Sample records for metagenomics terrestrial ecology

  1. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  2. Towards tera terra: Terabase sequencing of terrestrial metagenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, J.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial ecologists are taking a metagenomics approach to analyze complex and diverse soil microbial communities.

  3. Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs: an experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucherousset, Julien

    approach Pia Bartels · Julien Cucherousset · Cristian Gudasz · Mats Jansson · Jan Karlsson · Lennart Cross-ecosystem movements of material and energy are ubiquitous. Aquatic ecosystems typically receive¨v Department of Ecology and Genetics/Limnology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala

  5. Integrating Empirical-Modeling Approaches to Improve Understanding of Terrestrial Ecology Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Heather [University of Oklahoma; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent decades have seen tremendous increases in the quantity of empirical ecological data collected by individual investigators, as well as through research networks such as FLUXNET (Baldocchi et al., 2001). At the same time, advances in computer technology have facilitated the development and implementation of large and complex land surface and ecological process models. Separately, each of these information streams provides useful, but imperfect information about ecosystems. To develop the best scientific understanding of ecological processes, and most accurately predict how ecosystems may cope with global change, integration of empirical and modeling approaches is necessary. However, true integration - in which models inform empirical research, which in turn informs models (Fig. 1) - is not yet common in ecological research (Luo et al., 2011). The goal of this workshop, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program, was to bring together members of the empirical and modeling communities to exchange ideas and discuss scientific practices for increasing empirical - model integration, and to explore infrastructure and/or virtual network needs for institutionalizing empirical - model integration (Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA). The workshop included presentations and small group discussions that covered topics ranging from model-assisted experimental design to data driven modeling (e.g. benchmarking and data assimilation) to infrastructure needs for empirical - model integration. Ultimately, three central questions emerged. How can models be used to inform experiments and observations? How can experimental and observational results be used to inform models? What are effective strategies to promote empirical - model integration?

  6. de novo Metagenomic Assembly (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Koren, Sergey [University of Maryland

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Maryland's Sergey Koren on "denovo Metagenomic Assembly" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  7. de novo Metagenomic Assembly (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koren, Sergey [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Maryland's Sergey Koren on "denovo Metagenomic Assembly" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  8. High-resolution metagenomics targets major functional types in complex microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Lapidus, Alla; Ivanova, Natalia; Copeland, Alex C.; McHardy, Alice C.; Szeto, Ernest; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Suciu, Dominic; Levine, Samuel R.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bruce, David C.; Richardson, Paul M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most microbes in the biosphere remain uncultured and unknown. Whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics) allows glimpses into genetic and metabolic potentials of natural microbial communities. However, in communities of high complexity metagenomics fail to link specific microbes to specific ecological functions. To overcome this limitation, we selectively targeted populations involved in oxidizing single-carbon (C{sub 1}) compounds in Lake Washington (Seattle, USA) by labeling their DNA via stable isotope probing (SIP), followed by WGS sequencing. Metagenome analysis demonstrated specific sequence enrichments in response to different C{sub 1} substrates, highlighting ecological roles of individual phylotypes. We further demonstrated the utility of our approach by extracting a nearly complete genome of a novel methylotroph Methylotenera mobilis, reconstructing its metabolism and conducting genome-wide analyses. This approach allowing high-resolution genomic analysis of ecologically relevant species has the potential to be applied to a wide variety of ecosystems.

  9. Metagenomic biomarker discovery and explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segata, Nicola

    This study describes and validates a new method for metagenomic biomarker discovery by way of class comparison, tests of biological consistency and effect size estimation. This addresses the challenge of finding organisms, ...

  10. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe step-by-step the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of a bioinformatician. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning with pre-sequencing considerations such as community composition and sequence data type that will greatly influence downstream analyses. We proceed with recommendations for sampling and data generation including sample and metadata collection, community profiling, construction of shotgun libraries and sequencing strategies. We then discuss the application of generic sequence processing steps (read preprocessing, assembly, and gene prediction and annotation) to metagenomic datasets by contrast to genome projects. Different types of data analyses particular to metagenomes are then presented including binning, dominant population analysis and gene-centric analysis. Finally data management systems and issues are presented and discussed. We hope that this review will assist bioinformaticians and biologists in making better-informed decisions on their journey during a metagenomic project.

  11. Plant Ecology An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

  12. Metagenome Assembly at the DOE JGI (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chain, Patrick [DOE JGI at LANL] [DOE JGI at LANL

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Patrick Chain of DOE JGI at LANL, Co-Chair of the Metagenome-specific Assembly session, on "Metagenome Assembly at the DOE JGI" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  13. Metagenome Assembly at the DOE JGI (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chain, Patrick [DOE JGI at LANL

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Patrick Chain of DOE JGI at LANL, Co-Chair of the Metagenome-specific Assembly session, on "Metagenome Assembly at the DOE JGI" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  14. Metagenomes from Argonne's MG-RAST Metagenomics Analysis Server

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    MG-RAST has a large number of datasets that researchers have deposited for public use. As of July, 2014, the number of metagenomes represented by MG-RAST numbered more than 18,500, and the number of available sequences was more than 75 million! The public can browse the collection several different ways, and researchers can login to deposit new data. Researchers have the choice of keeping a dataset private so that it is viewable only by them when logged in, or they can choose to make a dataset public at any time with a simple click of a link. MG-RAST was launched in 2007 by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is part of the toolkit available to the Terragenomics project, which seeks to do a comprehensive metagenomics study of U.S. soil. The Terragenomics project page is located at http://www.mcs.anl.gov/research/projects/terragenomics/.

  15. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground–belowground ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in aboveground–belowground ecology Wim H. van der Putten ·Interactions, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology, NetherlandsInstitute of Ecology NIOO-KNAW, Boterhoeksestraat 48, 6666

  16. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  17. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  18. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate, and effects of army smokes in the aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate, and terrestrial ecological effects of hexachloroethane obscurant smokes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Voris, P.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; McFadden, K.M.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of hexachloroethane (HC) smoke were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on exposure scenarios, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of HC smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and two soil types. HC aerosols were generated in a controlled atmosphere wind tunnel by combustion of hexachloroethane mixtures prepared to simulate normal pot burn rates and conditions. The aerosol was characterized and used to expose plant, soil, and other test systems. Particle sizes of airborne HC ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), and particle size was affected by relative humidity over a range of 20% to 85%. Air concentrations employed ranged from 130 to 680 mg/m{sup 3}, depending on exposure scenario. Chlorocarbon concentrations within smokes, deposition rates for plant and soil surfaces, and persistence were determined. The fate of principal inorganic species (Zn, Al, and Cl) in a range of soils was assessed.

  19. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton. A combination of single cell genomics and metagenomics enabled us to analyze the genome content, metabolic adaptations, and biogeography of these taxa.

  20. Using the metagenomics RAST server (MG-RAST) for analyzing shotgun metagenomes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, E. M.; Wilkening, J.; Wilke, A.; Antonopoulos, D.; Meyer, F. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Chicago)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shotgun metagenomics creates millions of fragments of short DNA reads, which are meaningless unless analyzed appropriately. The Metagenomics RAST server (MG-RAST) is a web-based, open source system that offers a unique suite of tools for analyzing these data sets. After de-replication and quality control, fragments are mapped against a comprehensive nonredundant database (NR). Phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions are computed from the set of hits against the NR. The resulting data are made available for browsing, download, and most importantly, comparison against a comprehensive collection of public metagenomes. A submitted metagenome is visible only to the user, unless the user makes it public or shares with other registered users. Public metagenomes are available to all.

  1. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  2. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  3. The JGI Metagenome Program (2009 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah Green

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe discussed the DOE JGI Metagenomic Program on March 25, 2009 at the 4th Annual User Meeting.

  4. Meta-IDBA: A de novo Assembler for Metagenomic Data (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chin, Francis [University of Hong Kong

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Hong Kong's Francis Chin on "Meta-­?IDBA: A de novo Assembler for Metagenomic Data" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  5. Metagenome Data Integration, Data Storage, and Retrieval (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    White, Owen [University of Maryland

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Maryland's Owen White on "Metagenome Data Integration, Data Storage and Retrieval" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  6. Metagenome Data Integration, Data Storage, and Retrieval (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Owen [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Maryland's Owen White on "Metagenome Data Integration, Data Storage and Retrieval" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  7. Marriage or Civil Unions for Single Cells and Metagenomics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusch, Doug [J. Craig Venter Institute] [J. Craig Venter Institute

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    JCVI's Doug Rusch on "Marriage or Civil Unions for Single Cells and Metagenomes" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  8. A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Guy [EMBL-EBI] [EMBL-EBI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    EMBL-EBI's Guy Cochrane on "A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  9. Meta-IDBA: A de novo Assembler for Metagenomic Data (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Francis [University of Hong Kong] [University of Hong Kong

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Hong Kong's Francis Chin on "Meta-­?IDBA: A de novo Assembler for Metagenomic Data" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  10. Marriage or Civil Unions for Single Cells and Metagenomics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rusch, Doug [J. Craig Venter Institute

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    JCVI's Doug Rusch on "Marriage or Civil Unions for Single Cells and Metagenomes" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  11. A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Guy [EMBL-EBI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    EMBL-EBI's Guy Cochrane on "A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  12. Shotgun metagenomic data streams: surfing without fear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berendzen, Joel R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Timely information about bio-threat prevalence, consequence, propagation, attribution, and mitigation is needed to support decision-making, both routinely and in a crisis. One DNA sequencer can stream 25 Gbp of information per day, but sampling strategies and analysis techniques are needed to turn raw sequencing power into actionable knowledge. Shotgun metagenomics can enable biosurveillance at the level of a single city, hospital, or airplane. Metagenomics characterizes viruses and bacteria from complex environments such as soil, air filters, or sewage. Unlike targeted-primer-based sequencing, shotgun methods are not blind to sequences that are truly novel, and they can measure absolute prevalence. Shotgun metagenomic sampling can be non-invasive, efficient, and inexpensive while being informative. We have developed analysis techniques for shotgun metagenomic sequencing that rely upon phylogenetic signature patterns. They work by indexing local sequence patterns in a manner similar to web search engines. Our methods are laptop-fast and favorable scaling properties ensure they will be sustainable as sequencing methods grow. We show examples of application to soil metagenomic samples.

  13. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  15. Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology and Environmental Sciences This cross of ecology and environmental sciences, within the unparalleled natural laboratory that is the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Particular program strengths include terrestrial and aquatic ecology, environmental

  16. Exploiting HPC Platforms for Metagenomics: Challenges and Opportunities (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Canon, Shane [LBNL

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Zhong Wang, chair of the High-performance Computing session, gives a brief introduction before Berkeley Lab's Shane Canon talks about "Exploiting HPC Platforms for Metagenomics: Challenges and Opportunities" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  17. Using Soir Lucene for Large-Scale Metagenomics Data Retrieval and Analysis (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Goll, Johannes [JCVI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    JCVI's Johannes Goll on "Using Solr/Lucene for Large-Scale Metagenomics Data Retrieval and Analysis" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  18. Using Soir Lucene for Large-Scale Metagenomics Data Retrieval and Analysis (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goll, Johannes [JCVI] [JCVI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    JCVI's Johannes Goll on "Using Solr/Lucene for Large-Scale Metagenomics Data Retrieval and Analysis" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  19. Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-Fast Clustering Algorithms (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Li, Weizhong [San Diego Supercomputer Center

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    San Diego Supercomputer Center's Weizhong Li on "Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-fast Clustering Algorithms" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  20. Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome; Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies(Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sczyrba, Alex [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Alex Sczyrba on "Evaluation of the Cow Rumen Metagenome" and "Assembly by Single Copy Gene Analysis and Single Cell Genome Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  1. MetaVelvet: An Extension of Velvet Assembler to de novo Metagenome Assembly from Short Sequence Reads (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Yasumbumi [Keio University

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Keio University's Yasumbumi Sakakibara on "MetaVelvet: An Extension of Velvet Assembler to de novo Metagenome Assembly from Short Sequence Reads" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  2. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  3. Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Stepanauskas, Ramunas [Bigelow Laboratory

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Tanja Woyke, chair of the Single Cells and Metagenomes session, delivers an introduction, followed by Bigelow Laboratory's Ramunas Stepanauskas on "Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  4. Los Alamos creates bioinformatics tool for metagenome analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and our own guts. "Metagenomics is the study of entire microbial communities using genomics, such as when you sequence the DNA of a whole community of organisms at once," said...

  5. Metagenomic Sequencing of an In Vitro-Simulated Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Jenna L.; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Microbial life dominates the earth, but many species are difficult or even impossible to study under laboratory conditions. Sequencing DNA directly from the environment, a technique commonly referred to as metagenomics, is an important tool for cataloging microbial life. This culture-independent approach involves collecting samples that include microbes in them, extracting DNA from the samples, and sequencing the DNA. A sample may contain many different microorganisms, macroorganisms, and even free-floating environmental DNA. A fundamental challenge in metagenomics has been estimating the abundance of organisms in a sample based on the frequency with which the organism's DNA was observed in reads generated via DNA sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings: We created mixtures of ten microbial species for which genome sequences are known. Each mixture contained an equal number of cells of each species. We then extracted DNA from the mixtures, sequenced the DNA, and measured the frequency with which genomic regions from each organism was observed in the sequenced DNA. We found that the observed frequency of reads mapping to each organism did not reflect the equal numbers of cells that were known to be included in each mixture. The relative organism abundances varied significantly depending on the DNA extraction and sequencing protocol utilized. Conclusions/Significance: We describe a new data resource for measuring the accuracy of metagenomic binning methods, created by in vitro-simulation of a metagenomic community. Our in vitro simulation can be used to complement previous in silico benchmark studies. In constructing a synthetic community and sequencing its metagenome, we encountered several sources of observation bias that likely affect most metagenomic experiments to date and present challenges for comparative metagenomic studies. DNA preparation methods have a particularly profound effect in our study, implying that samples prepared with different protocols are not suitable for comparative metagenomics.

  6. Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Erik R.; Piao, Hailan; Scott, Nicole M.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; del Rio, Tijana G.; Foster, Brian; Copeland, A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Pati, Amrita; Gilbert, Jack A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oils can be major contaminants of the marine ecosystem and microorganisms play a significant role in the degradation of the main constituents of crude oil. To increase our understanding of the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in the marine ecosystem, we collected crude oil from an active seep area located in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and generated a total of about 52 Gb of raw metagenomic sequence data. The assembled data comprised ~500 Mb, representing ~1.1 million genes derived primarily from chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Members of Oceanospirillales, a bacterial order belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, recruited less than 2% of the assembled genes within the SBC metagenome. In contrast, the microbial community associated with the oil plume that developed in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout in 2010, was dominated by Oceanospirillales, which comprised more than 60% of the metagenomic data generated from the DWH oil plume. This suggests that Oceanospirillales might play a less significant role in the microbially mediated hydrocarbon conversion within the SBC seep oil compared to the DWH plume oil. We hypothesize that this difference results from the SBC oil seep being mostly anaerobic, while the DWH oil plume is aerobic. Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota, recruited more than 95% of the assembled archaeal sequences from the SBC oil seep metagenome, with more than 50% of the sequences assigned to members of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. These orders contain organisms capable of anaerobic methanogenesis and methane oxidation (AOM) and we hypothesize that these orders and their metabolic capabilities may be fundamental to the ecology of the SBC oil seep.

