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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Method for controlling gas metal arc welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Method for controlling gas metal arc welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Einerson, Carolyn J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

4

~DELING OF METAL TRANSFKR IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING Yong -Seog Kim and T. W. Eagar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) ) ~DELING OF METAL TRANSFKR IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING Yong -Seog Kim and T. W. Eagar theory and the pinch i ns t a bility theor y as a function of welding cur rent . Experimental of the gas metal arc process in the late 1940s, it has become one of the most important welding processes

Eagar, Thomas W.

5

Modelling of the bead formation during multi pass hybrid laser/gas metal arc welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Modelling of the bead formation during multi pass hybrid laser/gas metal arc welding Olivier dimensional finite element model has been developed to simulate weld bead formation in multi pass hybrid laser/gas metal arc welding. The model considers both a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) electrode and a laser beam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

~.,Slag-Metal Equilibrium During Submerged e-~~ Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~ . ~.·,Slag-Metal Equilibrium During Submerged ·e-~~ Arc Welding C. S. CHAI AND T. W. EAGAR A thermodynamic model of the equilibria existing between the slag and the weld metal during submerged arc welding over forty years ago, submerged arc welding has developed into one of the most efficient, most reliable

Eagar, Thomas W.

7

Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process has been modeled using a two-way fully coupled, transient in the form of heat, and the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld is made temperature

Grujicic, Mica

8

Direct Modeling of Material Deposit and Identification of Energy Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Modeling of Material Deposit and Identification of Energy Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding sources for finite element simulation of gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Design for the modeling of metal deposition results in a direct calculation of the formation of the weld bead, without any

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

METAL TRANSFER CONTROL IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING L.A. Jones, T.W. Eagar, J.H. Lang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METAL TRANSFER CONTROL IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING L.A. Jones, T.W. Eagar, J.H. Lang Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Abstract Power input to the arc in gas metal arc welding to decouple these processes. Methods to achieve this decoupling are discussed. Pulsed-power welding is widely

Eagar, Thomas W.

10

Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Burgardt, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welding M. Grujicic, S. Ramaswami, J.S. Snipes, R. Yavari, A. Arakere, C.-F. Yen, and B.A. Cheeseman-mechanical finite-element procedure is developed to model conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt of the workpiece and the weld temperature- dependent and by allowing the potential work of plastic deformation

Grujicic, Mica

12

Numerical Analysis of Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding under Modified Pulsed Current Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

causes a thermal load too high to apply to thin sectioned or heat-sensitive materials. In an effort was assumed as the boundary condition for the calculation of the electromagnetic force. The calculations were agreement between calculation and experimental results. I. INTRODUCTION IN gas metal arc welding (GMAW

Zhang, YuMing

13

Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, shielded metal arc, self-shielded metal arc, and submerged arc welding are reviewed. Calcu- lations upon heating is also discussed. Introduction Oxygen and nitrogen ~ontamination of weld metal

Eagar, Thomas W.

14

Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welding Process M. Grujicic, S. Ramaswami, J.S. Snipes, C.-F. Yen, B.A. Cheeseman, and J.S. Montgomery developed for the conventional Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) joining process and used to analyze butt-welding modules, each covering a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) dynamics of welding-gun behavior

Grujicic, Mica

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding machine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vision systems for arc welding, Friction stir... welding, Welding dual-phase steel, Metal transfer behavior, Submerged arc welding ... Source: DuPont, John...

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welded aisi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pass arc welds... WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) failures between carbon... along the weld interface and the formation of locally high...

17

DC arc weld starter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

Campiotti, Richard H. (Tracy, CA); Hopwood, James E. (Oakley, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Contrib. Plasma Phys. 51, No. 2-3, 293 296 (2011) / DOI 10.1002/ctpp.201000061 LTE Experimental Validation in a Gas Metal Arc Welding Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation in a Gas Metal Arc Welding Plasma Column F. Valensi1,2 , S. Pellerin1 , A. Boutaghane3 , K, France 7 CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l'Aum^one, 95315 Cergy-Pontoise cedex, France Received 12 Spectroscopy, Boltzmann Plot, Sola method, LTE. During gas metal arc welding (GMAW), the plasma obtained has

19

Gas metal arc welding of duplex stainless steel using flux cored wire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of chemical compositions and welding parameters on pitting corrosion resistance and notch toughness of duplex stainless steel weld metals by FCAW was investigated. And the effect of welding parameters on hot cracking susceptibility of the FCAW weld metals was also studied. Pitting corrosion resistance was improved with the increase of Cr, Mo and N content in the weld metal, and it was also proved that the corrosion resistance was greatly affected by welding heat input. Hot cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was increased with the increase of welding current and welding speed.

Maruyama, T.; Ogawa, T.; Nishiyama, S.; Ushijima, A.; Yamashita, K. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Fujisawa (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy This article has been welding by optical emission spectroscopy F Valensi1,2 , S Pellerin1 , A Boutaghane3 , K Dzierzega4 de Bourges), BP 4043, 18028 Bourges cedex, France 7 CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l

22

THE PHYSICS OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES Department of Materials Science and Engineering,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) THE PHYSICS OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES T.W.EAGAR Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract Welding is an extremely complex proce ss; however, due to its Wor ds: Arc Welding, Arc Physics, Shielding Gases, Gas Metal Arc Welding. 1. Introduction Langmuir

Eagar, Thomas W.

23

Percussive arc welding apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

Hollar, Jr., Donald L. (Overland Park, KS)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Welding arc initiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

Correy, Thomas B. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Welding arc initiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

Correy, T.B.

1989-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

ABSTRACT. Keyhole plasma arc welding is a unique arc welding process for deep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT. Keyhole plasma arc welding is a unique arc welding process for deep penetration. To ensure the quality of the welds, the presence of the keyhole is crit- ical. Understanding of the keyhole will certainly benefit the improvement of the process and weld quality. Currently, the size of the keyhole

Zhang, YuMing

27

Costing of Joining Methods -Arc Welding Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing of Joining Methods - Arc Welding Costs ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems.S. Colton © GIT 2009 5 #12;LaborLabor Di t ti f ldi· Direct time of welding ­ time to produce a length of weld ­ labor rate ­ multiplication gives labor cost per length · Set-up time, etc. · Personal time

Colton, Jonathan S.

28

A COUPLED APPROACH FOR THE MODELLING OF ARC WELDING Christel Pequet1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COUPLED APPROACH FOR THE MODELLING OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES Christel Pequet1 , Patrice Lasne1 ; email : michel.bellet@ensmp.fr Keywords: welding, finite elements, thermal arising in arc welding as well as their interaction: heat input, metal deposit, solidification, phase

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

NEW NUMERICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SIMULATION OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEW NUMERICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SIMULATION OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES Michel Bellet 1 , Makhlouf Antipolis, France; soudage@transvalor.com Keywords: welding, finite elements, material deposit, adaptive for arc welding simulation and analysis. The new numerical technologies essentially consist first

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Increasing Productivity of Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes. These are shown by Figure 2 and included shielded metal-arc welding (stick welding), gas tungsten arc welding (TIG), gas metal arc welding (MIG), flux cored arc welding, submerged arc welding, plasma arc welding, stud arc welding and carbon.... For extremely thin materials, the gas tungsten arc welding process may be sele t ed. For welding steels. the flux-cored process waul be the selection for plate work and heavier thick nesses. For sheet metal and thin plate, partic ularly for out...

Uhrig, J. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Slag Metal Reactions in Binary CaF2-Metal Oxide Welding Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Slag Metal Reactions in Binary CaF2-Metal Oxide Welding Fluxes Some otherwise chemically stable fluxes may decompose into suboxides in the presence of welding arcs, thereby providing higher levels of 0 2 in weld metal than those oxides which do not form suboxides ABSTRACT. The stability of metal

Eagar, Thomas W.

32

WELDING RESEARCH -s229WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s229WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dual-bypass gas metal arc welding (DB agrees with experimental data. Introduction Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is an arc welding process- minum alloy welded structures have been widely applied. The use of aluminum as an alternative material

Zhang, YuMing

33

Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

Frye, Lowell D. (Kingston, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

Frye, L.D.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

36

WELDING RESEARCH -s231WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s231WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-electrode gas metal arc welding (DE the welding wire and the bypass torch. To control the base metal current at the desired level, a group. Introduction Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is a major process for metals joining. Conventional GMAW is normally

Zhang, YuMing

37

Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

Pierce, S.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Welding of HSLA-100 steel using ultra low carbon bainitic weld metal to eliminate preheating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced high strength steels such as the Navy`s HSLA-100 and HSLA-80 contain sufficiently low carbon levels to be weldable without preheating. Unfortunately, commercial filler metals specifically designed to weld these steels without costly preheating have not yet been developed. The objective of this paper is to show that the Navy`s advanced steels can be welded by gas metal-arc (GMAW) and gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) without preheating by using filler metal compositions that produce weld metal with an ultra-low carbon bainitic (ULCB) microstructure. Filler metals were fabricated from vacuum induction melted (VIM) ingots containing ultra-low levels of C, O and N. HSLA-100 plate and plate from the VIM ingots were welded by both GMAW and GTAW with Ar-5% CO{sub 2} shielding gas using welding conditions to achieve cooling times from 800 to 500 C (t{sub 8-5}) from 35 to 14 sec. Weld metal tensile, hardness and CVN impact toughness testing as well as microstructural studies using transmission electron microscopy were conducted. The ULCB weld metal was relatively insensitive to cooling rate, resulting in good strength and toughness values over a wide range of t{sub 8-5} cooling times. Filler metal compositions which met the mechanical property requirements for HSLA-100, HSLA-80 and HSLA-65 weld metal were developed.

Devletian, J.H.; Singh, D.; Wood, W.E. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding welding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) technique using... .5%, and reduction in area of 17.3%. The filler rod used ... Source: Zhou, Wei - School of Mechanical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding process Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

process Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arc welding process...

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding processes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

processes Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arc welding processes...

44

Effect of Microstructure on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using for example gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). However as strength levels increase it becomes more difficult to fulfil impact toughness requirements with flexible and productive welding methods such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored... . Little effects are seen on the cross sectional area of each weld bead deposited with increase in interpass temperature but the proportion of recrystallised area increases [12]. By eliminating the columnar microstructure, hardness becomes more uniform...

Keehan, Enda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety or harmful emission giving metals. Welding Safety When welding outside of a designated welding booth, ensure injury. Avoid welding on materials such as galvanized or stainless steel in order to minimize toxic fume

Pawlowski, Wojtek

46

Numerical modelling of hybrid arc/laser welding: a Level Set approach for weld bead formation and residual stresses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Numerical modelling of hybrid arc/laser welding: a Level Set approach for weld bead formation.Bellet@mines-paristech.fr ABSTRACT The joining of high thickness steel sheets by means of hybrid Laser/GMAW welding processes of the workpiece borders. Two finite elements models are presented to illustrate: (i) A hybrid arc/laser welding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welded gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) technique using... .5%, and reduction ... Source: Zhou, Wei - School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang...

48

Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding robot Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... components using methods, such as gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB) and...

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic arc welding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... components using methods, such as gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB) and...

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc weld cladding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... components using methods, such as gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB) and...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding electrodes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW... logic control and adaptive fuzzy logic control of gas tungsten arc ... Source: Zhang, YuMing - Center for Manufacturing &...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding fumes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW... logic control and adaptive fuzzy logic control of gas tungsten arc ... Source: Zhang, YuMing - Center for Manufacturing &...

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding gmaw Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW... logic control and adaptive fuzzy logic control of gas tungsten arc ... Source: Zhang, YuMing - Center for Manufacturing &...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding material Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW... logic control and adaptive fuzzy logic control of gas tungsten arc ... Source: Zhang, YuMing - Center for Manufacturing &...

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding parameters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW... logic control and adaptive fuzzy logic control of gas tungsten arc ... Source: Zhang, YuMing - Center for Manufacturing &...

57

Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu [Mechanical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

welding system; (b) DSAW system and coordinate system. density of the arc energy... reduction as a primary goal. As can be seen in figure 1(a), a regular plasma arc welding (PAW)...

59

Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission, were also determined. An improved image of the weld pool can be obtained by operating within will require development of new sensor systems. As the "Yelding arc is a harsh environment, noncontacting to control joint tracking and weld E. W. KIM, C. ALLEMAND and T. W. EAGAR are with the Massachusetts

Eagar, Thomas W.

60

Control Engineering Practice 11 (2003) 14011411 Modeling and control of quasi-keyhole arc welding process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Engineering Practice 11 (2003) 1401­1411 Modeling and control of quasi-keyhole arc welding to operate the keyhole arc welding process. Because the method's effectiveness depends on the amperage reserved. Keywords: Modeling; Predictive control; Manufacturing; Welding 1. Introduction Keyhole arc

Zhang, YuMing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WELDING RESEARCH -s11WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s11WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-electrode gas metal arc welding (DE-GMAW) is a novel weld- ing process recently developed to increase welding productivity while maintaining the base its non- consumable tungsten electrode with a consumable welding wire electrode result- ing in a new

Zhang, YuMing

62

CHANGES IN SOLIDIFICATION MODE, AND THE MEASUREMENT OF COOLING RATES FOLLOWING SOLIDIFICATION DURING ARC WELDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLIDIFICATION DURING ARC WELDING 2.1 INTRODUCTION The solidification process in a weld pool has been shown to have a considerable in- fluence upon the properties of the resultant weld. It influences elements, and hence the homogeneity of the weld. Previous work on the cooling behaviour of welds (Garland

Cambridge, University of

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) technique using... .5%, and reduction in area of 17.3%. The filler rod used ... Source: Zhou, Wei - School of Mechanical...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc hybrid welding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) technique using... .5%, and reduction in area of 17.3%. The filler rod used ... Source: Zhou, Wei - School of Mechanical...

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc weld process Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) technique using... .5%, and reduction in area of 17.3%. The filler rod used ... Source: Zhou, Wei - School of Mechanical...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding modelisation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW or TIG) technique using... .5%, and reduction in area of 17.3%. The filler rod used ... Source: Zhou, Wei - School of Mechanical...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding dynamic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a system IO board; arc sensor interface board for weld seam tracking... inverter power source renders possible ... Source: Ang Jr.,, Marcelo H. - Department of Mechanical...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc weld-surfacing process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Summary: including arc processes, laser, electron beam, and friction stir welding. Surface modification of alloys... areas: Alloy Design, Production and Processing ...

69

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

71

Improved Microstructure and Properties of 6061 Aluminum Alloy Weldments Using a Double-Sided Arc Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welding Process Y.M. ZHANG, C. PAN, and A.T. MALE Due to its popularity and high crack sensitivity, 6061 aluminum alloy was selected as a test material for the newly developed double-sided arc welding (DSAW systematically. The percentage of fine equiaxed grains in the fully penetrated welds is greatly increased

Zhang, YuMing

72

Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Dilution and microsegregation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dilution and microsegregation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic stainless steel the weld will also signi® cantly affect the corrosion resistance. Dissimilar metal welds between a super dissimilar weld. The dilution level was found to decrease as the ratio of volumetric ® ller metal feedrate

DuPont, John N.

74

Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The modelling of irradiation embrittlement in submerged-arc welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until very recently, the irradiation embrittlement behavior of submerged-arc welds has been interpreted in terms of two mechanisms, namely a matrix damage component and an additional component due to the irradiation-enhanced production of copper-rich precipitates. However, some of the weld specimens from a recent accelerated re-irradiation experiment have shown high Charpy shifts which exceeded the values expected from the measured shift in yield stress. Microstructural examination has revealed the occurrence of intergranular fracture (IGF) in these specimens, accompanied by grain boundary segregation of phosphorus. Theoretical models were developed to predict the parametric dependence of irradiation-enhanced phosphorus segregation on experimental variables. Using these parametric forms, along with the concept of a critical level of segregation for the onset of IGF instead of cleavage, a three mechanism trend curve has been developed. The form of this trend curve, taking into account IGF as well as matrix and copper embrittlement, is thus mechanistically based. The constants in the equation, however, are obtained by a statistical fit to the actual Charpy shift database.

Bolton, C.J.; Buswell, J.T.; Jones, R.B.; Moskovic, R.; Priest, R.H. [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom). Berkeley Technology Centre

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} with strain amplitudes in the range {+-}0.20 to {+-}1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. The 18-8 group of austenitic stainless steels, such as AISI type 316, 304, and their modified grades, finds applications as structural material for various components of the liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR).

Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Sankara Rao, K.B.; Mannan, S.L. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Metal vapor arc ion plating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

78

Simple test for dissimilar-metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simplified accelerated test procedure has been developed for testing dissimilar-metal welds between austenitic stainless steels and low-alloy ferritic steels. The failure of these welded joints in operating steam generators of fossil-fired power plants has become an increasing problem for the utility industry. The proposed test is a three-point loading, bent-beam test that uses sheet specimens taken from a dissimilar-metal weldment. Tests were conducted in a simple test fixture where the specimens are loaded with a set-screw. To determine whether the test produces the same type of failure as those produced in a power plant, tests were conducted on specimens taken from a weld between Type 316 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel plates using Type 309 stainless steel filler metal. The specimens were loaded in the test fixture at room temperature and then thermally cycled between room temperature and 593/sup 0/C (1099/sup 0/F) by placing the test apparatus in a box furnace (thermal cycling during power plant operation plays a major role in the weld failure during service). The specimens were kept in the furnace for 20 to 70 hours (h), cooled to room temperature, and then the cycle was repeated. Metallographic examination of specimens cycled as few as 64 times with a total of 2300 h at 593/sup 0/C revealed that the specimens contained cracks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after long-time elevated-temperature service racks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after longtime elevated-temperature service in a fossil-fired steam generator. All indications are that this simple accelerated test could be used as a screening procedure to compare the relative behavior of ''improved'' welds in future research and development programs.

Klueh, R.L.; King, J.F.; Griffith, J.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Convection in Arc Weld Pools Electromagnetic and surface tension forces are shown to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convection in Arc Weld Pools Electromagnetic and surface tension forces are shown to dominate flow tension forces. It is shown that the electromag- netic and surface tension forces domi- nate the flow by experimental measurements of segrega- tion in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven

Eagar, Thomas W.

80

Examination of dissimilar metal welds in BWR and PWR piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses dissimilar metal weld examinations at PWRS. Surveys were conducted to document the dissimilar metal weld configurations at PWR plants and to update the information known about dissimilar metal weld configurations at BWR plants. The experiences which BWR utilities have had with dissimilar metal weld examinations are documented and include: correct identification of IGSCC, indications thought to be IGSCC but were actually fabrication flaws, and difficulties encountered with the examination of dissimilar metal welds after stress improvement. An experimental program was conducted which verified that the longitudinal wave procedures developed for BWRs are also applicable to PWR designs.

MacDonald, D.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States). NDE Center

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans #12 diffusion into austenite Carbon diffusion into austenite and carbide precipitation in ferrite Carbide precipitation from austenite CASE 2: elimination of carbides #12;#12;#12;0.110.090.070.050.03 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Cambridge, University of

82

WELDING RESEARCH FEBRUARY 2008, VOL. 87-s44  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH FEBRUARY 2008, VOL. 87-s44 ABSTRACT. Consumable double- electrode gas metal arc welding (DE- GMAW) is an innovative welding process that can significantly increase the deposi- tion rate arc welding(GMAW)gunandconstantcurrent (CC) power supply to a conventional GMAW setup -- Fig. 1

Zhang, YuMing

83

Laser-ultrasonic inspection of hybrid laser-arc welded HSLA-65 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) process is a relatively low heat input joining technology that combines the synergistic qualities of both the high energy density laser beam for deep penetration and the arc for wide fit-up gap tolerance. This process is especially suitable for the shipbuilding industry where thick-gauge section, long steel plates have been widely used in a butt joint configuration. In this study, preliminary exploration was carried out to detect and visualize the welding defects using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Results obtained on 9.3 mm thick butt-welded HSLA-65 steel plates indicated that the laser-ultrasonic SAFT inspection technique can successfully detect and visualize the presence of porosity, lack of fusion and internal crack defects. This was further confirmed by X-ray digital radiography and metallography. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the laser-ultrasonic technology for the automated inspection of hybrid laser-arc welds.

Lvesque, D.; Rousseau, G.; Monchalin, J.-P. [National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, QC (Canada); Wanjara, P.; Cao, X. [National Research Council Canada, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Level Set Approach for the Simulation of the Multipass Hybrid Laser / GMA Welding Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Level Set Approach for the Simulation of the Multipass Hybrid Laser / GMA Welding Process model, developed in a level set approach, is proposed to model hybrid gas metal arc / laser welding equation, the momentum and mass conservation equations and the weld bead development. The arc welding total

85

Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

Babu, N. Kishore [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Dissimilar-metal weld failures in boiler tubing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both ferritic heat-resisting steels and austenitic stainless steels are used for fossil-fired boilers for central power stations. The use of these two different types of materials within the system leads to the need for a dissimilar-metal weld transition joint. Increased cyclic operation of boilers has led to a rash of failures in welds between dissimilar metals; studies have identified the causes, and improved nondestructive testing techniques permit early identification of problem areas.

