Sample records for mesons contents baryons

  1. Multiquark Correlations in Light Mesons and Baryons from holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forkel, Hilmar [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A hadron's multiquark content reflects itself in the quark composition of the interpolator with which it has maximal overlap. The AdS/CFT dictionary translates the anomalous dimension of this interpolator into a mass correction for the corresponding dual mode. Hence such bulk-mass corrections can carry specific information on multiquark correlations. Two prominent examples are studied by implementing this robust and universal holographic mechanism into AdS/QCD gravity duals. In the baryon sector bulk-mass corrections are used to describe systematic good (i.e. maximally attractive) diquark effects. The baryon sizes are predicted to decrease with increasing good-diquark content, and the masses of all 48 observed light-quark baryon states are reproduced with unprecedented accuracy. Our approach further provides the first holographic description of a dominant tetraquark component in the lowest-lying scalar mesons. The tetraquark ground state emerges naturally as the lightest scalar nonet whereas higher excitations become heavier than their quark--antiquark counterparts and are thus likely to dissolve into the multiparticle continuum.

  2. Infrared regularization with vector mesons and baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Bruns; Ulf-G. Meißner

    2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the method of infrared regularization to spin-1 fields coupled to baryons. As an application, we discuss the axial form factor of the nucleon.

  3. Finding a rational nomenclature for mesons and baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, R.M.; Cahn, R.N.; Gidal, G.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Wohl, C.G.; Yost, G.P.; Porter, F.C.; Hernandez, J.J.; Montanet, L.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A history of the Particle Data Group's efforts to find a rational and systematic convention for naming mesons and baryons is given. Several versions of our proposal are reviewed, and name changes which would occur are summarized. Some of the mail we have received is described. We hope to stimulate additional feedback.

  4. Negative-parity {Lambda}{sub Q} baryons in the baryon-meson continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, Sachiko [Japan College of Social Work, Kiyose, Tokyo, 204-8555 (Japan); Takizawa, Makoto [Showa Pharmaceutical University, Machida, Tokyo, 194-8543 (Japan); Shimizu, Kiyotaka [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative-parity charmed baryons are investigated by employing the quark model as well as the effective baryon meson model with a bound state embedded in the continuum. Especially the mass difference between the J{sup P} 1/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons is discussed. The observed value of this mass splitting is almost the same as that of {Xi}{sub c}, about 30 MeV. It is found that most of this splitting can be reproduced by assuming a simple qqQ configuration. The coupling to the baryon-meson scattering state may enlarge the splitting as it does for the {Lambda}(1405)(1/2{sup -}) and {Lambda}(1520)(3/2{sup -}) case. We investigate this coupling effect and find that with an appropriately modified coupling or the pole energy, the peak can be reproduced.

  5. Measurement of baryon production in B-meson decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are B(B~pX) = ( 8.0+0.5+0.3 )%, B(B—+ AX) = ( 3.8+0.4%0.6)%, and B(B~:- X)=(0.27+0.05+0.04)%. From these rates and studies of baryon-lepton and baryon- antibaryon correlations in B decays, we have estimated the branching fraction B(B—+A, X) to be (6.4...+0.8+0.8)%. Combining these results, we calculate B ( A,+ ~pE ~+ ) to be (4.3+1.0+0.8)%. PACS number(s): 13.25.+ rn, 14.40.Jz I. INTRODUCTION Since B mesons can decay into final states with charmed or noncharmed baryons, they offer a unique lab- oratory for the study...

  6. Strange Content of Baryons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hippolyte; for the STAR Collaboration

    2003-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Via the study of strange particle production within the STAR experiment, we try to address the surprising amount of baryon transport at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We report here preliminary results showing that, at mid-rapidity and for the top energy of RHIC, the number of created baryons exceeds the number transported from the colliding nuclei. However, thanks to the large acceptance of the experimental setup, one could expect to observe the transition between the ``soft'' regime (low transverse momentum -$\\pt$- region corresponding to a bulk of hot and dense matter hadronizing) and the perturbative one (higher $\\pt$ region) where the fragmentation of incoming partons is supposed to dominate hadron production.}

  7. Anti-strange meson-baryon interaction in hot and dense nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Cabrera; Laura Tolos; Jörg Aichelin; Elena Bratkovskaya

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of in-medium cross sections and (off-shell) transition rates for the most relevant binary reactions for strange pseudoscalar meson production close to threshold in heavy-ion collisions at FAIR energies. Our results rely on a chiral unitary approach in coupled channels which incorporates the $s$- and $p$-waves of the kaon-nucleon interaction. The formalism, which is modified in the hot and dense medium to account for Pauli blocking effects, mean-field binding on baryons, and pion and kaon self-energies, has been improved to implement full unitarization and self-consistency for both the $s$- and $p$-wave interactions at finite temperature and density. This gives access to in-medium amplitudes in several elastic and inelastic coupled channels with strangeness content $S=-1$. The obtained total cross sections mostly reflect the fate of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance, which melts in the nuclear environment, whereas the off-shell transition probabilities are also sensitive to the in-medium properties of the hyperons excited in the $p$-wave amplitudes [$\\Lambda$, $\\Sigma$ and $\\Sigma^*(1385)$]. The single-particle potentials of these hyperons at finite momentum, density and temperature are also discussed in connection with the pertinent scattering amplitudes. Our results are the basis for future implementations in microscopic transport approaches accounting for off-shell dynamics of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  8. Measurements of Baryon Pair Decays of $?_{cJ}$ Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; D. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; R. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 106 $\\times 10^{6}$ $\\psi^{\\prime}$ decays collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII, three decays of $\\chi_{cJ}$ ($J=0,1,2$) with baryon pairs ($\\llb$, $\\ssb$, $\\SSB$) in the final state have been studied. The branching fractions are measured to be $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c0,1,2}\\rightarrow\\Lambda\\bar\\Lambda) =(33.3 \\pm 2.0 \\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-5}$, $(12.2 \\pm 1.1 \\pm 1.1)\\times 10^{-5}$, $(20.8 \\pm 1.6 \\pm 2.3)\\times 10^{-5}$; $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c0,1,2}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{0}\\bar\\Sigma^{0})$ = $(47.8 \\pm 3.4 \\pm 3.9)\\times 10^{-5}$, $(3.8 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5)\\times 10^{-5}$, $(4.0 \\pm 1.1 \\pm 0.5) \\times 10^{-5}$; and $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c0,1,2}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{+}\\bar\\Sigma^{-})$ = $(45.4 \\pm 4.2 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, $(5.4 \\pm 1.5 \\pm 0.5)\\times 10^{-5}$, $(4.9 \\pm 1.9 \\pm 0.7)\\times 10^{-5}$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Upper limits on the branching fractions for the decays of $\\chi_{c1,2}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{0}\\bar\\Sigma^{0}$, $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar\\Sigma^{-}$, are estimated to be $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c1}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{0}\\bar\\Sigma^{0}) < 6.2\\times 10^{-5}$, $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c2}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{0}\\bar\\Sigma^{0}) < 6.5\\times 10^{-5}$, $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c1}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{+}\\bar\\Sigma^{-}) < 8.7\\times 10^{-5}$ and $\\cal{B}$$(\\chi_{c2}\\rightarrow\\Sigma^{+}\\bar\\Sigma^{-}) < 8.8\\times 10^{-5}$ at the 90% confidence level.

  9. Light-Front Holography and Gauge/Gravity Duality: The Light Meson and Baryon Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the bound state Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we derive relativistic light-front wave equations in terms of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. These equations of motion in physical space-time are equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. Its eigenvalues give the hadronic spectrum, and its eigenmodes represent the probability amplitudes of the hadronic constituents at a given scale. An effective classical gravity description in a positive-sign dilaton background exp(+{kappa}{sup 2}z{sup 2}) is given for the phenomenologically successful soft-wall model which naturally encodes the internal structure of hadrons and their orbital angular momentum. Applications to the light meson and baryon spectrum are presented.

  10. On the baryonic contents of low mass galaxies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is an important observational constraint on cosmological and galactic models. However, it is critical to keep in mind that in observations only stars, molecular, and atomic gas are counted, while the contribution of the ionized gas is almost universally missed. The ionized gas is, however, expected to be present in the gaseous disks of dwarf galaxies simply because they are exposed to the cosmic ionizing background and to the stellar radiation that manages to escape from the central regions of the galactic disks into their outer layers. Such an expectation is, indeed, born out both by cosmological numerical simulations and by simple analytical models.

  11. The Information Content of Anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Ashley J; Manera, Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropic measurements of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature within a galaxy survey enable joint inference about the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ and angular diameter distance $D_A(z)$. These measurements are typically obtained from moments of the measured 2-point clustering statistics, with respect to the cosine of the angle to the line of sight $\\mu$. The position of the BAO features in each moment depends on a combination of $D_A(z)$ and $H(z)$, and measuring the positions in two or more moments breaks this parameter degeneracy. We derive analytic formulae for the parameter combinations measured from moments given by Legendre polynomials, power laws and top-hat Wedges in $\\mu$, showing explicitly what is being measured by each in real-space for both the correlation function and power spectrum, and in redshift-space for the power spectrum. The large volume covered by the DR11 SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS sample means that the correlation function can be well approxim...

  12. Observation and study of the baryonic B-meson decays B?D(*)pp?(?)(?)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Flanigan, J. M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for B-meson decay modes involving a charm meson, protons, and pions using 455×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. The branching fractions are measured for the following ten decays: B¯¯¯??D?pp?, B¯¯¯??D*?pp?, B¯¯¯??D?pp???, B¯¯¯??D*?pp???, B??D?pp???, B??D*?pp???, B¯¯¯??D?pp?????, B¯¯¯??D*?pp?????, B??D?pp?????, and B??D*?pp?????. The four B? and the two five-body B¯¯¯? modes are observed for the first time. The four-body modes are enhanced compared to the three- and the five-body modes. In the three-body modes, the M(pp?) and M(D(*)?p) invariant-mass distributions show enhancements near threshold values. In the four-body mode B¯¯¯??D?pp???, the M(p??) distribution shows a narrow structure of unknown origin near 1.5 GeV/c². The distributions for the five-body modes, in contrast to the others, are similar to the expectations from uniform phase-space predictions.

  13. A Study in Blue: The Baryon Content of Isolated Low Mass Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Jeremy D; Blanton, Michael R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the baryon content of low mass galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR8), focusing on galaxies in isolated environments where the complicating physics of galaxy-galaxy interactions are minimized. We measure neutral hydrogen (HI) gas masses and line-widths for 148 isolated galaxies with stellar mass between $10^7$ and $10^{9.5} M_{\\odot}$. We compare isolated low mass galaxies to more massive galaxies and galaxies in denser environments by remeasuring HI emission lines from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey 40% data release. All isolated low mass galaxies either have large atomic gas fractions or large atomic gas fractions cannot be ruled out via their upper limits. We measure a median atomic gas fraction of $f_{\\rm gas} = 0.82 \\pm 0.13$ for our isolated low mass sample with no systems below 0.30. At all stellar masses, the correlations between galaxy radius, baryonic mass and velocity width are not significantly affected by environment. Finally, we estimate a median b...

  14. Effects of the next-to-leading order terms in the chiral SU(3) Lagrangian on the strangeness -1 s-wave meson-baryon interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magas, V K; Ramos, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meson-baryon interactions in s-wave in the strangeness S=-1 sector are studied using a chiral unitarity approach based on the next-to-leading order chiral SU(3) Lagrangian. The model is fitted to the large set of experimental data in different two-body channels. Particular attention is paid to the $\\Xi$ hyperon production reaction, $\\bar{K} N \\rightarrow K \\Xi$, where the effect of the next-to-leading order terms in the Lagrangian play a crucial role, since the cross section of this reaction at tree level is zero.

  15. Constraining the strangeness content of the nucleon by measuring the $?$ meson mass shift in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Keisuke Ohtani

    2015-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of the $\\phi$ meson at finite density is studied, making use of a QCD sum rule approach in combination with the maximum entropy method. It is demonstrated that a possible mass shift of the $\\phi$ in nuclear matter is strongly correlated to the strangeness content of the nucleon, which is proportional to the strange sigma term, $\\sigma_{sN} = m_s \\langle N | \\overline{s}s | N \\rangle$. Our results furthermore show that, depending on the value of $\\sigma_{sN}$, the $\\phi$ meson could receive both a positive or negative mass shift at nuclear matter density. We find that these results depend only weakly on potential modifications of the width of the $\\phi$ meson peak and on assumptions made on the behavior of four-quark condensates at finite density. To check the stability of our findings, we take into account several higher order corrections to the operator product expansion, including $\\alpha_s$-corrections, terms of higher order in the strange quark mass and terms of higher twist that have not been considered in earlier works.

  16. A direct measurement of meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the $N(1675){\\frac{5}{2}}^-$ nucleon resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. G. Aznauryan; V. D. Burkert

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the $N^+(1675){\\frac{5}{2}}^-$ resonance state using new differential cross section data on $e p \\rightarrow e\\pi^+ n$ by the CLAS collaboration at $1.8 \\le Q^2 process. The data have been analyzed using two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and fixed-t dispersion relations. The extracted $\\gamma^* p\\rightarrow N(1675){\\frac{5}{2}}^-$ helicity amplitudes show significant coupling through the $A^p_{1/2}$ amplitude for $Q^2 \\le 4$GeV$^2$, while $A^p_{3/2}$ drops much faster and at $Q^2 \\ge 1.8$GeV$^2$ is already much smaller than $A^p_{1/2}$. Both results are consistent with the meson-baryon contributions from the dynamical coupled-channel model.

  17. Bottom-strange mesons in hyperonic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakar Pathak; Amruta Mishra

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-medium behavior of bottom-strange pseudoscalar mesons in hot, isospin asymmetric and dense hadronic environment is studied using a chiral effective model. The same was recently generalized to the heavy quark sector and employed to study the behavior of open-charm and open-bottom mesons. The heavy quark (anti-quark) is treated as frozen and all medium modifications of these bottom-strange mesons are due to their strange anti-quark (quark) content. We observe a pronounced dependence of their medium mass on baryonic density and strangeness content of the medium. Certain aspects of these in-medium interactions are similar to those observed for the strange-charmed mesons in a preceding investigation, such as the lifting of mass-degeneracy of $B_S^0$ and ${\\bar B}_S^0$ mesons in hyperonic matter, while the same is respected in vacuum as well as in nuclear matter. In general, however, there is a remarkable distinction between the two species, even though the formalism predicts a completely analogous in-medium interaction Lagrangian density. We discuss in detail the reason for different in-medium behavior of these bottom-strange mesons as compared to charmed-strange mesons, despite the dynamics of the heavy quark being treated as frozen in both cases.

  18. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsky, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow, Russia and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Krikun, A. [NORDITA, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden and Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  19. Light baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crede, Volker [Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of excited baryons serves as an excellent probe of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, highly-excited baryon resonances are sensitive to the details of quark confinement which is only poorly understood within QCD. Facilities worldwide such as Jefferson Lab, ELSA, and MAMI, which study the systematics of hadron spectra in photo- and electroproduction experiments, have accumulated a large amount of data in recent years including unpolarized cross section and polarization data for a large variety of meson-production reactions. These are important steps toward complete experiments that will allow us to unambiguously determine the scattering amplitude in the underlying reactions and to identify the broad and overlapping baryon resonance contributions. Several new nucleon resonances have been proposed and changes to the baryon listing in the 2012 Review of Particle Physics reflect the progress in the field.

  20. Light Vector Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  1. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense effort, notably the ordering of the Roper resonance in the low-lying Nucleon spectrum.

  2. Charmed baryon spectroscopy with Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesiak, Tadeusz [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-142 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies concerning charmed baryon spectroscopy, performed by the Belle collaboration, are briefly described. We report the first observation of two new baryons {xi}cx(2980) and {xi}cx(3077), a precise determination of the masses of {xi}c(2645) and {xi}c(2815), observation of the {lambda}c(2940)+ and experimental constraints on the possible spin-parity of the {lambda}c(2880)+. Observations of several exclusive decays of B mesons to the final states containing charmed baryons are also briefly presented.

  3. Strangeness S=-2 baryon-baryon interactions using chiral effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Polinder; J. Haidenbauer; U. -G. Meiß ner

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the leading order strangeness S=-2 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral effective field theory. The potential consists of contact terms without derivatives and of one-pseudoscalar-meson exchanges. The contact terms and the couplings of the pseudoscalar mesons to the baryons are related via SU(3) flavor symmetry to the S=-1 hyperon-nucleon channels. We show that the chiral effective field theory predictions with natural values for the low-energy constants agree with the experimental information in the S=-2 sector.

  4. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  5. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Guo, Feng-Kun; /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.; Hanhart, Christoph; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  6. Quenched chiral perturbation theory for baryon form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek B. Leinweber

    2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new intuitive method for the rapid calculation of the leading nonanalytic behavior of hadronic observables in quenched chiral perturbation theory is presented. After proving the technique in a consideration of baryon masses, the quenched magnetic moments of octet baryons are addressed. The technique provides a separation of magnetic moment contributions into full, sea, valence and quenched valence contributions, the latter being the conventional view of the quenched approximation. Both baryon mass and meson mass violations of SU(3)-flavor symmetry are accounted for. A comprehensive examination of the individual quark-sector contributions to octet baryon magnetic moments reveals that the u-quark contribution to the proton magnetic moment provides an optimal opportunity to directly view nonanalytic behavior associated with the quenched meson cloud of baryons in the quenched approximation.

  7. Status Report on the Light Baryonic States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. K. Nefkens; J. W. Price

    2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The regularities in the spectrum of the light baryon resonances are reviewed and compared with those of the light mesons. We discuss the occurrence of parity doublets and clusters, and note the trends in the values of the masses, widths, spins, and parities. The importance of SU(3) flavor is illustrated and the status of quark model calculations of the baryonic spectrum is reviewed. The absence of evidence for baryonic hybrids is particularly interesting. We propose to use better symbols for the baryon resonances which do not conflict with the simple quark structure of QCD. We shall comment also on fine tuning the Star System for the hadronic states. The importance of greater support for the construction and operation of secondary beams of $\\pi$, $K$, $\\bar p$, $\\vec{n}$ and $\\vec\\gamma$ up to 5 GeV/$c$ for the future of non-perturbative QCD is emphasized.

  8. Cross sections for pentaquark baryon production from protons in reactions induced by hadrons and photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Ko, Che Ming.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using hadronic Lagrangians that include the interaction of pentaquark Theta(+) baryon with K and N, we evaluate the cross sections for its production from meson-proton, proton-proton, and photon-proton reactions near threshold.,With empirical...

  9. Thermal Radiation from Nucleons and Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan-e Alam; Pradip Roy; Sourav Sarkar

    2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal photon emission rates due to meson-nucleon interactions have been evaluated. An exhaustive set of reactions involving p(\\bar p), n(\\bar n), rho, omega, a_1, pi and eta is seen to provide a sizeable contribution to the emission rate from hot hadronic matter. Contributions from baryonic resonances are found to be negligibly small.

  10. Baryonic matter and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize recent developments in identifying the ground state of dense baryonic matter and beyond. The topics include deconfinement from baryonic matter to quark matter, a diquark mixture, topological effect coupled with chirality and density, and inhomogeneous chiral condensates.

  11. Baryon-baryon mixing in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Implications of few-body hypernuclei for the understanding of the baryon-baryon interaction are examined. Octet-octet coupling effects not present in conventional, non strange nuclei are the focus. The need to identify strangeness {minus}2 hypernuclei to test model predictions is emphasized.

  12. Magnetic moments of octet baryons at finite density and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Y. Ryu; C. H. Hyun; M. -K. Cheoun

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the change of magnetic moments of octet baryons in nuclear matter at a finite density and temperature. Quark-meson coupling models are employed in describing properties of octet baryons and their interactions. Magnetic moments of octet baryons are found to increase non-negligibly as density and temperature increase, and we find that temperature dependence can be strongly correlated with the quark-hadron phase transition. Model dependence is also examined by comparing the results from the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model to those by the modified QMC (MQMC) model where the bag constant is assumed to depend on density. Both models predict sizable dependence on density and temperature, but the MQMC model shows a more drastic change of magnetic moments. Feasible changes of the nucleon mass by strong magnetic fields are also reported in the given models.

  13. Production of Pseudoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Briscoe; R. A. Arndt; I. I. Strakovsky; R. L. Workman

    2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments that study the hadronic and electromagnetic production of the pseudoscalar mesons -- pions, etas and kaons, contribute to our knowledge of the properties of baryon and hyperon resonances. Fixed-target programs at hadronic facilities such as BNL-AGS have been phased out. However, the availability of modern experimental facilities with pseudo-monochromatic or tagged medium-energy photon beams at GRAAL, SPring-8, Bonn, Mainz, and Jefferson Lab, together with LEGS, Max-Lab, and HIGS at lower energies, are beginning to produce high-quality results. These new data have smaller statistical uncertainties and better understood systematic uncertainties, than those obtained at the older bremsstrahlung facilities, for measurements of differential and integrated cross sections, as well as polarization and asymmetry. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of QCD-based approaches, such as the lattice-gauge calculations of baryon properties, and Chiral Perturbation Theory applied to threshold photoproduction, and are essential to the performance of Partial-Wave Analyses (PWA). These PWA studies are less model dependent than in the past, and are used in coupled-channels calculations that incorporate unitarity dynamically, and combine results from hadronic reaction channels with electromagnetic processes. This approach is necessary to extract resonance properties and may lead to the discovery of the "missing resonances" predicted by a number of different QCD-inspired calculations. We discuss recent experimental and phenomenological results for single and double pseudoscalar meson hadronic and photoproduction channels with emphasis on the JLab Hall B and the BNL/AGS Crystal Ball programs.