  7. Metagenomics, metaMicrobesOnline and Kbase Data Integration (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dehal, Paramvir [LBNL

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Paramvir Dehal on "Managing and Storing large Datasets in MicrobesOnline, metaMicrobesOnline and the DOE Knowledgebase" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  8. Metagenomics, metaMicrobesOnline and Kbase Data Integration (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehal, Paramvir [LBNL] [LBNL

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Paramvir Dehal on "Managing and Storing large Datasets in MicrobesOnline, metaMicrobesOnline and the DOE Knowledgebase" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  9. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI (Opening Remarks for the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    After a quick introduction by DOE JGI Director Eddy Rubin, DOE JGI's Nikos Kyrpides delivers the opening remarks at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  10. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI (Opening Remarks for the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After a quick introduction by DOE JGI Director Eddy Rubin, DOE JGI's Nikos Kyrpides delivers the opening remarks at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  11. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  12. Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic microbial metagenomics Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 2 Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics 027110371115856 Assignment 3: Metagenomics Due November 15th Summary:...

  14. Metagenomic analysis of permafrost microbial community response to thaw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; DeAngelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We employed deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes and related this data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows for the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses revealed that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there were rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5°C, permafrost metagenomes converged to be more similar to each other than while they were frozen. We found that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shifted rapidly during thaw. We also constructed the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponded to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost was released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost.

  15. DOE JGI Quality Metrics; Approaches to Scaling and Improving Metagenome Assembly (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI]; Brown, C Titus [Michigan State University

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Alex Copeland on "DOE JGI Quality Metrics" and Michigan State University's C. Titus Brown on "Approaches to Scaling and Improving Metagenome Assembly" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  16. 23F.S. Chapin, III et al., Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-9504-9_2, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    ;24 2 Earth's Climate System temperature. Because it is hot (6,000°C), the sun emits most energy as high distribution of terrestrial biomes. This chapter provides a general back- ground on the functioning exerts a key control over the function- ing of Earth's ecosystems. Temperature and water availability

  17. Computational Challenges for Microbial Genome and Metagenome Analysis (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mavrommatis, Kostas

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Kostas Mavrommatis of the DOE JGI gives a presentation on "Computational Challenges for Microbial Genome & Metagenome Analysis" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  18. Overview of IMG Challenges (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor [JGI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Victor Markowitz gives an overview of IMG challenges at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  19. Overview of IMG Challenges (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor [JGI] [JGI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Victor Markowitz gives an overview of IMG challenges at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  20. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaung, Stephanie J.

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics ...

  1. WebMGA: a Customizable Web Server for Fast Metagenomic Sequence Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sitao; Zhu, Zhengwei; Fu, Liming; Niu, Beifang; Li, Weizhong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive microbial sequence project proposed. Science 2007,alignment of short DNA sequences to the human genome. Genomeserver for fast metagenomic sequence analysis. BMC Genomics

  2. IMG/M: A data management and analysis system for metagenomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Szeto, Ernest; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chu, Ken; Dalevi, Daniel; Chen, I-Min A.; Grechkin,Yuri; Dubchak,Inna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis,Konstantinos; Hug enholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMG/M is a data management and analysis system for microbial community genomes (metagenomes) hosted at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG/M consists of metagenome data integrated with isolate microbial genomes from the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides IMG's comparative data analysis tools extended to handle metagenome data, together with metagenome-specific analysis tools. IMG/M is available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/m. Studies of the collective genomes (also known as metagenomes) of environmental microbial communities (also known as microbiomes) are expected to lead to advances in environmental cleanup, agriculture, industrial processes, alternative energy production, and human health (1). Metagenomes of specific microbiome samples are sequenced by organizations worldwide, such as the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the Venter Institute and the Washington University in St. Louis using different sequencing strategies, technology platforms, and annotation procedures. According to the Genomes OnLine Database, about 28 metagenome studies have been published to date, with over 60 other projects ongoing and more in the process of being launched (2). The Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is one of the major contributors of metagenome sequence data, currently sequencing more than 50% of the reported metagenome projects worldwide. Due to the higher complexity, inherent incompleteness, and lower quality of metagenome sequence data, traditional assembly, gene prediction, and annotation methods do not perform on these datasets as well as they do on isolate microbial genome sequences (3, 4). In spite of these limitations, metagenome data are amenable to a variety of analyses, as illustrated by several recent studies (5-10). Metagenome data analysis is usually set up in the context of reference isolate genomes and considers the questions of composition and functional or metabolic potential of individual microbiomes, as well as differences between microbiome samples. Such analysis relies on efficient management of genome and metagenome data collected from multiple sources, while taking into account the iterative nature of sequence data generation and processing. IMG/M aims at providing support for comparative metagenome analysis in the integrated context of microbial genome and metagenome data generated with diverse sequencing technology platforms and data processing methods.

  3. FAMeS: Fidelity of Analysis of Metagenomic Samples

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Metagenomics is a rapidly emerging field of research for studying microbial communities. To evaluate methods currently used to process metagenomic sequences, simulated datasets of varying complexity were constructed by combining sequencing reads randomly selected from 113 isolate genomes. These datasets were designed to model real metagenomes in terms of complexity and phylogenetic composition. Assembly, gene prediction and binning, employing methods commonly used for the analysis of metagenomic datasets at the DOE JGI, were performed. This site provides access to the simulated datasets, and aims to facilitate standardized benchmarking of tools for metagenomic analysis. FAMeS now hosts data coming from a comprehensive study of methodologies used to create OTUs from 16S rRNA targeted studies of microbial communities. Studies of phylogenetic markers at the molecular level have revealed a vast biodiversity of microorganisms living in the sea, land, and even within the human body. Microbial diversity studies of uncharacterized environments typically seek to estimate the richness and diversity of endemic microflora using a 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach. When most of the species in an environment are unknown and cannot be classified through a database search, researchers cluster 16S sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) or phylotypes, thereby providing an estimate of population structure. Using real 16S sequence data, we have performed a critical analysis of OTU clustering methodologies to assess the potential variability in OTU quality. FAMeS provides the sequence data, taxonomic information, multiple sequence alignments, and distance matrices used and described in the core paper, as well as compiled results of more than 700 unique OTU methods. [The above was copied from the FAMeS home page at http://fames.jgi-psf.org/] The core paper behind FAMeS is: Konstantinos Mavromatis, Natalia Ivanova, Kerrie Barry, Harris Shapiro, Eugene Goltsman, Alice C McHardy, Isidore Rigoutsos, Asaf Salamov, Frank Korzeniewski, Miriam Land, Alla Lapidus, Igor Grigoriev, Paul Richardson, Philip Hugenholtz, Nikos C Kyrpides, Nature Methods 2007 Jun;4(6):495-500.

  4. Metagenomic insights into evolution of heavy metal-contaminated groundwater microbial community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemme, C.L.; Deng, Y.; Gentry, T.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wu, L.; Barua, S.; Barry, K.; Green-Tringe, S.; Watson, D.B.; He, Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Tiedje, J.M.; Rubin, E.M.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents ({approx}50 years) has resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying {gamma}- and {beta}-proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is overabundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could have a key function in rapid response and adaptation to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  5. Metagenomic Insights into Evolution of a Heavy Metal-Contaminated Groundwater Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemme, Christopher L.; Deng, Ye; Gentry, Terry J.; Fields, Matthew W.; Wu, Liyou; Barua, Soumitra; Barry, Kerrie; Tringe, Susannah G.; Watson, David B.; He, Zhili; Hazen, Terry C.; Tiedje, James M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents (~;;50 years) have resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying ?- and ?-proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is over-abundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could be a key mechanism in rapidly responding and adapting to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  6. Metagenomic insights into evolution of a heavy metal-contaminated groundwater microbial community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemme, Christopher [University of Oklahoma; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Gentry, Terry [Texas A& M University; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Barua, Soumitra [University of Oklahoma; Barry, Kerry [Joint Genome Institute; Green-Tringe, Susannah [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Watson, David B [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Rubin, Edward M. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding adaptation of biological communities to environmental change is a central issue in ecology and evolution. Metagenomic analysis of a stressed groundwater microbial community reveals that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals, nitric acid and organic solvents (~50 years) has resulted in a massive decrease in species and allelic diversity as well as a significant loss of metabolic diversity. Although the surviving microbial community possesses all metabolic pathways necessary for survival and growth in such an extreme environment, its structure is very simple, primarily composed of clonal denitrifying - and -proteobacterial populations. The resulting community is overabundant in key genes conferring resistance to specific stresses including nitrate, heavy metals and acetone. Evolutionary analysis indicates that lateral gene transfer could have a key function in rapid response and adaptation to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding, assessing and predicting the impacts of human-induced activities on microbial communities ranging from human health to agriculture to environmental management, and their responses to environmental changes.

  7. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  8. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  9. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  10. Metagenomic assembly: Challenges, Successes and Validation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Scholz, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Matthew Scholz on "Metagenomic assembly: Challenges, Successes and Validation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  11. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  12. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: Networks of correlated environmental features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: Networks of correlated environmental University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA; 4 Keck Biotechnology Resource Laboratory, Yale University, New unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental

  13. WebMGA: a Customizable Web Server for Fast Metagenomic Sequence Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sitao; Zhu, Zhengwei; Fu, Liming; Niu, Beifang; Li, Weizhong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. : WebMGA: a customizable web server for fast metagenomicWebMGA: a customizable web server for fast metagenomicby the few available web servers are also limited and have

  14. Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Meyer, Folker [ANL

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Folker Meyer from Argonne National Lab gives a presentation on "Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  15. Discovery of Genes and Genomes through Deep Metagenomic Sequencing of Cow Rumen (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rubin, Eddy

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Director Eddy Rubin on "Discovery of Genes and Genomes through Deep Metagenomic Sequencing of Cow Rumen" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. Metagenomics for Etiologic Agent Discovery (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ross, Matthew [Baylor College of Medicine

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Matthew Ross on "Metagenomics for etiological agent discovery" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  17. Larval ecology and synchronous reproduction of two crustacean species : Semibalanus balanoides in New England, USA and Gecarcinus quadratus in Veraguas, Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyory, Joanna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental cues for synchronous reproduction were investigated for two highly abundant, ecologically important crustacean species: the temperate acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, and the tropical terrestrial ...

  18. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  19. Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Symbionts in a Gutless Worm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman, Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boeffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here we use a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, thus providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model that describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments that it inhabits.

  20. Symbiosis insights through metagenomic analysis of a microbialconsortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman,Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut, and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model which describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments which it inhabits.

  1. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass burning occurs in all vegetated terrestrial central Europe, andEurope in Table 2.6 and F ig . 2.67. Climatological global biomass

  2. Introduction: The Ecological Consequences of a Bipartite Life History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Mark H.

    Introduction: The Ecological Consequences of a Bipartite Life History The vast majority of demersal ecology of marine fishes are strik- ing. In marked contrast with the life history of terrestrial ver perception for coral reef fishes by Cowen et al., 2000; Cowen, 2002; Leis and McCormick, 2002; Planes, 2002

  3. SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

  4. 1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

  5. Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Undergraduate Programmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    and freshwater), restoration ecology, game farm management, ecotourism, community-based natural resource between Soil Science, Environmental Sociology and Genetics. During your fourth year you integrate all in which you may choose a career are: environmental impact assessment and monitoring (terrestrial

  6. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  7. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. Dixieexploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. In Napachange (USFWS, 2009), geothermal energy development (BLM,

  8. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11450 A metagenome-wide association study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    diabetes Junjie Qin1 *, Yingrui Li1 *, Zhiming Cai2 *, Shenghui Li1 *, Jianfeng Zhu1 *, Fan Zhang3 of gut microbiota has become a major research area in human disease, including type 2 diabetes, the most 2 diabetes, we developed a protocol for a metagenome-wide association study (MGWAS) and undertook

  9. Research review paper Stable isotope probing in the metagenomics era: A bridge towards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bioremediation Ondrej Uhlik a , Mary-Cathrine Leewis b , Michal Strejcek a , Lucie Musilova a , Martina Mackova a: Bioremediation Biodegradation Stable isotope probing Metagenomics Sequence-based screening Function Microbial biodegradation and biotransformation reactions are essential to most bioremediation processes, yet

  10. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Quake, Steve [University of Stanford

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  11. Endosymbiont hunting in the metagenome of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Saha, Surya [Cornell University

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Surya Saha on "Endosymbiont hunting in the metagenome of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri)" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. Scalability of Comparative Analysis, Novel Algorithms and Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mavrommatis, Kostas [JGI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Kostas Mavrommatis, chair of the Scalability of Comparative Analysis, Novel Algorithms and Tools panel, at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  13. Genome Assembly Forensics: Metrics for Assessing Assembly Correctness (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pop, Mihai [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Maryland's Mihai Pop on "Genome Assembly Forensics: Metrics for Assessing Assembly Correctness" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  14. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quake, Steve [University of Stanford] [University of Stanford

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  15. Scaling MG-RAST to Terabases (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Narayan [ANL] [ANL

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Lab's Narayan Desai on "Scaling MG-RAST to Terabases" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  16. Scalability of Comparative Analysis, Novel Algorithms and Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavrommatis, Kostas [JGI] [JGI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Kostas Mavrommatis, chair of the Scalability of Comparative Analysis, Novel Algorithms and Tools panel, at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  17. Memory Efficient Sequence Analysis Using Compressed Data Structures (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simpson, Jared [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Jared Simpson on "Memory efficient sequence analysis using compressed data structures" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  18. Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Alex Copeland on "Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  19. Genome Assembly Forensics: Metrics for Assessing Assembly Correctness (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pop, Mihai [University of Maryland

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Maryland's Mihai Pop on "Genome Assembly Forensics: Metrics for Assessing Assembly Correctness" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  20. Scaling MG-RAST to Terabases (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Desai, Narayan [ANL

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Lab's Narayan Desai on "Scaling MG-RAST to Terabases" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  1. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  2. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  3. Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

  4. Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain: an analysis. Historical ecology of the lower Santa Clara River,Ventura River, and Oxnard Plain: an analysis of terrestrial layers are available on SFEI's website, at www.sfei.org/projects/VenturaHE. Permissions rights for images

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novich, C.M. (ed.)