Klueh, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

~ WELDING RESEARCH ~Jlj~~~-------------!ID~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE tVELOING JOURNAL. IULY 1993  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ WELDING RESEARCH ~Jlj~~~-------------!ID~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE t·VELOING JOURNAL. IULY 1993 Sponsored by the American Welding Society and the Welding Research Council Metal Transfer in Pulsed Current Gas Metal Arc Welding A static force balance analysis was used to estimate the melting rates

Eagar, Thomas W.

89

Method for welding beryllium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Frank M. (Espanola, NM); O'Leary, Richard F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectrometry Sensitivity Excitation Sources 12 16 Spectrometers and Detectors SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING Health Effects of Welding THE PORTABLE X ? RAY FLUORESCENCE SURVEY METER METHODOLOGY RESULTS DISCUSSION OF RESULTS CAELUS I QblS RECQvfvt... Appendix C Basic Principle of AAS VITA Page 65 66 67 68 76 84 V1 11 LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. Transitions giving x-radiation 2. Fluorescent yield 3. Interaction of x-rays with matter 4. Particle size effects on x-ray intensity. . . 15 5...

Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Microstructural study of high energy density dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron microscopy analysis of two different CO/sub 2/ laser welded dissimilar metal combinations revealed the presence of minor constituents which could be attributed to terminal solidification events. In the case of the 15-5 PH/HP 9-4-20 welds, a NbC/austenite eutectic-type constituent was identified, which accounted for the observed fusion-zone hot cracks in these welds. The identity of the interdendritic constituent first observed optically by Patterson and Milewski/sup 9/ in 304L/625 GTA welds has been confirmed as Laves phase. It was further determined that this phase is enriched in Mo and Nb relative to the austenite matrix.

Cieslak, M.J.; Hills, C.R.; Headley, T.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effects of alloying elements on the strength and cooling rate sensitivity of ultra-low carbon alloy steel weld metals. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of weld cooling rate on the strength of autogenous GTAW deposited weld metal. The basic weld metal composition was based on a low carbon bainite metallurgical system. The weld metal yield strength goal was 130 ksi, needed to surpass the current HY-13O weld metal requirements. Vacuum Induction Melted (VIM) heats of steel were produced and processed into 3/4` thickness plates. The autogenous gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) on the parent steel plates were produced under two different heat input conditions. Tensile specimens were produced from the weldments; specimens from certain heats were subjected to gleeble thermal simulations of multi-pass welding conditions using the Gleeble 1500. All specimens were then evaluated for yield and ultimate tensile strength. From the data presented, it was found that the experimental compositions studied were less sensitive to cooling rate than current HY-130 welding consumables. The compositions tested approached the target yield strength of 130 ksi, but further work is necessary in this area.

Vassilaros, M.G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part Ill. Verification of the Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part Ill. Verification of the Theory U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR. The transfer of carbon and oxygen is also discussed. It is shown that the transfer of oxygen into the weld of inclusions in the solidifying weld pool. Methods of applying this analysis to multipass welds and active

Eagar, Thomas W.

95

RESONANT TRANSITION SWITCHING WELDING POWER SUPPLY N. Frohleke, H. Mundinger, S. Beineke, P. Wallmeier, H. Grotstollen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESONANT TRANSITION SWITCHING WELDING POWER SUPPLY N. Frohleke, H. Mundinger, S. Beineke, P-bridge topology used in a welding power supply. A new driving scheme adapts the resulting power circuitry for both the droplet and the short-circuiting transfer welding modes occurring in the gas metal arc welding process

Paderborn, Universität

96

Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2013 Corle Building Systems Submerged Arc Welding Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welding Machine Overview Due to the location of the two weld heads with respect to the ground shoes, the machine is unable to weld approximately the first 16 inches and final 12 inches of the I-beam. These sections must be hand welded later in the fabrication process. This hand welding process is inefficient

Demirel, Melik C.

97

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

Byrne, Stephen C. (Monroeville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Rapp, Robert A. (Columbus, OH)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part II. Theory ) U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part II. Theory ) U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR A kinetic model-shielded welding. The model ac~o~nts .for changes i~ ~lloy r~covery based on the geometry of the resulting weld bead. It also dtstmgUJshes compos1t1onal dtfferences be- tween single-pass and multiple-pass weld beads

Eagar, Thomas W.

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium clad metallic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: environments. Experimental Procedure The cladding was produced using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal... ABSTRACT. Single-pass welds and multi- ple-pass cladding...

103

Spatial and time-dependent distribution of plasma parameters in the metal-halide arc lamp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and time-dependent distribution of plasma parameters in the metal-halide arc lamp. A. Khakhaev, L. Luizova, K. Ekimov and A. Soloviev Petrozavodsk State University, Russia The metal-halide arc lamp is an effective light source and its investigation has a long history, but even at present some

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

The modelling of irradiation-enhanced phosphorus segregation in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel submerged-arc welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent results on neutron-irradiated RPV submerged-arc welds have revealed grain boundary segregation of phosphorus during irradiation, which may lead to intergranular fracture. However, the experimental database is insufficient to define the dependence of the process on variables such ad dose, dose-rate and temperature. This paper describes work in which two existing models of phosphorus segregation, under thermal or irradiation conditions, have been developed to obtain predictions of these dependencies. The critical parameters in the models have been adjusted to give consistency with the available reference data, and predictions have been made of the dependence of segregation on a number of variables.

Druce, S.G.; English, C.A.; Foreman, A.J.E.; McElroy, R.J.; Vatter, I.A. [AEA Technology, Didcot (United Kingdom). Harwell Lab.; Bolton, C.J.; Buswell, J.T.; Jones, R.B. [Nuclear Electric, Berkeley (United Kingdom). Berkeley Technology Centre

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method for welding beryllium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3570 (United States); Todorov, E.; Levesque, S. [Edison Welding Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED MELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT DENSITY A Thesis by ROBIN KENT DEVORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED WELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

111

Characterization of Defocused Electron Beams and Welds in Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals using the Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the first part of a project to compare new generation, continuous wave, laser welding technology to traditional electron beam welding technology, electron beam welds were made on commercially pure vanadium refractory metal and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel. The electron beam welds were made while employing EB diagnostics to fully characterize the beams so that direct comparisons could be made between electron beam and laser beams and the welds that each process produces.

Elmer, J W

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

Rosenberg, Richard A. (Naperville, IL); Goeppner, George A. (Orland Park, IL); Noonan, John R. (Naperville, IL); Farrell, William J. (Flossmoor, IL); Ma, Qing (Westmont, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Oxygen and Nitroaen Contamination During Submerged Arc Wel ding of Titanium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) ) ··- -~ Oxygen and Nitroaen Contamination During Submerged Arc Wel ding of Titanium T· \\v· Eagar* The oxygen content of ti tanium submerged arc wel ~ metal is primaril y derendent uron the purity of the fluo1~ ide fluxes, but it is shown here that the oxygen content of the weld metal may be affected

Eagar, Thomas W.

115

Electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering study of precipitation in low alloy steel submerged-arc welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous studies, submerged-arc welds with a range of compositions were irradiated in test reactors over a range of dose and dose-rates. The effect of irradiation was measured by Charpy V-notch and hardness tests, and an irradiation response model was developed. In this paper the authors report the results of a combined electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study on material from some of the Charpy specimens. The results have been interpreted in terms of the Russell and Brown modulus hardening model. In general they have confirmed the predictions of the irradiation response model, and shown that the copper precipitation contribution to the observed macroscopic to the observed macroscopic hardening is strongly dependent on nickel, dose and dose-rate.

Williams, T.J. [Rolls-Royce and Associates Ltd., Raynesway (United Kingdom); Phythian, W.J. [AEA Reactors Services, Didcot (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McNabb, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Predicting the Failure of Ultrasonic Spot Welds by Pull-out from Sheet Metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mode fracture of the base metal, the cohesive parameters for ductile fracture of an aluminum alloy were fracture in thin aluminum alloy coupons were determined by comparing experimental observations to numerical-welding has been recognized as a promising technology in joining automotive sheet metal. Compared

Thouless, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

Pernicka, John C. (Fort Collins, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosed method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. Such exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extruding beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

Lewandowski, Edward F. (Westmont, IL); Cassidy, Dale A. (Valparaiso, IN); Sommer, Robert G. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. The exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extrucing beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

Lewandowski, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Sommer, R.G.

1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a JohnsonMehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed Johnson-Mehltype equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

Chun, Eun Joon, E-mail: ejchun@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Baba, Hayato [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimoto, Kazutoshi [Department of the Application of Nuclear Technology, Fukui University of Technology, Gakuen 3-6-1, Fukui-shi, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Saida, Kazuyoshi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc rating atpv Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas tungsten arc welding Reginald Crawford,* George E... : An adaptive control based on fuzzy logic has been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW... -linear relationship...

129

Evidence for neutron irradiation-induced metallic precipitates in model alloys and pressure-vessel weld steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-vessel weld steel Stephen E. Cumblidge a , Arthur T. Motta a,*, Gary L. Catchen a , Gerhard Brauer b , Juurgen-irradiated model alloys (1 · 1023 n/m2 , E > 0:5 MeV) and 73W-weld steel (to 1.8 · 1023 n/m2 , E > 1 Me the pressure-vessel weld steel) showed evidence for both irradiation-induced metallic precipitation

Motta, Arthur T.

130

Stress Corrosion Cracking and Non-Destructive Examination of Dissimilar Metal Welds and Alloy 600  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has conducted research since 1977 in the areas of environmentally assisted cracking and assessment and reliability of non-destructive examination (NDE). Recent occurrences of cracking in Alloy 82/182 welds and Alloy 600 base metal at several domestic and overseas plants have raised several issues relating to both of these areas of NRC research. The occurrences of cracking were identified by the discovery of boric acid deposits resulting from through-wall cracking in the primary system pressure boundary. Analyses indicate that the cracking has occurred due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in Alloy 82/182 welds. This cracking has occurred in two different locations: in hot leg nozzle-to-safe end welds and in control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle welds. The cracking associated with safe-end welds is important due to the potential for a large loss of reactor coolant inventory, and the cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal and welds, particularly circumferential cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal, is important due to the potential for a control rod to eject resulting in a loss of coolant accident. The industry response in the U.S. to this cracking is being coordinated through the Electric Power Research Institute's Materials Reliability Project (EPRI-MRP) in a comprehensive, multifaceted effort. Although the industry program is addressing many of the issues raised by these cracking occurrences, confirmatory research is necessary for the staff to evaluate the work conducted by industry groups. Several issues requiring additional consideration regarding the generic implications of these isolated events have been identified. This paper will discuss the recent events of significant cracking in domestic and foreign plants, discuss the limitations of NDE in detecting SCC, identify deficiencies in information available in this area, discuss the USNRC approach to address these issues, and discuss the development of an international cooperative effort. (authors)

Jackson, Deborah A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heat and Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Argon and Helium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Massachusetts Institute of Tc:chnology, is Head of Secondary Metallurgy Group with MEFOS. Lulea, Sweden. T

Eagar, Thomas W.

132

Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI Series 5. Volume 1, Main report and Appendices A, B, C, and D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program obtained a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two high-copper (0.23 and 0.31 wt %) submerged-arc welds to determine the shift and shape of the K{sub Ic} curve as a consequence of irradiation. Compact specimens with thicknesses to 101.6 mm (4 in) in the irradiated condition and 203.2 mm (8 in) in the unirradiated condition were tested, in addition to Charpy impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens. Irradiations were conducted at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C and an average fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). The Charpy 41-J temperature shifts are about the same as the corresponding drop-weight NDT temperature shifts. The irradiated welds exhibited substantial numbers of cleavage pop-ins. Mean curve fits using two-parameter (with fixed intercept) nonlinear and linearized exponential regression analysis revealed that the fracture toughness 100 MPa{lg_bullet}{radical}m shifts exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Analyses of curve shape changes indicated decreases in the slopes of the fracture toughness curves, especially for the higher copper weld. Weibull analyses were performed to investigate development of lower bound curves to the data, including the use of a variable K{sub min} parameter which affects the curve shape.

Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Menke, B.H. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Described is a manual,portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary coolling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification.

Jonathan D Buttram

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc length control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

length of the arc. The measurement and control of the arc... and controllability of welding current. However, due to the difficulty met in measuring the arc length in...

136

Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a noticeable reaction layer. T-111 was found to have a small reaction layer at the interface with deposited Hastelloy X. Mar M-247 had a reaction layer larger than T-111. Hastelloy X joined well with a substrate of the same alloy, and throughout the experiments was found to have a density of {approx}99%, based on metallographic observations of porosity in the deposit. Of the three joining methods tested, inertial welding of bar stock appears to be the most mature at this time. MPW may be an attractive alternative due to the potential for high bond integrity, similar to that seen in explosion bonding. However, all three joining methods used in this work will require adaptation in order to join piping and tubing. Further investigations into the change in mechanical properties of these joints with time, temperature, irradiation, and the use of interlayers between the two materials must also be performed.

MJ Lambert

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

WELDING RESEARCH -S125WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -S125WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Microstructural evolution and solidification cracking susceptibility of dissimilar metal welds between AL- 6XN super austenitic stainless steel and two, differential thermal analysis, and Varestraint testing tech- niques. Welds were prepared over the en- tire

DuPont, John N.

138

Preferential precipitation site of sigma phase in duplex stainless steel weld metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels are characterized by favorable combination of mechanical and corrosion properties, consisting roughly of equal parts of austenite ({gamma}) and ferrite ({alpha}). But exposure to elevated temperatures brings partial decomposition of ferrite to austenite and sigma phase, which deteriorates their properties. Sigma phase forms often at ferrite/austenite ({alpha}/{gamma}) interfaces through nucleation process. The heterogeneous nucleation of sigma phase at an {alpha}/{gamma} interface depends on the chemical driving force and the interfacial energy. Many studies have examined the effect of chemical driving force on sigma phase formation in duplex and austenitic stainless steel weld metals with different chemical compositions, but no detailed report has described the influence of {alpha}/{gamma} interfacial energy on sigma phase nucleation. The Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship is accepted to bring a coherent and low energy {alpha}/{gamma} interface in duplex stainless steels. The coherency of {alpha}/{gamma} interface can affect the sigma phase formation. The present study has examined the effect of crystallographic orientation relationship at {alpha}/{gamma} interface on sigma phase formation in a duplex stainless steel weld metal where the chemical element distribution is relatively uniform because of rapid cooling during weld thermal cycle.

Sato, Y.S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Processing] [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Processing

1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Use of vacuum arc plasma guns for a metal puff Z-pinch system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a metal puff Z-pinch system has been studied experimentally. In this type of system, the initial cylindrical shell 4 cm in diameter was produced by ten plasma guns. Each gun initiates a vacuum arc operating between magnesium electrodes. The net current of the guns was 80 kA. The arc-produced plasma shell was compressed by using a 450-kA, 450-ns driver, and as a result, a plasma column 0.3 cm in diameter was formed. The electron temperature of the plasma reached 400 eV at an average ion concentration of 1.85 {center_dot} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The power of the Mg K-line radiation emitted by the plasma for 15-30 ns was 300 MW/cm.

Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Baksht, R. B. [Tel Aviv University, Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Tel Aviv 69101 (Israel)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

P.Andreson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. ??-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and ??-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of ??-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. The type, morphology and distribution of the phases are thoroughly investigated. Dissimilar welding is successfully performed without occurrence of any hot cracks.

Naffakh Moosavy, Homam, E-mail: homam_naffakh@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mapelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Massa 34, Milan 20156 (Italy)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

In: O'Brien R L (ed.) Welding Handbook-Volume 3: Materials and Applications, 8th Edn. American Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(fastening, adhesive bonding, soldering, brazing, arc welding, diffusion bonding, resistance welding, etc, such as diffusion bonding, come very close to this ideal; .. .' .. . . . : ' : \\. :-';... .: ... Joining

Eagar, Thomas W.

143

Nature and evolution of the fusion boundary in ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld metals. Part 1 -- Nucleation and growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental investigation of fusion boundary microstructure evolution in dissimilar-metal welds (DMWs) between ferritic base metals and a face-centered-cubic (FCC) filler metal was conducted. The objective of the work presented here was to characterize the nature and character of the elevated-temperature fusion boundary to determine the nucleation and growth characteristics of DMWs. Type 409 ferritic stainless steel and 1080 pearlitic steel were utilized as base metal substrates, and Monel (70Ni-30Cu) was used as the filler metal. The Type 409 base metal provided a fully ferritic or body-centered-cubic (BCC) substrate at elevated temperatures and exhibited no on-cooling phase transformations to mask or disguise the original character of the fusion boundary. The 1080 pearlitic steel was selected because it is austenitic at the solidus temperature, providing an austenite substrate at the fusion boundary. The weld microstructure generated with each of the base metals in combination with Monel was fully austenitic. In the Type 409/Monel system, there was no evidence of epitaxial nucleation and growth as normally observed in homogeneous weld metal combinations. The fusion boundary in this system exhibited random grain boundary misorientations between the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal grains. In the 1080/Monel system, evidence of normal epitaxial growth was observed at the fusion boundary, where solidification and HAZ grain boundaries converged. The fusion boundary morphologies are a result of the crystal structure present along the fusion boundary during the initial stages of solidification. Based on the results of this investigation, a model for heterogeneous nucleation along the fusion boundary is proposed when the base and weld metals exhibit ferritic (BCC) and FCC crystal structures, respectively.

Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.; Mills, M.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

Hooper, Frederick M (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Khler, Bernd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method of automatically welding with a non-consumable electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for maintaining a constant arc gap between the electrode and the weld puddle by controlling the addition of filler wire based on the arc voltage.

Kiefer, Joseph H. (Tampa, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

WELDING RESEARCH -S249WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thick that the reduction in the number of passes is dramatic, the time needed for additional positioning agent on the work- piece surface during gas tungsten arc welding to modify the flow in the weld pool mixtures of inorganic powders suspended in a volatile medium, for different materials. This method, re

Zhang, YuMing

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminide weld overlays Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JOURNAL Summary: WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) failures between carbon... along the weld interface and the formation of locally high...

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - aided welding etude Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JOURNAL Summary: WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) failures between carbon... along the weld interface and the formation of locally high...

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic welding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JOURNAL Summary: WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) failures between carbon... along the weld interface and the formation of locally high...

151

Review of Dissimilar Metal Welding for the NGNP Helical-Coil Steam Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding research and development of a new high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that is capable of providing high temperature process heat for industry. The steam generator of the HTGR will consist of an evaporator economizer section in the lower portion and a finishing superheater section in the upper portion. Alloy 800H is expected to be used for the superheater section, and 2.25Cr 1Mo steel is expected to be used for the evaporator economizer section. Dissimilar metal welds (DMW) will be needed to join these two materials. It is well known that failure of DMWs can occur well below the expected creep life of either base metal and well below the design life of the plant. The failure time depends on a wide range of factors related to service conditions, welding parameters, and alloys involved in the DMW. The overall objective of this report is to review factors associated with premature failure of DMWs operating at elevated temperatures and identify methods for extending the life of the 2.25Cr 1Mo steel to alloy 800H welds required in the new HTGR. Information is provided on a variety of topics pertinent to DMW failures, including microstructural evolution, failure mechanisms, creep rupture properties, aging behavior, remaining life estimation techniques, effect of environment on creep rupture properties, best practices, and research in progress to improve DMW performance. The microstructure of DMWs in the as welded condition consists of a sharp chemical concentration gradient across the fusion line that separates the ferritic and austenitic alloys. Upon cooling from the weld thermal cycle, a band of martensite forms within this concentration gradient due to high hardenability and the relatively rapid cooling rates associated with welding. Upon aging, during post weld heat treatment (PWHT), and/or during high temperature service, C diffuses down the chemical potential gradient from the ferritic 2.25Cr 1Mo steel toward the austenitic alloy. This can lead to formation of a soft C denuded zone near the interface on the ferritic steel, and nucleation and growth of carbides on the austenitic side that are associated with very high hardness. These large differences in microstructure and hardness occur over very short distances across the fusion line (~ 50 100 ?m). A band of carbides also forms along the fusion line in the ferritic side of the joint. The difference in hardness across the fusion line increases with increasing aging time due to nucleation and growth of the interfacial carbides. Premature failure of DMWs is generally attributed to several primary factors, including: the sharp change in microstructure and mechanical properties across the fusion line, the large difference in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the ferritic and austenitic alloys, formation of interfacial carbides that lead to creep cavity formation, and preferential oxidation of the ferritic steel near the fusion line. In general, the large gradient in mechanical properties and CTE serve to significantly concentrate the stress along the fusion where a creep susceptible microstructure has evolved during aging. Presence of an oxide notch can concentrate the stress even further. Details of the failure mechanism and the relative importance of each factor varies.

