahoney, A. Roderick; Milewski, John O

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  9. SNL/SRNL Joint Project on degradation of mechanical properties in structural metals and welds for GTS reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronevich, Joseph Allen; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; West, Scott; Morgan, Mike

    2015-12-01

    This project was intended to enable SNL-CA to produce appropriate specimens of relevant stainless steels for testing and perform baseline testing of weld heat-affected zone and weld fusion zone. One of the key deliverables in this project was to establish a procedure for fracture testing stainless steel weld fusion zone and heat affected zones that were pre-charged with hydrogen. Following the establishment of the procedure, a round robin was planned between SNL-CA and SRNL to ensure testing consistency between laboratories. SNL-CA and SRNL would then develop a comprehensive test plan, which would include tritium exposures of several years at SRNL on samples delivered by SNL-CA. Testing would follow the procedures developed at SNL-CA. SRNL will also purchase tritium charging vessels to perform the tritium exposures. Although comprehensive understanding of isotope-induced fracture in GTS reservoir materials is a several year effort, the FY15 work would enabled us to jump-start the tests and initiate long-term tritium exposures to aid comprehensive future investigations. Development of a procedure and laboratory testing consistency between SNL-CA and SNRL ensures reliability in results as future evaluations are performed on aluminum alloys and potentially additively-manufactured components.

  10. Fusion welding of a modern borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments designed to assess the fabrication and service weldability of 304B4A borated stainless steel were conducted. Welding procedures and parameters for manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, autogenous electron beam (EB) welding and filler-added EB welding were developed and found to be similar to those for austenitic stainless steels. Following the procedure development, four test welds were produced and evaluated by microstructural analysis and Charpy impact testing. Further samples were used for determination of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) response of the welds. The fusion zone structure of welds in this alloy consists of primary austenite dendrites with an interdendritic eutectic-like austenite/boride constituent. Welds also show an appreciable partially molten zone that consists of the austenite/boride eutectic surrounding unmelted austenite islands. The microstructure of the EB welds was substantially finer than that of the GTA welds, and boride coarsening was not observed in the solid state heat-affected zone (HAZ) of either weld type. The impact toughness of as-welded samples was found to be relatively poor, averaging less than 10 J for both GTA and EB welds. For fusion zone notched GTA and EB samples and centerline notched EB samples, fracture generally occurred along the boundary between the partially molten and solid-state regions of the HAZ. The results of the PWHT study were very encouraging, with typical values of the impact energy for HAZ notched samples approaching 40 J, or twice the minimum code-acceptable value.

  11. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-08

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H{sup ?} ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  12. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  13. Welding and Weldability of Thorium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, S.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; King, J.F.

    2000-03-12

    Ir-0.3%W alloys doped with thorium are currently used as post-impact containment material for radioactive fuel in thermoelectric generators that provide stable electrical power for a variety of outer planetary space exploration missions. Welding and weldability of a series of alloys was investigated using arc and laser welding processes. Some of these alloys are prone to severe hot-cracking during welding. Weldability of these alloys was characterized using Sigmajig weldability test. Hot-cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and composition. Thorium content and welding atmosphere were found to be very critical. The weld cracking behavior in these alloys can be controlled by modifying the fusion zone microstructure. Fusion zone microstructure was found to be controlled by welding process, process parameters, and the weld pool shape.

  14. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  15. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  16. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyedkashi, S. M. H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  17. Wonder Weld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are using the process shown here to create a super-strong weld for the upgrade of a key component of the Lab's experimental nuclear fusion reactor.

  18. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2002-02-12

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld and thermodynamic calculations to compare these results with the important phase transformation isotherms. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can be better understood and modeled.

  19. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2001-12-04

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal for the carbon-manganese steel studied in this investigation. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld to investigate transformation kinetics under both positive and negative temperature gradients in the HAZ. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can now be better understood and modeled.

  20. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys at the Paton Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchuk, Yatsenko, S.I.; Cherednichok, V.T.; Semenov, L.A. )

    1993-07-01

    The choice of the flash method for welding aluminum-alloy sections was governed first of all by the possibility of producing homogeneous-structure joints with the minimum amount of possible discontinuities and an insignificant metal strength loss in the welding zone. The aluminum alloy welding technology under consideration relies on the method of flash welding without using any protective atmospheres. The reason is first of all that a complex cross-sectional shape of workpieces being joined, their configuration and considerable overall dimensions make it difficult to use chambers of any type. Besides, conducted studies ascertained that in flash welding, in contrast to various fusion welding processes, the use of protective atmospheres or a vacuum is of little benefit. Here are the results of studying the specifics of thermal and electric processes in flashing, the physical features of weld joint formation, the basics of the welding technology, and the characteristics of the equipment.

  1. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  2. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  3. Novel concepts in weld science: Role of gradients and composite structure. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal and simulated weld metal properties were evaluated in this multi-part study. The results obtained on single phase solid solution systems were used as a basis for a fundamental study of the effects of compositional gradients on crack growth, both at low temperatures, in fatigue and at high temperatures during creep. Methods to physically simulate gradients in weld metals with roll bonded laminate composites were applied to analyses of ferrite-austenite and ferrite-sigma-austenite multiphase systems. Finally, results of the physical simulation analyses were utilized to predict the effects of weld process parameters on weld metal properties.