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the terrestrial ecology of semi-arid sites; (2) marine sciences; (3) radionuclide fate and effects; (4) waste mobilization, fate and effects; and (5) theoretical research on environmental sampling. (ACR)

  6. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  7. Omega: an Overlap-graph de novo Assembler for Meta-genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haider, Bahlul [ORNL; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk [ORNL; Bushnell, Brian [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chai, JJ [ORNL; Copeland, Alex [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pan, Chongle [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivation: Metagenomic sequencing allows reconstruction of mi-crobial genomes directly from environmental samples. Omega (overlap-graph metagenome assembler) was developed here for assembling and scaffolding Illumina sequencing data of microbial communities. Results: Omega found overlaps between reads using a prefix/suffix hash table. The overlap graph of reads was simplified by removing transitive edges and trimming small branches. Unitigs were generat-ed based on minimum cost flow analysis of the overlap graph. Obtained unitigs were merged to contigs and scaffolds using mate-pair information. Omega was compared with two de Bruijn graph assemblers, SOAPdenovo and IDBA-UD, using a publically-available Illumina sequencing dataset of a 64-genome mock com-munity. The assembly results were verified by their alignment with reference genomes. The overall performances of the three assem-blers were comparable and each assembler provided best results for a subset of genomes.

  8. CONSERVED VIRUS PROTEIN FAMILIES IN BACTERIOPHAGE GENOMES AND IN METAGENOMES OF HUMANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xixu

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    people that have helped me during my graduate study at Stowers Institute for Medical Research and Kansas University Medical Center. I am especially thankful to my advisor, Dr. Arcady Mushegian for his guidance, support, advice and encouragement... of Appendices Page Appendix A: the annotation of POGs-2007……………………………………………………..52 Appendix B: parameters for Roche 454 Newbler……………………………………...……….100 Appendix C: the virus protein orthologs identified in Metagenomics data…………………….102 1...

  9. Human Ecology Human ecology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

  10. Designing for ecology : the ecological park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Andres M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

  11. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  12. Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

  13. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

  14. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  15. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Phil; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification.

  16. Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Shi

    Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning Shi Pu International Institute for Geo hard to recover 3D building structures from 2D image. Recent studies ([2] [6]) show that laser scanning imagery, airborne and terrestrial laser scanning give explicit 3D information, which enables the rapid

  17. Ecology and environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

  18. Forest ecology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

  19. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

  20. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michelangelo Project: 3D Scanning of Large Statues,” Proc.for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damage

  1. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damageresolution 3d laser scanning to slope stability studies. ”

  2. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

  3. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  4. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

  5. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  6. Uncovering the Microbial Diversity of the Alberta Oil Sands through Metagenomics: A Stepping Stone for Enhanced Oil Recovery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voordouw, Gerrit

    the genomes of the subsurface Heavy Oil and Tar Sands (HOTS) reservoirs; the oil sand mine tailings ponds1 Uncovering the Microbial Diversity of the Alberta Oil Sands through Metagenomics: A Stepping Stone for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Environmental Solutions Writing Team: Julia Foght1 , Robert Holt2

  7. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  8. Ecology's OUO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartment ofYearEcology's OUO

  9. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  10. RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and management, aesthetic values, biodiversity, recreation, and many others) are sustained through time. Rangeland Ecology graduates are also well prepared to work in ecological restoration of drastically disturbed lands. Rangeland

  11. DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugenholtz, Phil [University of Queensland] [University of Queensland

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Queensland's Phil Hugenholtz on "Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  13. Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hugenholtz, Phil [University of Queensland

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Queensland's Phil Hugenholtz on "Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  14. Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Eric [Scripps and UCSD

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eric Allen of Scripps and UC San Diego on "Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  15. Synthetic Metagenomics: Converting digital information back to Biology (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, Sam [DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sam Deutsch of the DOE JGI on "Synthetic Metagenomics: Converting digital information back to Biology" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  16. ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

  17. Ecology 2007 21, 455464

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Functional Ecology 2007 21, 455­464 455 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd The speed of ecological speciation ANDREW P. HENDRY*, PATRIK on ecological time-scales (contemporary evolution) and adaptive divergence can cause reproductive isolation

  18. Ecology 2005 93, 231243

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 231­243 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS Darkness visible: reflections on underground ecology A. H. FITTER Department of Biology Journal of Ecology (2005) 93, 231­243 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2005.00990.x Soil, science and civilization

  19. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness of metagenomic-based enzyme discovery in lignocellulytic microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Gladden, J.G.; Allgaier, M.; D'haeseleer, P.; Fortney, J.L.; Reddy, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Singer, S.W.; Vander Gheynst, J.; Silver, W.L.; Simmons, B.; Hazen, T.C.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing cellulosic biofuels from plant material has recently emerged as a key U.S. Department of Energy goal. For this technology to be commercially viable on a large scale, it is critical to make production cost efficient by streamlining both the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass and fuel production. Many natural ecosystems efficiently degrade lignocellulosic biomass and harbor enzymes that, when identified, could be used to increase the efficiency of commercial biomass deconstruction. However, ecosystems most likely to yield relevant enzymes, such as tropical rain forest soil in Puerto Rico, are often too complex for enzyme discovery using current metagenomic sequencing technologies. One potential strategy to overcome this problem is to selectively cultivate the microbial communities from these complex ecosystems on biomass under defined conditions, generating less complex biomass-degrading microbial populations. To test this premise, we cultivated microbes from Puerto Rican soil or green waste compost under precisely defined conditions in the presence dried ground switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) or lignin, respectively, as the sole carbon source. Phylogenetic profiling of the two feedstock-adapted communities using SSU rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing or phylogenetic microarray analysis revealed that the adapted communities were significantly simplified compared to the natural communities from which they were derived. Several members of the lignin-adapted and switchgrass-adapted consortia are related to organisms previously characterized as biomass degraders, while others were from less well-characterized phyla. The decrease in complexity of these communities make them good candidates for metagenomic sequencing and will likely enable the reconstruction of a greater number of full length genes, leading to the discovery of novel lignocellulose-degrading enzymes adapted to feedstocks and conditions of interest.

  20. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  1. SYNTHESIS Industrial-strength ecology: trade-offs and opportunities in algal biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,4 Robert C. McBride,5 Shovon Mandal1 and Val H. Smith6 Abstract Microalgae represent one of the most as a renewable source of energy. Algae can produce many times more biomass per unit area than terrestrial crop, GMOs, micro-algae, phytoplankton, stoichiometry, trade-offs. Ecology Letters (2013) 16: 1393

  2. Chapter I: Ecological Acoustics 1.1 Ecological Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, Fred

    23 Chapter I: Ecological Acoustics 1.1 Ecological Perception The ecological approach to perception of view of low-level sensory stimuli. #12;Ecological Perception 24 The ecological approach, however of its ecological activities, can be obtained by direct sensitivity to invariant structures in the world

  3. Ecology or Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: File this under "Statistics to the Rescue". Economy or ecology? Ecology or economy? Tough choice. Especially for China which is barreling recklessly ahead in its quest to become top consumer nation. A recent release from...

  4. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  5. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  6. Ecology 2002 16, 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayhew, Peter

    U N C O R R EC TED PRO O F Functional Ecology 2002 16, 000­000 © 2002 British Ecological Society 1 of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK and Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Hill of Brathens, Banchory AB31 4DA, UK Summary 1. This study examined the indirect impacts of leaf-mining insects

  7. RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division Biotype has changed its name to Ecotype! Following the re-organisation of Forest Research into five science Divisions and three Support Divisions, the former Woodland Ecology Branches to form the new Ecology Division. We decided to give the divisional newsletter a new name (and

  8. Site vegetation report: Terrestrial vegetation survey (1993--1995) for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (EcMP) was designed to investigate the long-term ecological trends in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems at the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) (DOE 1993). Field sampling was conducted during 1993, 1994, and 1995, until the program was terminated in late 1995. This report presents the terrestrial vegetation data that were gathered by the EcMP. The site is located on the Colorado Piedmont, east of the Front Range, between Boulder and Golden, approximately 25 km (16 miles) northwest of Denver. The topography and proximity of the Site to the mountain front result in an interesting mixture of prairie and mountain plant species. The Site is one of the few large, relatively undisturbed areas of its kind that remains along the Colorado Piedmont. Until 1989, the primary mission of the Site was the production of nuclear weapons components (DOE 1993). After production ceased, Site personnel shifted their focus to cleanup and closure.

  9. The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment. An Investigation of the Possible Roskilde, Denmark Febtuary 1990 #12;1 Risø-M-2851 THE BEHAVIOUR OF IODINE IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT influence the migration behaviour of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is stated that the organic

  10. Metagenomic and functional analysis of hindgut microbiota of a wood-feeding higher termite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnecke, Falk; Warnecke, Falk; Luginbuhl, Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Ghassemian, Majid; Richardson, Toby H.; Stege, Justin T.; Cayouette, Michelle; McHardy, Alice C.; Djordjevic, Gordana; Aboushadi, Nahla; Sorek, Rotem; Tringe, Susannah G.; Podar, Mircea; Martin, Hector Garcia; Kunin, Victor; Dalevi, Daniel; Madejska, Julita; Kirton, Edward; Platt, Darren; Szeto, Ernest; Salamov, Asaf; Barry, Kerrie; Mikhailova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Matson, Eric G.; Ottesen, Elizabeth A.; Zhang, Xinning; Hernandez, Myriam; Murillo, Catalina; Acosta, Luis G.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Tamayo, Giselle; Green, Brian D.; Chang, Cathy; Rubin, Edward M.; Mathur, Eric J.; Robertson, Dan E.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Leadbetter, Jared R.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the standpoints of both basic research and biotechnology, there is considerable interest in reaching a clearer understanding of the diversity of biological mechanisms employed during lignocellulose degradation. Globally, termites are an extremely successful group of wood-degrading organisms and are therefore important both for their roles in carbon turnover in the environment and as potential sources of biochemical catalysts for efforts aimed at converting wood into biofuels. Only recently have data supported any direct role for the symbiotic bacteria in the gut of the termite in cellulose and xylan hydrolysis. Here we use a metagenomic analysis of the bacterial community resident in the hindgut paunch of a wood-feeding Nasutitermes species to show the presence of a large, diverse set of bacterial genes for cellulose and xylan hydrolysis. Many of these genes were expressed in vivo or had cellulase activity in vitro, and further analyses implicate spirochete and fibrobacter species in gut lignocellulose degradation. New insights into other important symbiotic functions including H{sub 2} metabolism, CO{sub 2}-reductive acetogenesis and N{sub 2} fixation are also provided by this first system-wide gene analysis of a microbial community specialized towards plant lignocellulose degradation. Our results underscore how complex even a 1-{micro}l environment can be.

  11. Ecology and environment What ecology and environment course is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Ecology and environment Essentials What ecology and environment course is there? Ecology 01273 876787 Why ecology and environment at Sussex? · You will be taught by lecturers who are leaders in research, with a broad range of experience and expertise including plant, bird and insect ecology, climate

  12. Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001 Population ecology is the discipline in ecology that deals with the structure and dynamics (e.g. growth interacting populations. Population ecology is closely related to other ecological disciplines, e

  13. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 342­352 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, reproductive value, sex allocation, sex-dependent mortality, varia- ble environment. Journal of Animal Ecology manipulation in kestrels © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 73, 342­352 van

  14. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than@ucsc.edu). #12;923 Riparian forest restoration © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology, 41

  15. Journal of Applied Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2002 39, 960­970 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science- tion, succession. Journal of Applied Ecology (2002) 39, 960­970 Introduction Efforts to reclaim@ucsc.edu). #12;961 Vegetation on reclaimed mines © 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology

  16. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner, Marsha W; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource of information for genome and metagenome projects world-wide. GOLD provides access to complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata through pre-computed lists and a search page. The database currently incorporates information for more than 2900 sequencing projects, of which 639 have been completed and the data deposited in the public databases. GOLD is constantly expanding to provide metadata information related to the project and the organism and is compliant with the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS) specifications.

  17. RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RANGELAND ECOLOGY Rangeland Ecology graduates are trained in the ecology and management, recreation, and many others) are sustained through time. Rangeland Ecology graduates are also well prepared to work in ecological restoration of drastically disturbed lands. Rangeland ecologist often work closely

  18. ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

  19. ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES* WINTER 2013 ECL 296 (CRN 50337) / PBG 292 (CRN 64677 24 The Modern Ecology of Ice-Covered Lakes in Antarctica: A Journey Back JANUARY 31 Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree: Ecology and Adaptive Radiation

  20. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We apply a principal component analysis across the initial sample set to draw correlations between sample variables and changes in microbiome populations.

  1. Enter Keyword(s) Today's Ecology Top

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enter Keyword(s) Today's Ecology Top News OMG's Business Ecology Initiative BEI Reaches 250 Member Advertisement Ecology Topics Botany Climate Research Ecology Environment Environmental Microbiology Environmental Monitoring Environmental Research Fisheries Research Marine Biology Meteorology Molecular Ecology

  2. Ecology 2006 20, 678688

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Carotenoid accumulation strategies for becoming a colourful HouseFunctional Ecology 2006 20, 678­688 678 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British. CRINO School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287­4501, USA Summary 1. Male House

  3. Ecology 2003 91, 240252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    Journal of Ecology 2003 91, 240­252 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-words: above-ground biomass change, carbon cycle, dry living above-ground bio- mass, tropical rain forest

  4. Ecology 2004 18, 212222

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Functional Ecology 2004 18, 212­222 © 2004 British Ecological Society 212 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd of California, Berkeley 94720-3140, CA, and Stable Isotope Ratio Facility for Environmental Research (SIRFER) examine if cultural conditions have an effect on instantaneous gas exchange and time-integrated carbon

  5. Ecology 2005 93, 10851093

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 1085­1093 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd G. WHITHAM Department of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research on ecosystems and ecosystem processes. Projected changes include increased levels of carbon dioxide, elevated

  6. Ecology 2004 92, 168173

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    in these islands. Key-words: Canary Islands, colonization, endemism, interspecific competition, Macaronesia, niche et al. 1994) and the Canary Islands (e.g. Francisco-Ortega et al. 1996), and these show that most.Oxford, UKJECJournal of Ecology0022-04772004 British Ecological SocietyFebruary 2004921ForumPhylogeny of island

  7. WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Brien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the WSDOT Highway Maintenance: Environmental Complianceand the Highway Maintenance Manual for Terrestrial Species.to impacts from routine maintenance activities. In response

  8. accumulating terrestrial plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keith Green, Megan Murphy, Jenna Pathways for Terrestrial Vertebrates. In Carlton, J., G. Ruiz, and R. Mack (Eds.), Invasive species: vectors and management strategies (pp....