John N. DuPont

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures in low-carbon high-strength steel weld metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural features and the formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures of acicular ferrite in a low-carbon high-strength steel weld metal were investigated by means of computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction technique and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. Multiple nucleation on inclusions, sympathetic nucleation or repeated nucleation, hard impingement, mutual intersection, and fixed orientation relationships of acicular ferrite grains were observed. They were all responsible for the formation of interlocked microstructures in the weld metal. During the process of isothermal transformation, the pre-formed acicular ferrite laths or plates partitioned austenite grains into many small and separate regions, and the growth of later formed acicular ferrite grains was confined in these small regions. Thus, the crystallographic grain size became smaller with the increasing holding time. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acicular ferrite is formed by multiple nucleation and sympathetic nucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hard impingement and intersection of ferrite grains occur at later stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pre-formed ferrite laths partition austenite grains into smaller regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth of later formed ferrite grains is confined in the smaller regions.

Wan, X.L.; Wang, H.H.; Cheng, L.; Wu, K.M., E-mail: wukaiming2000@yahoo.com

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Defect distributions have been documented by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction in alloy 152 and 52 mockups welds, alloy 52 and 52M overlay mockups and an alloy 52M inlay. Primary defects were small cracks at grain boundaries except for more extensive cracking in the dilution zone of an alloy 52 overlay on 304SS. Detailed characterizations of the dilution zone cracks were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy identifying grain boundary titanium-nitride precipitation associated with the intergranular separations. I. INTRODUCTION Weldments continue to be a primary location of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor systems. While problems related to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) sensitization and intergranular (IG) SCC of austenitic stainless alloys in boiling-water reactors (BWRs) have been significantly reduced, SCC has now been observed in HAZs of non-sensitized materials and in dissimilar metal welds where Ni-base alloy weld metals are used. IGSCC in weld metals has been observed in both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with recent examples for PWR pressure vessel penetrations producing the most concern. This has led to the replacement of alloy 600/182/82 welds with higher Cr, more corrosion-resistant replacement materials (alloy 690/152/52/52M). Complicating this issue has been a known susceptibility to cracking during welding [1-7] of these weld metals. There is a critical need for an improved understanding of the weld metal metallurgy and defect formation in Ni-base alloy welds to effectively assess long-term performance. A series of macroscopic to microscopic examinations were performed on available mockup welds made with alloy 52 or alloy 152 plus selected overlay and inlay mockups. The intent was to expand our understanding of weld metal structures in simulated LWR service components with a focus on as-welded defects. Microstructural features, defect distributions, defect characteristics and weld residual strains were examined by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Industry-supplied mock-up welds were characterized including alloy 52 and 152 weldments, alloy 52M overlay and inlay welds, and an alloy 52 overlay. II. WELDMENTS II.A. Alloy 52 and 152 Weld Mockups The alloy 52 and 152 weld mockups were fabricated by MHI for the Kewaunee reactor and were obtained from the EPRI NDE Center. The mockups were U-groove welds joining two plates of 304SS as shown in Figure 1. Alloy 152 butter (heat 307380) was placed on the U-groove surface for both mockups by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). For the alloy 152 weld mockup, the alloy 152 fill (heat 307380) was also applied using SMAW while for the alloy 52 weld mockup, the alloy 52 fill (heat NX2686JK) was applied using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welding parameters for the fill materials were substantially different with the alloy 152 SMAW having a deposition speed of 4-25 cm/min with a current of 95-145 A and the alloy 52 GTAW having a deposition speed of 4-10 cm/min with a current of 150-300 A. One prominent feature in these mockup welds is the presence of a crack starting at the 304SS butt joint at the bottom of the U-groove and extending up into the weld. It appears that the 304SS plate on either side of the butt joint acted as an anchor for the weld resulting in a stress rise across the slit that drove crack formation and extension up into the fill weld. As will be shown in the next section, the extent of the cracking around this stress riser was much greater in the MHI 52 weld mockup.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Welding Process Decoupling for Improved Control David E. Hardt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Welding Process Decoupling for Improved Control David E. Hardt Laboratory Arc Welding Process is characterized by many important process outputs, all of which should properties. This coupling arises form he three dimensional thermal diffusion processes inherent in welding

Eagar, Thomas W.

155

A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

true average strain ~ true plastic strain in softer phase of a dual-phase steel ~I true plastic strain in harder phase of a dual-phase steel UTS true strain at ultimate tensile stress y true strain at yieldingCHAPTER 5 A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS 5

Cambridge, University of

156

Spatial and time-dependent distribution of plasma parameters in the metal-halide arc lamp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It was shown by several authors that closed high pressure arc a.c. discharge in mercury vapors with addition of metal halide cannot be described in frames of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model. However some plasma parameters (electron and high lying excited states densities as well as Hg metastable levels densities) are assumed to be in equilibrium with electron temperature and these assumptions are applied in plasma diagnostics. To verify these supposition the method of local plasma spectroscopy based on spatial and temporal distribution of spectral line profiles was developed. The experimental set up is based on diffraction spectrometer with large aperture, spatial scanning device and photodetector, which allows to carry out the measurements in chosen phases of current period. The software for data acquisition and processing is based on LabVIEW system. The original method of joint data processing was applied to data arrays containing spatial, spectral and temporal distribution of a source surfa...

Khakhaev, A; Ekimov, K; Soloviev, A; Khakhaev, Anatoly; Luizova, Lidia; Ekimov, Konstantin; Soloviev, Alexey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Behaviour of Base Metals in Arc-Type Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems Insights from Merapi Volcano,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone stratovolcanoes provide important windows on the magmatic-hydrothermal processes at playThe Behaviour of Base Metals in Arc-Type Magmatic- Hydrothermal Systems ­ Insights from Merapi systems include a shallow magmatic reservoir (the porphyry stock), an overlying hydrothermal cell, its

Barnes, Sarah-Jane

158

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development. Comparative behavior of similar and dissimilar welds. Final report. [Welds of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler material; and austenitic to ferritic steel welds made by fusion welding alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F) stress rupture behavior of similar metal welds (SMWs) and dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) was investigated under cyclic load and cyclic temperature conditions to provide insight into the question, ''Why do DMWs fail sooner than SMWs in the fossil fuel boilers.'' The weld joints of interest were an all ferritic steel SMW made by fusion welding 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler metal and an austenitic to ferritic steel DMW made by fusion welding Alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using a nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3. The stress rupture behavior obtained on cross weld specimens was similar for both types of welds with only a 20% reduction in rupture life for the DMW. For rupture times less than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo base metal whereas, for rupture times greater than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo heat affected zone (HAZ). The HAZ failures exhibited a more brittle appearance than the base metal failures for both types of welds and it appears that the life of both joints was limited by the stress rupture properties of the HAZ. These results support the hypothesis that increased residual stresses due to abrupt changes in hardness (strength) of metals involved are the major contributors to the reduction in life of DMWs as compared to SMWs. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Busboom, H.; Ring, P.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the weldability of the MMC in this study refers to analyzing the microstructure of the welded MMC and evaluating their properties as a function of the input variables. This necessarily did not mean to make a full penetration butt joint; it rather was intended... of experiments (DOE). Factorial experiments are to be conducted to screen the non-significant variables and to choose comparatively significant welding variables. 2. Welding, testing, and evaluation methods It is proposed to weld these MMCs by a...

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy circumferential weld Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... deposition and friction welding. Many of the more dilute nickel based ... Source:...

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy 82h welds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... deposition and friction welding. Many of the more dilute nickel based ... Source:...

163

Weldability and weld performance of a special grade Hastelloy-X modified for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of weld defects in the electron beam (EB) welding and the tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding for Hastelloy-XR, a modified version of Hastelloy-X, are clarified through the bead-on-plate test and the Trans-Varestraint test. Based on the results, weldabilities on EB and TIG weldings for Hastelloy-XR are discussed and found to be almost the same as Hastelloy-X. The creep rupture behaviors of the welded joints are evaluated by employing data on creep properties of the base and the weld metals. According to the evaluation, the creep rupture strength of the EB-welded joint may be superior to that of the TIG-welded joint. The corrosion test in helium containing certain impurities is conducted for the weld metals. There is no significant difference of such corrosion characteristics as weight gain, internal oxidation, depleted zone, and so on between the base and the weld metals. Those are superior to Hastelloy-X.

Shimizu, S.; Mutoh, Y.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Intelligent Control of Modular Robotic Welding Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although robotic machines are routinely used for welding, such machines do not normally incorporate intelligent capabilities. We are studying the general problem of formulating usable levels of intelligence into welding machines. From our perspective, an intelligent machine should: incorporate knowledge of the welding process, know if the process is operating correctly, know if the weld it is making is good or bad, have the ability to learn from its experience to perform welds, and be able to optimize its own performance. To this end, we are researching machine architecture, methods of knowledge representation, decision making and conflict resolution algorithms, methods of learning and optimization, human/machine interfaces, and various sensors. This paper presents work on the machine architecture and the human/machine interface specifically for a robotic, gas metal arc welding cell. Although the machine control problem is normally approached from the perspective of having a central body of control in the machine, we present a design using distributed agents. A prime goal of this work is to develop an architecture for an intelligent machine that will support a modular, plug and play standard. A secondary goal of this work is to formulate a human/machine interface that treats the human as an active agent in the modular structure.

Smartt, Herschel Bernard; Kenney, Kevin Louis; Tolle, Charles Robert

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Chapter 7 -Welding The dangers in welding, cutting, heating and grinding should never be underestimated.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

36 Chapter 7 - Welding The dangers in welding, cutting, heating and grinding should never and to understand the hazards involved. Spot the hazard Hazards associated with welding include: · The arc itself eyes can become extremely red and sore and in extreme cases suffer permanent damage. · Welding gases

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted non-consumable arc Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas tungsten arc welding Reginald Crawford,* George E... : An adaptive control based on fuzzy logic has been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW Source: Zhang, YuMing -...

167

Formation of cobalt silicide from filter metal vacuum arc deposited films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal reaction of Co film deposited on Si (111) surfaces by a high current filter metal vacuum arc (FMEVAD) system has been studied. After deposition the films were annealed over the 400-900 C temperature range for 30 min. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to characterize the elemental depth distributions in the films subjected to different annealing temperatures. Ordered chemical phases were determined by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the morphology was determined by cross section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the phases formed are Co2Si at 400 C, CoSi + CoO at 500 C, CoSi + CoSi2 at 600 C, and CoSi2 at (700-800 C). At 900 C, CoSi2 was formed with a mixture of cubic cobalt and probably an amorphous cobalt oxide surface layer. The interface morphology was a rough cusp-like crenellation at 600 C which became less pronounced after annealing at 800 C.

Whitlow, Harry J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Chong M.; McCready, David E.; Zhang, Tonghe; Wu, Yuguang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microstructure/property relationships in dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steels and carbon steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metallurgical characteristics, toughness and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steel Alloy 2205 and carbon steel A36 have been evaluated. Both duplex stainless steel ER2209 and Ni-based Alloy 625 filler metals were used to join this combination using a multipass, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Defect-free welds were made with each filler metal. The toughness of both the 625 and 2209 deposits were acceptable, regardless of heat input. A narrow martensitic region with high hardness was observed along the A36/2209 fusion boundary. A similar region was not observed in welds made with the 625 filler metal. The corrosion resistance of the welds made with 2209 filler metal improved with increasing heat input, probably due to higher levels of austenite and reduced chromium nitride precipitation. Welds made with 625 exhibited severe attack in the root pass, while the bulk of the weld was resistant. This investigation has shown that both filler metals can be used to joint carbon steel to duplex stainless steels, but that special precautions may be necessary in corrosive environments.

Barnhouse, E.J. [Weirton Steel Corp., WV (United States); Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

In-process acoustic emission monitoring of dissimilar metal welding: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system to provide real-time, in-process acoustic emission monitoring to detect and locate flaws in bimetallic welds has been demonstrated. This system could provide reliable inspection of critical welds in cases where conventional NDE would be costly or impossible to apply. Tests were completed on four sample welds to determine the sensitivity of the system. Artificial flaws were introduced into two test samples and the acoustic emission results were verified by radiography and visual inspection techniques.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Steam generator conceptual design for the modular HTGR - Dissimilar metal weld considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steam generator for the current Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) has evolved from a technology basis developed in U.S. and European gas-cooled reactor programs. The MHTGR steam generator is a vertically-oriented, counterflow, shell-and-tube, once-through, non-reheat, helical heat exchanger with helium on the shell side and water/steam in the tubes. In the MHTGR applications, the normal operating temperatures of the steam generator tubes can be as high as 638/sup 0/C (1180/sup 0/F). Concerns such as cost, creep strength, steam side scaling and stress corrosion cracking often lead to a design decision to use two different tube materials, one for the evaporating portion and another for the superheating portion of the steam generator. The current MHTGR steam generator design utilizes 2 1/4 CR - 1 Mo material for the economizer/evaporator/initial superheater tube section and Alloy 800H material for the finishing superheat tube section. Therefore, a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) is incorporated in each tube circuit. This feature of the design imposes certain important constraints on the steam generator designer. This paper presents an overview of the MHTGR steam generator conceptual design, and then focuses on the DMW considerations and how these have influenced the design configuration.

Spring, A.H.; Basol, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Characterization of microstructure, chemical composition, corrosion resistance and toughness of a multipass weld joint of superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superduplex stainless steels have an austeno-ferritic microstructure with an average fraction of each phase of approximately 50%. This duplex microstructure improves simultaneously the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Welding of these steels is often a critical operation. In this paper we focus on characterization and analysis of a multipass weld joint of UNS S32750 steel prepared using welding conditions equal to industrial standards. The toughness and corrosion resistance properties of the base metal, root pass welded with gas tungsten arc welding, as well as the filler passes, welded with shielded metal arc welding, were evaluated. The microstructure and chemical composition of the selected areas were also determined and correlated to the corrosion and mechanical properties. The root pass was welded with low nickel filler metal and, as a consequence, presented low austenite content and significant precipitation. This precipitation is reflected in the corrosion and mechanical properties. The filler passes presented an adequate ferrite:austenite proportion but, due to their high oxygen content, the toughness was lower than that of the root pass. Corrosion properties were evaluated by cyclic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} media.

Tavares, S.S.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica/PGMEC, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ssmtavares@terra.com.br; Pardal, J.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica/PGMEC, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); Lima, L.D. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica/PGMEC, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); Bastos, I.N. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto Politecnico (IPRJ), Nova Friburgo/RJ (Brazil); Nascimento, A.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Campinas/SP (Brazil); Souza, J.A. de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica/PGMEC, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/RJ (Brazil)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry, substantial energy savings can be made. Savings are expected to be even greater in the case of new steels, which will require extensive mapping over large experimental ranges of parameters such as voltage, current, speed, heat input and pre-heat.

Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads.

Pernicka, John C. (Fort Collins, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads. 7 figs.

Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effects of thermal aging on Stress Corrosion Cracking and mechanical properties of stainless steel weld metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in and around primary loop piping welds in Boiling Water Reactors has been observed worldwide as plants continue to operate at temperatures and pressures near 2880C (5500F) and 6.9 MPa (1000 ...

Hixon, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of a copper filler metal on the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welded titanium-stainless steel joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking in an electron beam weld of titanium to stainless steel occurred during the cooling process because of internal thermal stress. Using a copper filler metal, a crack free joint was obtained, which had a tensile strength of 310 MPa. To determine the reasons for cracking in the Ti/Fe joint and the function of the copper filler metal on the improvement of the cracking resistance of the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, the microstructures of the joints were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The cracking susceptibilities of the joints were evaluated with microhardness tests on the cross-sections. In addition, microindentation tests were used to compare the brittleness of the intermetallics in the welds. The results showed that the Ti/Fe joint was characterized by continuously distributed brittle intermetallics such as TiFe and TiFe(Cr){sub 2} with high hardness ({approx} 1200 HV). For the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, most of the weld consisted of a soft solid solution of copper with dispersed TiFe intermetallics. The transition region between the weld and the titanium alloy was made up of a relatively soft Ti-Cu intermetallic layer with a lower hardness ({approx} 500 HV). The formation of soft phases reduced the cracking susceptibility of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Fe joint cracked for the brittleness and residual stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Cu/Fe joint with tensile strength of 310 MPa was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu diluted Ti and Fe contents in weld and separated the TiFe{sub 2} into individual blocks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial hard Ti-Fe compounds were replaced by soft Ti-Cu compounds in the weld. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of solid solution of copper formed in the weld.

Wang, Ting, E-mail: fgwangting@163.com [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); Zhang, Binggang, E-mail: zhang_bg@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Feng, Jicai, E-mail: fengjc@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China) [Key Laboratory of Special Welding in Shandong Province, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai, 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Tang, Qi, E-mail: tangqi@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

EFFECTS OF SURFACE DEPRESSION AND CONVECTION IN GTA WELDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SURFACE DEPRESSION AND CONVECTION IN GTA WELDING M.L. Lin, T.W. Eagar Materials of the weld pool which are changed by these fact ors . It is shown that, at current s in excess of 300 amperes in a different heat distribution on the weld pool surface . ALTHOUGH THE GAS tungsten arc (GTA) welding process

Eagar, Thomas W.

179

A comparison of LBW and GTAW processes in miniature closure welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When small electronic components with glass-to-metal seals are closure welded, residual stresses developed in the glass are of concern. If these stresses exceed allowable tensile levels` the resulting weld-induced seal failure may cause the entire component to be scrapped or reworked at substantial cost. Conventional wisdom says the best welding process for these applications is that which provides the least heat input, and that Laser Beam Welding (LBW) provides less heat input than Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. (GTAW); however, other concerns such as weld fit-up, part variability, and material weldability can modify the final choice of a welding process. In this paper we compare the characteristic levels of heat input and the residual stresses generated in the glass seals for the two processes (as calculated by 3D Finite Element Analysis) as a function of heat input and travel speed, and contrast some of the other manufacturing decisions that must be made to choose a production process. The geometry chosen is a standing edge corner weld in a cylindrical container about 20 mm diameter by 35 mm tall. Four metal pins are glassed into the part lid. The stresses calculated to result from continuous wave C0{sub 2} LBW are compared with those that result from GTAW. The total energy required by the laser weld is significantly less than for the equivalent size GTA weld. The energy input required for a given size weld is inversely proportional to the travel speed, but approaches a saturation level as the travel speed increases. LBW travel speeds ranging from 10 mm/sec to 50 mm/sec were examined.

Knorovsky, G.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Burchett, S.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Influence of welding passes on grain orientation -the example of a multi-pass V-weld.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation (CANDE), derived from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) with buttering. Comparisons are made using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The problem of intermixing of metals possessing no mutual solubility upon explosion welding (Cu-Ta, Fe-Ag, Al-Ta)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of the results obtained for joints of dissimilar metals such as copper-tantalum and iron-silver, the reason of immiscible suspensions mixing upon explosion welding has been cleared out. It has been found that the interface (plain or wavy) is not smooth and contains inhomogeneities, namely, cusps and local melting zones. The role of granulating fragmentation providing partitioning of initial materials as a main channel of input energy dissipation has been revealed. It has been shown that in joints of metals possessing normal solubility the local melting zones are true solutions, but if metals possess no mutual solubility the local melting zones are colloidal solutions. Realization of either emulsion or suspension variant takes place. The results can be used in the development of new joints of metals possessing no mutual solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immiscible pairs Ta/Cu and Fe/Ag are welded successfully by explosive welding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fragmentation provides for partitioning as the main energy dissipation channel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immiscible metals form colloidal solid solutions during solidification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melting and boiling temperatures ratio determines the colloidal solution type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local melting zones being in suspension form enhance welds hardening.