  4. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  5. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  6. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  7. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR WELDING END CLOSURE TO CONTAINER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frantz, C.E.; Correy, T.B.

    1959-08-01

    A semi-automatic apparatus is described for welding a closure to the open end of a can containing a nuclear fuel slug. An arc is struck at the center of the closure and is shifted to a region near its periphery. Then the assembly of closure, can, and fuel slug is rotated so that the peripheral region of the closure is preheated. Next the arc is shifted to the periphery itself of the closure, and the assembly is rotated so that the closure is welded to the can.

  8. Effects of zinc additions on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of sensitized stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 182 weld metal in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1995-09-01

    ZnO additions to boiling water reactor (BWR) water have been the focus of recent interest, primarily because of their beneficial influence in reducing buildup of radioactive species such as Co{sup 60} in the oxide film of structural components, e.g., stainless steel piping. The effect of ZnO additions on stress corrosion crack growth rates were studied using 1T CT fracture mechanics specimens of sensitized type 304 stainless steel, sensitized Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exposed to {approx}288 C water containing various levels of dissolved oxygen and impurities. Zn levels of 5 to 100 ppb Zn{sup 2+} were evaluated and found to reduce crack growth rates for all materials and in all water chemistries. Many Zn tests involved long term exposure and were performed at somewhat reduced corrosion potential (e.g., from {approx}+200 to 0 {minus}+50 mV{sub she}); variations in corrosion potential from +200, to +50, to {minus}50 mV{sub she} clearly had an important effect. The benefit of Zn appeared to be most pronounced when the growth rate was decreased (e.g., by corrosion potential). This was consistent with the findings of mechanistic studies, which showed that Zn decreased the repassivation response at times >10{sup 4} s, which is associated with low crack tip strain rates, i.e., low growth rates. Reduced corrosion potentials are also expected to directly effect Zn, since high (crack mouth) corrosion potentials inhibit the transport of Zn{sup 2+} into the crack. Zn also increased the fracture strain of the oxide on stainless steel, and may also reduce crack growth rates by increasing the pH in the crack. Similar benefits are expected for other structural materials, such as nonsensitized or irradiated stainless steel, carbon steel, low alloy steel, and other nickel alloys.

  9. WELDING APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Correy, T.B.; DeWitt, D.E.; Nelson, I.V.

    1963-04-23

    This patent covers an arrangement for replacing air in a welding chamber with an inert gas. This operation usually is time-consuming because of the tendency of the inert gas to mix with the air being removed from the welding chamber. The chamber is open at the bottom and has at its top a cover and a porous plate a little below the cover. The inert gas is admitted to the chamber through two screened openings in the cover. On passing through the porous plate, the gas acts as a piston extending across the chamber and moving downwardly to expel the air through the lower open end of the chamber, with a minimum of mixing with the air being expelled. (AEC)

  10. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum

  11. Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2008-11-01

    This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

  12. Solidification behavior and structure of Al-Cu alloy welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, J.A.; Li, M.; Yang, N.C.Y.

    1997-09-01

    The microsegregation behavior of electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds of Al-Cu alloys covering a range from 0.19 to 7.74 wt% Cu were characterized for dendrite core concentrations and fraction eutectic solidification. Although a single weld speed of 12.7 mm/sec was used, some differences were observed in the segregation behavior of the two weld types. The microsegregation behavior was also modeled using a finite differences technique considering dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling and solid state diffusion. Fairly good agreement was observed between measured and calculated segregation behavior although differences between the two weld types could not be completely accounted for. The concept of dendrite tip undercooling was used to explain the formation of a single through thickness centerline grain in the higher alloy content GTA welds.

  13. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements

  14. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filippi, Arthur M.; Sprecace, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  15. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser...

  16. A residual stress study in similar and dissimilar welds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Goldak, John A.; Aidun, Daryush K.; Coules, Harry E.; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Achuthan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Residual strain distributions in similar and dissimilar welds were measured using neutron diffraction (ND) method. Then, using three strain components, three-dimensional stress states were calculated. The results were used to determine the effect of the martensitic phase transformation and material properties on residual stress (RS) distribution. It was observed that smaller longitudinal RS was induced in the low carbon steel side of dissimilar weld when compared to its similar weld. Also, it was found that the transverse RS near and within the weld zone (WZ) in dissimilar weld exhibited a distinctive trend, with tensile mode reaching the yield strength ofmore » the base metal (BM). In order to characterize the WZ in dissimilar weld, we deployed optical microscopy, hardness, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). This study not only provides further insight into the RS state in similar and dissimilar welds; it also delivers important consequences of phase transformation in the latter case.« less

  17. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  18. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  19. Welding high-molybdenum superaustenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, T.; Koseki, T.

    1996-02-01

    A high-molybdenum, nitrogen-enriched, nickel-based filler metal was developed for welding superaustenitic stainless steels. The beneficial effects of high Ni content and nitrogen addition in reducing the solute microsegregation and the precipitation of intermetallic phases were used to design the filler alloy. The weld had a precipitate-free, fully austenitic microstructure and exhibited excellent mechanical properties, and reduced hot-cracking susceptibility and high-chloride pitting-corrosion resistance.