  9. Terrestrial applications of the heatpipe power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A terrestrial reactor that uses the same design approach as the Heatpipe Power System (HPS) may have applications both on earth and on other planetary surfaces. The baseline HPS is a potential, near-term, low-cost space fission power system. The system will be composed of independent modules, and all components operate within the existing database. The HPS has relatively few system integration issues; thus, the successful development of a module is a significant step toward verifying system feasibility and performance estimates. A prototypic, refractory-metal HPS module is being fabricated, and testing is scheduled to begin in November 1996. A successful test will provide high confidence that the HPS can achieve its predicted performance. An HPS incorporating superalloys will be better suited for some terrestrial or planetary applications. Fabrication and testing of a superalloy HPS module should be less challenging than that of the refractory metal module. A superalloy HPS core capable of delivering > 100 kWt to a power conversion subsystem could be fabricated for about $500k (unfueled). Tests of the core with electric heat (used to simulate heat from fission) could demonstrate normal and off-normal operation of the core, including the effects of heatpipe failure. A power conversion system also could be coupled to the core to demonstrate full system operation.

  10. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.; Balkwill, D.L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Beeman, R.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  11. 3, 11851214, 2006 Landscape ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 3, 1185­1214, 2006 Landscape ecology meets catchment hydrology B. Schr¨oder Title Page, and function in landscape ecology and catchment hydrology ­ how can quantitative landscape ecology support¨oder (boschroe@uni-potsdam.de) 1185 #12;HESSD 3, 1185­1214, 2006 Landscape ecology meets catchment hydrology B

  12. Master programme in Ecology & Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly organized by the Institute of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Bern Selected specialisation within the MSc programme in Ecology & Evolution Programme start and conservation Plant ecology Behaviour Evolution autumn semester spring semester year: 20.. 3 semester 4 semester

  13. Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China Jingfeng Xiao droughts had significant effects on terrestrial carbon cycling in China, although future studies should Lafayette, Indiana @ Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

  14. China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors Hanqin Tian,1 to be investigated. China is important in determining the global carbon balance in terms of both carbon emission change) on net carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems of China for the period 1961­2005 were modeled

  15. LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    , flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah vehicles, next generation robotic platforms, platform mechanics and materials, winterization of robotic

  16. China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

  17. Slide 1 (of 42) Observations of Terrestrial Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    formation epoch and occurrence rate of rocky terrestrial planets around solar- and intermediate- mass Observatory/Lynette Cook Zuckerman et al. (2008) #12;Slide 6 (of 42) What does Terrestrial mean 42) HD 15407A Gemini Observatory/Lynette Cook Melis et al. 2010, ApJ Letters #12;Slide 16 (of 42

  18. Ecology 2002 90, 223234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by clusters of open-water pools enclosed by the peat of surrounding terrestrial and semi-aquatic habitats of a focus now occupied by the largest pools. Peat depth varied systematically across the complex, leading peat- lands. The distinctive surface patterning of northern peatlands arises from small bodies of open

  19. Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

  20. Ecology 2007 95, 217225

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shefferson, Richard P.

    Matsunosato, Tsukuba 305-8687 Japan, and *Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Dormancyisassociatedwithdecreasedadultsurvivalinthe burnt orchid lower variability in survival and fitness over the long term. We suggest that conservation measures

  1. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  2. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  3. Pinniped ecology in Santa Monica Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearzi, Maddalena; Saylan, Charles A.; Barroso, Celia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bight. Anderson JW e d . Ecology of the Southern 2005 .347 - 359. 1998 . Behavioral ecology and demography of seals3 % 4 ) : Population Ecology of California Press Stewart B

  4. Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Alan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDITORIAL Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and successof areas in theoretical ecology. Among the highlights areyear represent theoretical ecology from around the world: 20

  5. TR-003 Ecology March 2000 Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-003 Ecology March 2000 Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  6. Comparative Metagenomics of Gut and Ocean: Identification of Microbial Marker Genes for Complex Environmental Properties(2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bork, Peer

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Peer Bork of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory on "Comparative Metagenomics of Gut and Ocean: Identification of Microbial Marker Genes for Complex Environmental Properties" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  7. Comparative Metagenomics of Gut and Ocean: Identification of Microbial Marker Genes for Complex Environmental Properties(2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bork, Peer

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Peer Bork of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory on "Comparative Metagenomics of Gut and Ocean: Identification of Microbial Marker Genes for Complex Environmental Properties" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  8. Identification of Novel Positive-Strand RNA Viruses by Metagenomic Analysis of Archaea-Dominated Yellowstone Hot Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Bolduc; Daniel P. Shaughnessy; Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin; Francisco F. Roberto; Mark Young

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  9. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia); O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, Universite de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  10. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in ecological research. Ecology 91: 2536–39. Ernest SKM,opportunities of open data in ecology. Science 331: 703–05.Stokstad E. 2011. Open-source ecology takes root across the

  11. 1808 METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 7 Ecology, 85(7), 2004, pp. 18081810

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    Forum 1808 METABOLIC THEORY OF ECOLOGY Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 7 Ecology, 85(7), 2004, pp. 1808­1810 2004 by the Ecological Society of America CAN FUNCTION AT THE ORGANISMAL LEVEL EXPLAIN ECOLOGICAL of chemistry, physics, and biology'' can be used to link the function of individual organisms to ecological pro

  12. 120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120131.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120­131. Accepted 27 December 2007 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quer- cus coccifera. ­ Web, Spain. #12;121WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 have important economic consequences because large amounts of public

  13. 44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 4453.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 44­53. Accepted 13 May 2009 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 agricultural landscape on local bird communities. ­ Web Ecol. 9: 44­53. This study assesses whether Alcalá de Henares, Spain. #12;45WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 multifunctional systems are common in southern Europe

  14. Landscape pattern Landscape ecology, if not ecology in general, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    VAL006- Landscape pattern metrics Landscape ecology, if not ecology in general, is largely founded on the notion that environmental patterns strongly influence ecological processes [32]. The habitats in which with organism perception and behav- ior to drive the higher-level processes of population dynamics and community

  15. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  16. Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    University and the director of the Stanford GPS Laboratory. 1. INTRODUCTION The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Alternative Positioning Navigation & Timing (APNT) program is developing and examining1 Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs Sherman Lo, Yu

  17. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  18. 880 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 3 Ecology, 83(3), 2002, pp. 880881

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

    880 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 3 Ecology, 83(3), 2002, pp. 880­881 2002 by the Ecological Society of America COMMUNITY ECOLOGY--IN SPANISH Jaksic A., Fabia´n. 2000. Ecologi´a de comunidades. Edi ecology. Few branches of ecology have gone through such a shocking process of redefinition of paradigms

  19. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry, E-mail: wade.g.henning@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  20. Ecology 2006 94, 276284

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2006 94, 276­284 © 2006 The Authors Journal compilation © 2006 British of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research, Northern Arizona University and Cupressaceae that are dependent on the host plant for water and mineral nutrients and a portion of their carbon

  1. Ecology 2006 94, 10111026

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -specific variation in resistance to wind mortality interacted strongly with: (i) shade tolerance characteristics, (ii Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Species resistance and community response to wind disturbance, Millbrook, NY 12545, USA Summary 1 Severe winds are the predominant cause of natural disturbance

  2. Ecology 2007 95, 12611273

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Wind-throw mortality in the southern boreal forest: effects of tree mortality as influenced by species, diameter and stand age were assessed across a gradient in wind in tree size and wind intensity index, and for three stand ages. 3. Probability of mortality was higher

  3. Ecology 2007 95, 13941403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    EvolutionResearchGroup(CSIC-IPNA),C/AstrofísicoFranciscoSánchez3,38206LaLaguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation (Canary Islands). 2. Seeds from all three plant species studied (Lycium intricatum, Rubia fruticosa probably in the colonization of other subtropical islands. Key-words: Badlands, Canary Islands, diplochory

  4. Ecology 2007 21, 154161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    of contexts, both reproductive and routine. For example, large antlers of moose are effective weapons in male Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Costs of bearing a sexually selected ornamental weapon be costly to produce and maintain. 2. Male fiddler crabs use a single greatly enlarged claw as both a weapon

  5. Ecology 2006 94, 905914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and water table affect wetland plant in experimental wetland plant communities, where the dominant plant species are non-mycorrhizal and subordinate table (un-saturated) treatment, above-ground plant biomass increased in the presence of AMF relative

  6. Research agenda for ecological effects of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, J.R.; Mooney, H.A.; Grow, G.R. (eds.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential ecological effects of a nuclear winter were discussed by 27 scientists, mostly terrestrial biologists, at a workshop held at Stanford University from June 11 to 14, 1984. The workshop focused on the experimental/observational programs and model-development programs that would be required to develop a capability for predicting nuclear-winter effects on three levels of biological organization - organism, community, and region. For each of the three levels of organization, participants summarized available biological data and models that could serve as starting points for developing a nuclear-winter predictive capability and provided an overview of ecological-assessment programs that must be undertaken to develop such a capability. Guidelines were established for designing an integrated ecological assessment program and for developing the required biological models. Finally, a list of recommendations was prepared for high-priority tasks that should be undertaken in the immediate future, including experiments at the individual-organism and community levels and analyses of regional observations.

  7. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  8. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  9. Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology? Asking the question, What is tropical ecology? may seem akin to asking questions such as, Who is buried in Grant's tomb? Tropical ecology is the study of the ecology of tropical regions. But so what? Consider these questions: First, what is ecology? What are its

  10. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

  11. The ecology of coral-microbe interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marhaver, Kristen Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    algal symbioses. Molecular Ecology 18:1823-1833. Webster, N.F. Rohwer. 2008. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls inin Caribbean coral reefs. Ecology Letters 9:818-826. Porter,

  12. CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology'' By Andruid Kerne dissertation submitted partial addresses browsing creatively, been co­developed with the metadisciplinary framework interface ecology, in addition inside them, open process without definite bounds. a metadiscipline, interface ecology brings

  13. PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology? Allan Konopka Biological Sciences Division for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include by a `microbial community' and identification of important characteristics specific to community ecology. What

  14. Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world://bee.oregonstate.edu/ecoe Ecological Engineering is: · Ecosystem restoration and habitat design at multiple scales · Watershed · Phytoremediation and bioremediation · Industrial ecology · Constructed wetlands and tidal marshlands · Mitigation

  15. commentary: A Darwinian approach to community ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freckleton, Robert P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plant ecol- ogy. Journal of Ecology, 55, 247-270. Kress, W.The merging of community ecology and phylogenetic biology.Ecology Let- ters, 12, 693-715. Freckleton, R. P. & Harvey,

  16. TR-017 Ecology March 2002 Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-017 Ecology March 2002 Technical Report Forest Research Vancouver Forest Region 2100 Labieux Region Coarse Woody Debris Working Group Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology

  17. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  18. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonter DN. 2010. Citizen science as an ecological researchand ecology Panel 2. Citizen science – crowd-sourcing bigspecies (NABCI 2011). Citizen science is a form of data

  19. Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program - 2015 Peer Review Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program - 2015 Peer Review...

  20. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, N.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L. [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

  1. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  2. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  3. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  4. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  5. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe Luigi Maiorano1 to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing

  6. The ecology of mutualism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, D. H.; James, Samuel W.; Keeler, K. H.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Quebec, Canada H3C 3P8 Sam James Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 48109 Kathleen H. Keeler School of Life Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA 68588 INTRODUCTION....annualreviews.org/aronline Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 1982.13:315-347. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 316 BOUCHER, JAMES & KEELER species" without evoking group selection. Two definitions have...

  7. Journal of Applied Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

  8. ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a way that preserves the greatest possible knowledge base, while making the most efficient and effectiveORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological effectively for planning, restoration, and management. Arranging the various elements within the ecosystem

  9. Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22: Economic Sustainability and Ecological Compatibility: Where is the room to move? October 21st - 22nd , 2010, Economic Sustainability: Room to Move? Workshop Hosted by Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Walden

  10. Journal of Applied Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    beneficial stream and river restoration. We propose five criteria that must be met for a river restoration ArticleEcological success in river restorationM. A. Palmer et al. FORUM Standards for ecologically successful river restoration M.A. PALMER,* E.S. BERNHARDT,* J. D. ALLAN, P.S. LAKE, G. ALEXANDER, S. BROOKS

  11. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  12. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

  13. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2007 76, 1045­1052 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British-words: density effect, Ficedula hypoleuca, long-term trend, Parus major, timing of breeding. Journal of Animal@utu.fi #12;1046 M. P. Ahola et al. © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society

  14. Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

  15. Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    the discovery of short bursts of gamma rays originating from Earth, called terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFsMeasurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray associated with 26 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) recorded by the RHESSI satellite over the Caribbean

  16. Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder" Mission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Abstract This paper addresses visualization issues of the Terrestrial Planet the visualization of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission (TPF) as a case study to identify and analyze

  17. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin ZOGG*, David GRIMM* ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200-30106 is introduced as well

  18. Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

  19. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  20. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces 2014 Ernest Orlando Lawrence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Sciences Honored for his outstanding accomplishments in environmental genomics and microbial ecology, including the development of innovative metagenomics...

  1. Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 769779 2006 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behe, Michael J.

    769 Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 769­779 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ECOLOGICAL and phenotypic plasticity in promoting ecological character displacement (i.e., trait evolution stemming from resource competition between species). Because ecological character displacement generates new populations

  2. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  3. For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

  4. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Ecology Volume 2012, Article ID 939862, 17 pages doi:10.1155/2012/939862 Review Article Parallel Ecological Speciation in Plants? Katherine L speciation, known as parallel ecological speciation, is one of several forms of evidence for ecology's role

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    ORIGINAL PAPER A general theory of ecology Samuel M. Scheiner & Michael R. Willig Received: 9 of ecology have existed for the past half century; ecologists simply have failed to explicitly recognize them. We present a general theory of ecology and show how it relates to ecology's numerous constituent

  6. Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

  7. Book Reviews Ecology, 92(8), 2011, p. 1705

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc

    Book Reviews Ecology, 92(8), 2011, p. 1705 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Advances in community ecology Gido, Keith B., and Donald A. Jackson, editors. 2010. Community ecology of stream fishes: community ecology; fish ecology; long-term studies; stream ecology. It is rare that a book has a 25-year

  8. Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arq172

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Deborah

    Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arq172 Forum: Invited Review The fusion of behavioral ecology and ecology Deborah M. Gordon Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA Behavioral ecology and ecology have projects in common. Community ecology can provide behavioral ecology

  9. CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

  10. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) Flight Baseline Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Marie; Shaklan, S; Kasting, J; Traub, W; Alexander, J; Angel, R; Blaurock, C; Brown, M; Brown, R; Burrows, C; Clampin, M; Cohen, E; Content, D; Dewell, L; Dumont, P; Egerman, R; Ferguson, H; Ford, V; Greene, J; Guyon, O; Hammel, H; Heap, S; Ho, T; Horner, S; Hunyadi, S; Irish, S; Jackson, C; Kasdin, J; Kissil, A; Krim, M; Kuchner, M; Kwack, E; Lillie, C; Lin, D; Liu, A; Marchen, L; Marley, M; Meadows, V; Mosier, G; Mouroulis, P; Noecker, M; Ohl, R; Oppenheimer, B; Pitman, J; Ridgway, S; Sabatke, E; Seager, S; Shao, M; Smith, A; Soummer, R; Stapelfeldt, K; Tenerell, D; Trauger, J; Vanderbei, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission presented here is an existence proof for a flagship-class internal coronagraph space mission capable of detecting and characterizing Earth-like planets and planetary systems at visible wavelengths around nearby stars, using an existing launch vehicle. TPF-C will use spectroscopy to measure key properties of exoplanets including the presence of atmospheric water or oxygen, powerful signatures in the search for habitable worlds.