Greenberg, B.A., E-mail: bella@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, S. Kovalevskoi str. 18, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, M.A. [Kurdyumov Institute of Metal Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Vernadskogo blvd. 36, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)] [Kurdyumov Institute of Metal Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Vernadskogo blvd. 36, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Rybin, V.V. [State Polytechnical University, Politekhnicheskaya str. 29, St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)] [State Polytechnical University, Politekhnicheskaya str. 29, St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation); Elkina, O.A.; Antonova, O.V.; Patselov, A.M.; Inozemtsev, A.V.; Plotnikov, A.V.; Volkova, A.Yu. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, S. Kovalevskoi str. 18, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, S. Kovalevskoi str. 18, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation); Besshaposhnikov, Yu.P. [OJSC Ural Chemical Machine Building Plant, Khibinogorskii Lane 33, Ekaterinburg, 620010 (Russian Federation)] [OJSC Ural Chemical Machine Building Plant, Khibinogorskii Lane 33, Ekaterinburg, 620010 (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Analysis of a Defected Dissimilar Metal Weld in a PWR Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the refueling outage 2000, inspections of the RC-loops of one of the Ringhals PWR-units, Ringhals 4, indicated surface breaking defects in the axial direction of the piping in a dissimilar weld between the Low alloy steel nozzle and the stainless safe end in the hot leg. In addition some indications were found that there were embedded defects in the weld material. These defects were judged as being insignificant to the structural integrity. The welds were inspected in 1993 with the result that no significant indications were found. The weld it self is a double U weld, where the thickness of the material is ideally 79,5 mm. Its is constructed by Inconel 182 weld material. At the nozzle a buttering was applied, also by Inconel 182. The In-service inspection, ISI, of the object indicated four axial defects, 9-16 mm deep. During fabrication, the areas where the defects are found were repaired at least three times, onto a maximum depth of 32 mm. To evaluate the defects, 6 boat samples from the four axial defects were cut from the perimeter and shipped to the hot-cell laboratory for further examination. This examination revealed that the two deep defects had been under sized by the ISI outside the requirement set by the inspection tolerances, while the two shallow defects were over sized, but within the tolerances of the detection system. When studying the safety case it became evident that there were several missing elements in the way this problems is handled with respect to the Swedish safety evaluation code. Among these the most notable at the beginning was the absence of reliable fracture mechanical data such as crack growth laws and fracture toughness at elevated temperature. Both these questions were handled by the project. The fracture mechanical evaluation has focused on a fit for service principal. Thus defects both in the unaffected zones and the disturbed zones, boat sample cutouts, of the weld have been analyzed. With reference to the Swedish safety evaluation system in accordance to the regulatory demands, a safety evaluation was performed using the R6-method. The failure assessment diagram is modified by the addition of the ASME XI safety factors both for limit load analysis and fracture assessment. This results in a very high conservatism since the secondary stresses such as residual stresses are high in the area. In order to quantify this effect an analysis in accordance to ASME IWB-3640, App. C was performed. This analysis provides the decision-makers with a sensitivity study; important to have to value the real risk of any missed defects in the area. (authors)

Efsing, P. [Barseback Kraft AB, P.O. Box 524, Loddekopinge SE-246 25 (Sweden); Lagerstrom, J. [Vattenfall AB, Ringhals, 430 22 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Qualification of large diameter duplex stainless steel girth welds intended for low temperature service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

British Gas recently had a requirement to fabricate some UNS31803 duplex stainless steel pipework for an offshore topsides process plant. The pipework had a maximum diameter of 600mm, with a corresponding wall thickness of 18mm, and it was designed to operate at a minimum temperature of {minus}40 C. There is a lack of published toughness data for girth welds in duplex stainless steel at this thickness and minimum design temperature. Additionally, toughness requirements for girth welds in current pipework and pressure vessel codes are based on experience with carbon steels. As a result, a program of work has been carried out to study the Charpy, CTOD and wide plate toughness of girth welds in 22%Cr duplex stainless steel pipework. The welds were produced using a typical gas tungsten arc/gas metal arc pipework fabrication procedure. In addition, non-destructive evaluation trials have been carried out on a deliberately defective weld using radiography and ultrasonics. It was demonstrated that double wall single image {gamma}-radiography, single wall single image and panoramic X-radiography, and conventional shear wave ultrasonics were all able to detect planar root defects varying from 3 to 7mm in depth. There was good agreement between the sizes recorded by ultrasonics and those measured from macrosections. Small scale mechanical tests demonstrated that welds with overmatching tensile properties, and low temperature toughness properties which were acceptable to specification, could be produced. Wide plate tests demonstrated that defect size calculations from BS PD7493 were conservative.

Prosser, K.; Robinson, A.G.; Rogers, P.F.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

ARC DISCHARGE SYNTHESIS AND MORPHOLOGY CONTROL OF EARLY TRANSITION METAL CARBIDE NANOPATICLES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work is directed to the understanding of the synthesis and morphology control of early transition metal carbides. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to fcc (more)

Grove , David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - austenitic steel welds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that require the use of austenitic stainless steels. A dissimi- lar metal weld (DMW... and microsegre- gation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic stainless...

186

Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Soluble transition metals cause the pro-inflammatory effects of welding fumes in vitro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epidemiological studies have consistently reported a higher incidence of respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis, metal fume fever (MFF), and chronic pneumonitis among welders exposed to high concentrations of metal-enriched ...

McNeilly, Jane D; Heal, Mathew R; Beverland, Iain J; Howe, Alan; Gibson, Mark D; Hibbs, Leon; MacNee, William; Donaldson, Ken

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Interfacial analysis of the ex-situ reinforced phase of a laser spot welded Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the interfacial reaction of the ex-situ reinforced phase (Ta) of a Zr-based ((Zr{sub 48}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}Ag{sub 8})Si{sub 0.75} + Ta{sub 5}) bulk metallic glass composite after laser spot welding, the interfacial regions of the reinforced phases located at specific zones in the welds including the parent material, weld fusion zone and heat affected zone were investigated. Specimen preparation from the specific zones for transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed using the focused ion beam technique. The test results showed that the reinforced phases in the parent material, weld fusion zone and heat affected zone were all covered by an interfacial layer. From microstructure analysis, and referring to the phase diagram, it was clear that the thin layers are an intermetallic compound ZrCu phase. However, due to their different formation processes, those layers show the different morphologies or thicknesses. - Highlights: An ex-situ Zr-based BMG composite was laser spot welded. The interfacial regions of the RPs located at PM, WFZ and HAZ were investigated. The RPs in the PM, WFZ and HAZ were all covered by a ZrCu interfacial layer. Due to different formation processes, those layers show the different morphology.

Wang, Huei-Sen, E-mail: huei@isu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 84001, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, 81148, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hou-Guang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 84001, Taiwan (China); Jang, Jason Shian-Ching [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan (China); Lin, Dong-Yih [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, 81148, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Gu, Jhen-Wang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 84001, Taiwan (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nickel-Based Superalloy Welding Practices for Industrial Gas Turbine Applications M.B. Henderson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alloy components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder components using methods, such as gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB) and laser welding, and methods and post-weld heat treatment procedures, if necessary. Increasingly to achieve through-life cost reduction

Cambridge, University of

190

Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

Ren, Weiju

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

MATHEHATICAL NODELING OF THE TEHPERATURE PROFILES AND WELD DILUTION IN ELECTROSLAG WELDING OF STEEL PLATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) MATHEHATICAL NODELING OF THE TEHPERATURE PROFILES AND WELD DILUTION IN ELECTROSLAG WELDING describes a calculation procedure for the detailed predic- tion of temperature profiles and weld dilution in the electroslag welding of mild steel plates. The temperature profiles in the liquid slag and the liquid metal

Eagar, Thomas W.

192

High-pressure arcs as vacuum-atmosphere interface and plasma lens for nonvacuum electron beam welding machines, electron beam melting, and nonvacuum ion material modification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure plasmas can be used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface as an alternative to differential pumping. Vacuum-atmosphere interface utilizing a cascade arc discharge was successfully demonstrated and a 175 keV electron beam was successfully propagated from vacuum through such a plasma interface and out into atmospheric pressure. Included in the article are a theoretical framework, experimental results, and possible applications for this novel interface. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Hershcovitch, A. [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Method for enhanced control of welding processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

Sheaffer, Donald A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA); Tung, David M. (Livermore, CA); Schroder, Kevin (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Dr. Thomas A. Siewert IN-SPACE WELDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) Dr. Thomas A. Siewert IN-SPACE WELDING Visions & Realities presented to Thirtieth Space This paperestablishes the value of having an in-space welding capability and identifies its applications, both near, Plasma Arc, and Laser Beam, are examined against the criteria for an in-space welding system. Research

Eagar, Thomas W.

195

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc hardfacing process Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to produce an output... Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Adaptive voltage control of gas tungsten arc welding Reginald Crawford,* George E... -mail: reginald.crawford@vanderbilt.edu...

197

Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Data collection on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels and weld metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data on the influence of low dose 400--550 C irradiation on the mechanical properties of structural steels (Types 304, 316, 316L, 316H and 316L(N) and associated weld metals) at temperatures from 20 C to 750 C, have been compiled from published literature and the results of British, Dutch, French and German laboratories. Properties evaluated include tensile, impact, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue. The preliminary results, which cover the dose range from 0 to 5 displacements per atom (and/or up to 9 appm helium) are presented as comparisons between irradiated and unirradiated control data, covering a range of strength and cyclic properties. The results show that low dose irradiation can have a significant influence on the properties, i.e.: (1) increases in tensile proof strength; (2) reductions in tensile ductility; (3) decreases in impact energy; (4) reductions in creep-rupture strength and ductility; and (5) reductions in creep-fatigue endurance. By considering the influence of irradiation temperature and dose level, the results are rationalized in terms of irradiation hardening and grain boundary embrittlement mechanisms.

Tavassoli, A.A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France); Picker, C.; Wareing, J. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steels ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steels Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluths Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

Metal Vaporization from Weld Pools A. BLOCK-BOLTEN and T. W. EAGAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an upper limit on the tem- perature produced on the surface of the metal due to evapo- rative cooling.4 5 to a direct reading emission spectrometer. The chamber was supplied with a lens guiding the light and the electrode. The hearth was water cooled and the entire system was purged with argon flow. The rotating water-cooled

Eagar, Thomas W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater environment was carried out in the different welding position, horizontal, vertical upward and downward. The soundness of cladding layers (about 3 mm) is confirmed in visual and penetration test, and cross section observation. In the application to the actual plants, it is preferable to reduce the start and end point numbers of beads with which a defect is easy to cause. Therefore a special welding equipment for a YAG laser CRC that could weld continuously was developed. (authors)

Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakaharacho, Isogoku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy steel welds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

used in the manufacture and repair of nickel... alloy components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... deposition and friction...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy steel weld Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

used in the manufacture and repair of nickel... alloy components. These include gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding, laser powder... deposition and friction...

204

Characterization of microstructures and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 stainless steel dissimilar welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 austenitic stainless steel dissimilar welds were investigated in this work. Three types of filler materials, Inconel 617, Inconel 82 and 310 austenitic stainless steels were used to obtain dissimilar joint using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Microstructural observations showed that there was no evidence of any possible cracking in the weldments achieved by the nickel-base filler materials. The welds produced by 617 and 310 filler materials displayed the highest and the lowest ultimate tensile strength and total elongation, respectively. The impact test results indicated that all specimens exhibited ductile fracture. Among the fillers, Inconel 617 exhibited superlative fracture toughness (205 J). The mechanical properties of the Inconel 617 filler material were much better than those of other fillers. - Research Highlights: {yields} A fine dendritic structure was seen for the Inconel 617 weld metal. {yields} A number of cracks were initiated when the 310 SS filler metal was used. {yields} All welded samples showed ductile fracture. {yields} The Inconel 617 filler material presents the optimum mechanical properties.

Shah Hosseini, H., E-mail: h.shahhosseini@ma.iut.ac.ir; Shamanian, M.; Kermanpur, A.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Final Assessment of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL conducted a technical assessment of the NDE issues and protocols that led to missed detections of several axially oriented flaws in a steam generator primary inlet dissimilar metal weld at North Anna Power Station, Unit 1 (NAPS-1). This particular component design exhibits a significant outside-diameter (OD) taper that is not included as a blind performance demonstration mock-up within the industrys Performance Demonstration Initiative, administered by EPRI. For this reason, the licensee engaged EPRI to assist in the development of a technical justification to support the basis for a site-specific qualification. The service-induced flaws at NAPS-1 were eventually detected as a result of OD surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the dissimilar metal weld. A total of five axially oriented flaws were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference. The field volumetric examination that was conducted at NAPS-1 was a non-encoded, real-time manual ultrasonic examination. PNNL conducted both an initial assessment, and subsequently, a more rigorous technical evaluation (reported here), which has identified an array of NDE issues that may have led to the subject missed detections. These evaluations were performed through technical reviews and discussions with NRC staff, EPRI NDE Center personnel, industry and ISI vendor personnel, and ultrasonic transducer manufacturers, and laboratory tests, to better understand the underlying issues at North Anna.

Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Doctor, Steven R.

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

Mueller, R.E. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Tullahoma, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

P ARC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARC INSTITUTE FOR SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP WIND ENERGY 2 : : D eveloped b y P ARC & S cience O utreach, w ith s upport f rom t he T oshiba A merica F oundation : : W ashington U...

208

Welding apparatus and methods for using ultrasonic sensing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welding apparatus using ultrasonic sensing is described and which includes a movable welder having a selectively adjustable welding head for forming a partially completed weld in a weld seam defined between adjoining metal substrates; an ultrasonic assembly borne by the moveable welder and which is operable to generate an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward the partially completed weld, and is further reflected from same; and a controller electrically coupled with the ultrasonic assembly and controllably coupled with the welding head, and wherein the controller receives information regarding the ultrasonic signal and in response to the information optimally positions the welding head relative to the weld seam.

McJunkin, Timothy R.; Johnson, John A.; Larsen, Eric D.; Smartt, Herschel B.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effect of the surface preparation techniques on the EBSD analysis of a friction stir welded AA1100-B{sub 4}C metal matrix composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been used in various automobile, aerospace and military industries. Yet characterization of the microstructure in these materials remains a challenge. In the present work, the grain structure in the matrix of B{sub 4}C particulate reinforced MMCs and their friction stir welds is characterized by using optical metallography and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Optical metallography can partially reveal the grain structure in the matrix of AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C composite. The EBSD technique has been successfully applied to characterize the grain structure in the AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C friction stir welds, which provides a powerful tool to follow the microstructural evolution of MMC materials during friction stir welding (FSW). Both mechanical polishing and ion beam polishing are used for the EBSD sample preparation. The effect of the sample preparation on the EBSD data acquisition quality is studied. Some typical examples, such as the identification of grains and subgrains, grain size distribution, deformation fields and the texture components are given. - Highlights: {yields} EBSD has been used to characterize the grain structure of Al-B{sub 4}C MMCs. {yields} Mechanical and ion beam polishing are compared for EBSD sample preparation of MMCs. {yields} EBSD shows great advantages over optical microscopy for microtexture analysis of MMCs.

Guo, J., E-mail: junfeng.guo@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 2B1 (Canada); Aluminium Technology Centre, National Research Council Canada, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 8C3 (Canada); Amira, S.; Gougeon, P. [Aluminium Technology Centre, National Research Council Canada, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 8C3 (Canada); Chen, X.-G. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi (QC), G7H 2B1 (Canada)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Determination of welding fume size with time using E7018 electrodes and A131B base metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which is primarily a function of particle size. It is known that most fumes are 0. 5 micron (um) or less when generated and coagulate to form larger particles as a function of time. Based on aerosol agglomeration rates and coagulated particle... for coagulation after welding had ceased. Initially, over 70% of the particles were less than 0. 93 um. However, between four and six minutes after welding was terminated, sub-micron size particles coagulated such that approximately 28K of the particles were...

Owen, Richard James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

Max Karasik

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Method for laser welding a fin and a tube  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Mahoney, A. Roderick (Albuquerque, NM); Milewski, John O (Santa Fe, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

WELDING RESEARCH -s85WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s85WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Measurement of weld pool surface is a difficult but urgent task in the welding community. It plays an important role not only in developing the next- generation intelligent welding machines but also for modeling complex welding processes. In recent years

Zhang, YuMing

214

Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by VUV-emission of Filament Driven Hydrogen Arc Discharge Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H^- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

Laulainen, J; Koivisto, H; Komppula, J; Tarvainen, O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (?400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (?900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for PARENT round-robin tests.

Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Welding and Weldability of Thorium-Doped Iridium Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ir-0.3%W alloys doped with thorium are currently used as post-impact containment material for radioactive fuel in thermoelectric generators that provide stable electrical power for a variety of outer planetary space exploration missions. Welding and weldability of a series of alloys was investigated using arc and laser welding processes. Some of these alloys are prone to severe hot-cracking during welding. Weldability of these alloys was characterized using Sigmajig weldability test. Hot-cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and composition. Thorium content and welding atmosphere were found to be very critical. The weld cracking behavior in these alloys can be controlled by modifying the fusion zone microstructure. Fusion zone microstructure was found to be controlled by welding process, process parameters, and the weld pool shape.

David, S.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; King, J.F.

2000-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Characteristics of the weld interface in dissimilar austenitic-pearlitic steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weld interface in dissimilar alloy welds between austenitic and pearlitic steels was observed directly by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Two types of weld interface were found in the joints. One was the austenite/martensite-like interface that formed the boundary between the mixed weld metal zone and the partially mixed transitional zone. The other is the martensite-like/ferrite interface that is the true liquid-solid boundary of the joint. These interfaces can exist independently in different joints and can also coexist in one joint, depending on the Cr and Ni contents of the filler metals and alloy in the base metals. The formation mechanism of the weld interface and its effect on the mechanical properties of the welded joint are discussed.

Pan, C.; Zhang, Z. (Wuhan Transportation Univ. (China). Dept. of Marine Mechanical Engineering)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

WELDING RESEARCH -s87WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s87WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Welding fume contains ele- ments that, in their pure of welding fume must be examined when considering fume toxicity. Various chemical analysis techniques are pre techniques to analyze the chemistry of mild steel welding fume. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that mild steel

Eagar, Thomas W.

220

WELDING RESEARCH -s57WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s57WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Low heat input is typically desired for welding high welding. However, a high current, and thus a high heat input, is required to melt more wire to achieve the HAZ size, microstructure, and the hard- ness of high-strength steel ASTM A514 welded by DE

Zhang, YuMing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

WELDING RESEARCH ~----------------------~--~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL. FEBRUARY 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J ) WELDING RESEARCH ~----------------------~--~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL. FEBRUARY 1990 Sponsored by the American Welding Society and the Welding Research Council All papers published in the Welding Journal's Welding Research Supplement undergo Peer Review before publication for: I) originality

Eagar, Thomas W.

222

Friction Stir Welding John Hinch and John Rudge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Stir Welding John Hinch and John Rudge September 11, 2002 1 Introduction Friction Stir Welding is an innovative technique for joining two pieces of metal. A rapidly rotating tool is pushed that a good model of friction stir welding should be able to predict - the power, the force, the temperature

Rudge, John

223

Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations H. M. Aarbogha,b, , M Institute for Energy Technology, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway. Abstract A single pass Metal Inert Gas welding which numerical codes quantifying welding stresses can be validated. It includes a mov- ing heat source

Boyer, Edmond

224

.Heat Generation Patterns and Temperature Profiles in_ Electroslag Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l .Heat Generation Patterns and Temperature Profiles in_ Electroslag Welding ) · T. DEBROY, J in the slag and metal phases for an electroslag welding system. It is shown that the current is significantly larger for the electroslag welding process than that of the electroslao refinino process operating

Eagar, Thomas W.

225

CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyedkashi, S. M. H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Wonder Weld  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are using the process shown here to create a super-strong weld for the upgrade of a key component of the Lab's experimental nuclear fusion reactor.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

welding And MAteriAlS College of Rural and Community Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

welding And MAteriAlS technology College of Rural and Community Development Community and Technical College 907-455-2932 www.ctc.uaf.edu/programs/weld/ Welding is an important industrial skill from welding basics to advanced pipe and metal plate fabrication. Classes are small to offer hands

Hartman, Chris

229

Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding.pichelin@b .ch Context: Wood can be welded using linear vibration welding tech- niques similar to the ones in plastic and metal industry[1] . Wood welding allows bonding strength similar to glued joints. However, due

Dalang, Robert C.

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - american welding society Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 94 WELD METAL DUCTILITY: REDUCTION IN AREA 8.1 INTRODUCTION Summary: of Fracture from Inclusions, in "Ductility", American Society for Metals, Chapman and Hall...

231

WELDING RESEARCH -s281WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s281WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Superaustenitic stainless steel alloys can often pose difficulties dur- ing fusion welding due to the unavoidable microsegregation of Mo and tramp ele. A method of producing austenitic welds is proposed that can po- tentially circumvent these issues by de

DuPont, John N.

232

WELDING RESEARCH -s51WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s51WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Electron microprobe analy- sis was utilized to examine the gradient of alloying elements across the weld inter- face of austenitic/ferritic dissimilar alloy welds. The concentration gradients were converted to martensite start (Ms) tem- perature gradients

DuPont, John N.

233

WELDING RESEARCH -s77WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELDING RESEARCH -s77WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. The microstructure of AL- 6XN plates joined via a double-sided fric- tion stir weld has been investigated. The microstructural zones that develop during friction stir welding (FSW) reflect de- creasing strains and less severe thermal cy- cles with increasing

DuPont, John N.

234

Waste Heat Recovery Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submerged Arc Furnaces are used to produce high temperature alloys. These furnaces typically run at 3000F using high voltage electricity along with metallurgical carbon to reduce metal oxides to pure elemental form. The process as currently...

O'Brien, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

Neural network analysis of strength and ductility of welding alloys for high strength low  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neural network analysis of strength and ductility of welding alloys for high strength low alloy There are considerable demands for the development of weld metals for high strength low alloy steels. To assist in meeting such demands, a neural network was trained and tested on a set of data obtained on weld metals

Cambridge, University of

238

Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks at Superplastic Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an investigation of the mechanical properties of weld material in aluminum tailor welded blanks (TWB) at superplastic temperatures and discusses the potential application of TWBs in superplastic forming operations. Aluminum TWBs consist of multiple sheet materials of different thickness or alloy that are butt-welded together into a single, variable thickness blank. To evaluate the performance of the weld material in TWBs, a series of tensile tests were conducted at superplastic temperatures with specimens that contained weld material in the gage area. The sheet material used in the study was Sky 5083 aluminum alloy, which was joined to produce the TWBs by gas tungsten arc welding using an AA5356 filler wire. The experimental results show that, in the temperature range of 500?C to 550?C and at strain rates ranging from 10-4 sec-1 to 10-2 sec-1, the weld material has a higher flow stress and lower ductility than the monolithic sheet material. The weld material exhibited elongations of 40% to 60% under these conditions, whereas the monolithic sheet achieved 220% to 360% elongation. At the same temperatures and strain rates, the weld material exhibited flow stresses 1.3 to 4 times greater than the flow stress in the monolithic sheet. However, the weld material did show a substantial increase in the strain rate sensitivity and ductility when compared to the same material formed at room temperature.