  20. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  1. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  2. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  3. Automatic hot wire GTA welding of pipe offers speed and increased deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykes, I.; Digiacomo, J.

    1995-07-01

    Heavy-wall pipe welding for the power and petrochemical industry must meet code requirements. Contractors strive to meet these requirements in the most productive way possible. The challenge put to orbital welding equipment manufacturers is to produce pipe welding equipment that cost-effectively produces code-quality welds. Orbital welding equipment using the GTA process has long produced outstanding quality results but has lacked the deposition rate to compete cost effectively with other manual and semiautomatic processes such as SMAW, FCAW and GMAW. In recent years, significant progress has been made with the use of narrow-groove weld joint designs to reduce weld joint volume and improve welding times. Astro Arc Polysoude, an orbital welding equipment manufacturer based in Sun Valley, Calif., and Nantes, France, has combined the hot wire GTAW process with orbital welding equipment using a narrow-groove weld joint design. Field test results show this process and procedure is a good alternative for many heavy-wall-pipe welding applications.

  4. Shielding gas selection for increased weld penetration and productivity in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinonen, J.I.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of hydrogen and helium additions to the argon shielding gas on GTA weld pool profiles in the case of two austenitic stainless steel sheets 3 mm thick are investigated here in detail. One of the test steels shows good weldability, with a relatively deep, narrow weld pool profile, but the other is poorly weldable, with a shallow, wide weld pool when argon shielding gas is used. Bead-on-plate test welds were produced with arc shields of argon, argon with hydrogen additions of 2 to 18.2% and argon with helium additions of 20 to 80%. The hydrogen additions increases the depth of weld penetration in both test steels, but productivity with respect to maximum welding speed can be improved to an accepted level only with steel sheets of good weldability in terms of a relatively high depth/width (D/W) ratio. The depth of penetration in the test steel of good weldability increased somewhat with helium additions and the D/W ratio remained unchanged, while these parameters increased markedly in the poorly weldable steel when a He-20% Ar shielding gas was used and resembled those of the more weldable steel.

  5. Laser weld jig

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Blarigan, Peter (Livermore, CA); Haupt, David L. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  6. Electron beam weld development on a Filter Pack Assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dereskiewicz, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A continuous electron beam welding procedure was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding procedure on the Filter Pack Assembly. A statistical study was used to evaluate the feasibility of electron beam welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to A356 cast weldments throughout the joint tolerance range specified on product drawings. Peak temperature exposures were not high enough to degrade the heat sensitive electrical components inside the cast weldment. Actual weldments with alodine coating on the weld joint area were successfully cleaned using a nonmetallic fiberglass brush cleaning method.

  7. Fusion welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  8. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  9. Predicting laser weld reliability with stochastic reduced-order models. Predicting laser weld reliability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Emery, John M.; Field, Richard V.; Foulk, James W.; Karlson, Kyle N.; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2015-05-26

    Laser welds are prevalent in complex engineering systems and they frequently govern failure. The weld process often results in partial penetration of the base metals, leaving sharp crack-like features with a high degree of variability in the geometry and material properties of the welded structure. Furthermore, accurate finite element predictions of the structural reliability of components containing laser welds requires the analysis of a large number of finite element meshes with very fine spatial resolution, where each mesh has different geometry and/or material properties in the welded region to address variability. We found that traditional modeling approaches could not bemore » efficiently employed. Consequently, a method is presented for constructing a surrogate model, based on stochastic reduced-order models, and is proposed to represent the laser welds within the component. Here, the uncertainty in weld microstructure and geometry is captured by calibrating plasticity parameters to experimental observations of necking as, because of the ductility of the welds, necking – and thus peak load – plays the pivotal role in structural failure. The proposed method is exercised for a simplified verification problem and compared with the traditional Monte Carlo simulation with rather remarkable results.« less

  10. Predicting laser weld reliability with stochastic reduced-order models. Predicting laser weld reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, John M.; Field, Richard V.; Foulk, James W.; Karlson, Kyle N.; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2015-05-26

    Laser welds are prevalent in complex engineering systems and they frequently govern failure. The weld process often results in partial penetration of the base metals, leaving sharp crack-like features with a high degree of variability in the geometry and material properties of the welded structure. Furthermore, accurate finite element predictions of the structural reliability of components containing laser welds requires the analysis of a large number of finite element meshes with very fine spatial resolution, where each mesh has different geometry and/or material properties in the welded region to address variability. We found that traditional modeling approaches could not be efficiently employed. Consequently, a method is presented for constructing a surrogate model, based on stochastic reduced-order models, and is proposed to represent the laser welds within the component. Here, the uncertainty in weld microstructure and geometry is captured by calibrating plasticity parameters to experimental observations of necking as, because of the ductility of the welds, necking – and thus peak load – plays the pivotal role in structural failure. The proposed method is exercised for a simplified verification problem and compared with the traditional Monte Carlo simulation with rather remarkable results.