  11. Leptogenesis, neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Rodejohann

    2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Leptogenesis in left-right symmetric theories is studied. The usual see-saw mechanism is modified by the presence of a left-handed Higgs triplet. A simple connection between the properties of the light left-handed and heavy right-handed neutrinos is found. Predictions of this scenario for neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation in long-baseline experiments are given. These observables can in principle distinguish different realizations of the model.

  12. Influence of massive planet scattering on nascent terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

    2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In most extrasolar planetary systems, the present orbits of known giant planets admit the existence of stable terrestrial planets. Those same giant planets, however, have typically eccentric orbits that hint at violent early dynamics less benign for low mass planet formation. Under the assumption that massive planet eccentricities are the end point of gravitational scattering in multiple planet systems, we study the evolution of the building blocks of terrestrial planets during the scattering process. We find that typically, evolutionary sequences that result in a moderately eccentric giant planet orbiting at a ~ 2.5 AU eject over 95% of the material initially present within the habitable zone. Crossing orbits largely trigger the ejection, and leave the surviving material with a wide dispersion in semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. Based on these results, we predict that radial velocity follow-up of terrestrial planet systems found by Kepler will find that these are anti-correlated with the presence of eccentric giant planets orbiting at a few AU.

  13. On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

  14. Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams J. B. Johnson (jerry.johnson@byu.edu), S. M. Peat and B. J. Adams, Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Dept

  15. ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy programs in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The EES Graduate Program includes studying a wide range of challenging problems in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy

  16. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avilés, Leticia

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Smaller colonies and more solitary living mark higher elevation patches during short and unpredictable windows of time (Jarvis et al. 1994) or by huddling together

  17. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, Robert

    of the web. 2. Weinvestigatedtheimpactof parasitismonthefoodwebstructureof aNewZealand intertidal mudflat, intertidal mudflat. Journal of Animal Ecology (2005) 74, 77­85 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2004.00899.x

  18. A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

  19. Dolphins and African apes: comparisons of sympatric socio-ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearzi, Maddalena; Stanford, Craig B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of sympatric ecology among dolphins and African apesA. 1998. Gorilla ecology and behaviour. EvolutionaryVolume 2: be- haviour, Ecology, and Conservation.Tokyo:

  20. Behavior, Ecology and Genetics of Geoffroy's Tamarin (Saguinus geoffroyi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz-Munoz, Samuel Luis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of landscapes for conservation. Ecology Letters 11: 78-91. LSystematics, behaviour and ecology. Oxford University Press,The evolutionary ecology of the major histocompatibility

  1. Feeding on Phytoestrogens: Implications of Estrogenic Plants for Primate Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasserman, Michael David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change. Journal of Tropical Ecology 21: 31-45. Chapman, C. ,success in a mammal. Ecology 90: Dixon, R. 2004.physiology, and feeding ecology. Evolutionary Anthropology

  2. Ecology and Conservation Biology This option is appropriate for students interested in the scientific study of ecology and conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    Biogeography 3 EEOB 570 Landscape Ecology 3 Y EEOB 596 Ecology and Society 3 AEcl 418 Stream Ecology 3 Y Ent

  3. SCIENCE PLAN AND PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE --SCIENTIFIC FOCUS AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Earth system models. Integration of biophysical, biochemical, physiological, and ecological processes

  4. The Functional Potential of Microbial Communities in Hydraulic Fracturing Source Water and Produced Water from Natural Gas Extraction Characterized by Metagenomic Sequencing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Bibby, Kyle J.; Lipus, Daniel; Hammack, Richard W.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. The metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsible formore »carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection.« less

  5. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair Evan Siemann Professors of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyoffersabroadrangeofcoursesinthebiosciences:animalbehavior,animal biology, bioinformatics, conservation biology, diseases, ecology, evolutionary biology, field ecology, genetics, genomics

  6. Responses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    to a wide range of environmental variations. Photosynthesis is a nonlinear function of solar radiationResponses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

  7. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  8. Ecologic and geographic distribution of filovirus disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Bauer, John T.; Mills, James N.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used ecologic niche modeling of outbreaks and sporadic cases of filovirus-associated hemorrhagic fever (HF) to provide a large-scale perspective on the geographic and ecologic distributions of Ebola and Marburg viruses. We predicted...

  9. Ecology, 88(11), 2007, pp. 27832792 2007 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawler, Josha

    for ecological data mining, have recently emerged from the machine-learning literature. Random forests (hereafterEcology, 88(11), 2007, pp. 2783­2792 Ó 2007 by the Ecological Society of America RANDOM FORESTS FOR CLASSIFICATION IN ECOLOGY D. RICHARD CUTLER,1,7 THOMAS C. EDWARDS, JR.,2 KAREN H. BEARD,3 ADELE CUTLER,4 KYLE T

  10. Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer disturbances to meet the desired objective #12;Aspen in Mixed Conifer ForestsAspen in Mixed Conifer Forests

  11. Ecology, 91(6), 2010, pp. 17631773 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecology, 91(6), 2010, pp. 1763­1773 Ó 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Recruitment and negative species interactions acts to drive community dynamics is a fundamental question in ecology. Here to drive community dynamics has become increasingly apparent in both theoretical and applied ecological

  12. Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems Why is Integration Needed in Ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems #12;Why is Integration Needed in Ecology? Great advances have been made by dividing ecology into subdisciplines. But too much focus on subdisciplines has also hindered ecology · too little study of the interface between disciplines · tended to narrow focus

  13. Ecology, 92(12), 2011, pp. 21592166 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Reports Ecology, 92(12), 2011, pp. 2159­2166 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America plant parasites is widespread. Yet, understanding the ecological determinants of evolutionary divergence such a trade-off has been reported, this study provides further ecological bases for the coexistence of closely

  14. Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 1 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102 DOE is to provide a summary of the literature on the physiology and molecular ecology of bacteria and in particular to be a comprehensive review. Excellent current detailed reviews are available on the physiology and molecular ecology

  15. Ecology, 91(10), 2010, pp. 29412951 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Mark

    Ecology, 91(10), 2010, pp. 2941­2951 Ó 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Origin Integrative Ecology Group, Estacio´n Biolo´gica de Do~nana, CSIC, 41092 Sevilla, Spain 6 Northwestern interactions--and on the food web's degree of compartmentalization. Despite its ecological importance

  16. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological Archives, iPlant, NatureServe, Dryad, the National Oceanographic Data Center). Some of these repositories house

  17. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Disks with Varying Surface Density Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Thomas Quinn; Jonathan I. Lunine

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``minimum-mass solar nebula'' (MMSN) model estimates the surface density distribution of the protoplanetary disk by assuming the planets to have formed in situ. However, significant radial migration of the giant planets likely occurred in the Solar system, implying a distortion in the values derived by the MMSN method. The true density profiles of protoplanetary disks is therefore uncertain. Here we present results of simulations of late-stage terrestrial accretion, each starting from a disk of planetary embryos. We assume a power-law surface density profile that varies with heliocentric distance r as r^-alpha, and vary alpha between 1/2 and 5/2 (alpha = 3/2 for the MMSN model). We find that for steeper profiles (higher values of alpha), the terrestrial planets (i) are more numerous, (ii) form more quickly, (iii) form closer to the star, (iv) are more massive, (v) have higher iron contents, and (vi) have lower water contents. However, the possibility of forming potentially habitable planets does not appear to vary strongly with alpha.

  18. Climate change and the loss of ecologically relevant large terrestrial carnivore populations are two important challenges cur-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    are as well understood as the one generated by sea otters on kelp forests in nearshore environments (Estes on kelp. In areas with sea otters, kelp is plentiful. In areas without them, kelp is rare. Recent work by Wilmers et al. (in press) shows that kelp forests throughout the North American range of otters contain 1

  19. Metagenomics Smart power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in agriculture, medicine, environmental management, and more. However, only about 1 percent with the "Perhapsatron," a device he designed to slowly compress a hot plasma to nuclear fusion conditions by using

  20. Metagenomics and Microbial Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    ago, some of the microorganisms in the Earth's oceans evolved the ability to use light energy from. Microorganisms drive most of the chemical cycles on Earth, process waste and promote growth and reproduction the Earth's surface. Ozone is special because, unlike oxygen molecules, it absorbs ultraviolet light

  1. NEW INTERNSHIP FOR WINTER Interactive Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    NEW INTERNSHIP FOR WINTER Interactive Ecology UC Santa Cruz Arboretum Internship Agency Sponsor: Brett Hall, Director of Collections and Conservation Interactive Ecology interns will work primarily, back pack tracker, GPS, google earth, etc). The Interactive Ecology internship will also explore, more

  2. SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Glennis A.

    SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

  3. Why study Ecological and Environmental Sciences at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Ecological and Environmental Sciences? In fourth year it is possible to specialise in conservation in environmental consultancy, conservation, policy advice and scientific research. Ecological and EnvironmentalWhy study Ecological and Environmental Sciences at Edinburgh? At Edinburgh students have a wide

  4. Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites Mike Duniway USGS-Southwest Biological Science of vegetation? Why do sites differ in response to disturbance & management? #12;Ecological Sites & Soil Properties · Within a climatic zone (e.g. MLRA), differentiation of ecological sites based on soil

  5. Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    1 23 Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896 Popul Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10144-012-0352-3 Impacts of enemy of Population Ecology and Springer Japan. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall not be self of Population Ecology and Springer Japan 2012 Abstract In this study, we used data from both experi- ments

  6. Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Dr James Pryke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Dr James Pryke My academic career began with an MSc on landscape ecology issues. After receiving my PhD, I undertook a two month fellowship at the Universiti. This position primarily involved conducting research into improving the design and management of ecological

  7. Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid and Maria Fernandez-Gimenez This paper discusses developments in our understanding about rangeland ecology and rangeland dynamics in the last 20 years. Before the late 1980's, the mainstream view in range ecology was that livestock

  8. Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid1 and Maria Fernandez Ecology Lab 2Associate Professor Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Global Issues and Questions in Rangeland Ecology · Despite the focus here on global issues, we need to recognize that Mongolia

  9. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  10. REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY OF SAGE GROUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY OF SAGE GROUSE IN CANADA 1999 Final Project Report For: 1998 and 1999 Sage% of all females attempted to nest. Breeding success (percent of hens that hatched 1egg during a single.5%, while male survival was estimated at about 30%. A basic population model developed from these data

  11. ACCESSCCESS MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuschin, Martin

    OPENPEN ACCESSCCESS MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 458: 39­52, 2012 doi: 10 and the instability or unpre- dictability of disturbance. Global warming is expec- ted to increase the vulnerability. 2010, Gruber 2011). Much of the available information about the impact on benthic systems comes

  12. Ecological Destruction, Health, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    : Power and Practice in Socio-Religious Dynamics among Karen Hayami Yoko Ecological Destruction, Health, Melbourne Victoria 3084, Australia Telephone: +61 3 9459 3021 Fax: +61 3 9457 5923 Email: info Set by KWIX Co., Ltd. Printed in Nagoya (Japan) by KWIX Co., Ltd. Distributors Australia Bushbooks PO

  13. Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palen, Wendy J.

    , Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

  14. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure, 1963; Gribbin, 1971]. Alternatively, magnetic storms might induce eddy electric currents in rocks along

  15. Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

  16. Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

  17. Heat partitioning in terrestrial planets during core formation by negative diapirism H. Samuel a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evonuk, Martha

    in terrestrial planets. We model the dynamic evolution of an iron diapir, sinking through a solid silicate proto experiments. This model can be applied to determine the heat distribution within terrestrial planets-like planets by conversion of potential into thermal energy via viscous heating (Rubie et al., 2007; Solomon

  18. To What Extent Does Terrestrial Life ``Follow The Water''? Eriita G. Jones and Charles H. Lineweaver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    uninhabited, we present empirical pressure-temperature (P-T ) phase diagrams of water, Earth, and terrestrial. This potentially uninhabited terrestrial liquid water includes (i) hot and deep regions of Earth where some combination of high temperature (T > 1228C) and restrictions on pore space, nu- trients, and energy

  19. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR STEREO Science Center (SSC) William T. Thompson STEREO Science Center Code 682, NASA-Goddard (William.T.Thompson@gsfc.nasa.gov 301-286-2040) #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 2STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission

  20. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  1. App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Restoration, Management 83 2.4.6 Compatibility of Wetland Management and Stream Management 84 2 2.5.5 Protection, Restoration, Management 103 2.5.6 Compatibility of Pond Management and StreamApp D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of Terrestrial Habitats

  2. An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

  3. Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed fromSource altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys

  4. The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Research The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change Luigi climate change model outputs for two climate scenarios. Overall, a substantial number of Mediterranean in climate. For 181 terrestrial mammals (68% of all Mediterranean mammals), we used an ensemble forecasting

  5. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  6. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

  7. On the dynamics and thermodynamics of terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, Regan L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for terrestrial planets, inclusive of viscous fluid behavior and featuring finite normal stress differences, is developed. This work offers new insights for the interpretation of planetary survey data. Evolution equations for poloidal and toroidal motions include gradients of density, viscosity, and two normal stress moduli. The poloidal field exhibits gradients in the cubic dilation, which couple non-isotropic pressures to the combined deformation field. In contrast, the toroidal field exhibits vorticity gradients with magnitudes proportional to the natural time. This holds even in the absence of material gradients. Consequently, viscosity gradients are not required to drive toroidal motions. The toroidal field is governed by an inhomogeneous diharmonic equation, exhibiting dynamic shear localization. The strain-energy density for this model, as a function of temperature, is found via thermodynamics. Assuming heat transfer with characteristic diffusivity, a radial model parameterized by thermomechani...