Davies, Richard W.; Vetrano, John S.; Smith, Mark T.; Pitman, Stan G.

2002-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Novel concepts in weld science: Role of gradients and composite structure. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal and simulated weld metal properties were evaluated in this multi-part study. The results obtained on single phase solid solution systems were used as a basis for a fundamental study of the effects of compositional gradients on crack growth, both at low temperatures, in fatigue and at high temperatures during creep. Methods to physically simulate gradients in weld metals with roll bonded laminate composites were applied to analyses of ferrite-austenite and ferrite-sigma-austenite multiphase systems. Finally, results of the physical simulation analyses were utilized to predict the effects of weld process parameters on weld metal properties.

Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dissimilar-alloy laser welding of titanium: Ti6Al-4V to Beta-C{trademark}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beta-C{sup TM} is a metastable-beta titanium alloy (nominal composition: Ti-3wt%Al-8wt%V-6wtTCr-4wt%Mo-4wt%Zr) which can be thermomechanically processed and heat treated to provide excellent combinations of strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. Recently, the increased application of metastable-beta titanium alloys in aerospace and commercial applications has resulted in the necessity to join these alloys to conventional alpha-beta titanium alloys. Based on this previous work, two approaches were considered for improving the ductility of dissimilar-alloy welds between Ti-6Al-4V and Beta-C{sup TM} in the present study: (1) application of a low heat input welding process to minimize the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ) beta grain size and (2) modification of the fusion zone chemical composition to allow greater microstructural optimization through postweld aging. CO{sub 2} laser welds were produced between Ti-6Al-4V and Beta-C{sup TM} sheet. Three different nominal fusion zone chemical compositions were obtained by varying the laser beam locations relative to the joint centerline and thereby melting different quantities of each base metal. For comparable postweld aging conditions, the laser welds exhibited ductilities superior to those of coarse-grained gas tungsten arc welds. Fracture analysis of the weld zone revealed a transition from a predominantly transgranular fracture in the low-temperature aged conditions to increasingly intergranular fracture following aging at higher temperature. This transition was promoted by an increase in the thickness and continuity of alpha phase at beta grain boundaries.

Liu, P.S.; Baeslack, W.A. III; Hurley, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS Revised - May 2013 Agricultural Research Center Washington State University #12;Table of Contents THE PROJECT SYSTEM, AN INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 5 DEVELOPING AN ARC PROJECT

Collins, Gary S.

243

Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V.; Doctor, Steven R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal halides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health & Safety Summary: of an open metal halide lamp. When the lamp failed, the inner arc tube ruptured (inner arc tube can reach... . INTRODUCTION Metal halide systems remain...

245

PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements for the actual can welding process, however, did not result in an improved weld geometry. Several possibilities for the lack of positive response exist, some of which are that (1) an insufficient number of test articles were welded under prototypic conditions, (2) the process was not optimized so that significant improvements were observable over the 'noise', and (3) the in-situ arc anneal closed the gap down too much so the can was unable to exhaust pressure ahead of the weld. Several operational and mechanical improvements were identified. The weld clamps were changed to a design consistent with those used in the legacy operations. A helium puff operation was eliminated; it is believed that this operation was the cause of the original weld defect. Also, timing of plug mast movement was found to correspond with weld irregularities. The timing of the movement was changed to occur during weld head travel between tacks. In the end a three sequential tack weld process followed by a pulse weld at the same current and travel speed as was used for the legacy processes was suggested for use during the IC qualification effort. Relative to legacy welds, the PDC IC weld demonstrates greater fluctuation in the region of the weld located between tack welds. However, canister weld response (canister to canister) is consistent and with the aid of the optical mapping system (for targeting the cut position) is considered adequate. DR measurements and METs show the PDC IC welds to have sufficient ligament length to ensure adequate canister pressure/impact capacity and to ensure adequate stub function. The PDC welding process has not been optimized as a result of this effort. Differences remain between the legacy BTC welds and the PDC IC weld, but these differences are not sufficient to prevent resumption of the current PDC IC qualification effort. During the PDC IC qualification effort, a total of 17 cans will be welded and a variety of tests/inspections will be performed. The extensive data collected during that qualification effort should be of a sufficient population to determ

Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Combinatorial optimization of welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C E D C Combinatorial optimization of welding sequences The problem Combinatorial optimization a welding example of a tail bearing housing vanes ­ Figure 1. The major structural details are the outer ring, the inner ring and the vanes. The vanes are welded to the rings using TIG welding. Fig. 1: Tail

Sóbester, András

250

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The influence of position in overlap joints of Mg and Al alloys on microstructure and hardness of laser welds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assembly. Therefore, the dissimilar-metal welding process has been identified as top priority for materials and resistance of this combination, and lead to the formation of intermetallic compounds in the welded metal. Keywords: laser welding, dissimilar materials, AZ31 magnesium alloy, A5754 aluminum alloy, microstructure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

WELDING RESEARCH SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL, JUNE, 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) WELDING RESEARCH SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL, JUNE, 1982 Sponsored by the American Welding Society .1mJ the Welding Research Council The Effect of Electrical Resistance on Nugget Formation During Spot Welding Applying a higher resistance coating to HSLA steel increases the welding current range

Eagar, Thomas W.

254

WELDING RESEARCH ~------------~-~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL, AUGUST 1989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) WELDING RESEARCH ·~------------~-~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL, AUGUST 1989 Sponsored by the American Welding Society and the Welding Research Council All papers published in the Welding Journal's Welding Research Supplement undergo Peer Review before publication for: 1) originality of the contribution

Eagar, Thomas W.

255

DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100211 Atomistic Simulation of the Explosion Welding Process**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100211 Atomistic Simulation of the Explosion Welding Process** By Ossi Saresoja, Antti Kuronen* and Kai Nordlund Explosive welding (EXW) is an industrial process used to join. In the process, welding occurs in a high velocity collision between metal plates, achieved by using chemical

Nordlund, Kai

256

Statistical Analysis of High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AA5083-H321  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Analysis of High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AA5083-H321 M. Grujicic AA5083, fatigue behavior, friction stir welding, maximum likelihood estimation 1. Introduction Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state metal-joining process that was invented

Grujicic, Mica

257

Fusion welding process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Strength and Microstructure of Laser Fusion Welded Ti-SS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

welding to diffusion bonding including metal-metal, metal- ceramic, and metal-polymer joints [1 such as stainless steel and titanium, as well as shape memory materials such as NiTi. Many material pairs, however. This study investigates the microstructures and strength of the laser fusion welded titanium-stainless steel

Yao, Y. Lawrence

259

Rotating arc spark plug  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

UT of bimetallic welds by shear horizontal waves and electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMUS) probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bimetallic transition welds include in most cases besides the austenitic weldment an austenitic buttering. Their inspection by ultrasound is strongly complicated by a high degree of elastic anisotropy. The elastic anisotropy results in phase and group velocities of the elastic wave-modes, which are functions of the propagation direction inside the weld metal and which cause skewing of the sound beams. The coarse grain structure leads to enhanced scattering. Furthermore, there exists a mismatch of the acoustical impedances between the weld metal and the base metal, which depends on the angle of incidence at the interface base metal/weld metal and weld metal/buttering. Due to these facts up to now using standard UT-techniques only the HAZ`s are inspected from both sides. In many cases dissimilar metal welds are only accessible from one side. Therefore, US-techniques are necessary which are capable to inspect the whole weld even if there is only access from one side. By improvement of the technology of the EMUS-probes and of the EMUS-instrumentation for the US-transduction of SH-waves a reliable technique for the ISI of dissimilar metal welds and also of austenitic welds is available. The contribution will shortly introduce into the physical basis of the SH-wave technique and present the results of test specimen measurements. The main part of the paper will report about the experiences and the results of field applications in different nuclear power plants.

Huebschen, G.; Salzburger, H.J.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Saarbruecken (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fusion welding. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the fusion welding of metals and non-metals. Among the materials cited are aluminum alloys, stainless steel, high density polyethylenes, titanium, ceramic fibers, and glass. Improvement of fusion welding through modeling and real-time control, studies on the bloating mechanism of shales, and prevention of fusion welding are also examined. (Contains a minimum of 53 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks.

263

Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Spot welding of steel and aluminum using insert sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automobile industries have been increasingly interested in the use of aluminum and thus joining of steel and aluminum becomes of importance. The joining of the two types of metal raises a problem of brittle welds caused by the formation of intermetallic compounds. The authors solved the problem by using an insert sheet. This paper deals with the resistance spot welding of steel and aluminum sheets using insert sheets. The insert sheet used in the present development was a steel/aluminum clad sheet of the 0.8 mm thickness with 50% steel and 50% aluminum. The clad sheet was produced by warm rolling of steel and aluminum with a direct resistance heating process. Steel to be warm rolled was of EDDQ of the 0.4 mm thickness and aluminum was of JIS A1050 of 0.6 mm thickness. The mechanical properties of the insert clad sheets were in between those of the steel sheets and the aluminum sheets, while the clad sheets showed much better formability than the aluminum sheets. Resistance spot welding was conducted for 0.8 mm thick EDDQ steel sheets and 1.0 mm thick aluminum alloy (AL-5.5%Mg) sheets under the welding force of 1.96 kN, welding current ranging between 4.2 and 20.1 kA, and welding time from 0.5 to 10 cycles. The steel was spot welded to the steel side of the insert sheet while the aluminum was welded to the aluminum side. What the authors investigated were the applicable welding current range, nugget diameter, tensile shear strength, U-tension strength, and macro- and microstructures. In conclusion, steel sheets can be spot welded to aluminum sheets without difficulty by using clad sheets as insert materials while the strength level of the dissimilar metal spot welds is close to that of aluminum joints.

Oikawa, H.; Saito, T.; Yoshimura, T. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Plasma arc melting of zirconium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Arc Position Sensing Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are often caused by solidification problems that arise during the melting and refining process. A common problem is arc constriction during melting. Previously, these...

267

SCC INITIATION AND GROWTH RATE STUDIES ON TITANIUM GRADE 7 AND BASE METAL, WELDED, AND AGED ALLOY 22 IN CONCENTRATED GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth rate response was evaluated on as-received, as-welded, cold worked and aged Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and titanium Grades 7 (UNS R52400), 28 (UNS R55323) and 29 (UNS R56404) at 105-165 C in various aerated, concentrated groundwater environments. Time-to-failure experiments on actively-loaded tensile specimens at 105 C evaluated the effects of applied stress, welding, surface finish, shot peening, cold work, crevicing, and aging treatments in Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), and found these materials to be highly resistant to SCC (none observed). Long-term U-bend data at 165 C corroborated these findings. Titanium Grade 7 and stainless steels were also included in the 105 C test matrix. Long term crack growth rate data showed stable crack growth in titanium Grade 7. Recent creep tests in air confirm literature data that these alloys are quite susceptible to creep failure, even below the yield stress, and it is unclear whether cracking in SCC tests is only accelerated by the creep response, or whether creep is responsible for cracking. Alloy 22 exhibited stable growth rates under ''gentle'' cyclic loading, but was prone to crack arrest at fully static loading. No effect of Pb additions was observed.

J.H. Payer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

advisory committee in the order of importance (high to low) - Weld with no or minimal fusion - Cold or stuck weld - Weld nugget size - Weld expulsion and indentation - Weld...

269

Dual wire welding torch and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

Diez, Fernando Martinez (Peoria, IL); Stump, Kevin S. (Sherman, IL); Ludewig, Howard W. (Groveland, IL); Kilty, Alan L. (Peoria, IL); Robinson, Matthew M. (Peoria, IL); Egland, Keith M. (Peoria, IL)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R&D are that various processes involving electron ion and laser beams that have now restrictions can, with the Plasma Shield be performed in practically any environment. For example, electron beam and laser welding can be performed under water, as well as, in situ repair of ship and nuclear reactor components. The plasma shield results in both thermal (since the plasma is hotter than the environment) and chemical shielding. The latter feature brings about in-vacuum process purity out of vacuum, and the thermal shielding aspect results in higher production rates.

Hershcovitch, Ady

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

CO{sub 2} laser welding of duplex and super-duplex stainless steels (the effect of argon-nitrogen assist-gas mixtures)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser welds have been fabricated on duplex and super duplex stainless steel substrates at a power of 3.5 kW. The work has examined the influence of Ar-N{sub 2} assist-gas mixtures on weld metal composition and microstructure. Welding in pure argon leads to reduction in the Cr, Ni, Mo and N content of the weld metal and a significant decrease in austenite volume fraction relative to the baseplate. Relative to welding in Ar, the use of a N{sub 2} bearing assist-gas restores the Cr, Ni and Mo levels to those found in the baseplate at the welding speeds employed. Moreover, the N{sub 2} bearing assist-gases result in an increase in the weld metal N content and austenite volume fraction relative to welding in pure Ar.

Robinson, J.M.; Reed, R.C. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Camyab, A. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method and apparatus for reclaiming metal values from electric arc furnace flue dust and sludge and rendering residual solids recyclable or non-hazardous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for treating dust and sludge contaminated with heavy metals and heavy metal oxides, comprising: waste material storage means; a mixer; means communicating with the waste material storage means and the mixer for introducing the waste material, solid carbonaceous material, and an organic binder to the mixer; a pelletizing device; means for introducing material from the mixer into the pelletizing device; pelletizer discharge means; an inclined rotary reduction smelter vessel having a charging and pouring opening in one end thereof; means for introducing pellets from the pelletizer discharge means to the rotary reduction smelter vessel; retractable burner means for heating the interior of the smelter vessel; means for rotating the smelter vessel about its inclined axis; and means for tilting the smelter vessel about a horizontal axis.

Bishop, N.G.; Bottinelli, N.E.; Kotraba, N.L.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Weld Results SUNY Stony Brook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weld Results Yan Zhan SUNY Stony Brook June 13rd, 2013 1 #12;Outline · Studied Parameters · Results Analysis ­ Contours Plots For the Weld Region ­ Axial Velocity Profile at Different Locations Near the Weld ­ Plots of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Momentum Thickness Near the Weld ­ Line Plot Goes From Inlet

McDonald, Kirk

275

Capacitor discharge process for welding braided cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A capacitor discharge process for welding a braided cable formed from a plurality of individual cable strands to a solid metallic electrically conductive member comprises the steps of: (a) preparing the electrically conductive member for welding by bevelling one of its end portions while leaving an ignition projection extending outwardly from the apex of the bevel; (b) clamping the electrically conductive member in a cathode fixture; (c) connecting the electrically conductive member clamped in the cathode fixture to a capacitor bank capable of being charged to a preselected voltage value; (d) preparing the braided cable for welding by wrapping one of its end portions with a metallic sheet to form a retaining ring operable to maintain the individual strands of the braided cable in fixed position within the retaining ring; (e) clamping the braided cable and the retaining ring as a unit in an anode fixture so that the wrapped end portion of the braided cable faces the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member; and (f) moving the cathode fixture towards the anode fixture until the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member contacts the end portion of the braided cable thereby allowing the capacitor bank to discharge through the electrically conductive member and through the braided cable and causing the electrically conductive member to be welded to the braided cable via capacitor discharge action.

Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dissimilar friction welding of titanium alloys to alloy 718  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of advanced, high-performance gas-turbine engines will require the utilization of elevated-temperature titanium-based materials, including conventional alloys, titanium aluminides, and titanium metal-matrix composites. The most efficient utilization of these materials in the engine compressor section would be achieved by directly joining these materials to existing nickel-base superalloys, such as Alloy 718. To date, the dissimilar welding of titanium alloys to nickel-based alloys has not been common practice because intermetallic compounds form in the weld and cause embrittlement. Special welding techniques must be developed to inhibit this compound formation and to provide high strength welds. In this investigation, a friction welding process was developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718. An interlayer system comprised of copper and niobium sheet layers was employed as a diffusion barrier and weld deformation enhancer. A postweld heat treatment (PWHT, 700{degrees}C for 20 min in vacuum) under axial pressure (Ksi) was used to improve the joint strength consistency. The following conclusions can be drawn from this investigation: (1) A friction welding technique has been developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to Alloy 718 using an interlayer system of niobium and copper. Joint strengths averaging approximately 50 Ksi were achieved. (2) Deformation was concentrated in the interlayers, especially the copper interlayer, during friction welding. Increased reduction in length (RIL) during friction welding resulted in a decrease in the interlayer thicknesses. (3) The EDS results showed that the niobium and copper interlayers prevent interdiffusion between the two parent metals, producing formation of detrimental phases.

Kuo, M.; Albright, C.E.; Baeslack, W.A. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Welding Process Fundamentals* Thomas W. Eagar and Aaron D. Mazzeo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(such as fastening, adhesive bonding, soldering, brazing, arc welding, diffusion bonding, and resistance the material surrounding it. Although some pro- cesses, such as diffusion bonding, can achieve results solids will bond if their surfaces are brought into intimate contact. One factor that generally inhibits

Eagar, Thomas W.

279

Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This region was followed by a dual-phase austenite/martensite region near the in- terface between the grade steels and stainless steels still occur in many in- dustrial applications. These failures have generally between the carbon steel and stainless steel end members to permit the deposition of two similar welds

DuPont, John N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY (OSU) TRAINING RESEARCH ISOTOPE GENERAL ATOMICS (TRIGA) OVERPACK CLOSURE WELDING PROCESS PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT & QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA{reg_sign} Reactor is currently being stored in thirteen 55-gallon drums at the Hanford Site's low-level burial grounds. This fuel is soon to be retrieved from buried storage and packaged into new containers (overpacks) for interim storage at the Hanford Interim Storage Area (ISA). One of the key activities associated with this effort is final closure of the overpack by welding. The OSU fuel is placed into an overpack, a head inserted into the overpack top, and welded closed. Weld quality, for typical welded fabrication, is established through post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE); however, in this case, once the SNF is placed into the overpack, routine testing and NDE are not feasible. An alternate approach is to develop and qualify the welding process/parameters, demonstrate beforehand that they produce the desired weld quality, and then verify parameter compliance during production welding. Fluor engineers have developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrating that weld quality requirements for closure of packaged SNF overpacks are met, using this alternate approach. The following reviews the activities performed for this development and qualification effort.

CANNELL, G.R.

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Procedure for Computing Residual Stresses from Neutron Diffraction Data and its Application to Multi-Pass Dissimilar Weld  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool for non-destructive measurement of internal residual stresses of welded structures. The conventional approach for determination of residual stresses requires the knowledge of stress-free lattice spacing a priori. For multiple-pass dissimilar metal welds common to nuclear reactor pipeline systems, the stress-free lattice parameter is a complex function of position due to the chemistry inhomogeneity in the weld region and can be challenging to determine experimentally. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the residual stress field in dissimilar welds without the use of stress-free lattice parameter. The theoretical basis takes advantage of the fact that the normal component of welding residual stresses is typically small for thin plate or pipe welds. The applicability of the new approach is examined and justified in a multi-pass dissimilar metal weld consisting of a stainless steel plate and a nickel alloy filler metal. The level of uncertainties associated with this new approach is assessed. Neutron diffraction experiment is carried out to measure the lattice spacing at various locations in the dissimilar weld. A comb-shaped specimen, electro-discharge machined from a companion weld, is used to determine the stress-free lattice spacing. The calculated results from the new approach are consistent with those from the conventional approach. The new approach is found to be a practical method for determining the two in-plane residual stress components in thin plate or pipe dissimilar metal welds.

Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Laser weld jig. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Friction stir welding tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barnes, Timothy A. (Ammon, ID)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Investigation of electromagnetic welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose several methodologies to study and optimize the electromagnetic process for Electromagnetic Forming (EMF) and Welding (EMW), thereby lowering the necessary process energy up to a factor of three and lengthening ...

Pressl, Daniel G. (Daniel Gerd)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fracture toughness of the molten zone of resistance spot welds Florent Krajcarz1,2*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In these tests, the load vs. load line displacement curve is recorded to derive the weld strength (i.e. maximal of the base metal still significantly influences the load vs. displacement curve, yet to a lesser extent than and the crack extension resistance of the molten zone of resistance spot welds under Mode I loading has been

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

288

CO{sub 2} laser beam welding of magnesium-based alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnesium has gained increased attention in recent years as a structural metal--especially in the automotive industry--necessitating the development of welding techniques qualified for this new application. Lasers are known to be an excellent tool for joining metals. This paper presents results of recent investigations on the weldability of several cast and wrought magnesium-based alloys. Plates with a thickness of 2.5--8 mm were butt joint welded with and without filler metal using a 2.5-kW CO{sub 2} laser. The investigations showed that magnesium alloys can be easily laser welded in similar and dissimilar joints. The beam characteristics of the laser leads to small welds and a deep penetration depth. Crackfree welds exhibiting low porosity and good surface finish can be achieved with appropriate process parameters. Generally, the laser welding leads to either no change or a small increase in hardness in the fusion zone (FZ) and in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) relative to the base metal. Less promising results were obtained for the cast alloy QE22, in which cracking in the age-hardened condition and a significant decrease in hardness occurred. Laser welded die cast alloys showed an extremely high level of porosity in the weld.