  14. Dynamical coupled-channels study of meson production reactions from EBACatJLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status of a combined and simultaneous analysis of meson production reactions based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab.

  15. Extraction of nucleon resonances from global analysis of meson production reactions at EBAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki [Excited Baryon Analysis Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the current status of exploring the dynamical aspect of the excited nucleon states through the comprehensive coupled-channels analysis of meson production reactions at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab.

  16. Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene Pasyuk

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to light baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoprodcution experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams and frozen spin polarized targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. This combination of experimental tools gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will facilitate model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experimental program and its current status together with recent results on double polarization measurements in ?{sup +} photoproduction are presented.

  17. Volume fluctuations and higher order cumulants of the net baryon number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Skokov; B. Friman; K. Redlich

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of volume fluctuations on cumulants of the net baryon number. Based on a general formalism, we derive universal expressions for the net baryon number cumulants in the presence of volume fluctuations with an arbitrary probability distribution. The relevance of these fluctuations for the baryon-number cumulants and in particular for the ratios of cumulants is assessed in the Polyakov loop extended quark-meson model within the functional renormalization group. We show that the baryon number cumulants are generally enhanced by volume fluctuations and that the critical behavior of higher order cumulants may be modified significantly.

  18. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  19. Extended-soft-core Baryon-Baryon Model ESC08 I. Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Nagels; Th. A. Rijken; Y. Yamamoto

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nijmegen extended-sft-core ESC08c model for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons ($N, \\Lambda, \\Sigma$, and $\\Xi$) is presented. In this first of a series of papers, the NN results are reported in detail. In the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem, the interactions are studied from the meson-exchange picture viewpoint, using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. The extended-soft-core (ESC) meson-exchange interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to ((i) One-boson-exchanges (OBE, which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar , vector, scalar, and axial-vector mesons, (ii) diffractive (i.e. multiple-gluon) exchanges, (iii) two pseudoscalar exchange (PS-PS), and (iv) meson-pair-exchange (MPE). The OBE- and MPE-vertices are regulated by gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cut-off masses for the BBM-vertices is dependent on the SU(3)-classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE, and a similar scheme for MPE. The simultaneous fit of the ESC-models to the NN- and YN-scattering data achieved excellent results for the NN, YN, and favorable properties for the $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ and $\\Xi N$ systems. In the case of ESC08c, the version of this paper, the results are: (i) For the selected 4313 pp and np scattering data ($ 0 \\leq T_{lab} \\leq 350$ MeV), the model achieved $\\chi^2/N_{data} = 1.08$. (ii) The deuteron binding energy and all NN low energy parameters are fitted very nicely. (iii) The YN-data are described also very well with $\\chi^/N_{data} = 1.09$. (iv) The model predicts a bound $\\Xi N(^3S_1,I=1)$ states with binding energy 1.56 MeV.

  20. Hybrid Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Meyer; E. S. Swanson

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the theoretical and experimental status of hybrid hadrons is presented. The states $\\pi_1(1400)$, $\\pi_1(1600)$, and $\\pi_1(2015)$ are thoroughly reviewed, along with experimental results from GAMS, VES, Obelix, COMPASS, KEK, CLEO, Crystal Barrel, CLAS, and BNL. Theoretical lattice results on the gluelump spectrum, adiabatic potentials, heavy and light hybrids, and transition matrix elements are discussed. These are compared with bag, string, flux tube, and constituent gluon models. Strong and electromagnetic decay models are described and compared to lattice gauge theory results. We conclude that while good evidence for the existence of a light isovector exotic meson exists, its confirmation as a hybrid meson awaits discovery of its iso-partners. We also conclude that lattice gauge theory rules out a number of hybrid models and provides a reference to judge the success of others.

  1. Hybrid baryons [alpha].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, P. R. (Philip R.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors review the status of hybrid baryons. The only known way to study hybrids rigorously is via excited adiabatic potentials. Hybrids can be modeled by both the bag and flux tube models. The low lying hybrid baryon is N 1/2{sup +} with a mass of 1.5 - 1.8 GeV. Hybrid baryons can be produced in the glue rich processes of diffractive {gamma}N and {pi}N production, {Psi} decays and p{bar p} annihilation. We review the current status of research on three quarks with a gluonic excitation, called a hybrid baryon. The excitation is not an orbital or radial excitation between the quarks. Hybrid baryons have also been reviewed elsewhere. The Mercedes-Benz logl in Figure 1 indicates two possible views of the confining interaction of three quarks, an essential issue in the study of hybrid baryons. In the logo the three points where the Y shape meets the boundary circle should be identified with the three quarks. There are two possibilities fo rthe interaction of the quarks: (1) a pairwise interaction of the quarks represented by the circle, or (2) a Y shaped interaction between the quarks, represented by the Y-shape in the logo.

  2. Precision measurement of the Lambda_b baryon lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; C. Baesso; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; G. Busetto; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; P. Chen; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; M. Dogaru; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; P. Garosi; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; P. Gorbounov; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; O. Kochebina; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; D. Lucchesi; J. Luisier; H. Luo; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; J. Maratas; U. Marconi; P. Marino; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; D. Martins Tostes; A. Massafferri; R. Matev; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; E. Maurice; A. Mazurov; B. Mc Skelly; J. McCarthy; A. McNab; R. McNulty; B. Meadows; F. Meier; M. Meissner; M. Merk; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; A. Mordà; M. J. Morello; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of the \\Lambda b baryon lifetime to that of the B0 meson is measured using 1.0/fb of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The \\Lambda b baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode \\Lambda b -> J/\\psi pK-, while the B0 meson decay used is the well known B0 -> J/\\psi pi+K- mode, where the pi+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K*0(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B0 meson lifetime, the \\Lambda b lifetime is found to be 1.482 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.012 ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  3. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  4. Baryon helicity in B decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the perturbative argument of helicity amplitudes to the two-body baryonic decays of B decays.

  5. [Medium energy meson research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, K.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p[bar p] annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report.

  6. [Medium energy meson research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, K.M.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p{bar p} annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report.

  7. Status of Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyuk, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoproduction experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams in combination with longitudinally and transversely polarized frozen spin targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will allow model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. The measurements were complete with both proton and deuteron targets. An overview of the collected experimental data will be presented.

  8. An Overview of Meson-Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Thomas

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference covers an extremely broad range of topics and in just a few pages it is impossible to even touch on all the areas which will be discussed. We have chosen to summarise just one area where there has recently been impressive progress, namely our quantitative understanding of strangeness in the nucleon. We also discuss a couple of examples where theoretical progress is of direct importance for future experiments as well as for the interpretation of hitherto anomalous results. Finally we make some remarks on meson and baryon spectroscopy and the exciting array of new facilities that are coming on-line in the near future.

  9. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Appelquist; Richard C. Brower; Michael I. Buchoff; George T. Fleming; Xiao-Yong Jin; Joe Kiskis; Graham D. Kribs; Ethan T. Neil; James C. Osborn; Claudio Rebbi; Enrico Rinaldi; David Schaich; Chris Schroeder; Sergey Syritsyn; Pavlos Vranas; Evan Weinberg; Oliver Witzel

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an $SU(N_D)$ strongly-coupled theory with even $N_D \\geq 4$. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vector-like representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to $SU(4)$, and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass $m_B \\gtrsim 300$ GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including: collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  10. Searches for the baryon- and lepton-number violating decays B 0 ? ? c + l ? , B ? ? ? l ? , and B ? ? ? ¯ l ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for B mesons decaying to final states containing a baryon and a lepton are performed, where the baryon is either ?c or ? and the lepton is a muon or an electron. These decays violate both baryon and lepton number and would be a signature of physics beyond the standard model. No significant signal is observed in any of the decay modes, and upper limits in the range (3.2–520)×10?? are set on the branching fractions at the 90% confidence level.

  11. Quark Contributions to Baryon Magnetic Moments in Full, Quenched and Partially Quenched QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek B. Leinweber

    2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The chiral nonanalytic behaviour of quark-flavor contributions to the magnetic moments of octet baryons are determined in full, quenched and partially-quenched QCD, using an intuitive and efficient diagrammatic formulation of quenched and partially-quenched chiral perturbation theory. The technique provides a separation of quark-sector magnetic-moment contributions into direct sea-quark loop, valence-quark, indirect sea-quark loop and quenched valence contributions, the latter being the conventional view of the quenched approximation. Both meson and baryon mass violations of SU(3)-flavor symmetry are accounted for. Following a comprehensive examination of the individual quark-sector contributions to octet baryon magnetic moments, numerous opportunities to observe and test the underlying structure of baryons and the nature of chiral nonanalytic behavior in QCD and its quenched variants are discussed. In particular, the valence u-quark contribution to the proton magnetic moment provides the optimal opportunity to directly view nonanalytic behavior associated with the meson cloud of full QCD and the quenched meson cloud of quenched QCD. The u quark in Sigma^+ provides the best opportunity to display the artifacts of the quenched approximation.

  12. Baryon Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Austregesilo; for the the COMPASS collaboration

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the COMPASS experiment, diffractive dissociation of the beam proton is one of the dominant processes for the 190GeV/c positive hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The status of the analysis of the reactions pp -> p_f pi^+ pi^- p_s and pp -> p_f K^+ K^- p_s is presented, where dominant features of the light-baryon spectrum become clearly visible. Furthermore, partial-wave analysis techniques to disentangle these spectra are discussed.

  13. Hyperons: Insights into baryon structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, J.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon octet is composed mainly of hyperons. Modern high energy hyperon beams provide a tool for the study of hyperon static properties and interactions. Experiments with these beams have provided new insights into hyperon rare decays, magnetic moments, and interactions. These experiments provide us with insights into the strong, weak, and electromagnetic structure of the baryons. 65 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Martin-Camalich, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Spain and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, BN1 9Qh, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  15. Doubly heavy baryons in a Salpeter model with AdS/QCD inspired potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannuzzi, Floriana [Universita degli Studi di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of baryons with two heavy quarks is predicted, assuming a configuration of a light quark and a heavy diquark. The masses are computed within a semirelativistic quark model, using a potential obtained in a gauge-gravity (anti-de Sitter/QCD) framework. All the parameters defining the model are determined fitting the meson spectrum. The obtained mass of {xi}{sub cc} is in agreement with the measurements.

  16. Correlated leading baryon-antibaryon production in e+e- --> ccbar --> Lambda_c+ antiLambda_c- X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of 649 \\pm 35 e+e- --> ccbar events produced at sqrt{s}~10.6 GeV containing both a Lambda_c baryon and a Lambda_c antibaryon. The number observed is roughly four times that expected if the leading charmed hadron types are uncorrelated, confirming an observation by the CLEO Collaboration. We find a 2-jet topology in these events but very few additional baryons, demonstrating that the primary c and cbar are predominantly contained in a correlated baryon-antibaryon system. In addition to the charmed baryons we observe on average 2.6 \\pm 0.2 charged intermediate mesons, predominantly pions, carrying 65% of the remaining energy.

  17. Baryonic Dark Matter in Galaxies

    B. J. Carr

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological nucleosynthesis calculations imply that many of the baryons in the Universe must be dark. We discuss the likelihood that some of these dark baryons may reside in the discs or halos of galaxies. If they were in the form of compact objects, they would then be natural MACHO candidates, in which case they are likely to be the remnants of a first generation of pregalactic or protogalactic Population III stars. Various candidates have been proposed for such remnants - brown dwarfs, red dwarfs, white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes - and we review the many types of observations (including microlensing searches) which can be used to constrain or exclude them.

  18. $?^{-}$, $?^{* -}$, $?^{* -}$ and $?^{-}$ decuplet baryon magnetic moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton Dean Slaughter

    2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of the ground state $U$-Spin $={3/2}$ baryon decuplet magnetic moments $\\Delta^{-}$, $\\Xi^{* -}$, $\\Sigma^{* -}$ and $\\Omega^{-}$ and their ground state spin 1/2 cousins $p$, $n$, $\\Lambda$, $\\Sigma^{+}$, $\\Sigma^{0}$, $\\Sigma^{-}$, $\\Xi^{+}$, and $\\Xi^{-}$ have been studied for many years with a modicum of success. The magnetic moments of many are yet to be determined. Of the decuplet baryons, only the magnetic moment of the $\\Omega^{-}$ has been accurately determined. We calculate the magnetic moments of the \\emph{physical} decuplet $U$-Spin $={3/2}$ quartet members without ascribing any specific form to their quark structure or intra-quark interactions.

  19. On finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. M. Lutz; R. Bavontaweepanya; C. Kobdaj; K. Schwarz

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N$^3$LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-$N_c$ sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counter terms relevant at N$^3$LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39$_{-1}^{+2}$ MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of $\\sigma_{sN} = 84^{+ 28}_{-\\;4}$ MeV. The flavour SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with $(802 \\pm 4)$ MeV and $(1103 \\pm 6)$ MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  20. Polarization Observables in the Photoproduction of Two Pseudoscalar Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston Roberts

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The many polarization observables that can be measured in process like {gamma}N {yields} M{sub 1}M{sub 2}B, where M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pseudoscalar mesons and B is a spin-1/2 baryon, are discussed. The relationships among these observables, their symmetries, as well as inequalities that they satisfy are briefly discussed. Within the context of a particular model for {gamma}N {yields} NKK, some of the observables are calculated, and their sensitivity to the ingredients of the model, and hence to the underlying dynamics of the process, are discussed.

  1. Meson photoproduction in the first and second resonance region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krusche

    2003-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of baryon resonances via meson photoproduction reactions on the free proton and on nucleons in the nuclear medium is discussed. Special emphasis is laid on the production of neutral mesons which due to the suppression of non-resonant backgrounds are particularly well suited for the study of excited states of the nucleon. Experiments carried out during the last ten years with the TAPS-detector at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) have very significantly contributed to a detailed investigation of the low lying nucleon resonances P33(1232), D13(1520) and S11(1535). The most recent results from single and double pion production and from eta-photoproduction are summarised.

  2. Search for Low Mass Exotic mesonic structures. Part I: experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, several papers discussed on the existence of a low mass new structure at a mass close to M=214.3 MeV. It was suggested that the $\\Sigma^{+}$ disintegration: $\\Sigma^{+}\\to$pP$^{0}$, P$^{0}\\to\\mu^{-}\\mu^{+}$ proceeds through an intermediate particle P$^{0}$ having such mass. The present work intends to look at other new or available data, in order to observe the eventual existence of small narrow peaks or shoulders in very low mesonic masses. Indeed narrow structures were already extracted from various data in dibaryons, baryons and mesons (at larger masses that those studied here).

  3. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelquist, Thomas; Buchoff, Michael I; Fleming, George T; Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kiskis, Joe; Kribs, Graham D; Neil, Ethan T; Osborn, James C; Rebbi, Claudio; Rinaldi, Enrico; Schaich, David; Schroeder, Chris; Syritsyn, Sergey; Vranas, Pavlos; Weinberg, Evan; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an $SU(N_D)$ strongly-coupled theory with even $N_D \\geq 4$. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vector-like representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to $SU(4)$, and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominant...

  4. Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interaction Applied to the Neutron-Deuteron Scattering (II) Polalization Observables of the Elastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukukawa; Yoshikazu Fujiwara

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering is solved in the Faddeev formalism, employing the energy-independent version of the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2. The differential cross sections and the spin polarization of the elastic scattering up to the neutron incident energy $E_n=65$ MeV are well reproduced without reinforcing fss2 with the three-body force. The vector analyzing-power of the neutron, $A_y(\\theta)$, in the energy region $E_n$ < 25 MeV is largely improved in comparison with the predictions by the meson-exchange potentials, thus yielding a partial solution of the long-standing $A_y$-puzzle owing to the nonlocality of the short-range repulsion produced by the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction. The large Coulomb effect in the vector and tensor analyzing-powers in $E_n$ < 10 MeV is also analyzed based on the Vincent and Phatak method and recent detailed studies by other authors.

  5. Partonic flow and $?$-meson production in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Abelev

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first measurements of the $\\phi$-meson elliptic flow ($v_{2}(p_{T})$) and high statistics $p_{T}$ distributions for different centralities from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In minimum bias collisions the $v_{2}$ of the $\\phi$ meson is consistent with the trend observed for mesons. The ratio of the yields of the $\\Omega$ to those of the $\\phi$ as a function of transverse momentum is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal $s$ quarks up to $p_{T}\\sim 4$ GeV/$c$, but disagrees at higher momenta. The nuclear modification factor ($R_{CP}$) of $\\phi$ follows the trend observed in the $K^{0}_{S}$ mesons rather than in $\\Lambda$ baryons, supporting baryon-meson scaling. Since $\\phi$-mesons are made via coalescence of seemingly thermalized $s$ quarks in central Au+Au collisions, the observations imply hot and dense matter with partonic collectivity has been formed at RHIC.

  6. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  7. Connecting the Baryons: Multiwavelength Data for SKA HI Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Martin; Obreschkow, Danail; Driver, Simon; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Zwaan, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The science achievable with SKA HI surveys will be greatly increased through the combination of HI data with that at other wavelengths. These multiwavelength datasets will enable studies to move beyond an understanding of HI gas in isolation to instead understand HI as an integral part of the highly complex baryonic processes that drive galaxy evolution. As they evolve, galaxies experience a host of environmental and feedback influences, many of which can radically impact their gas content. Important processes include: accretion (hot and cold mode, mergers), depletion (star formation, galactic winds, AGN), phase changes (ionised/atomic/molecular), and environmental effects (ram pressure stripping, tidal effects, strangulation). Governing all of these to various extents is the underlying dark matter distribution. In turn, the result of these processes can significantly alter the baryonic states in which material is finally observed (stellar populations, dust, chemistry) and its morphology (galaxy type, bulge/d...

  8. B meson decays into charmless pseudoscalar scalar mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Loma del Bosque 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico) and Depto. de Fsica-matematicas, Universidad de Pamplona, Pamplona, Norte de Santander (Colombia); Ramirez, Carlos A.; Mendoza S, J. A. [Depto. de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Depto. de Fsica-matematicas, Universidad de Pamplona, Pamplona, Norte de Santander (Colombia)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonleptonic weak decays of meson B into a scalar and pseudoscalar meson are studied. The scalar mesons under consideration are {sigma} (or f0(600)), f0(980), a0(980) and K{sub 0}{sup *}(1430). We calculate the Branching ratios in the Naive Factorization approximation. Scalars are assumed to be qq-bar bounded sates, but an estimation can be obtained in the case they are four bounded states.

  9. Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Arthur; P. A. Boyle; D. Brömmel; M. A. Donnellan; J. M. Flynn; A. Jüttner; H. Pedroso de Lima; T. D. Rae; C. T. Sachrajda; B. Samways

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculated the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes for the pseudoscalar mesons ($\\pi$ and $K$) and the longitudinally polarised vector mesons ($\\rho$, $K^*$ and $\\phi$) as part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' $N_f=2+1$ domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme. These quantities were obtained with a good precision and, in particular, the expected effects of $SU(3)$-flavour symmetry breaking were observed. Operators were renormalised non-perturbatively and extrapolations to the physical point were made, guided by leading order chiral perturbation theory. The main results presented are for two volumes, $16^3\\times 32$ and $24^3\\times 64$, with a common lattice spacing. Preliminary results for a lattice with a finer lattice spacing, $32^3\\times64$, are discussed and a first look is taken at the use of twisted boundary conditions to extract distribution amplitudes.

  10. $?$ Meson In $J/?$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wujun Huo; Xinmin Zhang; Tao Huang

    2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently BES at BEPC found evidence for the existence of the $\\sigma$ meson in the process of $J/\\Psi \\to \\sigma\\omega \\to\\pi\\pi\\omega$. In this paper we firstly discuss the relevant coupling $g_{\\sigma\\pi\\pi}$ and show that the linear $\\sigma$ model gives rise to a reasonable description of the $\\sigma$ decay into $\\pi$'s, then we calculate the coupling constant $g^{th}_{J/\\Psi\\sigma\\omega}$ by using the perturbative QCD technique and the light-cone wave functions of the $\\sigma$ and $\\omega$ mesons. The results show that the theoretical value of $g^{th}_{J/\\Psi\\sigma\\omega}$ is within the range of experimental value $g_{J/\\Psi\\sigma\\omega}$.

  11. Spectroscopy of doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanath, M. [Tata Institute; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Mathur, Nilmani [Tata Institute; Peardon, Michael [Trinity College, Dublin

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using lattice QCD with dynamical clover fermions. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) ? O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses. Using those splittings for doubly-charmed baryons, and taking input of experimental Bc meson mass, we predict the mass splittings of B?c?Bc to be about 80 ± 8 MeV and m?ccb=8050±10 MeV.

  12. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Edwards, Robert; Richards, David [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Fleming, George [Yale University New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Juge, K. Jimmy [Department of Physics, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Lichtl, Adam C. [RBRC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Mathur, Nilmani [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 40005 (India); Wallace, Stephen J. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  13. The light meson spectroscopy program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discoveries of a number of unexpected new charmomium-like meson states at the BaBar and Belle B-factories have demonstrated how little is still known about meson spectroscopy. In this talk we will review recent highlights of the light quark spectroscopy from collider and fixed target experiments.

  14. Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the baryonic content of the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. X. Thuan; Y. I. Izotov

    2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the latest measurements of the primordial abundances of the light nuclei D, 3He, 4He and 7Li is given. We discuss in particular the primordial abundance Yp of 4He as measured in blue compact dwarf galaxies. We argue that the best measurements now give a ``high'' value of Yp along with a ``low'' value of D/H, and that the two independent measurements are consistent within the framework of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis with a number of light neutrino species Nnu = 3.0+/-0.3 (2sigma).