  8. Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions – through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels – to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

  9. System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

  10. Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braswell, B.H. Jr.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

  11. The Genomes and Metagenomes (GEM) Catalogue (first presentation) and The ISA-GCDML Workshop (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Dawn [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding ''Research Coordination Network'' from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Dawn Field of the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology briefly introduces the GEM Catalogue, followed by Susanna Sansone of the European Bioinformatics Institute who talks about the ISA-GCDML workshop at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  12. The Genomes and Metagenomes (GEM) Catalogue (first presentation) and The ISA-GCDML Workshop (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Field, Dawn [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding ''Research Coordination Network'' from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Dawn Field of the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology briefly introduces the GEM Catalogue, followed by Susanna Sansone of the European Bioinformatics Institute who talks about the ISA-GCDML workshop at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  13. Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

  14. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance, June 24-26, 2008 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin Zogg* David Grimm* ETH Zurich, Switzerland [zogg, grimm]@geod.baug.ethz.ch Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200

  15. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium acceleration of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    . Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating fromTerrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium accelerationV) of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). This analysis provides the first direct evidence that TGFs are produced

  16. Ameliorating risk: Culturable and metagenomic monitoring of the 14 year decline of a genetically engineered microorganism at a bioremediation field site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burton, Whitney [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 represented the first genetically engineered microorganism to be approved in the United States for field release for applications related to subsurface soil bioremediation. In October 1996, strain HK44 was introduced into a replicated semi-contained array of soil lysimeters where its luciferase (luxCDABE)-based bioluminescent response to soil-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants was detected and monitored for the next two years. At the termination of this experiment, it was decided that the lysimeters remain available for future longer-term monitoring efforts, and were thus covered and left essentially undisturbed until the initiation of a large sampling event in 2010, fourteen years after the original release. Although after extensive sampling culturable HK44 cells were not found, additional molecular and metagenomic analyses indicated that genetic signatures of HK44 cells still persisted, with genes diagnostic for the bioluminescent transposon carried by strain HK44 (luxA and tetA) being found at low concentrations (< 5000 copies/g).

  17. Ecology, 77(5),1996, pp. 1367-1378 O 1996 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    Ecology, 77(5),1996, pp. 1367-1378 O 1996 by the Ecological Society of America PALEOBIOLOGY, COMMUNITY ECOLOGY, AND SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL PATTERN1 DAVIDJABLONSKIAND J. JOHNSEPKOSKI,JR. Department that some biotic interactions influence large-scale ecological and evolutionary patterns, albeit in more

  18. Ecological Applications, 00(0), 0000, pp. 000000 0000 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osenberg, Craig W.

    , Italy 10 Deptartamento Ecologi´a e Hidrologi´a, Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia

  19. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  20. Ecology, 87(9), 2006, pp. 22152220 2006 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extinction times based on extinction data for any species. The finding that the distribution of populationREPORTS Ecology, 87(9), 2006, pp. 2215­2220 Ó 2006 by the Ecological Society of America EXTINCTION extinctions is a key element of quantitative conservation biology and population ecology. Although stochastic

  1. Ecology, 92(4), 2011, pp. 924937 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruna, Emilio M.

    Ecology, 92(4), 2011, pp. 924­937 � 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Disentangling 3 School of Renewable Resources, Louisiana State University, 227 RNR Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-6202 USA 4 Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation and Center for Latin American

  2. Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Spring Semester 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Seminar Series Spring Semester 2013 All Hilu February 28 Robert Cox University of Virginia The ecology and physiology Christine May James Madison Unv. Disturbance ecology: linking stream communities

  3. Food Web Ecology of a Leafminer-Parasitoid Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blitzer, Eleanor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the timing of species interactions. Ecology Letters 13:1-10.The Netherlands. Landscape Ecology 23:595-602. Biesmeijer,there general patterns? Ecology Letters 11:499-515. Sala, O.

  4. The Ecology and Evolution of Soritid Foraminifera with Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Scott Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimates. Molecular Ecology 16:5326-5340. Zohary, T. , Z.in a host individual. Marine Ecology Progress Series 195:93-from Taiwan. Marine Ecology-Progress Series 295:113-121.

  5. The effect carbohydrate consumption on Argentine ants' nutritional ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Cheng T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 18, 111-an invasive mealybug. Ecology, 83, 2425-2438. Helms, K.R. &invasions. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, Kaplan,

  6. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 June 14, 2005 Issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation...

  7. John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

  8. update: Emerging research opportunities in global urban ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Sorte, Frank A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    populations.   Global  Ecology  and  Bio? geography, 20, Global  change  and  the  ecology  of  cities.   Science, rates in urban areas.  Ecology Letters, 12, 1165– La Sorte, 

  9. Why study Ecology at Auckland? Long-standingstrengthsinmarineecology,evolution,behaviour,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jing

    Why study Ecology at Auckland? ·Long? Formoreinformationabouttheprogrammeandtherequirements ofthefourspecialisations,visitwww.ecology.auckland.ac.nz. Adviceisavailablefromthe: +6493737599ext88199 Fax:+6493737431 Email: scifac@auckland.ac.nz Web: www.ecology.auckland.ac.nz BSc

  10. TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise for the inventory of dead wood in Coastal-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  11. Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowker, Geoffrey C.

    Information Ecology: Open System Environment for Data, Memories and Knowing Karen S. Baker@scu.edu Abstract. An information ecology provides a conceptual framework to consider data, the creation Ecological Research (LTER) community, presents some manifestations of traditionally unreported `invisible

  12. Insidious Island Invasion: An exploration of Falcataria moluccana stand ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnich, Amanda

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1997) 21:1-16. APPENDIX A:plantation forestry. ” Forest Ecology and Management (2006)Seychelles. ” Functional Ecology (2008) 22:359- Little, E.L.

  13. Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Cory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

  14. Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigeon, Timothy David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

  15. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  16. Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

  17. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remote ocean temperatures to respond, while a terrestrial cooling,summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changescooling due to a change in ocean circulation would imply a compensating remote

  18. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. I. PHOTOCHEMISTRY MODEL AND BENCHMARK CASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu

    We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all ...

  19. Spatial Ecology of the Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens): A Test of Species Distribution Models as Ecological Revealers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, William Timothy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:141-148. Kremen,simple habitat models. Ecology Letters 8:993-1009. Krebs, C.2008. Ecology: the experimental analysis of distribution and

  20. Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation by Oswald J. Schmitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation By Oswald J.Oswald J, Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation. Washington:when the protection of the ecosystem also extends outside of

  1. analysis suggests ecological: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. Liane 145 Full Citation: Nassauer, J. I. 1993. Ecological Function and the Perception of Suburban Residential Landscapes. In Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  2. applied ecology group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 (2005) 119--131 A functional method for classifying European Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: for use in joint ecological and economic studies J.G....

  3. adopting ecological principles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 BSCI 361 -Principles of Ecology Fall 2010 Syllabus & Course Description Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: BSCI 361 -...

  4. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace

  5. Effect of the terrestrial magnetic field on direct-current measurements in underground pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhala, R.M.; Dikmarova, L.P.; Kornienko, V.Yu.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the secondary field of an underground pipeline, magnetized by the terrestrial magnetic field, on noncontacting measurements of direct current flowing in it is discussed. The systematic errors of three known measurement methods are compared. A method based on the measurement of the difference between the field components parallel to the terrestrial field component orthogonal to the pipline is identified as the most accurate. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  7. Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport,de Nantes Jump to: navigation,Ecologic

  8. Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 Fall 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 ­ Fall 2013 Course Syllabus NRE 687: Landscape Planning in the field of landscape ecology. Hierarchy theory and methods for working across spatial scales. The social mining, collection, and validation Scientific research and application Digital tools, including Arc

  9. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolan, John

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 39­48, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION) as are microbes from discussions on biogeography (e.g. Pielou 1979, Lomolino & Heaney 2004) or ecological geography (Longhurst 1998). To some extent this is probably because of a perception

  10. UNITY IN DIVERSITY: ECOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS AS A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    in ecology Miguel A. Fortuna* and Jordi Bascompte Integrative Ecology Group Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSIC Apdo. 1056, E-41080 Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence should be addressed to M.A.F. e-mail: fortuna

  11. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  12. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bledsoe, Brian

    FrontiersinEcology and the Environment Stream restoration strategies for reducing river nitrogen). Natural resource managers are now asking how restoration of stream ecosystems might reduce the downstream turned to ecological restoration as a tool for reducing N loading. While more than 30% of the stream

  13. TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002 Efficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line intersec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002TR-021 Ecology March 2002 Efficiency of six line intersect sampling designsEfficiency of six line9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  14. Pollution Ecology: ERSC 355 page 1/4 POLLUTION ECOLOGY: ERSC 355

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    Pollution MH/TH 2 Sept 17 London Smog & LA Smog (photochemical smog) TH 3 Sept 24 Acid Rain effects on Aquatic Ecosystems MH 4 Oct 1 Acid Rain effects on Terrestrial Ecosystems & Air Pollution in the Kawartha

  15. Ecological

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s % @ { i::-EZrZ,

  16. Terrestrial perturbation experiments as an environmental assessment tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters.

  17. Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Chapter 15 Reverse Ecology: From Systems to Environments and Back Roie Levy and Elhanan Borenstein the environments in which they evolved and are adapted to. Re- verse Ecology--an emerging new frontier's ecology. The Reverse Ecology framework facilitates the translation of high-throughput genomic data

  18. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 93(7), 2012, pp. 1527­1539 Ó 2012 by the Ecological Society of America Uses and misuses of bioclimatic envelope, they can be applied to a variety of questions in ecology, evolution, and conservation. However, some have

  19. SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574577

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    574 SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574­577 2003 by the Ecological Society of America WHAT that genetics should be incorporated into ecological explanations (Collins 1986). C. C. Adams (1915) sug- gested. Evolutionary ecology emerged in the 1960s, driven by empirical results in three areas (Collins 1986

  20. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  1. SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 11241134

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilleland, Eric

    1124 SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 1124­1134 2005 by the Ecological Society of America STATISTICS OF EXTREMES: MODELING ECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES RICHARD W. KATZ,1,3 GRACE S. BRUSH,2 AND MARC B ecological disturbances is the central theme of this paper. The statistics of extremes have played only

  2. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 87(6), 2006, pp. 1345­1358 Ó 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ANALYTIC WEBS SUPPORT THE SYNTHESIS OF ECOLOGICAL DATA SETS AARON M. ELLISON,1,3 LEON J. OSTERWEIL,2 LORI CLARKE,2 JULIAN L. HADLEY,1 ALEXANDER WISE

  3. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  4. Ecology and Evolution Major www.biology.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Ecology and Evolution Major www.biology.pitt.edu Revised: 07/2012 The field of Ecology explores organisms have developed from ancestral ones. The Ecology and Evolution major is a good choice for students world, the ecological relationships of organisms from the individual to the global scale

  5. Terrestrial Background Reduction in RPM Systems by Direct Internal Shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Schweppe, John E.

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray detection systems that are close to the earth or other sources of background radiation often require shielding, especially when trying to detect a relatively weak source. One particular case of interest that we address in this paper is that encountered by the Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) systems placed at border-crossing Ports of Entry (POE). These RPM systems are used to screen for illicit radiological materials, and they are often placed in situations where terrestrial background is large. In such environments, it is desirable to consider simple physical modifications that could be implemented to reduce the effects from background radiation without affecting the flow of traffic and the normal operation of the portal. Simple modifications include adding additional shielding to the environment, either inside or outside the apparatus. Previous work [2] has shown the utility of some of these shielding configurations for increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of gross-counting RPMs. Because the total cost for purchasing and installing RPM systems can be quite expensive, in the range of hundreds of thousands of dollars for each cargo-screening installation, these shielding variations may offer increases in detection capability for relatively small cost. Several modifications are considered here in regard to their real-world applicability, and are meant to give a general idea of the effectiveness of the schemes used to reduce background for both gross-counting and spectroscopic detectors. These scenarios are modeled via the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code package [1] for ease of altering shielding configurations, as well as enacting unusual scenarios prior to prototyping in the field. The objective of this paper is to provide results representative of real modifications that could enhance the sensitivity of this, as well as the next generation of radiation detectors. The models used in this work were designed to provide the most general results for an RPM. These results are therefore presented as general guidance on what shielding configurations will be the most valuable for a generalized RPM, considered in light of their economic and geometric possibility in the real world.

  6. Approaches to advancescientific understanding of macrosystems ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Ofir; Ball, Becky; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Cheruvelil, Kendra; Finley, Andrew O.; Lottig, Noah; Punyasena, Surangi W.; Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Buckley, Lauren B.; Filstrup, Christopher T.; Keitt, Tim H.; Kellner, James R.; Knapp, Alan K.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Tcheng, David; Toomey, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Voordeckers, James W.; Wagner, Tyler; Williams, John W.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macrosystem ecological studies inherently investigate processes that interact across multiple spatial and temporal scales, requiring intensive sampling and massive amounts of data from diverse sources to incorporate complex cross-scale and hierarchical interactions. Inherent challenges associated with these characteristics include high computational demands, data standardization and assimilation, identification of important processes and scales without prior knowledge, and the need for large, cross-disciplinary research teams that conduct long-term studies. Therefore, macrosystem ecology studies must utilize a unique set of approaches that are capable of encompassing these methodological characteristics and associated challenges. Several case studies demonstrate innovative methods used in current macrosystem ecology studies.

  7. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

  8. The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. J.

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-44 1973 The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas By: William J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 44 Texas A&M University System...

  9. Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators July 21-25, 2014 CI 5540-003 (86282) 3 Credits Science and Earth Science curricula in Minnesota public schools. It is designed primarily for middle

  10. Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusconi, Roberto

    Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, ...

  11. Survival of Terrestrial Planets in the Presence of Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of ``Hot Jupiters'', Jovian mass planets with very short orbital periods orbiting nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the orbital migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. The migration of giant planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems, and previous analyses have assumed that no terrestrial planets survive after migration has occurred. We present numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process, eventually returning to circular orbits relatively close to their original positions. A fraction of the final orbits are in the Habitable Zone, suggesting that planetary systems with close-in giant planets are viable targets for searches for Earth-like habitable planets around other stars.