Weisheit, A.; Galun, R.; Mordike, B.L. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Strength and microstructure of laser fusion-welded TiSS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Strength and microstructure of laser fusion-welded Ti­SS dissimilar material pair robust and reliable dissimilar metal joints has the potential to enable new func- tionalities and reduce the manufacturing costs of medical devices. The need for dissimilar material welds in the med- ical device industry

Yao, Y. Lawrence

290

Mechanical and metallurgical properties of MMC friction welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical and metallurgical properties of similar and dissimilar welds involving aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) base material were investigated using factorial experimentation. The test materials comprised aluminum-based alloy 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (W6A.10A-T6), aluminum Alloy 6061-T6 and AISI 304 stainless steel. Notch tensile strength increased when high friction pressures were employed during MMC/MMC, MMC/Alloy 6061, MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel and Alloy 6061/Alloy 6061 friction welding. In MMC/Alloy 6061 welds, notch tensile strength also increased when high forging pressures were employed. Applied oxide films on both the MMC and AISI stainless steel substrates had a markedly detrimental effect on dissimilar weld mechanical properties. The optimum notch tensile strength properties were produced when high friction pressure values were applied during dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel welding. High friction pressure had two beneficial effects, i.e., it decreased the thickness of the FeAl{sub 3} intermetallic film and it promoted disruption and dispersal of oxide films at the joint interface. In direct contrast, the presence of thick anodized oxide films on the MMC substrate surface prior to friction welding had no observable influence on MMC/MMC weld mechanical properties.

Li, Z.; Maldonado, C.; North, T.H. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science; Altshuller, B. [Alcan R and D Labs., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development program. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Failure of dissimilar metal welds is a major cause of forced outage in fossil boilers. A research project was carried out to: Develop a clearer understanding of the underlying causes of dissimilar weld failures; develop a methodology for estimating the residual life of service welds; develop a critical discriminatory test to predict the relative performance of welds; and develop guidelines for improved-performance dissimilar welds. The research methodology included review of prior experience as well as evaluation of a large number of failed and unfailed welds obtained from boiler superheaters or reheaters. The evaluations included metallography, mechanical testing and boiler inspections; in many cases, tube loading histories at the dissimilar weld locations were estimated. This work resulted in a clearer understanding of the root cause of weld failures. Furthermore, a quantitative relationship was derived between failure susceptibility and weld metal ''system'' loads, cycles, and temperatures (all critical parameters in weld performance). Accelerated discriminatory tests, including a number of geometries and modes of stressing and thermal cycling, were examined. The shortest time to failure, good reproducibility, and the capability to control loads and monitor cracking were achieved in a test which involved applying four-point bending loads to internally pressurized full-size tubular specimens. Tests at 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F), which involved temperature cycling, had failure times of only 400 h for stainless-steel fillers and 1500 h for nickel-base fillers. Guidelines for improved welds were derived from all the program results. They include and offer guidance on the considerations of weld-filler selection, weld geometry, heat treatment, etc., in relation to expected service conditions and on locating DMWs to optimize service performance. 7 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

Hood, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Vacuum arc deposition devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modelling of friction stir welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the modelling of friction stir welding (FSW). FSW is a relatively new welding process where a rotating non-consumable tool is used to join two materials through high temperature deformation. The aim of the thesis...

Colegrove, Paul Andrew

297

College of Design ARC Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Design ARC Architecture KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped,landscape,andarchitecturalspaceswithattentiontotheirapplicationtothearchitecturalexperience.Studio:4hoursperweek. Prereq: Admission to the School of Architecture. ARC 102 DRAWING II: OBSERVATIONAL OF ARCHITECTURE. (3

MacAdam, Keith

298

TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

Hovanski, Yuri

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between alloy 800 and HP heat-resistant steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, dissimilar welds between HP heat-resistant steel and Incoloy 800 were made with four different filler materials including: 309 stainless steel and nickel-based Inconel 82, 182 and 617. The microstructure of the base metals, weld metals and their interfaces were characterized by utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopy. Grain boundaries migration in the weld metals was studied. It was found that the migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive. Precipitates of TiC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr and Mo) in the Inconel 617 weld metal are identified. The necessary conditions for the formation of cracks close to the fusion line of the 309-HP joints are described. Furthermore unmixed zone near the fusion line between HP steel base metal and Inconel 82 weld metal is discussed. An epitaxial growth is characterized at the fusion line of the 309-Alloy 800 and Inconel 617-Alloy 800 joints.

Dehmolaei, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir; Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A MULTILAYERED MULTIPASS FRICTION STIR WELD IN STEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayered multipass friction stir welding (MM-FSW) makes it possible to use FSW to fabricate thick-section structures. In this work, MM-FSW was demonstrated on a high strength low alloy steel; ASTM A572 Grade 50. Three steel plates with thicknesses of 0.18", 0.18", 0.24" respectively were stacked and friction stir welded together to form a 0.6" thick welded structure. The welded plate was sectioned into rectangular bars transverse to the weld direction for tensile testing to evaluate mechanical properties. Digital image correlation (DIC) was employed to map the local strain fields during tensile testing. The initial failure was found to occur simultaneously at the bottom and middle layers away from the weld zone. The top layer failed last in the base metal. The failure locations were consistent among different samples tested. Also, Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted for weld metal, heat affected zone, and the base metal at each layer as a function of temperature. The weld microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy and micro-hardness mapping.

Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Qiao, Dongxiao [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Robotic Welding and Inspection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the work performed under RP 1874-1, the factors influencing the performance of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) in elevated temperature power plant boiler service have been defined. Details of the results are given in other volumes of this report series. In this volume, design and procedure guidelines for improving DMW performance are provided. DMW life can be extended by: locating DMWs such that service conditions are conducive to long life; such locations may be identified by the use of the computerized analytical program PODIS, developed under RP 1874; using preferred weld filler metals; and using specific weld configurations. Details of each of these approaches are described herein. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Roberts, D.I.; Ryder, R.H.; Grunloh, H.J.; Thurgood, B.E. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Analysis of dissimilar welds exposed to high temperature H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S conditions in a hydrodesulfurizing (HDS) unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high temperature applications, dissimilar welds made with nickel-base alloy filler metals provide extended service lives as compared to similar welds made with stainless steel filler metals. Although considerable refinery experience exists, it is difficult to find published information for pressure boundary welds made with nickel-base filler metal in hot hydrogen and/or H{sub 2}S services. The Amuay Refinery has used nickel base alloy filler metals to join clad piping components in a number of piping applications. This paper details the results of an analysis of clad 1{1/4}Cr-{1/2} Mo steel hydroprocessing reactor effluent piping samples removed from service to assess the long term effects of hydrogen and H{sub 2}S on the dissimilar weld. Results of mechanical testing and metallurgical analysis reveal that no significant loss in properties occurred. Details of the weld procedures and weld joint design are provided.

Penuela, L.E.; Chirinos, J.G. [PDVSA Manufacture y Mercado, Judibana (Venezuela). Centro Refinacion Paraguana; Dobis, J.D. [KLAD Inc., Elkton, MD (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hall-effect arc protector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Hall-effect arc protector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Boise, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Masatsu kakuhan setsugo "Friction Stir Welding Complete aspects of FSW" Japan Welding Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masatsu kakuhan setsugo ­ "Friction Stir Welding ­ Complete aspects of FSW" Japan Welding Society years ago that the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) method was proposed by TWI. Because FSW is a solid state welding method, the peak temperature reached during FSW welding is lower than the traditional welding

Cambridge, University of

309

WELDING RESEARCH ~~--------------~~~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL, MAY 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) WELDING RESEARCH ~~--------------~~~ SUPPLEMENT TO THE WELDING JOURNAL, MAY 1990 Sponsored by the American Welding Society and the Welding Research Council All papers published in the Welding Journal's Welding Research Supplement undergo Peer Review before publication for: 1) originality of the contribution

Eagar, Thomas W.

310

Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials.

Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Microstructural issues in a friction-stir-welded aluminum alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observations of microstructures associated with friction-stir welding (FSW) in a number of aluminum alloys have consistently demonstrated the actual weld zone to consist of a (dynamically) recrystallized grain structure resulting from the extreme, solid-state, plastic deformation characterizing the process. Because of solubilities associated with the various precipitates in 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys, and the fact that the precipitates were either homogeneously distributed throughout both the original (unwelded) work-piece plates and the well zones (or formed varying densities of Widmanstaetten patterns within the original and recrystallized grains), it has been difficult to follow the stirring of stable, second-phase particles from the base metal (work-piece) into the weld zone. In the present investigation, a compositionally modified 1100 aluminum alloy (nominally 99.2% Al, 0.5% Fe, 0.15% Cu, 0.12% Si, 0.05 Mn, 0.04 Ti, balance in weight percent of Be and Mg), forming a stable microdendritic (second-phase), equiaxed, cell structure was friction-stir welded. These thermally stable, geometrically specific, precipitates in the base metal were compared with their disposition within the friction-stir-weld zone. In addition, as-cast plates of this alloy were cold-rolled 50% and friction-stir-welded in order to compare these two schedules (as-cast and 50% cold-rolled) in terms of residual hardness variations and related microstructural issues as well as the effect of prior deformation on the friction-stir welding process.

Flores, O.V.; Kennedy, C.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; Pappu, S.; Nowak, B.M.; McClure, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Grose, Stephen M. (Glenwood, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Shell Hoop Prestress Generated by Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be generated by the welding process. The data are notagainst the yoke for welding. TEST SETUP Annealed Type 304in two passes using TIG welding. After strain measurements

Meuser, R.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Application of Bayesian Neural Network for modeling and prediction of ferrite number in austenitic stainless steel welds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel weld metals, a lower ferrite limit is specified for stress in austenitic stainless steel welds M. Vasudevan, M. Murugananth*, and A.K. Bhaduri Materials Joining Section the influence of compositional variations on ferrite content for the austenitic stainless steel base

Cambridge, University of

317

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppthent au n07, Tome 40, J u i Z k t 1979, page C7-267 ENHANCEDARCING AS A FUNCTIONW ORGANIC EXPOSUREAND ARC CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENHANCEDARCING AS A FUNCTIONW ORGANIC EXPOSUREAND ARC CURRENT Pd AND PdIAg ELECTRODES E.W. Gray and J.R. Pharney and the electrode metal), arc duration statistics show an exponen- tial behavior. Under moderate to high organic

Boyer, Edmond

318

Arc Position Sensing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2 (CRAC 2 period)Office2Arbitrary FunctionArc

319

Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Welding Society Fellow November 29, 2012 Thomas J. Lienert of the Lab's Metallurgy group was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of Fellows during...

320

Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the knowledge, science, and application of welding. Thomas J. Lienert of the Lab's Metallurgy group was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of Fellows during...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Resistance spot welding of ultra-fine grained steel sheets produced by constrained groove pressing: Optimization and characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constrained groove pressing as a severe plastic deformation method is utilized to produce ultra-fine grained low carbon steel sheets. The ultra-fine grained sheets are joined via resistance spot welding process and the characteristics of spot welds are investigated. Resistance spot welding process is optimized for welding of the sheets with different severe deformations and their results are compared with those of as-received samples. The effects of failure mode and expulsion on the performance of ultra-fine grained sheet spot welds have been investigated in the present paper and the welding current and time of resistance spot welding process according to these subjects are optimized. Failure mode and failure load obtained in tensile-shear test, microhardness, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope images have been used to describe the performance of spot welds. The region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. The results show that optimum welding parameters (welding current and welding time) for ultra-fine grained sheets are shifted to lower values with respect to those for as-received specimens. In ultra-fine grained sheets, one new region is formed named recrystallized zone in addition to fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal. It is shown that microstructures of different zones in ultra-fine grained sheets are finer than those of as-received sheets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resistance spot welding process is optimized for joining of UFG steel sheets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum welding current and time are decreased with increasing the CGP pass number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness at BM, HAZ, FZ and recrystallized zone is enhanced due to CGP.

Khodabakhshi, F.; Kazeminezhad, M., E-mail: mkazemi@sharif.edu; Kokabi, A.H.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Characterization of Service Induced Flaws on the Far Side of Austenitic Welds Using Phased Array Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional ultrasonic testing methods continue to exhibit problems for applications involving coarse-grained structures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in these coarse-grained materials. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. Work to determine detection capabilities through welds with varied grain structures is being explored to provide a better understanding of the acoustic properties of these welded structures. Piping specimens with welds fabricated in vertical and horizontal positions to simulate field conditions have been studied. The insights gained from the austenitic piping will be applied to dissimilar metal weld configurations, corrosion resistant clad piping and cast stainless steels. This paper presents results for using PA ultrasonic technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of feed composition variations on process operating conditions and slag product performance; and collecting mass balance and operating data to support equipment and instrument design.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation S. A. GEDEON and T. W. EAGAR Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated

Eagar, Thomas W.

325

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

Jha, K.N.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. The intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding.

R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

WELDING AND CUTTING 10.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 10-1 SECTION 10 WELDING AND CUTTING 10.A GENERAL 10.A.01 Welders, cutters, and their supervisor shall be trained in the safe operation of their equipment, safe welding/cutting practices, and welding/cutting respiratory and fire protection. > AIHA publication "Welding Health and Safety: A Field

US Army Corps of Engineers

329

Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.. ) Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys Welds made with sharp bevel-groove weld aluminum and by aluminum alloy 5456 have been studied. The results indicate that initial absorption varies of the most dramatic illustrations of the differences in beam characteristics occurs when welding aluminum

Eagar, Thomas W.

330

Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

465. SappME. AHistoryofWelding:fromHepheastustowhistoryfolder/welding/index.html. SaricM,Markicevic,be retrieved from American Welding Society publications. The

LIU, SA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Laser welding of fused quartz  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer III, McIlwaine

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright © 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro Arc Hydro: GIS in Water Resources Seminar/Workshop Gainesville, Florida ­ November 15, 2007 Christine Dartiguenave, ESRI inc. cdartiguenave@esri.com #12;Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 2 2Arc Hydro

Kane, Andrew S.

333

Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

Craddock, Paul R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The effect of inter-pass temperature on residual stresses in multi-pass welds produced using a low transformation temperature filler alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the deposition of new metal with a relatively low inter-pass temperature leads to increased residual stressesThe effect of inter-pass temperature on residual stresses in multi-pass welds produced using a low-to-martensite transformation temperatures offer an effective method of reducing residual stresses in strong, steel welds

Cambridge, University of

335

Pipe weld crown removal device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

Sword, Charles K. (Pleasant Hills, PA); Sette, Primo J. (West Newton, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The role of electroplated coatings in metal joining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroplated and electroless coatings often play an important role in soldering, brazing, and welding operations. Thin deposits applied to critical surfaces before the joining operations can provide the difference between success and failure. Diffusion welding applications sometimes require coatings to help promote joining. For some applications, electroplating by itself can be used to join metals that cannot be welded or brazed because of metallurgical incompatibility. The use of electroplated coatings for these various joining applications is reviewed here.

Dini, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Atom probe field-ion microscopy investigation of nickel base superalloy welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructure development and elemental partitioning between {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} were measured in PWA-1480 electron beam welds and CMSX-4 pulsed-laser welds. In PWA-1480 EB welds, eutectic {gamma}{prime} phases were observed along the dendritic boundaries. The elemental partitioning between {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} was found to be similar to that in PWA-1480 base metal. In CMSX-4 pulsed laser welds, negligible eutectic {gamma}{prime} was observed. In addition, fine and irregularly shaped {gamma}{prime} precipitates were observed. The elemental partitioning between {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} was found to be different from that measured in the base metal. Large concentration gradients were observed in the {gamma} phase. The {gamma}{prime} precipitation kinetics in CM247DS alloy was measured using dilatometry and showed differences with different cooling rates. The microstructural investigations showed that at large undercoolings the number density of {gamma}{prime} precipitates increased and led to a finer size. This supports the microstructure development observations in PWA-1480 and CMSX-4 welds. Thermodynamic and kinetic calculations for the Ni-Al-Cr alloy system showed that as the cooling rate increases, the {gamma}{prime} growth leads to large concentration gradients in the {gamma} phase. The calculations agree with the atom probe results from PWA-1480 and CMSX-4 welds.

Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Miller, M.K.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

339

Application of Taguchi method in Nd-YAG laser welding of super duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation is aimed at achieving a near 50-50 % ferrite-austenite ratio of laser welded super duplex stainless steel, UNS S 32760 (Zeron 100). Bead-on-plate welding has been carried out using a 2 kW Nd-YAG laser with 3 different kinds of wave form, Continuous, Sine and Square wave. The weld metals were examined with respect to the phase volume contents by X-ray diffraction. Laser welding involved a large number of variables, interaction and levels of variables. Taguchi Method was selected and used to reduce the number of experimental conditions and to identify the dominant factors. The optimum combinations of controllable factors were found from each set of wave form. The optimum 40-60% ferrite-austenite ratio were realized on some of the combination parameter groups after using the Parameter Design method.

Yip, W.M.; Man, H.C.; Ip, W.H. [Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Kowloon (Hong Kong)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Inspection of Nickel Alloy Welds: Results from Five Year International Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission established and coordinated the international Program for the Inspection of Nickel alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in dissimilar metal welds. Round-robin results showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound provide the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in bottom-mounted instrumentation penetrations by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field.

Prokofiev, Iouri; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Plasma arc melting of titanium-tantalum alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos has several applications for high temperature, oxidation and liquid-metal corrosion resistant materials. Further, materials property constraints are dictated by a requirement to maintain low density; e.g., less than the density of stainless steel. Liquid metal compatibility and density requirements have driven the research toward the Ti-Ta system with an upper bound of 60 wt% Ta-40 wt% Ti. Initial melting of these materials was performed in a small button arc melter with several hundred grams of material; however, ingot quantities were soon needed. But, refractory metal alloys whose constituents possess very dissimilar densities, melting temperatures and vapor pressures pose significant difficulty and require specialized melting practices. The Ti-Ta alloys fall into this category with the density of tantalum 16.5 g/cc and that of titanium 4.5 g/cc. Melting is further complicated by the high melting point of Ta(3020 C) and the relatively low boiling point of Ti(3287 C). Previous electron beam melting experience with these materials resulted, in extensive vaporization of the titanium and poor chemical homogeneity. Vacuum arc remelting(VAR) was considered as a melting candidate and discarded due to density and vapor pressure issues associated with electron beam. Plasma arc melting offered the ability to supply a cover gas to deal with vapor pressure issues as well as solidification control to help with macrosegregation in the melt and has successfully produced high quality ingots of the Ti-Ta alloys.

Dunn, P.; Patterson, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Haun, R. [Retech, Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

High pressure neon arc lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

Jafarzadegan, M. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Feng, A.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeid, T. [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shen, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Soft zone formation in dissimilar welds between two Cr-Mo steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dissimilar weldments between 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steels have been characterized for their microstructural stability during various postweld heat treatments (PWHTs). The samples for the investigation were extracted from bead-on-plate weldments made by depositing 2.25Cr-1Mo weld metal on 9Cr-1Mo base plate and vice versa. Subsequent application of PWHT resulted in the formation of a soft zone in the low Cr ferritic steel weld or base plate. A carbide-rich hard zone, adjoining the soft zone, was also detected in the high Cr side of the weldment. Unmixed zones in the weld metal provided additional soft and hard zones in the weld metals. The migration of carbon from low-Cr steel to high-Cr steel, driven by the carbon activity gradient, has been shown to be responsible for the formation of soft and hard zones. A carbon activity diagram for 2.25Cr-1Mo/9Cr-1Mo weldments has been proposed to aid in the selection of welding consumables for reducing or preventing the soft zone formation.

Albert, S.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kulkarni, S.D. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pre-resistance-welding resistance check  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

Destefan, Dennis E. (Broomfield, CO); Stompro, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Phase transformations in welded supermartensitic stainless steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ferrite phase, and the development of a model to facilitate the choice of a suitable post-weld heat-treatment temperature. The microstructural examination of a variety of welds revealed the presence of retained ?-ferrite in dual-phase and grain... -coarsened HAZ regions. Under normal welding conditions, ?-ferrite retention was more pronounced in dual-phase HAZ and in molybdenum containing alloys. However, in multipass welds, ?-ferrite distribution was non-uniform as a result of reheating effects. A number...

Carrouge, Dominique

348

Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...._ _) Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails by N.S. Tsai* and T.W. Eagar* ABSTRACT 421 The advantages and limitations ofseveral conventional and prospective rail welding processes are reviewed with emphasis on the heat input rate, on joint preparation, on post weld grinding and on resultant metallurgical

Eagar, Thomas W.