  15. Net-Baryon Physics: Basic Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Alvarez-Muniz; R. Conceicao; J. Dias de Deus; M. C. Espirito Santo; J. G. Milhano; M. Pimenta

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that, in nuclear collisions, a sizable fraction of the available energy is carried away by baryons. As the baryon number is conserved, the net-baryon $B-\\bar{B}$ retains information on the energy-momentum carried by the incoming nuclei. A simple but consistent model for net-baryon production in high energy hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The basic ingredients of the model are valence string formation based on standard PDFs with QCD evolution and string fragmentation via the Schwinger mechanism. The results of the model are presented and compared with both data and existing models. These results show that a good description of the main features of net-baryon data is possible on the framework of a simplistic model, with the advantage of making the fundamental production mechanisms manifest.

  16. Open bottom mesons in hot asymmetric hadronic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakar Pathak; Amruta Mishra

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-medium masses and optical potentials of $B$ and ${\\bar B}$ mesons are studied in an isospin asymmetric, strange, hot and dense hadronic environment using a chiral effective model. The chiral $SU(3)$ model originally designed for the light quark sector, is generalized to include the heavy quark sector ($c$ and $b$) to derive the interactions of the $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons with the light hadrons. Due to large mass of bottom quark, we use only the empirical form of these interactions for the desired purpose, while treating the bottom degrees of freedom to be frozen in the medium. Hence, all medium effects are due to the in-medium interaction of the light quark content of these open-bottom mesons. Both $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons are found to experience net attractive interactions in the medium, leading to lowering of their masses in the medium. The mass degeneracy of particles and antiparticles, ($B^+$, $B^-$) as well as ($B^0$, ${\\bar B}^0$), is observed to be broken in the medium, due to equal and opposite contributions from a vectorial Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term. Addition of hyperons to the medium lowers further the in-medium mass for each of these four mesons, while a non-zero isospin asymmetry is observed to break the approximate mass degeneracy of each pair of isospin doublets. These medium effects are found to be strongly density dependent, and bear a considerably weaker temperature dependence. The results obtained in the present investigation are compared to predictions from the quark-meson coupling model, heavy meson effective theory, and the QCD Sum Rule approach.

  17. Eta absorption by mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Liu; C. M. Ko; L. W. Chen

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the $[SU(3)_{\\mathrm{L}} \\times SU(3)_{\\mathrm{R}}]_{\\mathrm{global}% }\\times [SU(3)_V]_{\\mathrm{local}}$ chiral Lagrangian with hidden local symmetry, we evaluate the cross sections for the absorption of eta meson ($% \\eta$) by pion ($\\pi$), rho ($\\rho$), omega ($\\omega$), kaon ($K$), and kaon star ($K^*$) in the tree-level approximation. With empirical masses and coupling constants as well as reasonable values for the cutoff parameter in the form factors at interaction vertices, we find that most cross sections are less than 1 mb, except the reactions $\\rho\\eta\\to K\\bar K^*(\\bar KK^*)$, $\\omega\\eta\\to K\\bar K^*(\\bar KK^*)$, $K^*\\eta\\to\\rho K$, and $K^*\\eta\\to\\omega K$, which are a few mb, and the reactions $\\pi\\eta\\to K\\bar K$ and $K\\eta\\to\\pi K$, which are more than 10 mb. Including these reactions in a kinetic model based on a schematic hydrodynamic description of relativistic heavy ion collisions, we find that the abundance of eta mesons likely reaches chemical equilibrium with other hadrons in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  18. Hadronic scattering of charmed mesons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Zhang, B.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of both charm meson pairs and dileptons resulting from their decays. These effects are estimated for heavy ion collisions at Super Proton Synchrotron energies and are found to be significant....

  19. Baryonic torii: Toroidal baryons in a generalized Skyrme model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Bjarke Gudnason; Muneto Nitta

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a Skyrme-type model with a potential term motivated by Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), which we call the BEC Skyrme model. We consider two flavors of the model, the first is the Skyrme model and the second has a sixth-order derivative term instead of the Skyrme term; both with the added BEC-motivated potential. The model contains toroidally shaped Skyrmions and they are characterized by two integers P and Q, representing the winding numbers of two complex scalar fields along the toroidal and poloidal cycles of the torus, respectively. The baryon number is B=PQ. We find stable Skyrmion solutions for P=1,2,3,4,5 with Q=1, while for P=6 and Q=1 it is only metastable. We further find that configurations with higher Q>1 are all unstable and split into Q configurations with Q=1. Finally we discover a phase transition, possibly of first order, in the mass parameter of the potential under study.

  20. Heavy Flavor Baryons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhr, Thomas

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 have filled many empty spots in the spectrum of heavy baryons over the last few years. The most recent results are described in this article: The first direct observation of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}, improved measurements of {Sigma}{sub b} properties, a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} branching ratio, and a high-statistics study of charm baryons.

  1. The Baryonic Tully Fisher Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Gurovich; Stacy S. McGaugh; Ken C. Freeman; Helmut Jerjen; Lister Staveley-Smith; W. J. G. De Blok

    2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We validate the baryonic Tully Fisher (BTF) relation by exploring the Tully Fish er (TF) and BTF properties of optically and HI-selected disk galaxies. The data includes galaxies from: Sakai et al. (2000) calibrator sample; McGaugh et al. (2000: MC2000) I-band sample; and 18 newly acquired HI-selected field dwarf galaxies observed with the ANU 2.3m telescope and the ATNF Parkes telescope from Gurovich's thesis sample (2005). As in MC2000, we re-cast the TF and BTF relations as relationships between baryo n mass and W_{20}. First we report some numerical errors in MC2000. Then, we c alculate weighted bi-variate linear fits to the data, and finally we compare the fits of the intrinsically fainter dwarfs with the brighter galaxies of Sakai et al. (2000). With regards to the local calibrator disk galaxies of Sakai et al. (2000), our results suggest that the BTF relation is indeed tighter than the T F relation and that the slopes of the BTF relations are statistically flatter th an the equivalent TF relations. Further, for the fainter galaxies which include the I-band MCG2000 and HI-selected galaxies of Gurovich's thesis sample, we calc ulate a break from a simple power law model because of what appears to be real c osmic scatter. Not withstanding this point, the BTF models are marginally better models than the equivalent TF ones with slightly smaller reduced chi^2.

  2. Nucleon Resonance Electrocouplings from the CLAS Meson Electroproduction Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker Burkert, Viktor Mokeev

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition helicity amplitudes {gamma}{sub {nu}}NN* (electrocouplings) were determined for prominent excited proton states with masses less than 1.8 GeV in independent analyses of major meson electroproduction channels: {pi}{sup +}n, {pi}{sup 0}p and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p. Consistent results on resonance electrocouplings obtained from analyses of these exclusive reactions with very different non-resonant contributions demonstrated reliable extraction of these fundamental quantities for states that have significant decays for either N{pi} or N{pi}{pi} channels. Preliminary results on electrocouplings of N* states with masses above 1.6 GeV have become available from the CLAS data on {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction off protons for the first time. Comparison with quark models and coupled channel approaches strongly suggest that N* structure is determined by contributions from an internal core of three constituent quarks and an external meson-baryon cloud at the distance scales covered in measurements with the CLAS detector.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Weak Non-Mesonic Decay of 10Be(Lambda)Hypernuclei at CEBAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Majewski; L. Majling; A. Margaryan; L. Tang

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypernuclei are convenient laboratory to study the baryon-baryon weak interaction and associated effective Hamiltonian. The strangeness changing process, in which a Lambda hyperon converts to a neutron with a release up to 176 MeV, provides a clear signal for a conversion of an s-quark to a d-quark. We propose to perform a non-mesonic weak decay study of 10Be(Lambda)hypernuclei using the (e,eK) reaction. These investigations will fully utilize the unique parameters of the CEBAF CW electron beam and RF system and are enabled by (1) the use of new detector for alpha particles based on the recently developed RF timing technique with picosecond resolution and (2) the small angle and large acceptance kaon spectrometer-HKS in Hall C.

  4. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fernando, I. P. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Goity, J. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,l^P=0^+] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2^+] and [70}},1^-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order 1/Nc} and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  5. Photoproduction of mesons off nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krusche

    2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results for the photoproduction of mesons off nuclei are reviewed. These experiments have been performed for two major lines of research related to the properties of the strong interaction. The investigation of nucleon resonances requires light nuclei as targets for the extraction of the isospin composition of the electromagnetic excitations. This is done with quasi-free meson photoproduction off the bound neutron and supplemented with the measurement of coherent photoproduction reactions, serving as spin and/or isospin filters. Furthermore, photoproduction from light and heavy nuclei is a very efficient tool for the study of the interactions of mesons with nuclear matter and the in-medium properties of hadrons. Experiments are currently rapidly developing due to the combination of high quality tagged (and polarized) photon beams with state-of-the-art 4pi detectors and polarized targets.

  6. Meson spectroscopy with unitary coupled-channels model for heavy-meson decay into three mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoshi Nakamura

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model for describing excited mesons decay into three mesons. The properties of the excited mesons can be extracted with this model. The model maintains the three-body unitarity that has been missed in previous data analyses based on the conventional isobar models. We study an importance of the three-body unitarity in extracting hadron properties from data. For this purpose, we use the unitary and isobar models to analyze the same pseudo data of {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n, and extract the properties of excited mesons. We find a significant difference between the unitary and isobar models in the extracted properties of excited mesons, such as the mass, width and coupling strength to decay channels. Hadron properties such as quantum numbers (spin, parity, etc.), mass and (partial) width have been long studied as a subject called hadron spectroscopy. The hadron properties provide important information for understanding internal structure of the hadron and dynamics which governs it. The dynamics here is of course QCD in its nonperturbative regime. The hadron properties can be extracted from data through a careful analysis, in many cases, partial wave analysis (PWA). Thus it is essential for hadron spectroscopy to have a reliable theoretical analysis tool.

  7. Phi Meson in Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.; Qiu, X. J.; Li, C. T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 45, NUMBER 3 MARCH 1992 Phi meson in dense matter C. M. Ko, P. Levai, * and X. J. Qiu Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A &M University, College Station, Texas 77843 C. T. Li Physics Department, National... Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764, China {Received 3 September 1991) The effect of the kaon loop correction to the property of a phi meson in dense matter is studied in the vector dominance model. Using the density-dependent kaon effective mass...

  8. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanath, M. [University of Graz; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Mathur, Nilmani [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay, India; Peardon, Michael [Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) ? O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  9. Study light scalar meson property from heavy meson decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Caidian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Wei [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari 70126 (Italy)

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the SU(3) symmetry limit, the ratio R {identical_to} (B(D{sup +{yields}}f{sub 0}l{sup +{nu}})+B(D{sup +{yields}{sigma}}l{sup +{nu}})/B(D{sup +{yields}}a{sub 0}{sup 0}l{sup +{nu}})) is equal to 1 if the scalar mesons are q-barq states, while it is 3 if these mesons are tentraquark states. This ratio provides a model-independent way to distinguish the descriptions for light scalar mesons. It also applies to the B{sup -{yields}}Sl{sup -{nu}}-bar, and B{sup 0}-bar{yields}J/{psi}({eta}{sub c})S decays. The SU(3) symmetry breaking effect is found to be under control, which will not spoil our method. The branching fractions of the D{sup +{yields}}Sl{sup +{nu}}, B{sup -{yields}}Sl{sup -{nu}}-bar and B{sup 0}-bar{yields}J/{psi}({eta}{sub c})S decays roughly have the order 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -6}, respectively. The B factory experiments and ongoing BEPC-II experiments are able to measure these channels and accordingly to provide the detailed information of the scalar meson inner structure.

  10. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and R. Rapp, Phys. Rev. C 73, 034913 (2006). [8] C. M. Ko and W. Liu, Nucl. Phys. A783, 233c (2007). [9] B. Zhang, L.-W. Chen, and C.-M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 72, 024906 (2005). [10] P. B. Gossiaux and J. Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014904 (2008). [11] P..., Phys. Rev. C 65, 065203 (2002). [29] A. Selem and F. Wilczek, arXiv:hep-ph/0602128. [30] S. Ekelin, S. Fredriksson, M. Ja?ndel, and T. I. Larsson, Phys. Rev. D 28, 257 (1983). [31] R. L. Jaffe, Phys. Rep. 409, 1 (2005...

  11. Extracting meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the N(1675)52- nucleon resonance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the $N(1675){\\frac{5}{2}}^-$ resonance state using recent differential cross section data on $e p \\rightarrow e\\pi^+ n$ by the CLAS collaboration at $1.8 \\le Q^2 more »contributions at $Q^2 \\geq 1.8 $GeV$^2$ from the dynamical coupled-channel model.« less

  12. Recent CLEO Charm Meson and Baryon Results Jim Napolitano (RPI & Cornell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CsI 2cm BP Silicon 3.5cm BP He-propane Microbeta 7 Bunches 1 IR Crossing Angle 9X3 Bunches 2230902 is significant! 9 #12;D0 -e+e Normalized q2 Distribution Preliminary! Paper will be submitted shortly. Form

  13. On the Methods for Constructing Meson-Baryon Reaction Models within Relativistic Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Julia-Diaz; H. Kamano; T. -S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato; N. Suzuki

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the relativistic quantum field theory, we analyze the differences between the $\\pi N$ reaction models constructed from using (1) three-dimensional reductions of Bethe-Salpeter Equation, (2) method of unitary transformation, and (3) time-ordered perturbation theory. Their relations with the approach based on the dispersion relations of S-matrix theory are dicusssed.

  14. Causal Baryon Diffusion and Colored Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Kapusta; C. Young

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a model of baryon diffusion which has the desired properties of causality and analyticity. The model also has the desired property of colored noise, meaning that the noise correlation function is not a Dirac delta function in space and time; rather, it depends on multiple time and length constants. The model can readily be incorporated in 3+1 dimensional second order viscous hydro-dynamical models of heavy ion collisions, which is particularly important at beam energies where the baryon density is large.

  15. Baryon onset in a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Haber; Florian Preis; Andreas Schmitt

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical baryon chemical potential for the onset of nuclear matter is a function of the vacuum mass and the binding energy. Both quantities are affected by an external magnetic field. We show within two relativistic mean-field models - including magnetic catalysis, but omitting the anomalous magnetic moment - that a magnetic field increases both the vacuum mass and the binding energy. For sufficiently large magnetic fields, the effect on the vacuum mass dominates and as a result the critical baryon chemical potential is increased.

  16. Distribution Amplitudes of Pseudoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Braun; M. Gockeler; R. Horsley; H. Perlt; D. Pleiter; P. E. L. Rakow; G. Schierholz; A. Schiller; W. Schroers; H. Stueben; J. M. Zanotti

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the first two moments of the distribution amplitudes of pseudoscalar mesons. Using two flavors of non-perturbatively improved clover fermions and non-perturbative renormalization of the matrix elements we perform both chiral and continuum extrapolations and compare with recent results from models and experiments.

  17. B-meson distribution amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Grozin

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    B-meson light-cone distribution amplitudes are discussed in these lectures in the framework of HQET. The evolution equation for the leading-twist distribution amplitude is derived in one-loop approximation. QCD sum rules for distribution amplitudes are discussed.

  18. Distribution Amplitudes of Vector Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Braun; D. Brömmel; M. Göckeler; R. Horsley; Y. Nakamura; H. Perlt; D. Pleiter; P. E. L. Rakow; A. Schäfer; G. Schierholz; A. Schiller; W. Schroers; T. Streuer; H. Stüben; J. M. Zanotti

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented for the lowest moment of the distribution amplitude for the K-star vector meson. Both longitudinal and transverse moments are investigated. We use two flavours of O(a) improved Wilson fermions, together with a non-perturbative renormalisation of the matrix element.

  19. Energy and system size dependence of phi meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of {phi} meson production (using the hadronic decay mode {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) by comparing the new results from Cu + Cu collisions and previously reported Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented are from midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) for 0.4 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c. At a given beam energy, the transverse momentum distributions for {phi} mesons are observed to be similar in yield and shape for Cu + Cu and Au + Au colliding systems with similar average numbers of participating nucleons. The {phi} meson yields in nucleus-nucleus collisions, normalized by the average number of participating nucleons, are found to be enhanced relative to those from p + p collisions with a different trend compared to strange baryons. The enhancement for {phi} mesons is observed to be higher at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV compared to 62.4 GeV. These observations for the produced {phi}(s{bar s}) mesons clearly suggest that, at these collision energies, the source of enhancement of strange hadrons is related to the formation of a dense partonic medium in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions and cannot be alone due to canonical suppression of their production in smaller systems.

  20. Recent Results on Charmed Baryons with Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuboyama, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Belle detector has accumulated e+e- collision data corresponding to 600 fb-1 at the {upsilon}(4S) energy. The paper presents the improved measurement of known charmed baryons; {xi}c and {xi}c(2645), as well as observation of new states; {sigma}c(2800), {xi}cx(2980) and {xi}cx(3077)

  1. Baryon spectroscopy with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene Pasyuk, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantial part of the experimental efforts at the experimental Hall-B of Jefferson Laboratory is dedicated to this studies of light baryon spectroscopy. In this report a general overview of the experimental capabilities in the Experimental Hall-B will be presented together with preliminary results of recent double polarization measurements and finally overall status of the program.

  2. Low Mass Exotic Baryons: Myth or Reality ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff

    2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Using mainly $\\vec{p}$ p $\\to$ p ${\\pi^+}X$ and $\\vec{p}$ p $\\to$ p$_{f}$~p$_{s}$ X reactions, narrow baryonic structures were observed in the mass range 950$\\le$ M $\\le$ 1800 MeV.

  3. Exotic low mass narrow baryons extracted from charge exchange reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to give further evidence for the existence of low mass exotic baryons. Narrow structures in baryonic missing mass or baryonic invariant mass were observed during the last twelve years. Since their evidence is still under debate, various data, measured with incident hadrons, by different collaborations, are reanalyzed to bring evidence on these narrow exotic baryonic resonances excited in charge-exchange reactions. These structures are clearly exotic as there is no room for them in the $qqq$ configurations: their width is smaller than the widths of "classical" baryonic resonances, moreover some of the masses lie below the pion threshold mass.

  4. Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X{sub c{bar c}} = {eta}{sub c} or J/{psi}. In particular, we report on the evidence of the B {yields} {eta}{sub c}K*{sup +} decay and provide a measurement of the width of {eta}{sub c}.

  5. Distinguishing two kinds of scalar mesons from heavy meson decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari 70126 (Italy); Lue, Cai-Dian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the SU(3) symmetry limit, semileptonic D{sup +}{yields}Sl{sup +}{nu} and B{sup -}{yields}Sl{sup -}{nu} decays, with S=a{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(980), and f{sub 0}(600), are found to obey different sum rules in the qq and the tetraquark descriptions for scalar mesons. Thus these sum rules can distinguish the two scenarios for light scalar mesons model independently. This method also applies to the B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({eta}{sub c})S decays. Two kinds of SU(3) symmetry breaking effects are found to be under control, which will not spoil our method. The branching fractions of the D{sup +}{yields}Sl{sup +}{nu}, B{sup -}{yields}Sl{sup -}{nu}, and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({eta}{sub c})S decays roughly have the order 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, and 10{sup -6}, respectively. The ongoing BEPC II and the forthcoming Super B experiments are able to measure these channels and, accordingly, to provide detailed information of the scalar meson inner structure.

  6. Two Baryons with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceno, Raul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Davoudi, Zohreh [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, WA (United States); Luu, Thomas [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Savage, Martin [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantization condition for two particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled-channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is fully relativistic and holds for all momenta below inelastic thresholds and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by m{sub {pi}} L, where m{sub {pi}} is the pion mass and L is the spatial extent of my box. Its implication for the studies of coupled-channel baryon-baryon systems is discussed, and the necessary tools for implementing the formalism are review.

  7. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,l^P=0^+] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2^+] and [70}},1^-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order 1/Nc} and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more »as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  8. Baryon Annihilation and Regeneration in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yinghua Pan; Scott Pratt

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of baryon-antibaryon annihilation during the hadronic stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision is explored by simulating the chemical evolution of a hadron gas. Beginning with a chemically equilibrated gas at an initial temperature of 170 MeV, the chemical composition of a representative hydrodynamic cell is followed throughout the hadronic stage. The cell's volume changes with time according to a parameterization that mimics a three-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion. The chemical evolution includes both annihilation and regeneration of baryons, consistent with detailed balance. During the hadronic stage, the number of baryons drops by approximately $40\\%$ for the case where there is no net baryonic charge. When the calculations are performed without the baryon regenerating processes, e.g. $5\\pi\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$, the loss of baryons was found to be closer to $50\\%$. After accounting for annihilation, yields are consistent with measurements from the ALICE Collaboration at the LHC. Baryon annihilation is shown to alter the extracted chemical breakup temperature by significantly changing the $p/\\pi$ ratio. Assuming that annihilation cross sections are independent of the strangeness and isospin of the annihilating baryon and anti-baryon, the loss of strange baryons from annihilation is found to be similar.

  9. Quark Nuggets as Baryonic Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan-e Alam; Sibaji Raha; Bikash Sinha

    1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmic first order phase transition from quarks to hadrons, occurring a few microseconds after the Big Bang, would lead to the formation of quark nuggets which would be stable on a cosmological time scale, if the associated baryon number is larger than a critical value. We examine the possibility that these surviving quark nuggets may not only be viable candidates for cold dark matter but even close the universe.

  10. Elastic meson production and Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Diehl

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss recent progress in the theory of exclusive meson production and Compton scattering, focusing on hard-scattering factorization and on the dipole formalism.