  12. Metal accumulation in terrestrial pulmonates at a lead/zinc smelter site in Arnoldstein, Austria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabitsch, W.B. [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)] [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently,the suitability of terrestrial gastropods was reviewed as quantitative indicator organisms for environmental metal pollution. The peculiar metal accumulation capabilities in molluscs have been known in detail for decades, but {open_quotes}only few data are available for terrestrial pulmonates{close_quotes}. Furthermore, data are restricted to only a few species, and despite similarities in metabolic pathways, species-specific properties in metal-budget strategies exist. Information concerning the potential range of metal burden in these animals form the field are, therefore, of ecophysical relevance. Snails satisfy a basic demand as quantitative indicators of the bioavailable fraction of terrestrial metal pollution. In this study concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc were measured in tissues of 4 species of snails collected in the vicinity of a lead/zinc smelter with a long history of pollution. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Organizational ecology and population dynamics in politics : an agent-based model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Danielle Fitzpatrick

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.3 Organizational Ecology and PopulationOrganizational Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2Chapter 3 An Agent Based Model of Organizational Ecology 3.1

  14. Theoretical ecology: a successful first year and a bright future for a new journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Alan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 EDITORIAL Theoretical ecology: a successful first year andvolume 2 of Theoretical Ecology. Looking back, this has beenfocusing on theoretical ecology can play an expanding role

  15. Ecology and Management of Canyon Flies (Fannia benjamini complex) in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekanayake, Panchali Kumari

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. W. 1976. Mosquito Ecology: Field sampling methods. Newin southern Israel. J. Vector Ecology. 36(1): S212-S218.control from chemical ecology. Agriculture, Ecosystems &

  16. Ecology and environments of an extreme faunal turnover in topical American scallops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James Travis

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleobiology, community ecology, and scales of ecologicalpattern. Ecology 77: 1367-1378. Jablonski, D. , K.W. Flessa,naturalist 108: ——. 1988. Does ecology matter? Paleobiology

  17. Photoperiodism, and related ecology, in Thalassia testudinum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marmelstein, Allan David

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHOTOPERIODISM, AND RELATED ECOLOGY, IN THALASSIA TESTUDINUM A Thesis By ALLAN DAVID MARMELSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1966 Major Subjects Biological Oceanography and Plant Physiology PHOTOPERIODISM, AND RELATED ECOLOGY, IN THALASSIA TESTUDINUM A Thesis ALLAN DAVID MARMELSTEIN App o as to s le and content by (C -Chairma of mmi tee) (Co-C irman of Comm' tee...

  18. Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

  19. Ecological Applications, 20(6), 2010, pp. 15691582 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Applications, 20(6), 2010, pp. 1569­1582 Ó 2010 by the Ecological Society of America Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 137 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 USA 2 Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside

  20. Basic and Applied Ecology 6 (2005) 463--469 Ecology and radiation of galling aphids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engstrom, Tag N.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic and Applied Ecology 6 (2005) 463--469 Ecology and radiation of galling aphids (Tamalia-inducing clade and appears to be radiating rapidly on different host-plants, in contrast to the gall inducers for Tamalia. (2) Gall-induction on well- armed host plants, otherwise protected with dense and viscous

  1. Ecology, 93(1), 2012, pp. 38 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aschehoug, Erik

    Reports Ecology, 93(1), 2012, pp. 3­8 Ó 2012 by the Ecological Society of America Fungal endophytes conditions. Here we tested the effects of two phylotypes of Alternaria endophytes on the growth, competitive in the absence of endophytes. However, one endophyte both increased the biomass of C. stoebe and reduced

  2. Ecology, 81(5), 2000, pp. 13511370 2000 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1351 Ecology, 81(5), 2000, pp. 1351­1370 2000 by the Ecological Society of America SURVIVAL RATES in the development of life history theory, especially in the idea of a cost of reproduction. Recent attempts­resighting data were collected on 1334 adult parrotlets over a decade. We expected adult survival to be low

  3. Ecology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 21082116 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    succession with climax communities being relatively uncommon. The effects of disturbance frequency mayEcology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 2108­2116 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Wave disturbance pressure (top-down), and storm waves (disturbance) in determining the standing biomass and net primary

  4. Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 675685 2006 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausher, Mark D.

    enemies. While much is known about how environmental variation influences the amount of damage a plant environmental variation impacts the magnitude and negative fitness effects of pathogen damage is important675 Ecology, 87(3), 2006, pp. 675­685 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ENVIRONMENTAL

  5. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change H. DAMON MATTHEWS, ANDREW J. WEAVER, AND KATRIN J. MEISSNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    extensive research over the past several years, the uncertainty range on estimates of terrestrial carbonTerrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change H. DAMON MATTHEWS, ANDREW, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (Manuscript received 18 June 2004, in final form 21 October 2004

  6. Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma Tobias Hoink, Jorg Schmalzl, and Ulrich Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalzl, Jörg

    Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma ocean Tobias Ho¨ink, Jo¨rg Schmalzl-48149 Mu¨nster, Germany (hoeink@earth.uni-muenster.de) [1] In a terrestrial magma ocean, the metal-silicate the separation of metal droplets from the liquid silicate, occurs on a characteristic timescale, which

  7. Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

  8. Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction [2] Brief (typically bursts of gamma rays with mean energies of 2 MeV originating from the Earth's atmosphere, referred to as terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), have been observed by the Burst et al., 2010; Briggs et al., 2010]. With spectra typically harder than cosmic gamma ray bursts

  9. Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a 23 February 2012 Keywords: XRD Clay mineralogy Monsoon Himalaya Indus Delta Floodplain Fluvial processes Large rivers We employed X-ray diffraction methods to quantify clay mineral assemblages

  10. Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric.... ....Norman Doelling has been named manager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant Program as an energy source, conversion of waste water and sewage sludge into a resource, and others.... ....Hatchery

  11. Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman A procedure is developed to incorporate equality constraints in Kalman filters, including the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and is referred to as the Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter (CEnKF). The constraint

  12. Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

  13. Frontiers in Contaminant Speciation and Reactivity in Terrestrial Environments: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    science. To delineate reaction mechanisms of contaminant reactions on soil minerals and in soils attenuation processes, speciation of metal(loid)s in heterogeneous soilslbiosolids/plants, and mineral/microbe/contaminant226 Frontiers in Contaminant Speciation and Reactivity in Terrestrial Environments: The Role

  14. On the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martyn J. Fogg; Richard P. Nelson

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of calculations aimed at examining how an inner system of planetesimals/protoplanets, undergoing terrestrial planet formation, evolves under the influence of a giant planet undergoing inward type II migration through the region bounded between 5 - 0.1 AU. We find that > 60% of the solids disk survives by being scattered by the giant planet into external orbits. Planetesimals are scattered outward almost as efficiently as protoplanets, resulting in the regeneration of a solids disk where dynamical friction is strong and terrestrial planet formation is able to resume. A simulation extended for a few Myr after the migration of the giant planet halted at 0.1 AU, resulted in an apparently stable planet of ~ 2 Earth masses forming in the habitable zone. Migration-induced mixing of volatile-rich material from beyond the `snowline' into the inner disk regions means that terrestrial planets that form there are likely to be water-rich. We predict that hot--Jupiter systems are likely to harbor water-rich terrestrial planets in their habitable zones. These planets may be detected by future planet search missions.

  15. Maternal Transfer of Contaminants and Reduced Reproductive Success of Southern Toads (Bufo [Anaxyrus] terrestris) Exposed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) residing in two locations: (1) an active coal combustion waste (CCW) disposal basin and adjacent 40-ha (Gastrophryne carolinensis) collected from a coal ash settling basin accumulated and transferred selenium (Se [Anaxyrus] terrestris) Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste Brian S. Metts,, * Kurt A. Buhlmann, Tracey D

  16. Volume estimates of trees with complex architecture from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    consuming and can require destructive sampling. In this study we used a terrestrial lidar sensor; data was analyzed on the basis of branch size and the sampling pattern of the sensor. Two hundred and fifty. 2, 023521 (14 May 2008) © 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers [DOI: 10

  17. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  18. VISION-BASED TECHNIQUES FOR REFRACTION ANALYSIS IN APPLICATIONS OF TERRESTRIAL GEODESY Philipp FLACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levelling ABSTRACT: Imaging sensors are increasingly spread in geodetic instruments, because they enable the evaluation of digital image data for the determination of direction and height. Beyond this, the analysis aufzuzeigen. 1. INTRODUCTION Due to automation of tasks in terrestrial geodesy, image sensors and vision

  19. UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil, consisting of a large percentage of very fine particles. Lunar soil also contains very irregular and jagged particles formed from the sintering together of broked grains during micro-meteorite bombardment. NASA has soil

  20. Small reductions in forest cover weaken terrestrial-aquatic linkages in headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    assessed the impacts of deforestation on the energy base of headwater food webs in seven headwater streams. Standing crop of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) declined with deforestation at large scales (i.e. catchment deforestation and riparian deforestation at the entire stream network scale). Terrestrial plant

  1. Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowling, Sharon A.

    Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation on atmospheric exchange of heat and moisture. Our CONTROL simulation had a mean global net primary production (NPP) of 56.3 GtCyr-1 which is half that of our scenario value of 115.1 GtCyr-1 . LAI and latent energy

  2. TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1 , L produces a strong spectral band contrast. This also gives varnish its shiny appearance. On Earth rock varnish may have a microbial origin [3]. Clays are transported from an external source and deposited

  3. Population genetic structure reveals terrestrial affinities for a headwater stream insect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin, Michael S.

    ). Recent studies (e.g. McGlashan, Hughes & Bunn, 2001; Wishart & Hughes, 2003; Huey, Hughes & Baker, 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd 1 #12;terrestrial among-drainage dispersal even less likely (Hughes et al., 1999, 2003; Wishart & Hughes, 2001, 2003; Monaghan et al., 2002; Schultheis, Weight & Hendricks, 2002

  4. Historical Reconstruction of Terrestrial Organic Matter Inputs to Fiordland, NZ Over the Last ~500 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................ 92 OMfossil ....................................................................................... 96 Source Reconstruction: Marine, Terrestrial, Fossil ................... 99 Conclusion...) demonstrates that in peat and 9 soil-poor environments, the BIT Index does not provide similar estimates of %OMterr in Northern Hemisphere fjords as 8, 13C, and C/N analysis. Additionally, it has been shown that the soil and marine GDGTs may vary...

  5. Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

  6. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  8. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  9. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  11. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  12. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  14. Applicability of 10 CFR 851 to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letter from Bruce Diamond, Assistant General Counsel for Environment, DOE, dated November 24, 2007 to Mr. Bertsch, Director and Professor, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, regarding Savannah Riber Ecology Laboratory's Request for Interpretive Ruling under 10 CFR 851.

  15. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

  16. Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

  17. START HERE 2014 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2014 Annual Report Sections...

  18. FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

  19. Mining Photo-sharing Websites to Study Ecological Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    Mining Photo-sharing Websites to Study Ecological Phenomena Haipeng Zhang School of Informatics the occurrence of ecological phenomena including ground snow cover, snow fall and vegetation density. We compare and by Earth- observing satellites. Besides the immediate application to ecology, our study gives insight

  20. Job Announcement Ph.D. Student Position in Microbial Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Matthias

    .microbial-ecology.net), Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science, University of Vienna, Austria A Ph.D. student position. For this purpose, the candidate will apply a battery of single-cell tools for studying the ecophysiology microbial ecology research. Applicants should hold an MSc degree in Microbiology, Microbial Ecology

  1. How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

  2. ECOLOGY ABIO 320 FALL 2013 DR. CARACO BIOLOGY 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraco, Thomas

    1 ECOLOGY ABIO 320 FALL 2013 DR. CARACO BIOLOGY 253 Course Web Page: www Scores Links to Lectures #12;2 Texts Gotelli, NJ. A Primer of Ecology. 4 th Edit., 2008 (Required ) Alstad, D. Basic Populus Models of Ecology. 2001 [Rec ] Link to Download Populus on Course Web Page

  3. EN-006 Ecology March 2001 Effects of Alternative Silvicultural Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EN-006 Ecology March 2001 Effects of Alternative Silvicultural Treatments on the Diversity and protecting the ecological diversity of the forest. STUDY AREA The Roberts Creek Study Forest was established a previous forest. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  4. Forest Ecology (3 credits) FOR 3153C Section: 2265

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Forest Ecology (3 credits) FOR 3153C Section: 2265 Lectures and Discussion Thursday (periods 3 Ecological principles and their application to the management of forests; major sections include tree students with an overview of 1) ecological principles at four major scales of biological organization

  5. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    RACKHAM ­ SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology Subplan Requirements SubPlan: CONECOL RG 11066 CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) RQ 7287 Conservation Ecology Core Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) LN 0010 Aquatic Sciences Specialization LN 0020 Conservation

  6. Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Prof. Karen J. Esler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    Conservation Ecology & Entomology Department Prof. Karen J. Esler Karen J. Esler received her Honours (First Class) in Botany and Zoology was followed by an Ecology-based PhD. Following a post and later (2005) in the Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology. In 2008 she was promoted to full

  7. DIVERSIFY -Ecology-inspired software evolution for diversity emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DIVERSIFY - Ecology-inspired software evolution for diversity emergence Benoit Baudry, Martin are essential to provide adaptive capacities to many forms of complex systems, ranging from ecological in software systems. In particular, we are inspired by bipartite ecological relationships to investigate

  8. NRE 509: Ecology: Science of Context and Interaction (2012) Instructors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 NRE 509: Ecology: Science of Context and Interaction (2012) Instructors William S. Currie in the MS program in NRE. It covers a wide range of topics in ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change some prior instruction in these areas. It covers basic ecological concepts and processes including

  9. Ecology-basics and applications Planned activities 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecology- basics and applications Planned activities 2013 Last update 2013-04-23 Anna-Sara Liman Activities Approximate dates Contact persons Advances in Basic Ecology Nov ­February 2013 Pär Forslund of Ecological Ideas January 2013 Jan.Bengtsson@slu.se Statistical programming in R 22-26th April 2013 Matt

  10. FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: Mondays 4pm-5pm Course Description: The biology and ecology of aquatic algae on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral reefs, rocky

  11. Ecological Applications, 21(4), 2011, pp. 11201137 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    closest to the forest inventory. Net primary production values for the Radar and Lidar initializations structure of plant canopies. Key words: biomass; canopy height; ecosystem demography; ecosystem modelingI mission; net primary production, NPP; radar; reducing modeling error. INTRODUCTION Terrestrial ecosystem

  12. Ecological Applications, 23(8), 2013, pp. 18171836 2013 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    in western Russia. Key words: climate change; permafrost degradation; river discharge; riverine DOC export increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of climate-induced increases be changing the relative importance of terrestrial carbon dynamics on this carbon flux. Improvements

  13. Ecology, 94(9), 2013, pp. 19551965 2013 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohonak, Andrew J.

    and experimental evidence for a mixed-age, mixed-origin bank of kelp microscopic stages in southern California studies have demonstrated that the microscopic stages of kelps can rapidly resume development from a delayed state. Like terrestrial seeds or aquatic resting eggs, banks of delayed kelp stages may supplement

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability DeBETAbility: Is the Beta House Ecologically Sustainable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BETAbility: Is the Beta House Ecologically Sustainable? Ada Cheung, Candy Cheung, Sapna Dilgir, Dallas Parsons, Jessica for the implementation of more ecologically sustainable practices at the Beta House, we recommend that the membersUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability De

  15. ELSEVIER Ecological Economics 14(1995) 143-159 Ecological economic modeling and valuation of ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -economicmodeling; Ecosystem models; Patuxent River basin; Spatial modeling; Land use 1. Introduction In its report, Reducing of ecological systems. Startingwith an existing spatially articulated ecosystem model of the Pqtuxent River

  16. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunin, Victor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sludge from a lab-scale bioreactor revealed that the primarysequenced from a lab-scale bioreactor sludge (123), a Ricemicrobial communities from Bioreactor Institution Univ of

  17. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon cycling to improve climate modeling and carbon...