349

Energy Sources Used for Fusion Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Energy Sources Used for Fusion Welding Thomas W. Eagar, Massachusetts Institute of Technology WELDING AND JOINING processes are es- sential for the development of virtually every manufactured product this situation. First, welding and joining are multifaceted, both in terms of process variations (such as fas

Eagar, Thomas W.

350

The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

Anders, Andre

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ferrite determination in stainless steel welds -- Advances since 1974  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of MagneGage Number 3 Magnet strengths led to a concept for extending, by extrapolation, the calibration range of AWS A4.2-7.4 to ferrite levels above 28 FN. Ferrite Numbers could then be assigned to thinner coating thickness standards for primary calibration of MagneGages over the extended range. Calibration using primary standards is limited to a very few instruments, due to the difference in distribution of ferromagnetic material in coating thickness standards vs that in stainless steel weld metal. secondary standards, covering the range from near zero to about 100 FN, became available for calibrating additional instruments at the beginning of 1995. A round robin of tests established that the interlaboratory reproducibility of measurement after calibration by the secondary standards is similar to that observed with MagneGages calibrated by use of primary standards. Excessive ferrite in duplex stainless steel weld metals has adverse effects on weld properties. The utility of the Ferrite Number measurement system for duplex stainless steels is thus established. Development of a solid link between Ferrite Number and ferrite percent, determination of ferrite in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of duplex stainless steel weldments, and further development of predicting diagrams remain for the future.

Kotecki, D.J. [Lincoln Electric Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Precipitate stability and recrystallisation in the weld nuggets of friction stir welded Al-Mg-Si and Al-Mg-Sc alloys.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Precipitate stability and recrystallisation in the weld nuggets of friction stir welded Al Two different precipitate hardening aluminium alloys processed by friction stir welding were of continuous and discontinuous recrystallisation occurred in the weld nugget. Keywords friction stir welding

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

353

Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Morphologies of the transition region in dissimilar austenitic-ferritic welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The morphology of the transition region in dissimilar austenitic-ferritic steel welds has been characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. With increasing base metal carbon content, a martensite-like layer in the unmixed zone of this region diminishes or disappears, and a saw-tooth-like morphology extends form the partially melted zone into the weld. The number of weld interfaces also changes with variation in carbon content, from the double austenite/martensite-like and martensite-like/ferrite interfaces to a single austenite/martensite-like one. These variations are attributed to the local melting range of the base metal, which depends upon the carbon content, cooling rate, and alloy element segregation.

Pan, C.; Zhang, Z. [Wuhan Transportation Univ., Wuhan, Hubei (China). Lab. of Electron Microscopy] [Wuhan Transportation Univ., Wuhan, Hubei (China). Lab. of Electron Microscopy

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Dissimilar-welded failure analysis and development: Volume 6, Weld condition and remaining life assessment manual: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Step-by-step guidelines contained in a new engineering manual explain how to evaluate dissimilar metal weld loadings, assess the current state of damage, and predict remaining weld life. Suggested plant and operational modifications will help utility personnel identify root causes and avoid additional failures in a given boiler. Failure of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) between the austenitic and ferritic steel tubing used in superheaters and reheaters constitutes a major cause of forced outages in fossil boilers. EPRI has undertaken a study of DMWs, reported in volumes 1-6 of this nine-volume series, to provide utilities with a systematic approach for identifying root causes, remedying identified problems, and estimating remaining DMW useful life. This manual follows the three-phase approach outlined in the EPRI guidelines for life extension (report CS-4778). The investigators subjected the samples to detailed metallurgical examination and established correlations among operating conditions, system stresses, and the extent of observed DMW cracking. These correlations were quantified in the PODIS computer code (prediction of damage in service code; EPRI report CS-4252, volume 7). The investigators documented this information in a manual explaining how to carry out life assessment of DMWs. These guidelines describe an analytic procedure that computes the current level of DMW damage based on operating temperature, the number and nature of cycles, and system stresses. They explain a procedure for supplementary destructive examinations to verify the analytic predictions. 10 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Shimmed electron beam welding process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fracture toughness of thick section dissimilar electron beam weld joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural investigations as well as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness test based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were performed on single pass, full penetration similar and dissimilar electron beam (EB) welds of 40 mm thick 316L type austenitic steel and high alloyed fine tempered martensitic 9Cr 1Mo Nb V (P91 -ASTM A213) steel. The latter modified steel has been developed to fill up the gap between 12Cr steel and austenitic stainless steels with respect to the high temperature properties and better weldability. Furthermore, it shows a small thermal expansion coefficient and is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking like the austenitic steel. The weldment properties were evaluated by microstructural analysis, microhardness, Charpy V- notch impact, and by newly developed flat microtensile specimens (0.5 mm thick). The dissimilar EB weld metal and HAZ of P91 steel has been shown to be microstructurally and mechanically distinct from both austenitic and martenistic parent metals. The use of microsized rectangular tensile specimens provides unique solution to the problem of the mechanical property determination of the narrow EB weld joint. The HAZ of the 9Cr1Mo steel exhibits extremely poor CTOD toughness properties in as-welded condition at room temperature. The CTOD values obtained were believed to be represent the intrinsic property of this zone, since the distance of the crack tip to the austenitic steel part was too large to receive a stress relaxation effect from low strength side on the crack tip (by accommodating the applied strains in the high toughness, lower strength 316L plate).

Kocak, M.; Junghans, E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the noise in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

Anders, Andre

2011-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Random Curves by Conformal Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle given in terms of the exponential of Gaussian Free Field. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

Astala, K; Kupiainen, A; Saksman, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Random Curves by Conformal Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle given in terms of the exponential of Gaussian Free Field. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

K. Astala; P. Jones; A. Kupiainen; E. Saksman

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Filters for cathodic arc plasmas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effect of Welding Speed and Defocusing Distance on the Quality of Laser Welded Ti-6Al-4V  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Welding Speed and Defocusing Distance on the Quality of Laser Welded Ti-6Al-4V A:YAG laser, Laser welding, Ti-6Al-4V alloy Abstract In this study, the weldability of 5.1-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V at various welding speeds and defocusing distances. The joint quality was characterized in terms of weld

Medraj, Mamoun

368

Stability measurements of PPL atmospheric pressure arc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the stability of atmospheric pressure arcs have been started at PPL to understand and improve the performance of arc furnaces used for processing applications in metallurgy and hazardous waste treatment. Previous studies have suggested that the violent instabilities in such arcs may be due to kink modes. A 30 kW, 500 Amp CW DC experimental arc furnace was constructed with a graphite cathode and a molten steel anode. The arc plasma is diagnosed with 4000 frames/sec digital camera, Hall probes, and voltage and current monitors. Under certain conditions, the arc exhibits an intermittent helical instability, with the helix rotating at {approx}600 Hz. The nature of the instability is investigated. A possible instability mechanism is the self-magnetic field of the arc, with saturation occurring due to inhomogeneous heating in a helical arc. The effect of external DC and AC magnetic fields on the instability is investigated. Additionally, arc deflection due to external transverse magnetic field is investigated. The deflection angle is found to be proportional to the applied field, and is in good agreement with a simple model of the {rvec J} x {rvec b} force on the arc jet.

Roquemore, L.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Wurden, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy Approach: Weld Quality Metrics * Ranked by industry advisory committee in the order of importance (high to low) - Weld with no or minimal fusion - Cold or stuck weld -...

370

Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid dermal fillers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

metals (IN625 and IN622) using the gas... ) were produced by varying the independent welding parameters of arc power and volumetric filler... - sectional areas. The dilution...

372

Passively damped vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, H.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

Peacock, H.B.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

An interchangeable-cathode vacuum arc plasma source David K. Olson,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design based on metal vapor vacuum arc MeVVA concepts is employed as a plasma source for a study of a 7 using a boron-carbide disk as the cathode target. The design is simplified from typical designs with a proton beam. We create our 7 Be on the surface of a sample of enriched boron carbide. Because 7

Hart, Gus

378

ARC-ED Curriculum: The Application of Video Game Formats to Educational Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

educational practices are examined in relation to the motivational features of arcade games. Also, guidelines for educational curriculum based on arcade game formats are proposed and the term Arc-Ed Curriculum is offered to describe such software. The content...

Chaffin, Jerry D.; Maxwell, Bill; Thompson, Barbara

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELDS by Naseem Issa Abdallah Haddad;The Development of Microstructure in Duplex Stainless Steel Welds Abstract Duplex stainless steels

Cambridge, University of

380

Linkage of the ArcHydro Data Model with SWAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linkage of the ArcHydro Data Model with SWAT Francisco Olivera, Ph.D., P.E. Milver Valenzuela Texas on a hub basis. Independent of the already connected models HUB #12;Arc Hydro Arc Hydro can be used as the hub for connecting hydrologic models. #12;Arc Hydro #12;What it is and what it is not ... Arc Hydro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chemical composition and RT[sub NDT] determinations for Midland weld WF-70  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Heavy-Section Steal Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series has the objective to investigate the affects of radiation on the fracture toughness of the low-upper-shelf submerged-arc welds (B W designation WF-70) in the reactor pressure vessel of the canceled Midland Unit 1 nuclear plant. This report discusses determination of variations in chemical composition And reference temperature (RT[sub NDT]) throughout the welds. Specimens were machined from different sections and through thickness locations in both the beltline and nozzle course welds. The nil-ductility transition temperatures ranged from [minus]40 to [minus]60[degrees]C ([minus]40 and [minus]76[degrees]F) while the RT[sub NDT]S, controlled by the Charpy behavior, varied from [minus]20 to 37[degrees]C ([minus]4 to 99[degrees]F). The upper-shelf energies varied from 77 to 108 J (57 to 80 ft-lb). The combined data revealed a mean 41-J (30-ft-lb) temperature of [minus]8[degrees]C (17[degrees]F) with a mean upper-shelf energy of 88 J (65 ft-lb). The copper contents range from 0.21 to 0.34 wt % in the beltline weld and from 0.37 to 0.46 wt % in the nozzle course weld. Atom probe field ion microscope analyses indicated substantial depletion of copper in the matrix but no evidence of copper clustering. Statistical analyses of the Charpy and chemical composition results as well as interpretation of the ASME procedures for RT[sub NDT] determination are discussed.

Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Swain, R.L.; Miller, M.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

Jimenez, E. Jr.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Welding shield for coupling heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Recycling of electric-arc-furnace dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is one of the largest solid waste streams produced by steel mills, and is classified as a waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Successful recycle of the valuable metals (iron, zinc, and lead) present in the dust will result in resource conservation while simultaneously reducing the disposal problems. Technical feasibility of a novel recycling method based on using hydrogen as the reductant was established under this project through laboratory experiments. Sponge iron produced was low in zinc, cadmium, and lead to permit its recycle, and nontoxic to permit its safe disposal as an alternative to recycling. Zinc oxide was analyzed to contain 50% to 58% zinc by weight, and can be marketed for recovering zinc and lead. A prototype system was designed to process 2.5 tons per day (600 tons/year) of EAF dust, and a preliminary economic analysis was conducted. The cost of processing dust by this recycling method was estimated to be comparable to or lower than existing methods, even at such low capacities.

Sresty, G.C.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Iridate with Fermi Arcs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRed CrossAn Iridate with Fermi Arcs An Iridate

386

Polymer Welding: Strength Through Entanglements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale simulations of thermal welding of polymers are performed to investigate the rise of mechanical strength at the polymer-polymer interface with the welding time. The welding process is in the core of integrating polymeric elements into devices as well as in thermal induced healing of polymers; processes that require development of interfacial strength equal to that of the bulk. Our simulations show that the interfacial strength saturates at the bulk shear strength much before polymers diffuse by their radius of gyration. Along with the strength increase, the dominant failure mode changes from chain pullout at the interface to chain scission as in the bulk. Formation of sufficient entanglements across the interface, which we track using a Primitive Path Analysis is required to arrest catastrophic chain pullout at the interface. The bulk response is not fully recovered until the density of entanglements at the interface reaches the bulk value. Moreover, the increase of interfacial strength before saturation is proportional to the number of interfacial entanglements between chains from opposite sides.

Ting Ge; Flint Pierce; Dvora Perahia; Gary S. Grest; Mark O. Robbins

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor as the basis for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity, hydrogen production, and process heat applications. The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. An intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding. This report describes the preliminary results of a scoping study that evaluated the diffusion welding process parameters and the resultant mechanical properties of diffusion welded joints using Alloy 800H. The long-term goal of the program is to progress towards demonstration of small heat exchanger unit cells fabricated with diffusion welds. Demonstration through mechanical testing of the unit cells will support American Society of Mechanical Engineers rules and standards development, reduce technical risk, and provide proof of concept for heat exchanger fabrication methods needed to deploy heat exchangers in several potential NGNP configurations.1 Researchers also evaluated the usefulness of modern thermodynamic and diffusion computational tools (Thermo-Calc and Dictra) in optimizing the parameters for diffusion welding of Alloy 800H. The modeling efforts suggested a temperature of 1150 C for 1 hour with an applied pressure of 5 MPa using 15 {micro}m nickel foil as joint filler to reduce chromium oxidation on the welded surfaces. Good agreement between modeled and experimentally determined concentration gradients was achieved

R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Characterization of solid-phase welds between Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0. 01Si and Ti-13. 5A1-21. 5Nb titanium aluminide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissimilar-alloy welds have been produced between Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si (wt.%) and Ti-13.5Al-21.5Nb (wt.%) titanium aluminide using three different solid-phase welding processes that create significantly different thermo-mechanical conditions at the weld interface. Exposure to supertransus temperatures, appreciable deformation and rapid cooling of the weld interface region during linear-friction welding promote dynamic recrystallization of beta grains and beta decomposition to fine martensitic products. In contrast, diffusion welding at temperatures below the base metal beta transus temperatures and at relatively low pressures minimizes deformation and microstructural variations in the weld interface region relative to the unaffected base metal. During capacitor-discharge resistance spot welding, extremely rapid heating of the weld interface region to near-solidus temperatures, and subsequent rapid cooling, result in the formation of a metastable, ordered-beta microstructure in the Ti-13.5ASl-21.5Nb and fine alpha-prime martensite in the Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si.

Baeslack, W.A. III; Juhas, M.; Fraser, H.L. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Broderick, T.F. (Wright Labs., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Materials Directorate)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

Dunn, K.A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

High temperature low-cycle fatigue of friction welded joints - type 304-304 stainless steel and alloy 718-718 nickel base superalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper assesses the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue of the Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 718 superalloy friction-welded joints. Strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests for 304-304 and 718-718 friction-welded specimens were carried out at 923 K in air to obtain the fatigue strength of the joints. These materials were selected as the cyclic hardening and softening materials, respectively. The 304-304 welded specimens showed inferior fatigue strength in comparison with the base metal while the 718-718 specimens exhibited fatigue strength equivalent to that of the base metal. The difference in the fatigue strength between the two materials is discussed from the viewpoint of the cyclic deformation behavior and strain reduction at weld interface.

Wakai, T. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center); Sakane, M.; Ohnami, M. (Ritsumeikan Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Okita, K. (Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Miki (Japan). Technical Center for Machinery and Metals); Fukuchi, Y. (Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Kobe (Japan))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design of Welding Alloys Creep and Toughness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The subject of welding is challenging because of its complexity and because its applications are in the majority of cases, safety critical. The work presented in this thesis deals with both these aspects from the point of view of welding alloys...

Marimuthu, Murugananth

394

Manual tube-to-tubesheet welding torch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welding torch made of a high temperature plastic which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and the back side of a tube plate and has a ballooned end in which an electrode, filler wire guide, fiber optic bundle, and blanketing gas duct are disposed.

Kiefer, Joseph H. (Tampa, FL); Smith, Danny J. (Tampa, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, R.S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

Hawke, R.S.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

antilles island arc: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The morphology of the underthrust oceanic crust controls the mag matic activity of the island arc, and particularly the development, in space and time, of "arc compartments." Denis...

399

Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 February 10, 2006 An...

400

Creep rupture testing of alloy 617 and A508/533 base metals and weldments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NGNP, which is an advanced HTGR concept with emphasis on both electricity and hydrogen production, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 750-1000 C. Alloy 617 is a prime candidate for VHTR structural components such as reactor internals, piping, and heat exchangers in view of its resistance to oxidation and elevated temperature strength. However, lack of adequate data on the performance of the alloy in welded condition prompted to initiate a creep test program at Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, Testing has been initiated to evaluate the creep rupture properties of the pressure vessel steel A508/533 in air and in helium environments. The program, which began in December 2009, was certified for quality assurance NQA-1 requirements during January and February 2010. Specimens were designed and fabricated during March and the tests were initiated in April 2010. During the past year, several creep tests were conducted in air on Alloy 617 base metal and weldment specimens at temperatures of 750, 850, and 950 C. Idaho National Laboratory, using gas tungsten arc welding method with Alloy 617 weld wire, fabricated the weldment specimens. Eight tests were conducted on Alloy 617 base metal specimens and nine were on Alloy 617 weldments. The creep rupture times for the base alloy and weldment tests were up to {approx}3900 and {approx}4500 h, respectively. The results showed that the creep rupture lives of weld specimens are much longer than those for the base alloy, when tested under identical test conditions. The test results also showed that the creep strain at fracture is in the range of 7-18% for weldment samples and were much lower than those for the base alloy, under similar test conditions. In general, the weldment specimens showed more of a flat or constant creep rate region than the base metal specimens. The base alloy and the weldment exhibited tertiary creep after 50-60% of the rupture life, irrespective of test temperature in the range of 750-950 C. The results showed that the stress dependence of the creep rate followed a power law for both base alloy and weldments. The data also showed that the stress exponent for creep is the same and one can infer that the same mechanism is operative in both base metal and weldments in the temperature range of the current study. SEM fractography analysis indicated that both base metal and weldment showed combined fracture modes consisting of dimple rupture and intergranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was more evident in the weldment specimens, which is consistent with the observation of lower creep ductility in the weldment than in the base metal.

Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

Chen, Jian [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

National Student Conference in Metallic Materials Halifax Hall, Endcliffe Village, University of Sheffield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stir Welding Sam Gascoyne1 , BP Wynne1 , PB Prangnell2 , 1 Advanced Metallic Systems CDT, University;Linear friction welding of aluminium to copper Imran Bhamji, RJ Moat, M Preuss, PL Threadgill, AC Addison Session B1 Joining, Ennis Room Chair Alexandra Panteli, The University of Manchester Corner Friction

Cambridge, University of

403

Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits Peter Kokelaar and Cathy Busby fabrics indicative of welding of glass shards and pumice at temperatures >500"C. The occurrence emplacement temperature in pyroclas- tic deposits is welding. Welding is hot-state viscous deformation

Busby, Cathy

405

Optical Inspection of Welding Seams Fabian Timm1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Inspection of Welding Seams Fabian Timm1,2 , Thomas Martinetz1 , and Erhardt Barth1,2 1 present a framework for automatic inspection of welding seams based on specular reflections. To this end by using welding techniques. Soldering and welding techniques are common in diverse areas such as printed

406

Weld: A Multithreading Technique Towards Latency-tolerant VLIW Processors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weld: A Multithreading Technique Towards Latency- tolerant VLIW Processors Emre ?zer, Thomas M architecture model, named Weld, for VLIW processors. Weld integrates multithreading support into a VLIW a novel hardware technique called operation welding that merges operations from different threads

Conte, Thomas M.

407

Effect of activity differences on hydrogen migration in dissimilar titanium alloy welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of alloy composition on hydrogen activity was measured for seven titanium alloys as a means to determine the tendency for hydrogen migration within dissimilar metal welds. The alloys were: Ti-CP (unalloyed Ti), Ti-3Al-2.5V, Ti-3Al-2.5V-3Zr, Ti-3Al-2Nb-1Ta, Ti-6Al, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo. Hydrogen pressure-hydrogen concentration relationships were determined for temperatures from 600 C to 800 C and hydrogen concentrations up to approximately 3.5 at. pct (750 wppm). Fusion welds were made between Ti-CP and Ti-CP and between Ti-CP and Ti-6Al-4V to observe directly the hydrogen redistribution in similar and dissimilar metal couples. Hydrogen activity was found to be significantly affected by alloying elements, particularly Al in solid solution. At a constant Al content and temperature, an increase in the volume fraction of {beta} reduced the activity of hydrogen in {alpha}-{beta} alloys. Activity was also found to be strongly affected by temperature. The effect of temperature differences on hydrogen activity was much greater than the effects resulting from alloy composition differences at a given temperature. Thus, hydrogen redistribution should be expected within similar metal couples subjected to extreme temperature gradients, such as those peculiar to fusion welding. Significant hydrogen redistribution in dissimilar alloy weldments also can be expected for many of the compositions in this study. Hydride formation stemming from these driving forces was observed in the dissimilar couple fusion welds. In addition, a basis for estimating hydrogen migration in titanium welds, based on hydrogen activity data, is described.