  11. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass usingmore »SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  12. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  13. Baryonic pinching of galactic dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafsson, Michael; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper [Cosmology, Particle Astrophysics and String Theory, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden); Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution cosmological N-body simulations of four galaxy-scale dark matter halos are compared to corresponding N-body/hydrodynamical simulations containing dark matter, stars and gas. The simulations without baryons share features with others described in the literature in that the dark matter density slope continuously decreases towards the center, with a density {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r{sup -1.3{+-}}{sup 0.2}, at about 1% of the virial radius for our Milky Way sized galaxies. The central cusps in the simulations which also contain baryons steepen significantly, to {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r{sup -1.9{+-}}{sup 0.2}, with an indication of the inner logarithmic slope converging. Models of adiabatic contraction of dark matter halos due to the central buildup of stellar/gaseous galaxies are examined. The simplest and most commonly used model, by Blumenthal et al., is shown to overestimate the central dark matter density considerably. A modified model proposed by Gnedin et al. is tested and it is shown that, while it is a considerable improvement, it is not perfect. Moreover, it is found that the contraction parameters in their model not only depend on the orbital structure of the dark-matter-only halos but also on the stellar feedback prescription which is most relevant for the baryonic distribution. Implications for dark matter annihilation at the galactic center are discussed and it is found that, although our simulations show a considerable reduced dark matter halo contraction as compared to the Blumenthal et al. model, the fluxes from dark matter annihilation are still expected to be enhanced by at least a factor of a hundred, as compared to dark-matter-only halos. Finally, it is shown that, while dark-matter-only halos are typically prolate, the dark matter halos containing baryons are mildly oblate with minor-to-major axis ratios of c/a=0.73{+-}0.11, with their flattening aligned with the central baryonic disks.

  14. anderson meson physics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility...

  15. Stopping and Baryon Transport in Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Videbaek

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  16. Precision Cosmology and the Density of Baryons in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kaplinghat; M. S. Turner

    2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Big-bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements give independent, accurate measurements of the baryon density and can test the framework of the standard cosmology. Early CMB data are consistent with the longstanding conclusion from BBN that baryons constitute a small fraction of matter in the Universe, but may indicate a slightly higher value for the baryon density. We clarify precisely what the two methods determine, and point out that differing values for the baryon density can indicate either an inconsistency or physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. We discuss other signatures of the new physics in CMB anisotropy.

  17. Exotic hybrid mesons with light quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Thomas A. DeGrand; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs. M. Heller; Jim Hetrick; Craig McNeile; Kari Rummukainen; Bob Sugar; Doug Toussaint; Matt Wingate

    1996-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid mesons, made from a quark, an antiquark and gluons, can have quantum numbers inaccessible to conventional quark-antiquark states. Confirmation of such states would give information on the role of "dynamical" color in low energy QCD. We present preliminary results for hybrid meson masses using light Wilson valence quarks.

  18. New developments in multi-meson systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Detmold; Brian Smigielski

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    New developments in the study of multi-meson systems are reviewed. We highlight a new recursive algorithm for generating the requisite contractions needed for studying complex systems of mesons involving large numbers of particles or multiple species of particles. First results on mixed species systems involving pions and kaons are also presented.

  19. Up to N{sup 3}LO heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory calculation for the M1 properties of three-nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Park, Tae-Sun [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Department of Physics and BAERI, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    M1 properties, comprising magnetic moments and radiative capture of thermal neutron observables, are studied in two- and three-nucleon systems. We use meson exchange current derived up to N{sup 3}LO using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory a la Weinberg. Calculations have been performed for several qualitatively different realistic nuclear Hamiltonians, which permits us to analyze model dependence of our results. Our results are found to be strongly correlated with the effective range parameters such as binding energies and the scattering lengths. Taking into account such correlations, the results are in good agreement with the experimental data with small model dependence.

  20. Thermodynamics of baryonic matter with strangeness within non-relativistic energy density functional model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; F. Gulminelli; M. Oertel

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the thermodynamical properties of compressed baryonic matter with strangeness within non-relativistic energy density functional models with a particular emphasis on possible phase transitions found earlier for a simple $n,p,e,\\Lambda$-mixture. The aim of the paper is twofold: I) examining the phase structure of the complete system, including the full baryonic octet and II) testing the sensitivity of the results to the model parameters. We find that, associated to the onset of the different hyperonic families, up to three separate strangeness-driven phase transitions may occur. Consequently, a large fraction of the baryonic density domain is covered by phase coexistence with potential relevance for (proto)-neutron star evolution. It is shown that the presence of a phase transition is compatible both with the observational constraint on the maximal neutron star mass, and with the present experimental information on hypernuclei. In particular we show that two solar mass neutron stars are compatible with important hyperon content. Still, the parameter space is too large to give a definitive conclusion of the possible occurrence of a strangeness driven phase transition, and further constraints from multiple-hyperon nuclei and/or hyperon diffusion data are needed.

  1. GlueX: Meson Spectroscopy in Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgado, Carlos [Norfolk State University, JLAB; Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the GlueX experiment \\cite{gluex} is to provide crucial data to help understand the soft gluonic fields responsible for binding quarks in hadrons. Hybrid mesons, and in particular exotic hybrid mesons, provide the ideal laboratory for testing QCD in the confinement regime since these mesons explicitly manifest the gluonic degrees of freedom. Photoproduction is expected to be effective in producing exotic hybrids but there is little data on the photoproduction of light mesons. GlueX will use the new 12-GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab to produce a 9-GeV beam of linearly polarized photons using the technique of coherent bremsstrahlung. A solenoid-based hermetic detector is under construction, which will be used to collect data on meson production and decays. These data will also be used to study the spectrum of conventional mesons, including the poorly understood excited vector mesons. This talk will give an update on the experiment as well as describe theoretical developments \\cite{Dudek:2011bn} to help understand how these data can provide insights into the fundamental theory of strong interactions.

  2. The Baryon Catastrophe and the multiphase intracluster medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. F. Gunn; P. A. Thomas

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the theories and observations which together have led to the concept of the Baryon Catastrophe: observations of the baryon fraction on the scale of clusters of galaxies appear to be at least three times as high as the universal baryon fraction predicted by the theory of primordial nucleosynthesis in a flat, $\\Omega_0 = 1$, universe. We investigate whether this discrepancy could be eliminated by treating the intracluster gas as a multiphase medium, and find that this treatment both lowers the calculated mass of gas in a cluster and increases the inferred gravitational potential. These combined effects can reduce the calculated baryon fraction by between a quarter and a half: the precise amount depends upon the volume fraction distribution of density phases in the gas but is independent of the temperature profile across the cluster. Thus moving to a multiphase intracluster medium cannot resolve the Baryon Catastrophe by itself; other possible causes and explanations are discussed.

  3. A model for net-baryon rapidity distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Alvarez-Muñiz; R. Conceição; J. Dias de Deus; M. C. Espírito Santo; J. G. Milhano; M. Pimenta

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear collisions, a sizable fraction of the available energy is carried away by baryons. As the baryon number is conserved, the net-baryon $B-\\bar{B}$ retains information on the energy-momentum carried by the incoming nuclei. A simple and consistent model for net-baryon production in high energy proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The basic ingredients of the model are valence string formation based on standard PDFs with QCD evolution and string fragmentation via the Schwinger mechanism. The results of the model are presented and compared with data at different centre-of-mass energies and centralities, as well as with existing models. These results show that a good description of the main features of net-baryon data is possible in the framework of a simplistic model, with the advantage of making the fundamental production mechanisms manifest.

  4. Absorption of the $?$ and $?$ Mesons in Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Wood; R. Nasseripour; M. Paolone; C. Djalali; D. P. Weygand; the CLAS Collaboration

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their long lifetimes, the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ mesons are the ideal candidates for the study of possible modifications of the in-medium meson-nucleon interaction through their absorption inside the nucleus. During the E01-112 experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the mesons were photoproduced from $^{2}$H, C, Ti, Fe, and Pb targets. This paper reports the first measurement of the ratio of nuclear transparencies for the $e^{+}e^{-}$ channel. The ratios indicate larger in-medium widths compared with what have been reported in other reaction channels.

  5. New Physics Effects From B Meson Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Kundu

    2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, we point out some of the present and future possible signatures of physics beyond the Standard Model from B-meson decays, taking R-parity conserving and violating supersymmetry as illustrative examples.

  6. Rare meson decays into very light neutralinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, Ben [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented for the two-body decays of mesons into light neutralinos and from the first complete calculation of the loop-induced decays of kaons to pions plus light neutralinos and of B mesons to kaons plus light neutralinos. The branching ratios are shown to be strongly suppressed within the MSSM with minimal flavor violation, and no bounds on the neutralino mass can be inferred from experimental data, i.e. a massless neutralino is allowed.

  7. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Lichtl

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  8. Low-Energy Thermal Photons from Meson-Meson Bremsstrahlung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Liu; R. Rapp

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Within an effective hadronic model including electromagnetic interactions via a U$_{\\rm em}$(1) gauge, we reinvestigate photon Bremsstrahlung from a hot hadronic gas as expected to be formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at SPS energies. We calculate photon emission from the reactions $\\pi\\pi\\to\\pi\\pi\\gamma$ and $\\pi K \\to\\pi K\\gamma$ by an explicit (numerical) evaluation of the multi-dimensional phase space integral. This, in particular, allows to avoid the commonly employed soft photon approximation (SPA), as well as to incorporate final-state thermal enhancement factors. % during the hadronic stage of the fireball. Both improvements are shown to result in an appreciable increase of the photon production rate over previous hadronic calculations. Upon convolution over a thermal fireball we find an improvement in the description of recent low transverse-momentum WA98 data at SPS. The influence of both Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal and in-medium effects on "$\\sigma$" and $\\rho$-meson exchanges are briefly discussed.

  9. DO HOT HALOS AROUND GALAXIES CONTAIN THE MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: michevan@umich.ed, E-mail: jbregman@umich.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxies are missing most of their baryons, and many models predict these baryons lie in a hot halo around galaxies. We establish observationally motivated constraints on the mass and radii of these halos using a variety of independent arguments. First, the observed dispersion measure of pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud allows us to constrain the hot halo around the Milky Way: if it obeys the standard Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW) profile, it must contain less than 4%-5% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy. This is similar to other upper limits on the Galactic hot halo, such as the soft X-ray background and the pressure around high-velocity clouds. Second, we note that the X-ray surface brightness of hot halos with NFW profiles around large isolated galaxies is high enough that such emission should be observed, unless their halos contain less than 10%-25% of their missing baryons. Third, we place constraints on the column density of hot halos using nondetections of O VII absorption along active galactic nucleus (AGN) sightlines: in general they must contain less than 70% of the missing baryons or extend to no more than 40 kpc. Flattening the density profile of galactic hot halos weakens the surface brightness constraint so that a typical L{sub *} galaxy may hold half its missing baryons in its halo, but the O VII constraint remains unchanged, and around the Milky Way a flattened profile may only hold 6%-13% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy ((2-4) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). We also show that AGN and supernovae at low to moderate redshift-the theoretical sources of winds responsible for driving out the missing baryons-do not produce the expected correlations with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship and, therefore, are insufficient to explain the missing baryons from galaxies. We conclude that most of missing baryons from galaxies do not lie in hot halos around the galaxies, and that the missing baryons never fell into the potential wells of protogalaxies in the first place. They may have been expelled from the galaxies as part of the process of galaxy formation.

  10. Lepton Number Violation and the Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harz, Julia; Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay, lepton number violating collider processes and the Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (BAU) are intimately related. In particular lepton number violating processes at low energies in combination with sphaleron transitions will typically erase any pre-existing baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In this contribution we briefly review the tight connection between neutrinoless double beta decay, lepton number violating processes at the LHC and constraints from successful baryogenesis. We argue that far-reaching conclusions can be drawn unless the baryon asymmetry is stabilized via some newly introduced mechanism.

  11. Relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates and cold baryons with a stiff equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their superfluid properties, some compact astrophysical objects such as neutron stars may contain a significant part of their matter in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We consider a partially-relativistic model of self-gravitating BECs where the relation between the pressure and the rest-mass density is assumed to be quadratic (as in the case of classical BECs) but pressure effects are taken into account in the relation between the energy density and the rest-mass density. At high densities, we get a stiff equation of state similar to the one considered by Zel'dovich (1961) in the context of baryon stars in which the baryons interact through a vector meson field. We determine the maximum mass of general relativistic BEC stars described by this equation of state by using the formalism of Tooper (1965). This maximum mass is slightly larger than the maximum mass obtained by Chavanis and Harko (2012) using a fully-relativistic model. We also consider the possibility that dark matter is made of BECs and apply the partially-relativistic model of BECs to cosmology. In this model, we show that the universe experiences a stiff matter phase, followed by a dust matter phase, and finally by a dark energy phase (equivalent to a cosmological constant). The same evolution is obtained in Zel'dovich (1972) model which assumes that initially, near the cosmological singularity, the universe is filled with cold baryons. Interestingly, the Friedmann equations can be solved analytically in that case and provide a simple generalization of the $\\Lambda$CDM model. We point out, however, the limitations of the partially-relativistic model for BECs and show the need for a fully-relativistic one.

  12. Search for Quasi Bound $?$ Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Machner

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for a quasi bound $\\eta$ meson in atomic nuclei is reviewed. This tentative state is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. The theory starts from elastic $\\eta$ nucleon scattering which is derived from production data within some models. From this interaction the $\\eta$ nucleus interaction is derived. Model calculations predict binding energies and widths of the quasi bound state. Another method is to derive the $\\eta$ nucleus interaction from excitation functions of $\\eta$ production experiments. The $s$ wave interaction is extracted from such data via final state interaction theorem. We give the derivation of $s$ wave amplitudes in partial wave expansion and in helicity amplitudes and their relation to observables. Different experiments extracting the final state interaction are discussed as are production experiments. So far only three experiments give evidence for the existence of the quasi bound state: a pion double charge exchange experiment, an effective mass measurement, and a transfer reaction at recoil free kinematics with observation of the decay of the state.

  13. Baryon Masses in Lattice QCD with Exact Chiral Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, T W; Chiu, Ting-Wai; Hsieh, Tung-Han

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the baryon mass spectrum in quenched lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. For 100 gauge configurations generated with Wilson gauge action at $ \\beta = 6.1 $ on the $ 20^3 \\times 40 $ lattice, we compute (point-to-point) quark propagators for 30 quark masses in the range $ 67 {MeV} \\le m_q \\le 1790 {MeV} $. For baryons only composed of strange and charm quarks, their masses are extracted directly from the time correlation functions, while for those containing $ u (d) $ light quarks, their masses are obtained by chiral extrapolation to $ m_\\pi = 135 $ MeV. Our results of baryon masses are in good agreement with experimental values, except for the negative parity states of $ \\Lambda $ and $ \\Lambda_c $. Further, our results of charmed (including doubly-charmed and triply-charmed) baryons can serve as predictions of QCD.

  14. Further evidence for narrow exotic low mass baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Although narrow low mass baryonic structures, observed mainly in SPES3 (Saturne) data, were not confirmed in recent experiments using lepton probes, their existence is confirmed in other data, where hadronic probes were used.

  15. Observation of the ?[subscript b][superscript 0] Baryon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The observation of the bottom, strange baryon ?[subscript b][superscript 0] through the decay chain ?[subscript b][superscript 0]??[subscript c][superscript +]?[superscript -], where ?[subscript c][superscript +]??[superscript ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  17. The phase diagram of nuclear and quark matter at high baryon density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima; Chihiro Sasaki

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review theoretical approaches to explore the phase diagram of nuclear and quark matter at high baryon density. We first look over the basic properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and address how to describe various states of QCD matter. In our discussions on nuclear matter we cover the relativistic mean-field model, the chiral perturbation theory, and the approximation based on the large-Nc limit where Nc is the number of colors. We then explain the liquid-gas phase transition and the inhomogeneous meson condensation in nuclear matter with emphasis put on the relevance to quark matter. We commence the next part focused on quark matter with the bootstrap model and the Hagedorn temperature. Then we turn to properties associated with chiral symmetry and exposit theoretical descriptions of the chiral phase transition. There emerge some quark-matter counterparts of phenomena seen in nuclear matter such as the liquid-gas phase transition and the inhomogeneous structure of the chiral condensate. The third regime that is being recognized recently is what is called quarkyonic matter, which has both aspects of nuclear and quark matter. We closely elucidate the basic idea of quarkyonic matter in the large-Nc limit and its physics implications. Finally, we discuss some experimental indications for the QCD phase diagram and close the review with outlooks.

  18. The phase diagram of nuclear and quark matter at high baryon density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review theoretical approaches to explore the phase diagram of nuclear and quark matter at high baryon density. We first look over the basic properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and address how to describe various states of QCD matter. In our discussions on nuclear matter we cover the relativistic mean-field model, the chiral perturbation theory, and the approximation based on the large-Nc limit where Nc is the number of colors. We then explain the liquid-gas phase transition and the inhomogeneous meson condensation in nuclear matter with emphasis put on the relevance to quark matter. We commence the next part focused on quark matter with the bootstrap model and the Hagedorn temperature. Then we turn to properties associated with chiral symmetry and exposit theoretical descriptions of the chiral phase transition. There emerge some quark-matter counterparts of phenomena seen in nuclear matter such as the liquid-gas phase transition and the inhomogeneous structure of the chiral condensate. The third reg...

  19. Light Vector Mesons in the Nuclear Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Wood; R. Nasseripour; D. P. Weygand; C. Djalali; C. Tur; U. Mosel; P. Muehlich; CLAS Collaboration

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The light vector mesons ($\\rho$, $\\omega$, and $\\phi$) were produced in deuterium, carbon, titanium, and iron targets in a search for possible in-medium modifications to the properties of the $\\rho$ meson at normal nuclear densities and zero temperature. The vector mesons were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) via their decays to $e^{+}e^{-}$. The rare leptonic decay was chosen to reduce final-state interactions. A combinatorial background was subtracted from the invariant mass spectra using a well-established event-mixing technique. The $\\rho$ meson mass spectrum was extracted after the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ signals were removed in a nearly model-independent way. Comparisons were made between the $\\rho$ mass spectra from the heavy targets ($A > 2$) with the mass spectrum extracted from the deuterium target. With respect to the $\\rho$-meson mass, we obtain a small shift compatible with zero. Also, we measure widths consistent with standard nuclear many-body effects such as collisional broadening and Fermi motion.

  20. Rare meson decays into very light neutralinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreiner, H. K.; Grab, S.; Koschade, Daniel; Kraemer, M.; O'Leary, Ben; Langenfeld, Ulrich [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen, Germany and Centre for Research in String Theory, Department of Physics, Queen Mary, University of London, E1 4NS London (United Kingdom); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the bounds on the mass of the lightest neutralino from rare meson decays within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with and without minimal flavor violation. We present explicit formulas for the two-body decays of mesons into light neutralinos and perform the first complete calculation of the loop-induced decays of kaons to pions and light neutralinos and B mesons to kaons and light neutralinos. We find that the supersymmetric branching ratios are strongly suppressed within the MSSM with minimal flavor violation, and that no bounds on the neutralino mass can be inferred from experimental data, i.e., a massless neutralino is allowed. The branching ratios for kaon and B meson decays into light neutralinos may, however, be enhanced when one allows for nonminimal flavor violation. We find new constraints on the MSSM parameter space for such scenarios and discuss prospects for future kaon and B meson experiments. Finally, we comment on the search for light neutralinos in monojet signatures at the Tevatron and at the LHC.

  1. K+ production in baryon-baryon and heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, GQ; Ko, Che Ming; Chung, WS.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaon production cross sections in nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-Delta, and Delta-Delta interactions are studied in a boson exchange model. For the latter two interactions, the exchanged pion can be on-mass shell...only contributions due to a virtual pion an included via the Peierls method by taking into account the finite Delta width. With these cross sections and also those for pion-baryon interactions, subthreshold kaon production from heavy-ion collisions is studied in the relativistic transport model....

  2. K+ production in baryon-baryon and heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, GQ; Ko, Che Ming; Chung, WS.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaon production cross sections in nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-Delta, and Delta-Delta interactions are studied in a boson exchange model. For the latter two interactions, the exchanged pion can be on-mass shell...only contributions due to a virtual pion an included via the Peierls method by taking into account the finite Delta width. With these cross sections and also those for pion-baryon interactions, subthreshold kaon production from heavy-ion collisions is studied in the relativistic transport model....

  3. Heavy to light baryon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, X. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Huang, T. [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China)] [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China); [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Li, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Temperature-dependent cross sections for meson-meson nonresonant reactions in hadronic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Ping Zhang; Xiao-Ming Xu; Hui-Jun Ge

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a potential of which the short-distance part is given by one gluon exchange plus perturbative one- and two-loop corrections and of which the large-distance part exhibits a temperature-dependent constant value. The Schrodinger equation with this temperature-dependent potential yields a temperature dependence of the mesonic quark-antiquark relative-motion wave function and of meson masses. The temperature dependence of the potential, the wave function and the meson masses brings about temperature dependence of cross sections for the nonresonant reactions pi pi -> rho rho for I=2, KK -> K* K* for I=1, KK* -> K* K* for I=1, pi K -> rho K* for I=3/2, pi K* -> rho K* for I=3/2, rho K -> rho K* for I=3/2 and pi K* -> rho K for I=3/2. As the temperature increases, the rise or fall of peak cross sections is determined by the increased radii of initial mesons, the loosened bound states of final mesons, and the total-mass difference of the initial and final mesons. The temperature-dependent cross sections and meson masses are parametrized.