  18. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunin, Victor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. F. Banfield. 2007. Strainer: software for analysis ofwindows (Fig. 5). Strainer is also dedicated software for

  19. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0Soil

  20. INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phylogeny, molecular ecology and taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phylogeny, molecular ecology and taxonomy of southern Iberian lineages of Triops that in total, the species is divided into six distinct clades, comprising T. m. mauritanicus, T. m. simplex supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13127-010-0026-y) contains supplementary

  2. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 22: 301­313, 2000 Published October 26 of the phytoplankton community. This community was dominated by cells, which averaged 77% (range 41 to 98, and might contribute to fueling planktonic communities with the limiting nutrient through regeneration. KEY

  3. PHENOTYPIC INTEGRATION Studying the Ecology and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badyaev, Alex

    PHENOTYPIC INTEGRATION Studying the Ecology and Evolution of Complex Phenotypes Massimo Pigliucci Katherine Preston 1 2004 #12;3 Integration and Modularity in the Evolution of Sexual Ornaments An Overlooked, and this selec- tion favors reduced integration (e.g., favors modified allometric relationships) between sexual

  4. Environmental science and ecology involve studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    Environmental science and ecology involve studies of the biosphere, hydro- sphere, and lithosphere in environmental science is conducted on spatial scales varying from a single algal cell to the Earth as a whole's environmental scientists require investigation by an interdisciplinary team, including members from several

  5. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Robert

    ;© The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Human population growth and industrial develop- ment have led to increased and unsustainable con- sumption of natural resources. The resulting interrelated for the pollination of fruit, vegetable, oil, seed, and nut crops (Free 1993). The global economic value of wild

  6. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagarin, Rafe

    observational studies began revealing for the first time responses of species and communities to climate warming community. Both of these factors are well represented by observational approaches to ecology, which are re, but is greatly enhanced by technological advances in remote sensing, microscopy, genetics, animal

  7. Habitat Restoration I. Defining ecological restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    ) Rehabilitation ­ visual improvements of a disturbed land 3) Reclamation ­ preparation and enhancement of degraded land to fulfill its former use or a new use A. Past "restoration" projects have been categorized by the three R's: #12;3 Reclamation B. How Ecological restoration differs from the 3 "Rs": 1) Reestablish

  8. Restoration Ecology Stable states vs. classic succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    #12;Wetland restoration goals #12;Wetland restoration goals Restoration of stream meanders ­ majorRestoration Ecology #12;Stable states vs. classic succession #12;Stable states vs. classic succession Beisner et al., 2003 #12;Restoration can be difficult if an ecosystem has moved to a new state

  9. The Ecology of Malware Jedidiah R. Crandall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephanie

    The Ecology of Malware Jedidiah R. Crandall University of New Mexico Dept. of Computer Science Mail stop: MSC01 1130 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 crandall@cs.unm.edu Roya Ensafi University of New Mexico Dept. of Computer Science Mail stop: MSC01 1130 1 University of New Mexico

  10. Five Differences Between Ecological and Economic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological and economic networks have many similarities and are often compared. However, the comparison is often more apt as metaphor than a direct equivalence. In this paper, five key differences are explained which should inform any analysis which compares the two.

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  12. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    temperatures, partial melting of the polar ice caps, ocean acidification, and a host of other impacts on EarthFrontiersinEcology and the Environment Do trophic cascades affect the storage and flux RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS Do trophic cascades affect the storage and flux of atmospheric carbon? An analysis

  13. Inferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    (LASSO), Sparse Bayesian Regression (SBR), Graphical Gaussian Models (GGMs) and Bayesian Networks (BNs to thank Marco Grzegorczyk for the answering my question about Bayesian networks and the MCMC methodsInferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data Frank Dondelinger Master of Science

  14. Ecology, Silviculture, and Management of Black Hills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    . Battaglia United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station General Technical Report RMRS-GTR-97 September 2002 #12;Shepperd, Wayne D.; Battaglia, Michael A. 2002. Ecology in Arizona, and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Michael A. Battaglia is a research associate with METI

  15. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    their important ecological role, bacteria are rarely or poorly represented in global models (Arhonditsis & Brett Luminy, Case 901, 13 288 Marseille Cedex 9, France 2 Vrije Universiteit, Faculty of Earth and Life was fractionated into reserve and struc- ture compartments. The model was constructed by accounting for a constant

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  17. Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

  18. Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

  19. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  20. Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

  1. DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships.

  2. The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther Kletetschka b,c,d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kletetschka, Gunther

    The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther-mail address: kohout@natur.cuni.cz (T. Kohout). URL: http://www.volny.cz/tomkohout/meteo/. www

  3. Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland types—than was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

  4. Predictions for the correlation between giant and terrestrial extrasolar planets in dynamically evolved systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The large eccentricities of many giant extrasolar planets may represent the endpoint of gravitational scattering in initially more crowded systems. If so, the early evolution of the giant planets is likely to be more restrictive of terrestrial planet formation than would be inferred from the current, dynamically quiescent, configurations. Here, we study statistically the extent of the anti-correlation between giant planets and terrestrial planets expected in a scattering model. We use marginally stable systems of three giant planets, with a realistic range of planetary masses, as a simple model for the initial conditions prior to scattering, and show that after scattering the surviving planets reproduce well the known extrasolar planet eccentricities beyond a > 0.5 AU. By tracking the minimum periastron values of all planets during the evolution, we derive the distribution of orbital radii across which strong perturbations (from crossing orbits) are likely to affect low mass planet formation. We find that scattering affects inner planet formation at orbital separations less than 50% of the final periastron distance of the innermost massive planet in approximately 30% of the realizations, and can occasionally influence planet formation at orbital separations less than 20% of the final periastron distance of the innermost massive planet. The domain of influence of the scattering massive planets increases as the mass differential between the massive planets decreases. Observational study of the correlation between massive and terrestrial extrasolar planets in the same system has the potential to constrain the origin of planetary eccentricity.

  5. Observable Consequences of Planet Formation Models in Systems with Close-in Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Avi M. Mandell

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, two planetary systems have been discovered with close-in, terrestrial-mass planets (planet; 4) formation from material being shepherded by moving secular resonances during dispersal of the protoplanetary disk; 5) tidal circularization of eccentric terrestrial planets with close-in perihelion distances; and 6) photo-evaporative mass loss of a close-in giant planet. Models 1-4 have been validated in previous work. We show that tidal circularization can form hot Earths, but only for relatively massive planets (> 5 Earth masses) with very close-in perihelion distances (planets of less than about 70 Earth masses, photo-evaporation can remove the planet's envelope and leave behind the solid core on a Gyr timescale, but only for planets inside 0.025-0.05 AU. Using two quantities that are observable by current and upcoming missions, we show that these models each produce unique signatures, and can be observationally distinguished. These observables are the planetary system architecture (detectable with radial velocities, transits and transit-timing) and the bulk composition of transiting close-in terrestrial planets (measured by transits via the planet's radius).

  6. Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres II: H2S and SO2 Photochemistry in Anoxic Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu; Bains, William

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur gases are common components in the volcanic and biological emission on Earth, and are expected to be important input gases for atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets. We study the atmospheric composition and the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets with sulfur compounds (i.e., H2S and SO2) emitted from their surfaces. We use a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry model and radiative transfer model to investigate the sulfur chemistry in atmospheres ranging from reducing to oxidizing. The most important finding is that both H2S and SO2 are chemically short-lived in virtually all types of atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets, based on models of H2, N2, and CO2 atmospheres. This implies that direct detection of surface sulfur emission is unlikely, as their surface emission rates need to be extremely high (>1000 times Earth's volcanic sulfur emission) for these gases to build up to a detectable level. We also find that sulfur compounds emitted from the surface lead to photochemical formation of element...

  7. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  8. Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severinghaus, J.P.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

  9. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  10. The ecology of anthrax and coinfection trade-offs from an immunological perspective: seasonal aspects of host susceptibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cizauskas, Carrie Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phodopus  sungorus.  Functional  Ecology  23:979–988.  Mus  musculus.  Molecular  Ecology   Abu-­?Raddad,  L.  J.  transmission  of  parasites?  Ecology  Letters  12:528– de  

  11. Nutritional Ecology of a Generalist Herbivore Vanessa cardui Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) on Variable Larval and Adult Diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanOverbeke, Dustin R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RIVERSIDE Nutritional Ecology of a Generalist HerbivoreVH, editor. Taxonomy and Ecology London, New York. p. 243-Tests of two hypotheses. Ecology (Tempe) 75:1997-2006.

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  13. Science and technology for industrial ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

  14. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  15. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  16. Terrestrial Remotely Sensed Imagery in Support of Public Health: New Avenues of Research Using Object-Based Image Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    segmentation-based analysis of geospatial data cananalysis of disease ecology and risk: An example using object-based classification techniques. Geospatial

  17. SECTION 17 Table of Contents 17 Pend Oreille Subbasin Inventory of Existing Programs Terrestrial ............ 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality (IDEQ) and Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE) are involved in programs that affect the land at this time are: 1. Water Quality. Goal ­ Meet rules, regulations of section 319 of Water Quality Act. A major thrust of NRCS at this time is to help write Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). Conservation

  18. Dr. Yeqiao (Y.Q.) Wang Professor in Terrestrial Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    & Mapping: Chinese Academy of Science, 1987. B.Sc., Physics/Geography: Northeast Normal University, China Environmental Scientist, Center for Environmental Restoration Systems, Energy Systems Division, Argonne National, reporting and forecasting the ecological conditions of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail" funded by NASA

  19. america suggest ecological: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lack of a broad theoretical framework. The context dependency of impact has fueled the perception Ricciardi, Anthony 154 Ecology, 91(12), 2010, pp. 35153525 2010 by the...

  20. archaea ecology metabolism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by higher of cognitive psychology, there are subtleties in the notion of direct perception that are often over- looked Cummins, Fred 132 Ecological Sites Relationship to...

  1. assessing ecological risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    years, the emission Cirpka, Olaf Arie 7 ENVE 569 ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT TOPIC SYLLABUS Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: ENVE 569 - ENVIRONMENTAL RISK...

  2. approach combining ecological: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concept drives the analysis to the aimed specification part whereas the second allows Zachmann, Gabriel 24 Trait-based approaches to marine microbial ecology MIT - DSpace Summary:...

  3. Strontium-90 at the Hanford Site and its Ecological Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Poston, Ted M.

    2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses the sampling of strontium-90 on the Hanford Site and any implications it may have to the ecology of the area.

  4. Enhancing protection for unusually sensitive ecological areas from pipeline releases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sames, Christina; Fink, Dennis

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECOLOGICAL AREAS FROM PIPELINE RELEASES Christina Sames;Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, DPS-10/ 400 7thof a hazardous liquid pipeline accident. Pipeline operators

  5. 2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

  6. POPULATION ECOLOGY Phenology of Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Phenology of Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and Associated citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), initiates economic losses in citrus due

  7. anthropogenic ecological change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scales Lovejoy, Shaun 78 Climate change as an ecosystem architect: Implications to rare plant ecology, conservation, and restoration CiteSeer Summary: Recent advances in...

  8. Ecological Issues Related to Decommissioning of California's Offshore Production Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Mark H.

    Ecological Issues Related to Decommissioning of California's Offshore Production Platforms Report................................................................................................................ 8 II.A. Review of California platforms............................................................................. 8 II.A.i Geography of California platforms

  9. Linear and Bayesian Planet Detection Algorithms for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Jeremy Kasdin; Isabelle Braems

    2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Current plans call for the first Terrestrial Planet Finder mission, TPF-C, to be a monolithic space telescope with a coronagraph for achieving high contrast. The coronagraph removes the diffracted starlight allowing the nearby planet to be detected. In this paper, we present a model of the planet measurement and noise statistics. We utilize this model to develop two planet detection algorithms, one based on matched filtering of the PSF and one using Bayesian techniques. These models are used to formulate integration time estimates for a planet detection with desired small probabilities of false alarms and missed detections.

  10. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

  11. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  12. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  13. Distribution of terrestrial age and petrologic type of meteorites from western Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA)); Wlotzka, F.; Palme, H. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (West Germany))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of 54 meteorites have been recovered from Daraj, Western Libya. After assessment of pairing of samples, using petrologic criteria, {sup 14}C terrestrial ages were obtained on 13 samples selected from 9 different fall events. Eleven of the ages range from 3,500 to 7,600 years, with only two samples having ages in excess of 10,000 years. The cut-off in ages may be related to the timing of climatic changes in the Hammadah al Hamra.

  14. Foraging Ecology of North Pacific Albacore in the California Current System (CCS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAN DIEGO Foraging ecology of North Pacific albacore in theVS (1961) Experimental ecology of the feeding of fishes.Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology 12:187-217 McGowan JA,

  15. Ecology in Africa: a view from the past for informing the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Dino J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reviews ISSN 1948?6596  Ecology in Africa: a view from the the future  African Ecology – Benchmarks and Historical s  role  in  shaping  the  ecology  of  Africa…”.   These 

  16. Foraging ecology of North Pacific albacore in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAN DIEGO Foraging ecology of North Pacific albacore in theVS (1961) Experimental ecology of the feeding of fishes.Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology 12:187-217 McGowan JA,

  17. update: A cure for seeing double? Convergence and unification in biogeography and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael N; Hortal, Joaquin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The merging of community ecology and phylogenetic biology.Ecology Letters, 12, Chase, J.M. & Myers, J.A. (2011)D.W. (2011) The comparative ecology and biogeogra- phy of

  18. The Ecology and Conservation of the Critically Endangered Cross River Gorilla in Cameroon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Sarah

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of desert bighorn sheep. Ecology Letters, 8, 1029-1038.Journal of Animal Ecology, 79, 1157-1163. Beazley, K. ,Journal of Animal Ecology, 75, 1393-1405. Boulanger, J.G. &

  19. Ecology and Trophic Interactions of Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilly, William; Field, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12:00, Humboldt squid ecology and climate effects, 40Date: 2/28/2012 Title Ecology and Trophic Interactions ofNOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division 110 Shaffer Rd.

  20. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.