Kennedy, J.R.; Adler, P.N. [Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States). Corporate Research Center; Margolin, H. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in Weldalite welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weldalite is a lithium-containing aluminum alloy which is being considered for aerospace applications because its favorable strength-to-weight ratio. Successful welding of this alloy depends on the control of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in the heat affected zone. Neutron and x-ray scattering methods of residual stress measurement were applied to plasma arc welds made in aluminum-lithium alloy test panels as part of an evaluation of materials for use in welded structures. In the course of these studies discrepancies between x-ray and neutron results from the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld were found. Texture changes and recovery from the cold work, indicated in peak widths, were found in the HAZ as well. The consideration of x-ray and neutron results leads to the conclusion that there is a change in solute composition which modifies the d-spacings in the HAZ which affects the neutron diffraction determination of residual stresses. The composition changes give the appearance of significant compressive strains in the HAZ. This effect and sharp gradients in the texture give severe anomalies in the neutron measurement of residual stress. The use of combined x-ray and neutron techniques and the solution to the minimizing of the neutron diffraction anomalies are discussed.

Spooner, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pardue, E.B.S. [Technology for Energy Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C. (RR E) A different set of alloys, such as Alloy N and 242, are needed to handle molten salts at this temperature. The diffusion welding development work described here builds on techniques developed during the NGNP work, as applied to these alloys. There is also the matter of dissimilar metal welding, since alloys suitable for salt service are generally not suited for service in gaseous oxidizing environments, and vice versa, and welding is required for the Class I boundaries in these systems, as identified in the relevant ASME codes.

Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Diffusion Welding of Alloys for Molten Salt Service - Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work is concerned with heat exchanger development for molten salt service, including the proposed molten salt reactor (MSR), a homogeneous reactor in which the fuel is dissolved in a circulating fluid of molten salt. It is an outgrowth of recent work done under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program; what the two reactor systems have in common is an inherently safe nuclear plant with a high outlet temperature that is useful for process heat as well as more conventional generation The NGNP program was tasked with investigating the application of a new generation of nuclear power plants to a variety of energy needs. One baseline reactor design for this program is a high temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which provides many options for energy use. These might include the conventional Rankine cycle (steam turbine) generation of electricity, but also other methods: for example, Brayton cycle (gas turbine) electrical generation, and the direct use of the high temperatures characteristic of HTGR output for process heat in the chemical industry. Such process heat is currently generated by burning fossil fuels, and is a major contributor to the carbon footprint of the chemical and petrochemical industries. The HTGR, based on graphite fuel elements, can produce very high output temperatures; ideally, temperatures of 900 C or even greater, which has significant energy advantages. Such temperatures are, of course, at the frontiers of materials limitations, at the upper end of the performance envelope of the metallic materials for which robust construction codes exist, and within the realm of ceramic materials, the fabrication and joining of which, on the scale of large energy systems, are at an earlier stage of development. A considerable amount of work was done in the diffusion welding of materials of interest for HTGR service with alloys such as 617 and 800H. The MSR output temperature is also materials limited, and is projected at about 700 C. (RR E) A different set of alloys, such as Alloy N and 242, are needed to handle molten salts at this temperature. The diffusion welding development work described here builds on techniques developed during the NGNP work, as applied to these alloys. There is also the matter of dissimilar metal welding, since alloys suitable for salt service are generally not suited for service in gaseous oxidizing environments, and vice versa, and welding is required for the Class I boundaries in these systems, as identified in the relevant ASME codes.

Denis Clark; Ronald Mizia; Piyush Sabharwall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Double-Sided Arc Welding of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Magnesium alloys are of interest to the automotive industry because of their high specific strength and potential to reduce vehicle weight and fuel consumption. In (more)

Shuck, Gerald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

An Application of Augmented Reality (AR) in the Teaching of an Arc Welding Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology that utilizes computer vision methods to overlay virtual objects onto the real world scene so as to make them appear to co-exist with the real objects. Its main objective ...

Chong, J. W. S.

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding automation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA E... : An adaptive control based on fuzzy logic has been implemented for Gas Tungsten ... Source: Zhang, YuMing - Center for...

417

Microstructures and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V welds with filler additions of tantalum and FS85  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many applications in the nuclear industry require that titanium alloys be welded to refractory metal alloys. Because of the widely dissimilar properties of these materials, the homogeneity of the fusion zone os of particular concern. To address this issue, a study was conducted to characterize the fusion zones of Ti-6Al-4V welds made with filler additions of tantalum and FS85 (Nb-28Wt%Ta-10wt%W-1wt%Zr). A goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of making microstructural predictions based on calculated fusion zone electron/atom (e/a) ratios. The welds were made by placing tantalum or FS85 shims between two pieces of 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V and making an electron beam weld along the length of the shim. With complete mixing, these shims were expected to produce fusion zone e/a ratios of 3.63{emdash}4.14 for the Ta series and 3.63{emdash}4.06 for the FS85 series, and microstructures consisting of {alpha}`, {alpha}`, and perhaps {omega}. The weld macro- and microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The mechanical properties of the welds were assessed using transverse and all-weld-metal tensile tests. The results showed a general increase in strength and decrease in ductility with increasing {beta} stabilizer level. As a result of this study, parameters were developed to increase the fusion zone size and increase mixing of the components. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC04-76DR00789, and at Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

Damkroger, B.K.; Dixon, R.D.; Cotton, J.D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Welding of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc. For more information on how of the ARCS Foundation, Inc. funds seven scholarships for exceptional University of Georgia doctoral students. Available to attend the ARCS Foundation Awards Luncheon in Atlanta on November 21, 2013. ARCS Foundation

Arnold, Jonathan

420

Inertia-friction welding of particulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum metal-matrix composites (Al-MMC) are rapidly becoming materials of choice for many aerospace, automotive, recreational sports, and microelectronic applications. The attractive features of these materials include high specific strength and stiffness, a low coefficient of thermal expansion and enhanced wear characteristics relative to monolithic aluminum alloys. The effective engineering application of Al-MMC will commonly require their joining beth to themselves, to dissimilar Al-MMC, and to monolithic aluminum alloys. In the present work, dissimilar-alloy inertia-friction welds were produced between a 6061-T6 Al-MMC tube reinforced with l0 v/o Al{sub x}O{sub 3} particles (W6A.l0A-T6) and a modified A356 case MMC bar reinforced with 20 v/o SiC particles (F3S.20S), or a monolithic 6061-T6511 aluminum alloy bar. In Phase I, a fractional-factorial test matrix was statistically designed and performed to evaluate the effects of flywheel speed and axial pressure on the weld integrity, microstructure, hardness, tensile and torsion strengths and fracture behavior. In Phase 2, the effects of pre-weld machining of the solid bar on weld alignment and mechanical properties were evaluated. inertia-friction welding was shown to be effective for the joining of alumina particulate-reinforced composites to monolithic aluminum and to SiC-particulate reinforced aluminum. High-integrity joints exhibiting a defect-free joint interface with varying degrees of base alloy intermixing were produced at optimum parameter settings. Tensile and torsional strength joint efficiencies for the alumina-particulate MMC to monolithic aluminum alloy welds exceeded 80% and 75%, respectively, with tensile strength maximized with high axial pressure and flywheel speed, and torsional strength maximized at both medium and high levels of flywheel speed and axial pressure.

Cola, M.J.; Baeslack, W.A. III; Kou, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Diffusion-Welded Microchannel Heat Exchanger for Industrial Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of next generation reactors is to increase energy ef?ciency in the production of electricity and provide high-temperature heat for industrial processes. The ef?cient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process. The need for ef?ciency, compactness, and safety challenge the boundaries of existing heat exchanger technology. Various studies have been performed in attempts to update the secondary heat exchanger that is downstream of the primary heat exchanger, mostly because its performance is strongly tied to the ability to employ more ef?cient industrial processes. Modern compact heat exchangers can provide high compactness, a measure of the ratio of surface area-to-volume of a heat exchange. The microchannel heat exchanger studied here is a plate-type, robust heat exchanger that combines compactness, low pressure drop, high effectiveness, and the ability to operate with a very large pressure differential between hot and cold sides. The plates are etched and thereafter joined by diffusion welding, resulting in extremely strong all-metal heat exchanger cores. After bonding, any number of core blocks can be welded together to provide the required ?ow capacity. This study explores the microchannel heat exchanger and draws conclusions about diffusion welding/bonding for joining heat exchanger plates, with both experimental and computational modeling, along with existing challenges and gaps. Also, presented is a thermal design method for determining overall design speci?cations for a microchannel printed circuit heat exchanger for both supercritical (24 MPa) and subcritical (17 MPa) Rankine power cycles.

Piyush Sabharwall; Denis E. Clark; Michael V. Glazoff; Michael G. McKellar; Ronald E. Mizia

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Arc distribution during the vacuum arc remelting of Ti-6Al-4V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the BiotSavart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

Woodside, Charles Rigel [U.S. DOE; King, Paul E. [U.S. DOE; Nordlund, Chris [ATI Albany Operations

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Prediction of Welding Distortion Panagiotis Michaleris and Andrew DeBiccari  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Prediction of Welding Distortion Panagiotis Michaleris and Andrew DeBiccari Edison Welding Institute Columbus, Ohio ABSTRACT. This paper presents a numerical analysis technique for predicting welding induced distortion. The technique combines two dimensional welding simulations with three dimensional

Michaleris, Panagiotis

424

Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-matallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved, 1) To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug. 2) investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys. 3) Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method and apparatus for real time weld monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and apparatus are provided for real time weld monitoring. An infrared signature emitted by a hot weld surface during welding is detected and this signature is compared with an infrared signature emitted by the weld surface during steady state conditions. The result is correlated with weld penetration. The signal processing is simpler than for either UV or acoustic techniques. Changes in the weld process, such as changes in the transmitted laser beam power, quality or positioning of the laser beam, change the resulting weld surface features and temperature of the weld surface, thereby resulting in a change in the direction and amount of infrared emissions. This change in emissions is monitored by an IR sensitive detecting apparatus that is sensitive to the appropriate wavelength region for the hot weld surface.

Leong, Keng H. (Lemont, IL); Hunter, Boyd V. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Vibration welding system with thin film sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

428

Waste form development for a DC arc furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory crucible study was conducted to develop waste forms to treat nonradioactive simulated {sup 238}Pu heterogeneous debris waste from Savannah River, metal waste from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and nominal waste also from INEL using DC arc melting. The preliminary results showed that the different waste form compositions had vastly different responses for each processing effect. The reducing condition of DC arc melting had no significant effects on the durability of some waste forms while it decreased the waste form durability from 300 to 700% for other waste forms, which resulted in the failure of some TCLP tests. The right formulations of waste can benefit from devitrification and showed an increase in durability by 40%. Some formulations showed no devitrification effects while others decreased durability by 200%. Increased waste loading also affected waste form behavior, decreasing durability for one waste, increasing durability by 240% for another, and showing no effect for the third waste. All of these responses to the processing and composition variations were dictated by the fundamental glass chemistry and can be adjusted to achieve maximal waste loading, acceptable durability, and desired processing characteristics if each waste formulation is designed for the result according to the glass chemistry.

Feng, X.; Bloomer, P.E.; Chantaraprachoom, N.; Gong, M.; Lamar, D.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

Trent, Jett B. (Knoxville, TN); Murphy, Jimmy L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc plasma method Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arc System Summary: of the most promising directions. The method of plasma pyrolysis and gasification, where at waste processing... -6. High-current electric arcs or electric arc...

432

Processing electric arc furnace dust into saleable chemical products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern steel industry uses electric arc furnace (EAF) technology to manufacture steel. A major drawback of this technology is the production of EAF dust, which is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The annual disposal of approximately 0.65 million tons of EAF dust in the United States and Canada is an expensive, unresolved problem for the steel industry. EAF dust byproducts are generated during the manufacturing process by a variety of mechanisms. The dust consists of various metals (e.g., zinc, lead, cadmium) that occur as vapors at 1,600{degrees}C (EAF hearth temperature); these vapors are condensed and collected in a baghouse. The production of one ton of steel will generate approximately 25 pounds of EAF dust as a byproduct, which is currently disposed of in landfills.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1983-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

435

CUTTING -WELDING -HOT WORKS REQUIRED NOTIFICATION TO CUFD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CUTTING - WELDING - HOT WORKS REQUIRED NOTIFICATION TO CUFD Instructions: Fill out this form in its Time for work: Description of Work: Brazing Roofing Sweating WeldingSolderingCutting Other

Stuart, Steven J.

436

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

Leijun Li

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

Local mechanical properties of Alloy 82/182 dissimilar weld joint between SA508 Gr.1a and F316 SS at RT and 320C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the variations of local mechanical and microstructural properties in dissimilar metal weld joints consisting of the SA508 Gr.1a ferritic steel, Alloy 82/182 filler metal, and F316 austenitic stainless steel. Flat or round tensile specimens and transmission electron microscopy disks were taken from the base metals, welds, and heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the joints and tested at room temperature (RT) and/or at 320 C. The tensile test results indicated that the mechanical property was relatively uniform within each material zone, but varied considerably between different zones. Further, significant variations were observed both in the austenitic HAZ of F316 SS and in the ferritic HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a. The yield stress (YS) of the weld metal was under-matched with respect to the HAZs of SA508 Gr.1a and F316 SS by 0.78 to 0.92, although the YS was over-matched with respect to both base metals. The minimum ductility occurred in the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1 at both test temperatures. The plastic instability stress also varied considerably in the weld joints, with minimum values occurring in the SA508 Gr.1a base metal at RT and in the HAZ of F316 SS at 320 C, suggesting that the probability of ductile failure caused by a unstable deformation at the Alloy 82/182 buttering layer is low. Within the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a, the gradient of the YS and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was significant, primarily because of the different microstructures produced by the phase transformation during the welding process. The increment of YS was unexpectedly high in the HAZ of F316 SS, which was explained by the strain hardening induced by a strain mismatch between the weldment and the base metal. This was confirmed by the transmission electron micrographs showing high dislocation density in the HAZ.

Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Kim, Jin Weon [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding A. H. DILAWARI, J for the Electroslag Welding Process. In the formulation, allowance has been made {or both etee- tromagnetic and b in the use of electroslag welding (ESW), particularly for the construction of thick walled pressure vessels

Eagar, Thomas W.

440

Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

Michaleris, Panagiotis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Some European Developments in Welding Consumables L. Karlsson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some European Developments in Welding Consumables L. Karlsson and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* November 1 a selected survey of incisive research on novel welding consumables which contribute to the structural and insight based on metallurgical experience. We congratulate the Japan Welding Society for organising

Cambridge, University of

442

A PARANETRIC STlJDY OF THE ELECTROSLAG WELDING PROCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) A PARANETRIC STlJDY OF THE ELECTROSLAG WELDING PROCESS by W. S. Ricci and T. W. Eagar conducted on electroslag welds to statistically evaluate the effect of i ndependent process variables upon dependent process responses consisting of heat affected zone size, dilution, form factor, welding speed

Eagar, Thomas W.

443

Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet Preweld and postweld current modifications on the resistance spot welding of galvanized steel sheet ·are analyzed using high phenomena through· out the weld process are discussed. In addition. the duration of current modifi· cation

Eagar, Thomas W.

444

Conformal welding and the sewing equations Eric Schippers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conformal welding and the sewing equations Eric Schippers Department of Mathematics University of Manitoba Winnipeg Rutgers 2014 Eric Schippers (Manitoba) Conformal welding Rutgers 1 / 41 #12;Introduction Schippers (Manitoba) Conformal welding Rutgers 2 / 41 #12;Introduction Our work in general We began

Schippers, Eric

445

REAL TIME ULTRASONIC ALUMINUM SPOT WELD MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

Regalado, W. Perez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr. [Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research, Physics Department, University of Windsor, 292 Essex Hall, 401 Sunset Ave. N9B 3P4 Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

446

CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING Peng Cheng, Andrew J. Birnbaum, Y Egland Technology and Solutions Division Caterpillar Inc. Peoria, IL KEYWORDS Welding, Distortion, Correction, Laser Forming ABSTRACT Welding-induced distortion is an intrinsic phenomenon arising due

Yao, Y. Lawrence

447

CONFORMAL WELDING AND KOEBE'S THEOREM CHRISTOPHER J. BISHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONFORMAL WELDING AND KOEBE'S THEOREM CHRISTOPHER J. BISHOP Abstract. It is well known that not every orientation preserving homeomorphism of the circle to itself is a conformal welding, but in this paper we prove several results which state that every homeomorphism is \\almost" a welding in a precise

Bishop, Christopher

448

Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

Cambridge, University of

449

Apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds is described in which is utilized in combination with a moveable welder for forming a partially completed weld, and an ultrasonic generator mounted on a moveable welder in which is reciprocally moveable along a path of travel which is laterally disposed relative to the partially completed weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bitsoi, Rodney J. (Ririe, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pace, David P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Phase transformation and mechanical behavior in annealed 2205 duplex stainless steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase transformations and mechanical behaviour during welding and subsequent annealing treatment of 2205 duplex stainless steel have been investigated. Detailed microstructural examination showed the presence of higher ferrite amounts in the heat affected zone (HAZ), while higher amounts of austenite were recorded in the centre region of the weld metal. Annealing treatments in the temperature range of 800-1000 deg. C resulted in a precipitation of {sigma} phase and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} chromium carbides at the {gamma}/{delta} interfaces that were found to be preferential precipitation sites. Above 1050 deg. C, the volume fraction of {delta} ferrite increases with annealing temperature. The increase of {delta} ferrite occurs at a faster rate in the HAZ than in the base metal and fusion zone. Optimal mechanical properties and an acceptable ferrite/austenite ratio throughout the weld regions corresponds to annealing at 1050 deg. C. Fractographic examinations showed that the mode of failure changed from quasi-cleavage fracture to dimple rupture with an increase in the annealing temperature from 850 to 1050 deg. C.

Badji, Riad [LPMTM-CNRS- Universite Paris 13, 99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)], E-mail: riadbadji1@yahoo.fr; Bouabdallah, Mabrouk [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, 10, Avenue Hassan Badi, BP 182, El Harrach (Algeria); Bacroix, Brigitte; Kahloun, Charlie [LPMTM-CNRS- Universite Paris 13, 99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Belkessa, Brahim; Maza, Halim [Welding and NDT research Centre, B.P 64, Cheraga (Algeria)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modelling of Mechanical Properties of Ferritic Weld Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

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Lalam, Sree Harsha

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc radiation delivery Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AC Electric Arc System Ph. G... -6. High-current electric arcs or electric arc plasma torches are used practically in all plasma... into the arc is transformed by means of...

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc delivery radiation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AC Electric Arc System Ph. G... -6. High-current electric arcs or electric arc plasma torches are used practically in all plasma... into the arc is transformed by means of...

455

Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on...

456

Arc Geometry and Algebra: Foliations, Moduli ... - Purdue University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the simplicial complex which has one simplex for each arc family ? with the ithe face ..... 1.6.2 Loop graph of an arc family: A geometric construction of the dual.

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

457

arc ion sources: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and performance of vacuum arc ion sources. Brown, I 2013-01-01 2 Development of High Efficiency Versatile Arc Discharge Ion Source (VADIS) at CERN Isolde CERN Preprints Summary: We...

458

arc ion source: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and performance of vacuum arc ion sources. Brown, I 2013-01-01 2 Development of High Efficiency Versatile Arc Discharge Ion Source (VADIS) at CERN Isolde CERN Preprints Summary: We...

459

Actively controlled vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of FeCrB-based alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe28.2%Cr3.8%B1.5%Si1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the ScheilGulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: We deposit FeCrB-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

Sorour, A.A., E-mail: ahmad.sorour@mail.mcgill.ca; Chromik, R.R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca; Gauvin, R., E-mail: raynald.gauvin@mcgill.ca; Jung, I.-H., E-mail: in-ho.jung@mcgill.ca; Brochu, M., E-mail: mathieu.brochu@mcgill.ca

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "metal arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Heat Recovery From Arc Furnaces Using Water Cooled Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT RECOVERY FROM ARC FURNACES USING WATER COOLED PANELS D. F. Darby Deere & Company Moline, Illinois ABSTRACT In 1980-81, the John Deere Foundry at East Moline underwent an expansion program that in creased its capacity by over 60...%. This expansion was centered around the melt department where the four existing 13MVA electric arc furnaces were augmented with two additional 13MVA arc furnaces. A waste heat recovery system was installed on all six of the arc furnaces which, with modifica...

Darby, D. F.

462

Correlations between SAR arc intensity and solar and geomagnetic activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

±1960, Rees and Akasofu (1963) and Roach and Roach (1963) found that there are correlations of the SAR arc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

463

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc. Biomedical and Health Sciences the Atlanta chapter of the ARCS Foundation, Inc. funds eight scholarships for exceptional University.S. citizenship. · GPA of 3.5 or above. · Available to attend the ARCS Foundation Awards Luncheon in Atlanta

Arnold, Jonathan

466

Way to reduce arc voltage losses in hybrid thermionic converters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported concerning the output and emission characteristics of the arc and hybrid regimes in a plane-parallel thermionic converter with Pt--Zr--O electrode pair. It is shown that arc voltage losses can be reduced to values below those obtainable in ordinary arc thermionic converters.

Tskhakaya, V.K.; Yarygin, V.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z