  5. Workbook Contents

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  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat ContentHeat ContentHeat

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat ContentHeatHeat Content

  3. Issues in Light Meson Spectroscopy: The Case for Meson Spectroscopy at Cebaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Godfrey

    1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I review some outstanding issues in meson spectroscopy. The most important qualitative issue is whether hadrons with explicit gluonic degrees of freedom exist. To answer this question requires a much better understanding of conventional $q\\bar{q}$ mesons. I therefore begin by examining the status of conventional meson spectroscopy and how the situation can be improved. The expected properties of gluonic excitations are discussed with particular emphasis on hybrids to give guidance to experimental searches. Multiquark systems are commented upon as they are likely to be important in the mass region under study and will have to be understood better. In the final section I discuss the opportunities that CEBAF can offer for the study of meson spectroscopy.

  4. Rho Meson in Dense Hadronic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asakawa, M.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.; Qiu, X. J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Lagrangian, we find that both the rho-meson peak and width increase with increasing nuclear density, and that a low-mass peak appears at invariant mass around three times the pion mass. Including the decreasing density-dependent hadron masses...

  5. Medium Effects on the Rho-Meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asakawa, M.; Ko, Che Ming.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The property of a rho meson in dense nuclear matter is studied using the QCD sum rule. The spectral function appearing on the hadronic side of the sum rule is evaluated in the vector dominance model that takes into account the interaction between...

  6. Charmonium meson and hybrid radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Peng [Indiana U., JLAB; Yépez-Martínez, Tochtli [Indiana U.; Szczepaniak, Adam P. [Indiana U., JLAB

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the non-relativistic limit of the QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge, to describe radiative transitions between conventional charmonium states and from the lowest multiplet of cc¯ hybrids to charmonium mesons. The results are compared to potential quark models and lattices calculations.

  7. Production of Mesons and Baryons at High Rapidity and High PT in Proton-Proton Collisions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen, Norway 10 University of Bucharest, Romania 11 Institute for Space Science, Bucharest, Romania (Dated: May 11, 2007) We present particle spectra

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click

  15. Decays of excited baryons in the large Nc expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose Goity; Norberto Scoccola

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis of the decay widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  16. Cosmological Baryon Sound Waves Coupled with the Primeval Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Naoshi Sugiyama; Humitaka Sato

    1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid equations for the baryon-electron system in an expanding universe are derived from the Boltzmann equation. The effect of the Compton interaction is taken into account properly in order to evaluate the photon-electron collisional term. As an application, the acoustic motions of the baryon-electron system after recombination are investigated. The effective adiabatic index $\\gamma$ is computed for sound waves of various wavelengths, assuming the perturbation amplitude is small. The oscillations are found to be dumped when $\\gamma$ changes from between 1 (for an isothermal process) to 5/3 (for an adiabatic process).

  17. Light Baryon Spectroscopy using the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker Crede

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baryons are complex systems of confined quarks and gluons and exhibit the characteristic spectra of excited states. The systematics of the baryon excitation spectrum is important to our understanding of the effective degrees of freedom underlying nucleon matter. High-energy electrons and photons are a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing a microscope for examining the nucleon and the strong nuclear force. Current experimental efforts with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory utilize highly-polarized frozen-spin targets in combination with polarized photon beams. The status of the recent double-polarization experiments and some preliminary results are discussed in this contribution.

  18. Spectroscopy of triply charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Padmanath, M; Edwards, Robert G; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of excitations of triply-charmed baryons is computed using lattice QCD including dynamical light quark fields. The spectrum obtained has baryonic states with well-defined total spin up to 7/2 and the low-lying states closely resemble the expectation from models with an SU(6)x O(3) symmetry. Energy splittings between extracted states, including those due to spin-orbit coupling in the heavy quark limit are computed and compared against data at other quark masses.

  19. Study of flavor-tagged baryon production in B decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an antinucleon N¯ at the lower vertex. ~Higher excitations of the ground state baryons can also be formed. By ‘‘Lc’’ and ‘‘Jc’’ in the figure, we implicitly include all such excitations. For example, Sc’s could also be produced in this process. All Sc’s decay... strongly by pion emission to Lc .) In the case where one of the popped qq¯ pairs is an ss¯ pair, production of a Jc results. Although external W emission with W2!c¯s can contribute to baryon production @Fig. 1~b!#, it is expected to be severely phase space...

  20. Combining Quark and Link Smearing to Improve Extended Baryon Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Lichtl; Subhasish Basak; Robert Edwards; George T. Fleming; Urs M. Heller; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Ikuro Sato; Stephen Wallace

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of Gaussian quark-field smearing and analytic stout-link smearing on the correlations of gauge-invariant extended baryon operators are studied. Gaussian quark-field smearing substantially reduces contributions from the short wavelength modes of the theory, while stout-link smearing significantly reduces the noise from the stochastic evaluations. The use of gauge-link smearing is shown to be crucial for baryon operators constructed of covariantly-displaced quark fields. Preferred smearing parameters are determined for a lattice spacing a_s ~ 0.1 fm.

  1. Search for Low Mass Exotic Baryons in One Pion Electroproduction Data Measured at JLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to give further evidence for the existence of low mass exotic baryons. Narrow structures in baryonic missing mass or baryonic invariant mass were previously observed during the last ten years. Since their existence is sometimes questionable, the structure functions of one pion electroproduction cross sections, measured at JLAB, are studied to add informations on the possible existence of these narrow exotic baryonic resonances.

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear Jan Feb362 41,298 36,4875

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear Jan Feb362 41,298

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear Jan Feb362

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear Jan

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear JanAnnual",2014

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYearAnnual",2014 ,"Release

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYearAnnual",2014

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197Annual",2014 ,"Release

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197Annual",2014

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197Annual",2014Monthly","4/2015"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet%)"

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click- Underground Storage

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click- Underground

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click- UndergroundTotal

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click-

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)"

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas) (MMcf)"Monthly","4/2015"

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas)

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas)Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase Gas)Monthly","4/2015"

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBase

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBaseMonthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBaseMonthly","4/2015"

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 AlaskaBaseMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015Monthly","4/2015"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015Monthly","4/2015"Annual",2014

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549Monthly","4/2015" ,"ReleaseAnnual",2014

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549Monthly","4/2015"

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549Monthly","4/2015"Monthly","4/2015"

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release Date:","2015/06/30"

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015" ,"ReleaseAnnual",2014 ,"Release

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015" ,"ReleaseAnnual",2014

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015"

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015"Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015"Monthly","4/2015"

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015"Monthly","4/2015"and Distribution

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967Monthly","4/2015"Monthly","4/2015"and

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release Date:","6/30/2015" ,"Next

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release Date:","6/30/2015"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143Monthly","4/2015" ,"Release

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143Monthly","4/2015" ,"ReleaseDaily","7/20/2015"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143Monthly","4/2015"

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143Monthly","4/2015"Monthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data"

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural Gas ProvedCoalbed

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural Gas

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural GasDry Natural Gas

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural GasDry Natural

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural GasDry

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural GasDryNonproducing

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved Natural

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved NaturalProved Reserves, Wet

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved NaturalProved Reserves,

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved NaturalProved

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forAssociated-Dissolved

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab atpri_sum_a_epg0_fwa_dmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab atpri_sum_a_epg0_fwa_dmcf_a.xls" ,"Available

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab atpri_sum_a_epg0_fwa_dmcf_a.xls"

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tab

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tabpri_sum_a_epg0_pin_dmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tabpri_sum_a_epg0_pin_dmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tabpri_sum_a_epg0_pin_dmcf_m.xls" ,"Available

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or tabpri_sum_a_epg0_pin_dmcf_m.xls"

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or30,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1900" ,"Data

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or30,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1900"

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or30,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1900""

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or30,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1900""Natural Gas

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet name or30,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1900""Natural

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973" ,"Release

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"No. 2

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"No. 2Total

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"No.

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"No.Propane

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheet nameMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"No.PropaneMotor

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products "

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oil and

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oil

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oilmbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oilmbbl_m.xls" ,"Available

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude Oilmbbl_m.xls"

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total Crude

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for Total

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied for

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry" ,"Click worksheet

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry" ,"Click

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry" ,"ClickPercentages

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Net Receipts by

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Net Receipts

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Net

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker, Pipeline,

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil by

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil byof by

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil byof

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil"

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net Production of Total

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net Production of

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net Production

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net ProductionUsers Prices

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net ProductionUsers

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net ProductionUsersPrices -

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net ProductionUsersPrices

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net ProductionUsersPricesNo.

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender Net

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender NetArea" ,"Click

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender NetArea"

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender NetArea"Area"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender NetArea"Area"for

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlender

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to End Users "

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to End Users

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to End UsersAcquisition

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to End

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to EndNo. 2 Distillate

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to EndNo. 2

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to EndNo.

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales to

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales toHeating Oil Weekly

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales toHeating Oil

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales toHeating OilPropane

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales toHeating

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales toHeatingand Petroleum

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales toHeatingand

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSales

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSalesCrude Oil and Petroleum

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSalesCrude Oil and

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSalesCrude Oil andDomestic

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSalesCrude Oil

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area ofBlenderSalesCrude

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct SuppliedMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1981"

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProductMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1981" ,"Data

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProductMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1981"

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"ClickMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1981" ,"Data

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"ClickMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataU.S.

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"Marketed ProductionMarketedHeat Content

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content of Natural Gas

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content of Natural GasHeat

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content of Natural

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content of NaturalHeat

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content of NaturalHeatHeat

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content of

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content ofHeat

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content ofHeatHeat

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content ofHeatHeatHeat

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content ofHeatHeatHeatHeat

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat Content

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat ContentHeat

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat ContentHeatHeat

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat ContentHeatHeatHeat

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat ContentHeatHeatHeatHeat

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeat ContentHeatHeatHeatHeatHeat

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content of Natural Gas

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content of Natural

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content of NaturalHeat

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content of

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content ofHeat

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content ofHeatHeat

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content ofHeatHeatHeat

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat Content

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat ContentHeat

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat ContentHeatHeat

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat ContentHeatHeatHeat

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables JulyMonthly","4/2015"Annual",2014 ,"ReleaseMexico (MMcf)"MarketedHeatHeat ContentHeatHeatHeatto

  14. Universal neutrino mass hierarchy and cosmological baryon number asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing Zhizhong [CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918 (4), Beijing 100039 (China)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conjecture that three light Majorana neutrinos and their right-handed counterparts may have a universal geometric mass hierarchy. Incorporating this phenomenological conjecture with the Fritzsch texture of lepton mass matrices in a simple seesaw mechanism, we show that it is possible to simultaneously account for current neutrino oscillation data and the cosmological baryon number asymmetry via leptogenesis.

  15. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (1/2)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  16. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zolotov, Adi, E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  17. The Double Charm Baryon Family at SELEX James S. Russ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    -Charm Baryon Spectroscopy SELEX Double Charm Wine and Cheese 6/13/03. 1 #12;The SELEX Collaboration G.P. Thomas.A. Victorov Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Russia Li Yunshan, Mao Chensheng, Zhao Wenheng, He Kangling, Zheng Shuchen, Mao Zhenlin Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, P.R. China M.Y. Balatz5, G

  18. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (2/2)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  19. Excited States in Staggered Meson Propagators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; C. Bernard; T. Burch; C. DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; E. B. Gregory; U. M. Heller; J. Osborn; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on preliminary results from multi-particle fits to meson propagators with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We are able to measure excited states in propagators with pion quantum numbers, which we interpret as the pion 2S state, and is evidence of locality of the action. In the a_0 (0^{++}) propagators we find evidence for excited states which are probably the expected decay channels, pi+eta and K+Kbar.

  20. Helicity operators for mesons in flight on the lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Thomas, Robert Edwards, Jozef Dudek

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the desire to construct meson-meson operators of definite relative momentum in order to study resonances in lattice QCD, we present a set of single-meson interpolating fields at nonzero momentum that respect the reduced symmetry of a cubic lattice in a finite cubic volume. These operators follow from the subduction of operators of definite helicity into irreducible representations of the appropriate little groups. We show their effectiveness in explicit computations where we find that the spectrum of states interpolated by these operators is close to diagonal in helicity, admitting a description in terms of single-meson states of identified JPC. The variationally determined optimal superpositions of the operators for each state give rapid relaxation in Euclidean time to that state, ideal for the construction of meson-meson operators and for the evaluation of matrix elements at finite momentum.

  1. Ringberg 2003 Vector Mesons Paul Thompson 1 Paul Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringberg 2003 Vector Mesons Paul Thompson 1 Paul Thompson B i r mi ng ham U ni v e r si t y S ummar y H 1 and Z E U S C ollab or at i ons #12;Ringberg 2003 Vector Mesons Paul Thompson 2 Motivation s s e s #12;Ringberg 2003 Vector Mesons Paul Thompson 3 § Experimentally clean process § w id e k

  2. The Vacuum Structure of Vector Mesons in QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rennecke, Fabian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the chiral dynamics of vector mesons in two-flavor QCD in vacuum by utilizing a functional renormalization group approach. This allows us to capture the dynamical transition from the quark-gluon phase at high energies to the hadronic phase at low energies without the necessity of model parameter tuning. We use this to analyze the scaling of vector meson masses towards the chiral symmetry breaking scale, the decoupling of the mesons at high energies and the validity of vector meson dominance.

  3. The Evolution of Galaxies by the Incompatibility between Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding-Yu Chung

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the evolution of galaxies is by the incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. Due to the structural difference, baryonic matter and dark matter are incompatible to each other as oil droplet and water in emulsion. In the interfacial zone between dark matter and baryonic matter, this incompatibility generates the modification of Newtonian dynamics to keep dark matter and baryonic matter apart. The five periods of baryonic structure development in the order of increasing incompatibility are the free baryonic matter, the baryonic droplet, the galaxy, the cluster, and the supercluster periods. The transition to the baryonic droplet generates density perturbation in the CMB. In the galaxy period, the first-generation galaxies include elliptical, normal spiral, barred spiral, irregular, and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In the cluster period, the second-generation galaxies include modified giant ellipticals, cD, evolved S0, dwarf elliptical, BCD, and tidal dwarf galaxies. The whole observable expanding universe behaves as one unit of emulsion with increasing incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. The properties of dark matter and baryonic matter are based on cosmology derived from the two physical structures: the space structure and the object structure. Baryonic matter can be described by the periodic table of elementary particles.

  4. Recent developments in the search for baryonic dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Carr

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological nucleosynthesis calculations imply that many of the baryons in the Universe must be dark. We discuss the likelihood that some of these dark baryons may reside in galaxies as Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs), the remnants of a first generation of pregalactic or protogalactic stars. Various candidates have been proposed for such remnants and we review the many types of observations which can be used to detect or exclude them. Claims to have found positive evidence for some of the candidates have generally turned out to be spurious or questionable, so the status of the MACHO scenario remains controversial. However, it would be premature to reject MACHOs altogether and further observations are likely to resolve the issue soon.

  5. Exotic hybrid mesons from improved Kogut-Susskind fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bernard; T. Burch; C. DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; E. B. Gregory; U. M. Heller; J. Osborn; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize our measurement of the mass of the exotic $1^{-+}$ hybrid meson using an improved Kogut-Susskind action. We show results from both quenched and dynamical quark simulations and compare with results from Wilson quarks. Extrapolation of these results to the physical quark mass allows comparison with experimental candidates for the $1^{-+}$ hybrid meson.

  6. Meson phase space density in heavy ion collisions from interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsch, G.F. (Department of Physics and Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The interferometric analysis of meson correlations provides a measure of the average phase space density of the mesons in the final state. This quantity is a useful indicator of the statistical properties of the system, and it can be extracted with a minimum of model assumptions. Values obtained from recent measurements are consistent with the thermal value, but do not rule out superradiance effects.

  7. Hard Exclusive ?^0-Meson Production at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Wollny for the COMPASS collaboration

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New results for the transverse target spin azimuthal asymmetry A_{UT}^{sin(\\phi-\\phi_S)} for hard exclusive \\rho^0-meson production on a transversely polarised ^6LiD and NH_3 target will be presented. The measurement was performed with the COMPASS detector using the 160 GeV/c muon beam of the SPS at CERN. The asymmetry is sensitive to the nucleon helicity-flip generalised parton distribution E, which is related to the orbital angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon.

  8. Lattice String Breaking and Heavy Meson Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I T Drummond; R R Horgan

    1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how string breaking on the lattice, treated as a mixing effect, can be related to decay rates for heavy quark systems. We use this to make a preliminary calculation of the energy split at maximum mixing for static quarks in QCD from the decay rate for $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B{\\bar B}$. We extend the calculation to achieve rough estimates for the contributions of channels involving $B, B^*, B_s and B_s^*$ mesons to the width of the $\\Upsilon(5S)$.

  9. Phenomenological implications of the nucleon's meson cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Hobbs

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-distance structure of the interacting nucleon receives important contributions from its couplings to light hadronic degrees of freedom -- a light meson cloud -- while an analogous nonperturbative mechanism is expected to generate an intrinsic charm (IC) component to the proton wavefunction. We investigate both possibilities, keeping for the former a special eye to improving the theoretical understanding of the pion-nucleon vertex in light of proposed measurements. Regarding the latter possibility of IC, we highlight recent results obtained by a global QCD analysis of the light-front model proposed in Hobbs et al. (Phys Rev D 89:074008, 2014).

  10. Observation of the doubly strange b-Baryon Omega(b)-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez Orduna, de Jesus, Jose; /CINVESTAV, IPN

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports the first experimental evidence of the doubly strange b-baryon {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} (ssb) following the decay channel {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}(1S) {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} {Omega}{sup -} {Lambda} K{sup -} p {pi}{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 Tev. Using approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, they observe 17.8 {+-} 4.9(stat) {+-} 0.8(syst) {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} signal events at 6.165 {+-} 0.010(stat) {+-} 0.013(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} with a corresponding significance of 5.4 {sigma}, meaning that the probability of the signal coming from a fluctuation in the background is 6.7 x 10{sup -8}. The theoretical model we have to describe what we believe are the building blocks of nature and the interactions between them, is known as Standard Model. The Standard Model is the combination of Electroweak Theory and Quantum Chromodynamics into a single core in the attempt to include all interactions of subatomic particles except those due to gravity in a simple framework. This model has proved highly accurate in predicting certain interactions, but it does not explain all aspects of subatomic particles. For example, it cannot say how many particles there should be or what their masses are. The search goes on for a more complete theory, and in particular an unified field theory describing the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. Twelve elementary particles are known in the Standard Model: the Fermions. They have spin -1/2 and obey the Pauli Exclusion Principle. Fermions are divided into six Quarks: up u, down d, charm c, strange s, top t and, bottom b; and six Leptons: electron e, muon {mu}, tau {tau}, electron neutrino {nu}{sub e}, muon neutrino {nu}{sub {mu}} and, tau neutrino {nu}{sub {tau}}. Quarks interact via the strong force because they carry color charge, electromagnetically because of their electric charge and via the weak nuclear interaction because of the weak isospin. Quarks form color-neutral composite particles known as Hadrons which are divided in Mesons, containing a quark and an antiquark and Baryons, made up three quarks. Leptons have no color charge and can not interact via the strong force. Only three of them have electric charge, hence interact electromagnetically. The motion of non-electrically charged leptons, the neutrinos, is influenced only by the weak nuclear interaction. Every fermion have an associated antiparticle. For quarks, the antiparticle carry opposite electric charge, color charge and baryon number. For leptons, the antiparticle carry opposite electric charge and lepton number. Fermions are suitably grouped together considering their properties and three generations of them are defined. A higher generation fermion have greater mass than those in lower generations. Charged members of the first generation do not decay and form the ultimate building blocks for all the baryonic matter we know about. Charged members of higher generations have very short half lives and are found normally in high-energy environments. Non-electrically charged fermions do not decay and rarely interact with baryonic matter. The way particles interact and influence each other in the Standard Model is result from matter particles exchanging other particles, known as Force Mediating Particles. They are believed to be the reason of the existence of the forces and interactions between particles observed in the laboratory and the universe. Force mediating particles have spin 1, i.e., they are Bosons, and do not follow the Pauli Exclusion Principle. The types of force mediating particles are: the photon {gamma}, three gauge bosons W{sup {+-}} and Z and, eight gluons g. Photons have no mass, the theory of Quantum Electrodynamics describe them very well and are responsible for mediation of the electromagnetic force between electrically charged particles. Gauge bosons are massive, being Z heavier than W{sup {+-}}. They are responsible for the mediation of the weak interactions between particles of different flavors but

  11. Baryon magnetic moments in the background field method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, F X; Zhou, L; Wilcox, W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation of the magnetic moments for the baryon octet and decuplet using the background-field method and standard Wilson gauge and fermion actions in the quenched approximation of lattice QCD. Progressively smaller static magnetic fields are introduced on a $24^4$ lattice at beta=6.0 and the pion mass is probed down to about 500 MeV. Magnetic moments are extracted from the linear response of the masses to the background field.

  12. Baryon magnetic moments in the external field method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, F X; Zhou, L; Wilcox, W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation of the magnetic moments of the baryon octet and decuplet using the external field method and standard Wilson gauge and fermion actions in the quenched approximation. Progressively smaller static magnetic fields are introduced on a $24^4$ latticeat beta=6.0 and the pion mass is probed down to about 500 MeV. Magnetic moments are extracted from the linear response of the masses to the external field.

  13. Compton Scattering on the Deuteron in Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Beane; M. Malheiro; D. R. Phillips; U. van Kolck

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Compton scattering on the deuteron is studied in the framework of baryon chiral perturbation theory to third order in small momenta, for photon energies of order the pion mass. The scattering amplitude is a sum of one- and two-nucleon mechanisms with no undetermined parameters. Our results are in good agreement with existing experimental data, and a prediction is made for higher-energy data being analyzed at SAL.

  14. QCD sum rules for the baryon octet in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Kryshen

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon self-energies are expressed in terms of the QCD condensates of the lowest dimension in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter within the QCD sum-rule approach. The self-energies are shown to satisfy the Gell-Mann--Okubo relations in the linear SU(3) breaking approximation. The results are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by the standard nuclear physics methods.

  15. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  16. Baryonic fraction in the cold plus hot dark matter universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eunwoo Choi; Dongsu Ryu

    1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a study to constrain the fraction of baryonic matter in the cold plus hot dark matter (CHDM) universe by numerical simulations which include the hydrodynamics of baryonic matter as well as the particle dynamics of dark matter. Spatially flat, COBE-normalized CHDM models with the fraction of hot component $\\Omega_h\\leq0.2$ are considered. We show that the models with $h/n/\\Omega_h=0.5/0.9/0.1$ and $0.5/0.9/0.2$ give a linear power spectrum which agrees well with observations. Here, $h$ is the Hubble constant in unit of $100~km/s/Mpc$ and $n$ is the spectral index of the initial power spectrum. Then, for the models with $h/n/\\Omega_h=0.5/0.9/0.2$ and baryonic fraction $\\Omega_b=0.05$ and 0.1 we calculate the properties of X-ray clusters, such as luminosity function, temperature distribution function, luminosity-temperature relation, histogram of gas to total mass ratio, and change of average temperature with redshift $z$. Comparison with the observed data of X-ray clusters indicates that the model with $\\Omega_b=0.05$ is preferred. The COBE-normalized CHDM model with $\\Omega_b>0.1$ may be ruled out by the present work, since it produces too many X-ray bright clusters.

  17. Discriminating Majorana Neutrino Textures in the light of Baryon Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikanta Borah; Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study all possible texture zeros in the Majorana neutrino mass matrix which are allowed from neutrino oscillation as well as cosmology data when the charged lepton mass matrix is assumed to take the diagonal form. In case of one-zero texture, we write down the Majorana phases which are assumed to be equal and the lightest neutrino mass as a function of the Dirac CP phase. In case of two-zero texture, we numerically evaluate all the three CP phases and lightest neutrino mass by solving four real constraint equations. We then constrain texture zero mass matrices from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry through the mechanism of leptogenesis. Adopting a type I seesaw framework, we consider the CP violating out of equilibrium decay of the lightest right handed neutrino as the source of lepton asymmetry. Apart from discriminating between the texture zero mass matrices and light neutrino mass hierarchy, we also constrain the Dirac and Majorana CP phases so that the observed baryon asymmetry can be produced. In two-zero texture, we further constrain the diagonal form of Dirac neutrino mass matrix from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry.

  18. Estimations of baryon asymmetry for different neutrino mass models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amal Kr. Sarma; Hijam Zeen Devi; N. Nimai Singh

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comparison of the numerical prediction on baryon asymmetry of the Universe in different neutrino mass models. We start with a very brief review on the main formalism of baryogenesis via leptogenesis through decay of heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos, and then calculate the baryon asymmetry of the universe for known six neutrino mass models viz., three quasi-degenerate, two inverted and one normal hierarchical models, which are derived from canonical seesaw formula. The corresponding mass matrices for the right-handed Majorana neutrino as well as the Dirac neutrino, which are fixed at the seesaw stage for generating correct light neutrino mass matrices, are again employed in the calculation of baryogenesis. This procedure removes possible ambiguity on the choices of Dirac neutrino and right-handed Majorana mass matrices, and fixes input parameters at the seesaw stage. We find that the ranges of predictions from both normal hierarchical model and degenerate model (DegT1A) are almost consistent with the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. Combining the present result with other predictions such as light neutrino masses and mixing angles, and stability under radiative corrections in MSSM, the normal hierarchical model appears to be the most favourable choice of nature.

  19. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; E. S. Kokoulina; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2015-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can be deviated in a magnetic field and detected. The collinear emission (along the beam direction) of a charged meson may be used to produce high energy (anti)neutron beams. This can be very useful to measure the difference of the cross sections of (anti)proton and (anti)neutron scattering from the target and may open the way for checking sum rules with antiparticles. Hard meson emission allows also to enhance the cross section when the energy loss from one of the incident particles lowers the total energy up to the mass of a resonance. The cross section can be calculated, on the basis of factorized formulas, where the probability of emission of the light mesons multiplies the cross section of the sub-process. Multiplicity distributions for neutral and charged meson production are also given.

  20. Addendum: Triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU_6 quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Fujiwara; Y. Suzuki; M. Kohno; K. Miyagawa

    2007-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU_6 quark-model interaction derived from a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction, which is now energy independent and reserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that about 350 keV is left for the energy which is to be accounted for by three-body forces.

  1. Precision Studies of Light Mesons at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Ketzer; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN's SPS investigates the structure and excitations of strongly interacting systems. Using reactions of 190 GeV/c pions with protons and nuclear targets, mediated by the strong and electromagnetic interaction, an unprecedented statistical precision has been reached allowing new insight into the properties of light mesons. For the first time the diffractively produced 3pi final state has been analyzed simultaneously in bins of invariant mass and four-momentum transfer using a large set of 88 waves up to a total angular momentum of 6. In addition to a precise determination of the properties of known resonances and including a model-indepedent analysis of the pi pi S-wave isobar, a new narrow axial-vector state coupling strongly to f0(980)pi has been found in previously unchartered territory. By selecting reactions with very small four-momentum transfer COMPASS is able to study processes involving the exchange of quasi-real photons. These provide clean access to low-energy quantities such as radiative couplings and polarizabilities of mesons, and thus constitute a test of model predictions such as chiral perturbation theory.

  2. Quark Potential in a Quark-Meson Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chengfu Mu; Pengfei Zhuang

    2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate quark potential by considering meson exchanges in the two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density. There are two kinds of oscillations in the chiral restoration phase, one is the Friedel oscillation due to the sharp quark Fermi surface at high density, and the other is the Yukawa oscillation driven by the complex meson poles at high temperature. The quark-meson plasma is strongly coupled in the temperature region $1\\le T/T_c \\lesssim 3$ with $T_c$ being the critical temperature of chiral phase transition. The maximum coupling in this region is located at the critical point.

  3. Orientifold Planar Equivalence: The Quenched Meson Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biagio Lucini; Gregory Moraitis; Agostino Patella; Antonio Rago

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study of Orientifold Planar Equivalence is performed in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories for N=2,3,4,6. Quenched meson masses are extracted in the antisymmetric, symmetric and adjoint representations for the pseudoscalar and vector channels. An extrapolation of the vector mass as a function of the pseudoscalar mass to the large-N limit shows that the numerical results agree within errors for the three theories, as predicted by Orientifold Planar Equivalence. As a byproduct of the extrapolation, the size of the corrections up to O(1/N^3) are evaluated. A crucial prerequisite for the extrapolation is the determination of an analytical relationship between the corrections in the symmetric and in the antisymmetric representations, order by order in a 1/N expansion.

  4. Transport properties of a meson gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent results on a systematic method to calculate transport coefficients for a meson gas (in particular, we analyze a pion gas) at low temperatures in the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Our method is based on the study of Feynman diagrams with a power counting which takes into account collisions in the plasma by means of a non-zero particle width. In this way, we obtain results compatible with analysis of Kinetic Theory with just the leading order diagram. We show the behavior with temperature of electrical and thermal conductivities and shear and bulk viscosities, and we discuss the fundamental role played by unitarity. We obtain that bulk viscosity is negligible against shear viscosity near the chiral phase transition. Relations between the different transport coefficients and bounds on them based on different theoretical approximations are also discussed. We also comment on some applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Hydrogen like classification for light nonstrange mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Afonin

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent experimental results on the spectrum of highly excited light nonstrange mesons are known to reveal a high degree of degeneracy among different groups of states. We revise some suggestions about the nature of the phenomenon and put the relevant ideas into the final shape. The full group of approximate mass degeneracies is argued to be $SU(2)_f\\times I\\times O(4)$, where $I$ is the degeneracy of isosinglets and isotriplets and O(4) is the degeneracy group of the relativistic hydrogen atom. We discuss the dynamical origin and consequences of considered symmetry with a special emphasis on distinctions of this symmetry from the so-called chiral symmetry restoration scenario.

  6. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fegan, Stuart [INFN-GENOVA

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  7. Light-Meson Spectroscopy with COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Grube for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPASS is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron investigating the structure and spectrum of hadrons. One primary goal is the search for new hadronic states, in particular spin-exotic mesons and glueballs. After a short pilot run in 2004 with a 190 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ beam on a Pb target, which showed a significant spin-exotic $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ resonance consistent with the controversial $\\pi_1(1600)$, COMPASS collected large data samples with negative and positive hadron beams on H$_2$, Ni, W, and Pb targets in 2008 and 2009. We present results from a partial-wave analysis of diffractive dissociation of 190 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ into $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states on Pb and H$_2$ targets with squared four-momentum transfer in the range 0.1 < t' < 1 (GeV/c)^2. This reaction provides clean access to the light-quark meson spectrum up to masses of 2.5 GeV/c^2. A first comparison of the data from Pb and H$_2$ target shows a strong target dependence of the production strength of states with spin projections $M = 0$ and 1 relative to the $a_2(1320)$. The 2004 Pb data were also analyzed in the region of small squared four-momentum transfer t' < 10^{-2} (GeV/c)^2, where we observe interference of diffractive production and photoproduction in the Coulomb-field of the Pb nucleus.

  8. Baryon number fluctuation and the quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    baryon number are also studied. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.64.041901 PAC A new state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma, is ex- pected to be formed in heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies, such as at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ~RHIC...! that has just begun its operation at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Many observables have been proposed as possible signatures for the quark-gluon plasma phase dur- ing the collisions @1#, such as strangeness enhancement @2#, J/c suppression @3...

  9. Baryon number fluctuation and the quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    #, modification of high pT particle spec- trum @4#, and M T scaling @5# and double phi peaks @6# in the dilepton spectrum. Recently, event-by-event fluctuations of various particles have also attracted much attention @7#. Since the baryon and charge numbers... of Ref. @12# for the production of particles with con- serving charges, we have the following master equation for the multiplicity distribution of BB? pairs: dPn dt 5 G V ^Nm1&^Nm2&~Pn212Pn! 2 L V @n 2Pn2~n11 !2Pn11# . ~1! In the above, Pn(t...

  10. Baryonic Bound State of Vortices in Multicomponent Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muneto Nitta; Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Keisuke Ohashi

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a bound state of three 1/3-quantized Josephson coupled vortices in three-component superconductors with intrinsic Josephson couplings, which may be relevant with regard to iron-based superconductors. We find a Y-shaped junction of three domain walls connecting the three vortices, resembling the baryonic bound state of three quarks in QCD. The appearance of the Y-junction (but not a Delta-junction) implies that in both cases of superconductors and QCD, the bound state is described by a genuine three-body interaction (but not by the sum of two-body interactions). We also discuss a confinement/deconfinement phase transition.

  11. Seesaw mechanism, baryon asymmetry and neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Falcone

    2002-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified but very instructive analysis of the seesaw mechanism is here performed. Assuming a nearly diagonal Dirac neutrino mass matrix, we study the forms of the Majorana mass matrix of right-handed neutrinos, which reproduce the effective mass matrix of left-handed neutrinos. As a further step, the important effect of a non diagonal Dirac neutrino mass matrix is explored. The corresponding implications for the baryogenesis via leptogenesis and for the neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. We propose two distinct models where the baryon asymmetry is enhanced.

  12. Observation of the baryonic B decay B ¯ 0 ? ? c + ? ¯ K ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the baryonic B decay B¯¯¯0?¯¯¯0?¯¯¯K? with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471×106 BB¯¯¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. We measure the branching fraction for the decay B¯¯¯0??+c?¯¯¯K? to be (3.8±0.8stat±0.2sys±1.0?c)×10??. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the ?+c branching fraction. We find that the ?+cK? invariant-mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c².

  13. Chiral Lagrangian Parameters for Scalar and Pseudoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardeen, W; Thacker, H

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a high-statistics study of scalar and pseudoscalar meson propagators in quenched lattice QCD are presented. For two values of lattice spacing, $\\beta=5.7$ ($a \\approx .18$ fm) and 5.9 ($a \\approx .12$ fm), we probe the light quark mass region using clover improved Wilson fermions with the MQA pole-shifting ansatz to treat the exceptional configuration problem. The quenched chiral loop parameters $m_0$ and $\\alpha_{\\Phi}$ are determined from a study of the pseudoscalar hairpin correlator. From a global fit to the meson correlators, estimates are obtained for the relevant chiral Lagrangian parameters, including the Leutwyler parameters $L_5$ and $L_8$. Using the parameters obtained from the singlet and nonsinglet pseudoscalar correlators, the quenched chiral loop effect in the nonsinglet scalar meson correlator is studied. By removing this QCL effect from the lattice correlator, we obtain the mass and decay constant of the ground state scalar, isovector meson $a_0$.

  14. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edwards, Robert G.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Thomas, Christopher Edward; Guo, Peng

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the ?, ?' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmore »as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qqbar-like spectrum.« less

  15. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Dudek, Jozef J. [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Thomas, Christopher Edward [Trinity College, Dublin; Guo, Peng [Indiana U.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the ?, ?' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qqbar-like spectrum.

  16. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Dudek, Jozef J. [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Thomas, Christopher Edward [Trinity College, Dublin; Guo, Peng [Indiana U.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the ?, ?' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qqbar-like spectrum.

  17. Structure of light meson multiplets and a semirelativistic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulcher, L.P.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semirelativistic model of light quark-antiquark pairs, which is an extension of the phenomenological model of De Rujula, Georgi, and Glashow, is presented. Our model incorporates significant new relativistic kinetic energy effects as well as important relativistic corrections to the potential energy. For definiteness, the potential of Gupta, Radford, and Repko is used to help define the mass parameters. In order to obtain good agreement between theory and experiment, we include quark-antiquark annihilation effects for the 1S mesons and higher-order spin-spin effects for the 2S mesons. We are also successful at identifying numerous meson states between about 900 and 2300 MeV as members of the 1P, 1D, and 1F multiplets. Predictions are given for the locations of 19 missing meson states between 1300 and 2300 MeV.

  18. The Photoproduction of Hybrid Mesons from Cebaf to HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Close; P. R. Page

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Decay widths, branching ratios and production dynamics of some recently discovered $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}, 0^{-+}$,$1^{--}$ and $2^{-+}$ mesons are found to be in remarkable agreement with the predicted properties of hybrid mesons. We propose tests for this new dynamics, emphasise the critical role of $\\pi b_1$ or $\\pi h_1$ decay channels in discriminating hybrids from conventional states, and suggest that photoproduction may offer special opportunities for isolation and confirmation of hybrids.

  19. Large N QCD in two dimensions with a baryonic chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Galvez; Ari Hietanen; Rajamani Narayanan

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider large N gauge theory on a two dimensional lattice in the presence of a baryonic chemical potential. We work with one copy of naive fermion and argue that reduction holds even in the presence of a chemical potential. Analytical arguments supported by numerical studies show that there is no phase transition as a function of the baryonic chemical potential.

  20. Supersonic relative velocity effect on the baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uroš [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: jyoo@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum analysis to constrain dark energy models with high precision.

  1. Charmed baryon spectroscopy and light flavour symmetry from lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bali, Gunnar; Pérez-Rubio, Paula

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the ground state and first excited state masses of singly and doubly charmed spin 1/2 and 3/2 baryons with positive and negative parity. Configurations with $N_f=2+1$ non-perturbatively improved Wilson-clover fermions were employed, with the same quark action also being used for the valence quarks, including the charm. The spectrum is calculated for pion masses in the range $M_\\pi \\sim 259-460$~MeV at a lattice spacing $a\\sim 0.075$ fm. Finite volume effects are studied comparing lattices with two different linear spatial extents ($1.8\\,{\\rm fm}$ and $2.4\\,{\\rm fm}$). The physical point is approached from the SU(3) limit keeping the flavour averaged light quark mass fixed. The baryon masses are extrapolated using expansions in the strange-light quark mass difference. Most particles fall into the expected SU(3) multiplets with well constrained extrapolations, the exceptions having a possibly more complex internal structure. Overall agreement is found with experiment for the masses and splittings o...

  2. Baryonic Dark Matter: Limits from HST and ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard Gilmore; IoA Cambridge; UK

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent HST and ISO observations provide very severe limits on any compact baryonic contributions to galactic (dark) halos. When combined with Milky Way Galaxy microlensing results, almost the entire plausible range of massive compact baryonic objects is excluded by direct observation. Deep direct imaging at 7mu and 15mu with ISOCAM on the ISO spacecraft directly excludes hydrogen-burning stars of any mass above the hydrogen-burning limit, and of any chemical abundance, from being the predominant explanation of the dark halos of external spiral galaxies. In the Milky Way Galaxy, HST has provided luminosity functions to the hydrogen-burning limit in several globular clusters. The resulting mass functions do not provide any support for dominance by very low-mass stars. This is consistent with field surveys for sub-stellar mass brown dwarfs, which show such objects to be relatively rare. These results are complemented by very deep HST luminosity functions in the Large Magellanic Cloud, providing strong support for the (near)-universality of the stellar mass function. Very recent HST results are available for the nearby dSph galaxy UMi. This galaxy, the most dark-matter dominated object known on kpc scales, has a normal stellar mass function at low masses. The prospects are bright for dark elementary particles.

  3. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  4. Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Oliver K.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Professor Baker was a faculty member at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, and, jointly, a Staff Physicist at Jefferson Lab in nearby Newport News from September 1989 to July 2006. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded the grant DE-FG02-97ER41035 Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei, while Baker was in this joint appointment. Baker sent a closeout report on these activities to Hampton University’s Sponsored Research Office some years ago, shortly after joining Yale University in 2006. In the period around 2001, the research grant with Baker as the Principal Investigator (PI) was put under the supervision of Professor Liguang Tang at Hampton University. Baker continued to pursue the research while in this join appointment, however the administrative responsibilities with the DOE and with Hampton University rested with Professor Tang after 2001, to my recollection. What is written in this document is from Baker’s memory of the research activities, which he has not pursued since joining the Yale University faculty.

  5. Investigation of Semileptonic B Meson Decay to P-Wave Charm Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessop, Colin P.

    2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied semileptonic B meson decays with a P-wave charm meson in the final state using 3.29 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring. We find a value for the exclusive semileptonic product branching fraction: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub 1}{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}){Beta}(D{sub 1}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (0.373 {+-} 0.085 {+-} 0.052 {+-} 0.024)% and an upper limit for {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sub 2}{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}){Beta}(D*{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 0.16% (90% C.L.). These results indicate that at least 20% of the total B semileptonic rate is unaccounted for by the observed exclusive decays, B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, B{sup -} {yields} D{sub 1}{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, and B{sup -} {yields} D*{sub 2}{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}.

  6. Discriminating Majorana Neutrino Textures in the light of Baryon Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borah, Manikanta; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study all possible texture zeros in the Majorana neutrino mass matrix which are allowed from neutrino oscillation as well as cosmology data when the charged lepton mass matrix is assumed to take the diagonal form. Considering two different possible values of the lightest neutrino mass giving rise to quasi-degenerate and hierarchical light neutrino mass spectrum respectively, we write down the Majorana CP phases as a function of the Dirac CP phase using the constraints coming from vanishing or equality of elements in a particular texture zero mass matrix. We constrain texture zero mass matrices from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry through the mechanism of leptogenesis. Adopting a type I seesaw framework, we consider the CP violating out of equilibrium decay of the lightest right handed neutrino as the source of lepton asymmetry. Apart from discriminating between the texture zero mass matrices and light neutrino mass hierarchy, we also constrain the Dirac CP phase so that the observed b...

  7. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  8. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious anti-gravity agent of this acceleration has been called ``dark energy''. To measure the dynamics of dark energy, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10^9 individual galaxies, by observing the 21cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three dimensional brightness mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  9. Baryon Asymmetry in Neutrino Mass Models with and without ?_13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng. K. Francis

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the comparative studies of cosmological baryon asymmetry in different neutrino mass models with and without {\\theta}_13 by considering the three diagonal form of Dirac neutrino mass matrices, down-quark (4,2), up-quark (8,4) and charged lepton (6,2). The predictions of any models with {\\theta}_13 are consistent in all the three stages of leptogenesis calculations and the results are better than the predictions of any models without {\\theta}_13 which are consistent in a piecemeal manner with the observational data. For the best model, the normal hierarchy Type-IA for charged lepton (6,2) without {\\theta}_13, the predicted inflaton mass required to produce the observed baryon asymmetry is found to be 3.6x10 to the power 10 GeV corresponding to reheating temperature TR 4.5x10 to the power 6 GeV, while for the same model with {\\theta}_13, the inflaton mass is 2.24x10 to the power 11 GeV, TR 4.865x10 to the power 6 GeV and weak scale gravitino mass m(2 divided by 3) 100 GeV without causing the gravitino problem. These values apply to the recent discovery of Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV. The relic abundance of gravitino is proportional to the reheating temperature of the thermal bath. One can have the right order of relic dark matter abundance only if the reheating temperature is bounded to below 10 to the power 7 GeV.

  10. Spin Polarisability of the Nucleon in the Heavy Baryon Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Vijaya Kumar; Yong-Liang Ma; Yue-Liang Wu

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a heavy baryon effective field theory with photon as an external field in accordance with the symmetry requirements similar to the heavy quark effective field theory. By treating the heavy baryon and anti-baryon equally on the same footing in the effective field theory, we have calculated the spin polarisabilities $\\gamma_i, i=1...4$ of the nucleon at third order and at fourth-order of the spin-dependent Compton scattering. At leading order (LO), our results agree with the corresponding results of the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, at the next-to-leading order(NLO) the results show a large correction to the ones in the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory due to baryon-antibaryon coupling terms. The low energy theorem is satisfied both at LO and at NLO. The contributions arising from the heavy baryon-antibaryon vertex were found to be significant and the results of the polarisabilities obtained from our theory is much closer to the experimental data.

  11. Comparison of models for baryon calculations in a covariant three-body Faddeev approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossak, Wilhelm R.

    -preserving truncation. In mesons: Chiral symmetry is formalized by AV-WTI (guarantees massless pions in the chiral limit) Symmetry-preserving truncation. In mesons: Chiral symmetry is formalized by AV-WTI (guarantees massless: Simplest realization of AV-WTI keep only vector part of qg-vertex, µ, Helios Sanchis Alepuz (University

  12. Rapidity resummation for $B$-meson wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Long Shen; Yu-Ming Wang

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse-momentum dependent (TMD) hadronic wave functions develop light-cone divergences under QCD corrections, which are commonly regularized by the rapidity $\\zeta$ of gauge vector defining the non-light-like Wilson lines. The yielding rapidity logarithms from infrared enhancement need to be resummed for both hadronic wave functions and short-distance functions, to achieve scheme-independent calculations of physical quantities. We briefly review the recent progress on the rapidity resummation for $B$-meson wave functions which are the key ingredients of TMD factorization formulae for radiative-leptonic, semi-leptonic and non-leptonic $B$-meson decays. The crucial observation is that rapidity resummation induces a strong suppression of $B$-meson wave functions at small light-quark momentum, strengthening the applicability of TMD factorization in exclusive $B$-meson decays. The phenomenological consequence of rapidity-resummation improved $B$-meson wave functions is further discussed in the context of $B \\to \\pi$ transition form factors at large hadronic recoil.

  13. Measurements of the properties of ?c(2595), ?c(2625), ?c(2455), and ?c(2520) baryons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [/Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Gonzalez, B Alvarez [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [/Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of the resonance properties of ?c(2595)+ and?c(2595)+ baryons in their decays to?c+?+?- as well as ?c(2455)++,0 and ?c(2455)++,0 baryons in their decays to ?c+?± final states. These measurements are performed using data corresponding to 5.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Exploiting the largest available charmed baryon sample, we measure masses and decay widths with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for ?c states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited ?c+ states.

  14. Measurements of the properties of ?c (2595), ?c (2625), ?c (2455), and ?c (2520) baryons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; et al

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of the resonance properties of ?c(2595)+ and ?c(2595)+ baryons in their decays to ?c+?+?- as well as ?c(2455)++,0 and ?c(2455)++,0 baryons in their decays to ?c+?± final states. These measurements are performed using data corresponding to 5.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Exploiting the largest available charmed baryon sample, we measure masses and decay widths with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for ?c states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited ?c+ states.

  15. Role of mesons in the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akdogan, Taylan

    The roles played by mesons in the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon are explored using as a basis a model containing vector mesons with coupling to the continuum together with the asymptotic Q2 [Q superscript 2] ...

  16. J/psi absorption by nucleons in the meson-exchange model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Liu, Wei; Ko, Che Ming.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reinvestigate the J/Psi dissociation processes induced by the reactions with nucleons, J/Psi + N -> D-(*) + Lambda(c), in the meson- exchange model. Main constraints used in this work are vector- meson dominance and charm vector...

  17. Effect of in-medium parameters of rho meson in its photoproduction reactions on nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Swapan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist model calculations showing the modification of the hadronic parameters of $\\rho$ meson in the nuclear environment. From these parameters, we extract the $\\rho$ meson nucleus optical potential and show the medium effect due to this potential on the $\\rho$ meson mass distribution spectra in the photonuclear reaction. The calculated results reproduced reasonably the measured $e^+e^-$ invariant mass, i.e., $\\rho$ meson mass, distribution spectra in the $( \\gamma, \\rho^0 \\to e^+e^- )$ reaction on nuclei.

  18. Effect of in-medium parameters of rho meson in its photoproduction reactions on nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swapan Das

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist model calculations showing the modification of the hadronic parameters of $\\rho$ meson in the nuclear environment. From these parameters, we extract the $\\rho$ meson nucleus optical potential and show the medium effect due to this potential on the $\\rho$ meson mass distribution spectra in the photonuclear reaction. The calculated results reproduced reasonably the measured $e^+e^-$ invariant mass, i.e., $\\rho$ meson mass, distribution spectra in the $( \\gamma, \\rho^0 \\to e^+e^- )$ reaction on nuclei.

  19. Bc Meson Formfactors and Bc-->PV Decays Involving Flavor Dependence of Transverse Quark Momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohit Dhir; R. C. Verma

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the Bc form factors in the BSW framework, by investigating the effects of the flavor dependence on the average transverse quark momentum inside a meson. Branching ratios of two body decays of Bc meson to pseudoscalar and vector mesons are predicted.

  20. Decays of Charmed Mesons to PV Final States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya; Jonathan L. Rosner

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    New data on the decays of the charmed particles $D^0$, $D^+$, and $D_s$ to $PV$ final states consisting of a light pseudoscalar meson $P$ and a light vector meson $V$ are analyzed. Following the same methods as in a previous analysis of $D \\to PP$ decays, one can test flavor symmetry, extract key key amplitudes, and obtain information on relative strong phases. Analyses are performed for Cabibbo-favored decays and then extended to predict properties of singly- and doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed processes.

  1. Meson production in high-energy electron-nucleus scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göran Fäldt

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of meson production through two-photon fusion in inelastic electron-nucleus scattering is now under way. A high-energy photon radiated by the incident electron is fused with a soft photon radiated by the nucleus. The process takes place in the small-angle-Coulomb region of nuclear scattering. We expound the theory for this production process as well as its interference with coherent-radiative-meson production. In particular, we investigate the distortion of the electron wave function due to multiple-Coulomb scattering.

  2. Determination of the total width of the eta' meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Czerwinski; P. Moskal; D. Grzonka; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of both the low-emittance proton-beam of the Cooler Synchrotron COSY and the high momentum precision of the COSY-11 detector system, the mass distribution of the eta' meson was measured with a resolution of 0.33 MeV/c^2 (FWHM), improving the experimental mass resolution by almost an order of magnitude with respect to previous results. Based on the sample of more than 2300 reconstructed pp --> pp eta' events the total width of the eta' meson was determined to be 0.226 +- 0.017(stat.) +- 0.014(syst.) MeV/c^2.

  3. On the pair-electromagnetic pulse from an electromagnetic Black Hole surrounded by a Baryonic Remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remo Ruffini; Jay D. Salmonson; James R. Wilson; She-Sheng Xue

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of an expanding Pair-Electromagnetic pulse (PEM pulse) with a shell of baryonic matter surrounding a Black Hole with electromagnetic structure (EMBH) is analyzed for selected values of the baryonic mass at selected distances well outside the dyadosphere of an EMBH. The dyadosphere, the region in which a super critical field exists for the creation of electron-positron pairs, is here considered in the special case of a Reissner-Nordstrom geometry. The interaction of the PEM pulse with the baryonic matter is described using a simplified model of a slab of constant thickness in the laboratory frame (constant-thickness approximation) as well as performing the integration of the general relativistic hydrodynamical equations. The validation of the constant-thickness approximation, already presented in a previous paper Ruffini, et al.(1999) for a PEM pulse in vacuum, is here generalized to the presence of baryonic matter. It is found that for a baryonic shell of mass-energy less than 1% of the total energy of the dyadosphere, the constant-thickness approximation is in excellent agreement with full general relativistic computations. The approximation breaks down for larger values of the baryonic shell mass, however such cases are of less interest for observed Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). On the basis of numerical computations of the slab model for PEM pulses, we describe (i) the properties of relativistic evolution of a PEM pulse colliding with a baryonic shell; (ii) the details of the expected emission energy and observed temperature of the associated GRBs for a given value of the EMBH mass; 10^3 solar masses, and for baryonic mass-energies in the range 10^{-8} to 10^{-2} the total energy of the dyadosphere.

  4. Cosmological implications of two types of baryon acoustic oscillation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Wang, Shuang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We explore the cosmological implications of two types of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data that are extracted by using the spherically averaged one-dimensional galaxy clustering (GC) statistics (hereafter BAO1) and the anisotropic two-dimensional GC statistics (hereafter BAO2), respectively. Methods: Firstly, making use of the BAO1 and the BAO2 data, as well as the SNLS3 type Ia supernovae sample and the Planck distance priors data, we constrain the parameter spaces of the $\\Lambda$CDM, the $w$CDM, and the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) model. Then, we discuss the impacts of different BAO data on parameter estimation, equation of state $w$, figure of merit and deceleration-acceleration transition redshift. At last, we use various dark energy diagnosis, including Hubble diagram $H(z)$, deceleration diagram $q(z)$, statefinder hierarchy $\\{S^{(1)}_3, S^{(1)}_4\\}$, composite null diagnosic (CND) $\\{S^{(1)}_3, \\epsilon(z)\\}$ and $\\{S^{(1)}_4, \\epsilon(z)\\}$, to distinguish the differences between the...

  5. QCD phase diagram at finite baryon and isospin chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kouno, Hiroaki [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for thermal systems with finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub iso}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data at not only {mu}{sub iso}={mu}{sub B}=0, but also {mu}{sub iso}>0 and {mu}{sub B}=0. In the {mu}{sub iso}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, where T is temperature, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub iso}=0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub iso}-T plane at {mu}{sub B}=0 as {mu}{sub iso} increases. The thermodynamics at small T is controlled by {radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{pi}{sup 2}) defined by the chiral and pion condensates, {sigma} and {pi}.

  6. Two-Baryon Systems with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohreh Davoudi

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I derive the most general quantization condition for energy eigenvalues of two interacting baryons in a finite cubic volume when arbitrary twisted boundary conditions are imposed on their finite-volume wavefunctions. These quantization conditions are used, along with experimentally known scattering parameters of two-nucleon systems in the coupled 3S1-3D1 channels, to demonstrate the expected effect of a selection of twisted boundary conditions on the spectrum of the deuteron. It is shown that an order of magnitude reduction in the finite-volume corrections to the deuteron binding energy arise in moderate volumes with a proper choice of boundary conditions on the proton and the neutron, or by averaging the result of periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions. These observations mean that a sub-percent accuracy can be achieved in the determination of the deuteron binding energy at (spatial) volumes as small as ~(9[fm])^3 in upcoming lattice QCD calculations of this nucleus with physical light-quark masses. The results reviewed in this talk are presented in details in Ref. [1].

  7. Weighing Galaxy Disks with the Baryonic Tully-Fisher Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaugh, Stacy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the stellar masses of disk galaxies with two independent methods: a photometrically self-consistent color$-$mass-to-light ratio relation (CMLR) from population synthesis models, and the Baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) calibrated by gas rich galaxies. These two methods give consistent results. The CMLR correctly converts distinct Tully-Fisher relations in different bands into the same BTFR. The BTFR is consistent with $M_b \\propto V_f^4$ over nearly six decades in mass, with no hint of a change in slope over that range. The intrinsic scatter in the BTFR is negligible, implying that the IMF of disk galaxies is effectively universal. The gas rich BTFR suggests an absolute calibration of the stellar mass scale that yields nearly constant mass-to-light ratios in the near-infrared (NIR): $0.57\\;M_{\\odot}/L_{\\odot}$ in $K_s$ and $0.45\\;M_{\\odot}/L_{\\odot}$ at $3.6\\mu$. There is only modest intrinsic scatter ($\\sim 0.12$ dex) about these typical values. There is no discernible variation with color o...

  8. Helioseismology with long range dark matter-baryon interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilídio Lopes; Paolo Panci; Joseph Silk

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how DM-baryon long-range interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new $U(1)$ gauge boson and the photon, affects the evolution of the Sun and in turn the sound speed profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that dark matter particles with a mass of $\\sim 10\\;{\\rm GeV}$, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of $10^{-9}$ and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the \\LUX\\ detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

  9. H_2D^+: a light on baryonic dark matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecilia Ceccarelli; Carsten Dominik

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that the dark halos of galaxies are constituted by cloudlets of cold ( 10^7$ cm^{-3}) molecular gas. Such gas is extremely difficult to detect, because the classical tracers of molecular gas, CO and/or dust grains, have very low abundances and their emission is exceedingly weak. For this reason, the cloudlet hypothesis remains so far substantially unproven. In this Letter we propose a new method to probe the presence of cold H_2 clouds in galactic halos: the ground transition of ortho-H_2D^+ at 372 GHz. We discuss why the H_2D^+ is abundant under the physical conditions appropriate for the cloudlets, and present a chemical model that predicts the H_2D^+ abundance as function of four key parameters: gas density and metallicity, cosmic ray ionization rate and dust grain size. We conclude that current ground-based instruments might detect the ortho-H_2D^+ line emitted by the cloudlets halo, and prove, therefore, the existence of large quantities of dark baryonic matter around galaxies.

  10. Pulse Structure of Hot Electromagnetic Outflows with Embedded Baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) show a dramatic pulse structure that requires bulk relativistic motion, but whose physical origin has remained murky. We focus on a hot, magnetized jet that is emitted by a black hole and interacts with a confining medium. Strongly relativistic expansion of the magnetic field, as limited by a corrugation instability, may commence only after it forms a thin shell. Then the observed $T_{90}$ burst duration is dominated by the curvature delay, and null periods arise from angular inhomogeneities, not the duty cycle of the engine. We associate the $O(1)$ s timescale observed in the pulse width distribution of long GRBs with the collapse of the central 2.5-3$M_\\odot$ of a massive stellar core. A fraction of the baryons are shown to be embedded in the magnetized outflow by the hyper-Eddington radiation flux; they strongly disturb the magnetic field after the compactness drops below $\\sim 4\\times 10^3(Y_e/0.5)^{-1}$. The high-energy photons so created have a compressed pulse structure. Delayed...

  11. Studies of the B(c) meson at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spezziga, Mario; /Texas Tech.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the latest measurements of the B{sub c} meson properties using 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF detector. The results include the B{sub c} mass and the ratio of branching fraction B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi} l with respect to B {yields} J/{psi}K.

  12. Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with a Meson Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Y. Chen; Y. B. Dong; M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The results for the elastic nucleon form factors and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes to the Delta(1232) resonance, obtained with the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with the inclusion of a meson cloud correction are briefly presented. The pion cloud effects are explicitly discussed.

  13. $?$ mesons in strong abelian magnetic field in SU(3) lattice gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Luschevskaya; O. A. Kochetkov; O. V. Larina; O. V. Teryaev

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the masses of neutral and charged $\\rho$ mesons in strong abelian magnetic field in $SU(3)$ gluodynamics. The behaviour of the ground state energy of these particles in the external magnetic field depends on its spin projection $s_z$ on the axis of external magnetic field. The masses of $\\rho^0$ meson with $s_z=\\pm 1$ increase with the field. The masses of $\\rho^{\\pm}$ mesons with zero spin also grow with the magnetic field. The ground state energies of $\\rho^{-}$ meson with $s_z=-1$ and $\\rho^{+}$ meson with $s_z=+1$ diminish as a function of the field, while the energies of $\\rho^{+}$ meson with $s_z=-1$ and $\\rho^{-}$ meson with $s_z=+1$ rise with the field value.

  14. Radiative Decays of the B Meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Hirohisa A

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiative decays of the B meson to the final states K *(892){gamma} and {rho}(770){gamma} proceed through virtual effective flavor-changing neutral current processes which are sensitive to contributions from high mass scales from within the Standard Model of particle interactions and from possible new physics. In the context of the Standard Model, these transitions are of interest in probing the weak interaction behavior of the top quark. In particular, the ratio of branching fractions for the two processes can be used to extract the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|. Potential new physics contributions in these virtual transitions may induce new sources of direct CP violation and enhancement or suppression of the rate of these processes. The B {yields} K*{gamma} is a manifestation of the b {yields} s{gamma} radiative transition. This process has been previously observed by the CLEO collaboration and its branching fraction measured. While the theoretical prediction for the inclusive rate of b {yields} s{gamma} transitions is more robust than that of the exclusive B {yields} K*{gamma}, the prospects for precise measurements of {Beta}[B {yields} K*{gamma}] and direct CP violation in this channel has attracted considerable attention. The analysis described here represents an improved measurement of the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching factions and a more sensitive search for direct CP violation. In 22.7 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector in 1999-2000, we measure: {Beta}[B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}] = 4.23 {+-} 0.40(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}[B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}] = 3.83 {+-} 0.62(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.) x 10{sup -5}. We find no evidence for direct CP violation in the decays and constrain -0.170 < A{sub CP} < 0.082 at 90% Confidence Level. The B {yields} {rho}{gamma} proceeds through the analogous b {yields} d{gamma} radiative transition. As such, its rate is suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} {Omicron}(50) relative to B {yields} K*{gamma} and remains unobserved. Current limits on the branching fractions of B {yields} {rho}{gamma} are still an order of magnitude above the theoretical predictions. While the uncertainty in the theoretical predictions for the branching fraction of this mode are large, it may be possible to reduce these uncertainties by considering the ratio of the branching fractions for B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} K*{gamma} which would lead to a measurement of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|. The analysis presented here represents a search with nearly an order of magnitude more data and new analysis techniques. In a sample of 61 .7 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events, we find no significant evidence for the decay B {yields} {rho}{gamma} is and establish the following 90% Confidence Level upper limits on the branching fraction: {Beta}[B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}] < 1.5 x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}[B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}] < 2.8 x 10{sup -6}.

  15. Measurements of the meson-photon transition form factors of light pseudoscalar mesons at large momentum transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the electromagnetic transitions ?*?? meson. We have measured these form factors in the momentum transfer ranges from 1.5 to 9, 20, and 30GeV(2) for ?(0), ?, and ??, respectively, and have made comparisons to various theoretical predictions....

  16. CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    THE APPLICATIONS AND VALIDITY OF BODE'S LAW CAN WE EXPLAIN BODE'S LAW USING GRAVITY? 8 Law of Gravitation 8 Centre#12;#12;CONTENTS CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION WHO, HOW AND WHEN IS THE BODE'S LAW DISCOVERED? 1 THE BODE'S LAW HOW THE BODE'S LAW SATISFIED URANUS 3 HOW THE BODE'S LAW LED TO THE DISCOVERY OF CERES

  17. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Éric Aubourg; Stephen Bailey; Julian E. Bautista; Florian Beutler; Vaishali Bhardwaj; Dmitry Bizyaev; Michael Blanton; Michael Blomqvist; Adam S. Bolton; Jo Bovy; Howard Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Joel R. Brownstein; Angela Burden; Nicolás G. Busca; William Carithers; Chia-Hsun Chuang; Johan Comparat; Antonio J. Cuesta; Kyle S. Dawson; Timothée Delubac; Daniel J. Eisenstein; Andreu Font-Ribera; Jian Ge; J. -M. Le Goff; Satya Gontcho A Gontcho; J. Richard Gott III; James E. Gunn; Hong Guo; Julien Guy; Jean-Christophe Hamilton; Shirley Ho; Klaus Honscheid; Cullan Howlett; David Kirkby; Francisco S. Kitaura; Jean-Paul Kneib; Khee-Gan Lee; Dan Long; Robert H. Lupton; Mariana Vargas Magaña; Viktor Malanushenko; Elena Malanushenko; Marc Manera; Claudia Maraston; Daniel Margala; Cameron K. McBride; Jordi Miralda-Escudé; Adam D. Myers; Robert C. Nichol; Pasquier Noterdaeme; Sebastián E. Nuza; Matthew D. Olmstead; Daniel Oravetz; Isabelle Pâris; Nikhil Padmanabhan; Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille; Kaike Pan; Marcos Pellejero-Ibanez; Will J. Percival; Patrick Petitjean; Matthew M. Pieri; Francisco Prada; Beth Reid; Natalie A. Roe; Ashley J. Ross; Nicholas P. Ross; Graziano Rossi; Jose Alberto Rubiño-Martín; Ariel G. Sánchez; Lado Samushia; Ricardo Tanausú Génova Santos; Claudia G. Scóccola; David J. Schlegel; Donald P. Schneider; Hee-Jong Seo; Erin Sheldon; Audrey Simmons; Ramin A. Skibba; Anže Slosar; Michael A. Strauss; Daniel Thomas; Jeremy L. Tinker; Rita Tojeiro; Jose Alberto Vazquez; Matteo Viel; David A. Wake; Benjamin A. Weaver; David H. Weinberg; W. M. Wood-Vasey; Christophe Yèche; Idit Zehavi; Gong-Bo Zhao

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data. We take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Ly-alpha forest (LyaF) in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III. BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy, and in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Combining BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a 1.7% measurement of $H_0=67.3 \\pm1.1$ km/s/Mpc. This measurement assumes standard pre-recombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat LCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For open LCDM, our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields $\\Omega_m=0.301 \\pm 0.008$ and curvature $\\Omega_k=-0.003 \\pm 0.003$. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints remain consistent with flat LCDM. While the overall $\\chi^2$ of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2-2.5 sigma) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshifts remain consistent with our constraints, but models where dark matter decays into radiation are sharply limited. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit of 0.56 eV on the summed mass of neutrino species, improving to 0.26 eV if we include Planck CMB lensing. Standard dark energy models constrained by our data predict a level of matter clustering that is high compared to most, but not all, observational estimates. (Abridged)

  18. Gluonic profile of the static baryon at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed S. Bakry; Derek B. Leinweber; Anthony G. Williams

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gluon flux distribution of a static three quark system has been revealed at finite temperature in the pure SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. An action density operator is correlated with three Polyakov loops representing the baryonic state at a temperatures near the end of the QCD plateau, T/T_c = 0.8, and another just before the deconfinement point, T/T_c = 0.9. The flux distributions at short distance separations between the quarks display an action-density profile consistent with a filled Delta shape iso-surface. However the Delta-shaped action iso-surface distributions are found to persist even at large inter-quark separations for both temperatures. The action density distribution in the quark plane exhibits a nonuniform pattern for all quark separations considered. This result contrasts the well-known Y-shaped uniform action density gluonic-flux profile obtained using the Wilson-loop as a quark source operator at zero temperature. We systematically measure and compare the main aspects of the profile of the flux distribution at the two considered temperature scales for three sets of isosceles triangle quark configurations. The radii, amplitudes and rate of change of the width of the flux distribution are found to reverse their behavior as the temperature increase from the end of the QCD plateau region towards the deconfinement point. Remarkably, we find the mean square width of the flux distribution shrinks and localizes for quark separations larger than 1.0 fm at T/T_c = 0.8 which results in an identifiable Y-shaped radius profile. Near the deconfinement point, the action-density delocalizes and the width broadens linearly at large quark separations.

  19. Bulk thermodynamics and charge fluctuations at non-vanishing baryon density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan Miao; Christian Schmidt

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on bulk thermodynamic quantities as well as net baryon number, strangeness and electric charge fluctuations in QCD at non-zero density and temperature obtained from lattice calculations with almost physical quark masses for two values of the lattice cut-off $aT=1/4$ and 1/6 . We show that with our improved p4fa3-action the cut-off effects are under control when using lattices with a temporal extent of 6 or larger and that the contribution to the equation of state, which is due to a finite chemical potential is small for $\\mu_q/T<1$. Moreover, at vanishing chemical potential, i.e. under conditions almost realized at RHIC and the LHC, quartic fluctuations of net baryon number and strangeness are large in a narrow temperature interval characterizing the transition region from the low to high temperature phase. At non-zero baryon number density, strangeness fluctuations are enhanced and correlated to fluctuations of the net baryon number. If strangeness is furthermore forced to vanish, as it may be the case in systems created in heavy ion collisions, strangeness fluctuations are significantly smaller than baryon number fluctuations.

  20. Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media A Comparison of Self-Protecting Digital Content and AACS Independent Security Evaluators www.securityevaluators.com May 3, 2005 Copyright for Optical Media 2 #12;Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media 3 Executive

  1. B-meson spectroscopy in HQET at order 1/m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardoni, Fabio; Bulava, John; Della Morte, Michele; Fritzsch, Patrick; Garron, Nicolas; Gérardin, Antoine; Heitger, Jochen; von Hippel, Georg; Simma, Hubert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the B spectrum performed in the framework of Heavy Quark Effective Theory expanded to next-to-leading order in 1/m and non-perturbative in the strong coupling. Our analyses have been performed on Nf=2 lattice gauge field ensembles corresponding to three different lattice spacings and a wide range of pion masses. We obtain the Bs-meson mass and hyperfine splittings of the B- and Bs-mesons that are in good agreement with the experimental values and examine the mass difference m_{Bs}-m_B as a further cross-check of our previous estimate of the b-quark mass. We also report on the mass splitting between the first excited state and the ground state in the B and Bs systems.

  2. Light Meson Form Factors at near Physical Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Benjamin; Leinweber, Derek; Menadue, Benjamin; Mahbub, Selim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability for most hadrons to decay via strong interactions prevents the direct measurement of their electromagnetic properties. However, a detailed understanding of how these resonant states feature in scattering processes can allow one to disentangle such information from photo production processes. In particular, there has been increasing interest in the determination of magnetic dipole moments using such methods. In a recent study, Gudino et al. provide the first experimental determination of the magnetic dipole moment of the rho meson. To facilitate a comparison with this experimental determination, we present a calculation of the rho meson and pion electromagnetic form factors calculated in the framework of Lattice QCD. Using the PACS-CS 2+1 flavour full QCD gauge field configurations, we are able to access low $Q^2$ values at near-physical quark masses. Through the use of variational techniques, we control excited state systematics in the matrix elements of the lowest-lying states and gain access to ...

  3. Communication with SIMP dark mesons via Z'-portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyun Min Lee; Min-Seok Seo

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a consistent extension of the SIMP models with dark mesons by including a dark U(1)_D gauge symmetry. Dark matter density is determined by a thermal freeze-out of the $3\\to2$ self-annihilation process, thanks to the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the presence of a gauge kinetic mixing between the dark photon and the SM hypercharge gauge boson, dark mesons can undergo a sufficient scattering off the Standard Model particles and keep in kinetic equilibrium until freeze-out in this SIMP scenario. Taking the SU(N_f)xSU(N_f)/SU(N_f) flavor symmetry under the SU(N_c) confining group, we show how much complementary the SIMP constraints on the parameters of the dark photon are to be for current experimental searches for dark photon.

  4. Near-threshold Photoproduction of Phi Mesons from Deuterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Qian; W. Chen; H. Gao; K. Hicks; K. Kramer; J. M. Laget; T. Mibe; Y. Qiang; S. Stepanyan; D. J. Tedeschi; W. Xu; K. P. Adhikari; M. Amaryan; M. Anghinolfi; J. Ball; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bellis; A. S. Biselli; C. Bookwalter; D. Branford; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; S. L. Careccia; D. S. Carman; P. L. Cole; P. Collins; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; A. Daniel; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; B. Dey; S. Dhamija; C. Djalali; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; P. Eugenio; S. Fegan; M. Y. Gabrielyan; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; R. W. Gothe; L. Graham; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Hassall; M. Holtrop; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; S. S. Jawalkar; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; P. Khetarpal; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; P. Konczykowski; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; V. Kuznetsov; K. Livingston; D. Martinez; M. Mayer; J. McAndrew; M. E. McCracken; B. McKinnon; C. A. Meyer; K. Mikhailov; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; B. Moreno; K. Moriya; B. Morrison; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; P. Nadel-Turonski; A. Ni; S. Niccolai; I. Niculescu; M. R. Niroula; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; S. Anefalos Pereira; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B. G. Ritchie; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; H. Seraydaryan; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; I. I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; C. E. Taylor; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; B . Vernarsky; M. F. Vineyard; E. Voutier; L. B. Weinstein; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; Z. W. Zhao

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the differential cross section on $\\phi$-meson photoproduction from deuterium near the production threshold for a proton using the CLAS detector and a tagged-photon beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The measurement was carried out by a triple coincidence detection of a proton, $K^+$ and $K^-$ near the theoretical production threshold of 1.57 GeV. The extracted differential cross sections $\\frac{d\\sigma}{dt}$ for the initial photon energy from 1.65-1.75 GeV are consistent with predictions based on a quasifree mechanism. This experiment establishes a baseline for a future experimental search for an exotic $\\phi$-N bound state from heavier nuclear targets utilizing subthreshold/near-threshold production of $\\phi$ mesons.

  5. Heavy hybrid mesons in the QCD sum rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng-Zhi Huang; Shi-Lin Zhu

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectra of the hybrid mesons containing one heavy quark ($q\\bar{Q}g$) within the framework of QCD sum rules in the heavy quark limit. The derived sum rules are stable with the variation of the Borel parameter within their corresponding working ranges. The extracted binding energy for the heavy hybrid doublets $H^h(S^h)$ and $M^h(T^h)$ is almost degenerate. We also calculate the pionic couplings between these heavy hybrid and the conventional heavy meson doublets using the light-cone QCD sum rule method. The extracted coupling constants are rather small as a whole. With these couplings we make a rough estimate of the partial widths of these pionic decay channels.

  6. Chiral Extrapolation of Lattice Data for Heavy Meson Hyperfine Splittings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X.-H. Guo; P.C. Tandy; A.W. Thomas

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the chiral extrapolation of the lattice data for the light-heavy meson hyperfine splittings D*-D and B*-B to the physical region for the light quark mass. The chiral loop corrections providing non-analytic behavior in m{sub {pi}} are consistent with chiral perturbation theory for heavy mesons. Since chiral loop corrections tend to decrease the already too low splittings obtained from linear extrapolation, we investigate two models to guide the form of the analytic background behavior: the constituent quark potential model, and the covariant model of QCD based on the ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger equations. The extrapolated hyperfine splittings remain clearly below the experimental values even allowing for the model dependence in the description of the analytic background.

  7. An estimate of QGP viscosity from STAR data on $?$ mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative hydrodynamics, with a lattice based equation of state, where the confinement-deconfinement transition is a cross-over at $T_{co}$=196 MeV, we have analysed the STAR data on $\\phi$ meson production in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. From a simultaneous fit to $\\phi$ mesons multiplicity, mean $p_T$ and integrated $v_2$, we obtain a phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity, $\\eta/s =0.15 \\pm 0.05 \\pm 0.03$, the first error is due to the experimental uncertainty in STAR measurements, the second reflects the uncertainties in initial and final conditions of the fluid. A host of STAR data, e.g. $\\phi$ multiplicity, integrated $v_2$, mean $p_T$, $p_T$ spectra ($p_T <$3 GeV), in central Au+Au collisions, are consistent with the estimate of viscosity.

  8. Observation of ?c1 Decays into Vector Meson Pairs ??, ?? and, ??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using (106±4)×10? ?(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider, we present the first measurement of decays of ?c1 to vector meson pairs ??, ??, and ??. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4±0.3±0.5)×10??, (6.0±0.3±0.7)×10??, and (2.2±0.6±0.2)×10??, for ?c1 ???, ??, and ??, respectively, which indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in ?cJ decays. In addition, the measurement of ?cJ??? provides the first indication of the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed ?cJ decay. Finally, we present improved measurements for the branching fractions of ?c0 and ?c2 to vector meson pairs.

  9. Toward the excited meson spectrum of dynamical QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, Jozef J. [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Edwards, Robert G.; Richards, David G.; Thomas, Christopher E. [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Peardon, Michael J. [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed description of the extraction of the highly excited isovector meson spectrum on dynamical anisotropic lattices using a new quark-field construction algorithm and a large variational basis of operators. With careful operator construction, the combination of these techniques is used to identify the continuum spin of extracted states reliably, overcoming the reduced rotational symmetry of the cubic lattice. Excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers (0{sup +-}, 1{sup -+} and 2{sup +-}), and states of high spin are resolved, including, for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation, spin-four states. The determinations of the spectrum of isovector mesons and kaons are performed on dynamical lattices with two volumes and with pion masses down to {approx}400 MeV, with statistical precision typically at or below 1% even for highly excited states.

  10. Production of $?$ and $?'$ Mesons on Nucleons and Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krusche; C. Wilkin

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of $\\eta$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}$ mesons in photon- and hadron-induced reactions on free and quasi-free nucleons and on nuclei is reviewed. The extensive database on $\\gamma N \\to \\eta N$, for both proton and neutron targets, is described in detail and its implications for the search for $N^{\\star}$ resonances much heavier than the dominant $S_{11}(1535)$ discussed. Though less is currently known about the production of the $\\eta^{\\prime}$ or of $\\eta\\pi$ pairs, these also offer tantalizing prospects in the search for the missing isobars. The more limited data available on pion-induced production are still necessary ingredients in the partial wave analysis discussed. The production of the $\\eta$-meson in $pp$ and $pn$ collisions shows once again the strong influence of the $S_{11}(1535)$ isobar, which is in contrast to the relatively weak behaviour seen near threshold for $\\eta^{\\prime}$ production. This difference is reflected in the important final state interaction effects of the $\\eta$ in nuclei that may even lead to this meson being "bound" in some systems. The evidence for this is reviewed for both $\\gamma A$ and $p A$ collisions. The inclusive photoproduction of $\\eta$, $\\eta^{\\prime}$, and $\\eta\\pi$ pairs from nuclei provides further information regarding the production mechanism and the interaction of the $\\eta$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}$ with nuclei and the $\\eta\\pi$ pairs may even allow access to low mass $\\eta A$ systems that are forbidden in direct single-meson photoproduction.

  11. Relativistic description of weak decays of $B_s$ mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Faustov; V. O. Galkin

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The branching fractions of the semileptonic and rare $B_s$ decays are calculated in the framework of the QCD-motivated relativistic quark model. The form factors of the weak $B_s$ transitions are expressed through the overlap integrals of the initial and final meson wave functions in the whole accessible kinematical range. The momentum transfer dependence of the form factors is explicitly determined without additional model assumptions and extrapolations. The obtained results agree well with available experimental data.

  12. Diffusion of hidden charm mesons in hadronic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanya Mitra; Sabyasachi Ghosh; Santosh K. Das; Sourav Sarkar; Jan-e Alam

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of a hot hadronic medium have been evaluated by using hidden charm mesons as probes. The matrix elements for the evaluation of these coefficients are calculated using an effective theory as well as from scattering lengths. Although the transport coefficients show a significant rise with temperature its effects on the suppression of $J/\\psi$ in hadronic matter is not significant.

  13. Transverse quark distribution in mesons: QCD sum rule approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.H.; Hatsuda, T.; Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washingtion, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD sum rules are used to compute the first few moments of the mesonic quark momentum. Transverse, longitudinal, and mixed transverse-longitudinal components are examined. The transverse size of the pion is shown to be dictated by the gluon condensate, even though the mass and the longitudinal distribution are dominated by the quark condensate. The implications of our results for color transparency physics and finite temperature QCD are discussed.

  14. The Nc dependencies of baryon masses: Analysis with Lattice QCD and Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calle Cordon, Alvaro C. [JLAB; DeGrand, Thomas A. [University of Colorado; Goity, Jose L. [JLAB

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baryon masses at varying values of Nc and light quark masses are studied with Lattice QCD and the results are analyzed in a low energy effective theory based on a combined framework of the 1/Nc and Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory expansions. Lattice QCD results for Nc=3, 5 and 7 obtained in quenched calculations, as well as results for unquenched calculations for Nc=3, are used for the analysis. The results are consistent with a previous analysis of Nc=3 LQCD results, and in addition permit the determination of sub-leading in 1/Nc effects in the spin-flavor singlet component of the baryon masses as well as in the hyperfine splittings.

  15. The Nc dependencies of baryon masses: Analysis with Lattice QCD and Effective Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Calle Cordon; T. DeGrand; J. L. Goity

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Baryon masses at varying values of Nc and light quark masses are studied with Lattice QCD and the results are analyzed in a low energy effective theory based on a combined framework of the 1/Nc and Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory expansions. Lattice QCD results for Nc = 3, 5 and 7 obtained in quenched calculations, as well as results for unquenched calculations for Nc = 3, are used for the analysis. The results are consistent with a previous analysis of Nc = 3 Lattice QCD results, and in addition permit the determination of sub-leading in 1/Nc effects in the spin-flavor singlet component of the baryon masses as well as in the hyperfine splittings.

  16. A new relativistic model of hybrid star with interactive quark matter and dense baryonic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Chakraborty; Farook Rahaman; Arkopriya Mallick

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a relativistic model of hybrid star admitting conformal symmetry considering quark matter and baryonic matter as two different fluids. We define interaction equations between the normal baryonic matter and the quark matter and study the physical situations for repulsive, attractive and zero interaction between the constituent matters. From the interaction equations we find out the value of the equation of state (EOS) parameter for normal baryonic matter which is found to be consistent with the value obtained from the Walecka model for nucleonic matter at high density. The measured value of the Bag constant is used to explore the space time geometry inside the star. The theoretical mass-radius values are compared with the available observational data of the compact objects. From the nature of the match with the observational data, we predict the nature of interaction that must be present inside the hybrid stars

  17. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanath, M. [Tata Institute; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Mathur, Nilmani [Tata Institute; Peardon, Michael [Trinity College

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)?O(3) symmetry.

  18. Net-baryon number fluctuations in (2+1)-flavor QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Schmidt

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a lattice study of net-baryon number fluctuations in (2+1)-flavor QCD. The results are based on a Taylor expansion of the pressure with respect to the baryon chemical potential. We calculate higher moments of the net-baryon number fluctuations and compare with the corresponding resonance gas results. We find that for temperature below 0.9T_c the fluctuations seem to agree with the hadron resonance gas predictions. Close to T_c, higher moments are increasingly more sensitive to the critical behavior of the QCD phase transition. Furthermore, we estimate the radius of convergence of the Taylor series as well as the curvature of the transition line in the temperature chemical potential plane.

  19. Studies of the $?$ meson with WASA at COSY and KLOE-2 at DA$?$NE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Moskal

    2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the basic motivations of the KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY experiments is the test of fundamental symmetries and the search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model in the hadronic and leptonic decays of ground-state mesons and in particular in decays of the $\\eta$ meson. At COSY these mesons are produced in collisions of proton or deuteron beam with hydrogen or deuterium pellet target, and at DA$\\Phi$NE $\\eta$ mesons originate from radiative decays of $\\phi$ meson or from the fusion of virtual gamma quanta exchanged between colliding electrons and positrons. This contribution includes brief description of experimental techniques used by KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY as well as some of physics aspects motivating investigations of production and decays of $\\eta$ mesons.

  20. Self-consistent solution of the Schwinger-Dyson equations for the nucleon and meson propagators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracco, M.E.; Eiras, A.; Krein, G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Pamplona, 145-01405-900 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Instituto de Fisica Teorica-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Pamplona, 145-01405-900 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wilets, L. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schwinger-Dyson equations for the nucleon and meson propagators are solved self-consistently in an approximation that goes beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. The traditional approach consists in solving the nucleon Schwinger-Dyson equation with bare meson propagators and bare meson-nucleon vertices; the corrections to the meson propagators are calculated using the bare nucleon propagator and bare nucleon-meson vertices. It is known that such an approximation scheme produces the appearance of ghost poles in the propagators. In this paper the coupled system of Schwinger-Dyson equations for the nucleon and the meson propagators are solved self-consistently including vertex corrections. The interplay of self-consistency and vertex corrections on the ghosts problem is investigated. It is found that the self-consistency does not affect significantly the spectral properties of the propagators. In particular, it does not affect the appearance of the ghost poles in the propagators.

  1. Light Meson Form Factors at near Physical Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Owen; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Benjamin Menadue; Selim Mahbub

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability for most hadrons to decay via strong interactions prevents the direct measurement of their electromagnetic properties. However, a detailed understanding of how these resonant states feature in scattering processes can allow one to disentangle such information from photo production processes. In particular, there has been increasing interest in the determination of magnetic dipole moments using such methods. In a recent study, Gudino et al. provide the first experimental determination of the magnetic dipole moment of the rho meson. To facilitate a comparison with this experimental determination, we present a calculation of the rho meson and pion electromagnetic form factors calculated in the framework of Lattice QCD. Using the PACS-CS 2+1 flavour full QCD gauge field configurations, we are able to access low $Q^2$ values at near-physical quark masses. Through the use of variational techniques, we control excited state systematics in the matrix elements of the lowest-lying states and gain access to the matrix elements of the first excited state. Our determination of the rho meson $g$-factor $g_{\\rho} = 2.21(8)$ is in excellent agreement with this experimental determination, but with a significantly smaller uncertainty.

  2. Test of OZI violation in vector meson production with COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Bernhard; Karin Schönning; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN SPS completed its data taking with hadron beams (p, \\pi, K) in the years 2008 and 2009 by collecting a large set of data using different targets (H2, Pb, Ni, W). These data are dedicated to hadron spectroscopy, where the focus is directed to the search for exotic bound states of quarks and gluons (hybrids, glueballs). The production of such states is known to be favoured in glue-rich environments, e.g. so-called OZI-forbidden processes. The OZI rule postulates that processes with disconnected quark line diagrams are forbidden. On the one hand, the study of the degree of OZI violation in vector meson production yields the possibility to learn more about the involved production mechanisms. On the other hand it helps to understand the nucleon's structure itself. Contrary to former experiments, the large data sample allows for detailed studies in respect to Feynman's variable xF. We present results from the ongoing analysis on the comparison of \\omega and \\phi vector mesons production in pp->p(\\omega/\\phi)p, where the possibility of measuring the spin alignment of both vector mesons at the same time makes COMPASS unique.

  3. Production of spin-3 mesons in diffractive DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Caporale; I. P. Ivanov

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the amplitudes of J^{PC}=3^{--} meson production in diffractive DIS within the k_t-factorization approach, with a particular attention paid to the rho_3(1690) meson. We find that at all Q^2 the rho_3(1690) production cross section is 2-5 times smaller than the rho(1700) production cross section, which is assumed to be a pure D-wave state. Studying sigma_L and sigma_T separately, we observe domination of rho_3 in sigma_L and domination of rho(1700) in sigma_T and offer an explanation of this behavior in simple terms. We also find very strong contributions -- sometimes even domination -- of the s-channel helicity violating amplitudes. The typical color dipole sizes probed in rho_3 production are shown to be larger than those in the ground state rho production, and the energy dependence of rho_3 cross section turns out to be much flatter than the rho production cross section. All the conclusions about the relative behavior of rho_3(1690) and rho(1700) mesons are numerically stable against variations of input parameters.

  4. Incoherent photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons off nuclei at forward angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgyan, Sergey [JINR; Gasparian, Ashot H. [North Carolina Ag. and Tech. St. U; Gan, Liping [University of North Carolina at Wilmington; Larin, Ilya F. [ITEP, Moscow; Khandaker, Mahbubul A. [Idaho State U

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the photon tagging facilities together with the novel, high-resolution fast calorimetry make it possible to perform photoproduction cross section measurements of pseudoscalar mesons on nuclei with a percent level accuracy. The extraction of the radiative decay widths, needed for testing the symmetry breaking effects in QCD, from these measurements at small angles is done by the Primakoff method. This method requires theoretical treatment of all processes participating in these reactions at the same percent level. The most updated description of general processes, including the nuclear coherent amplitude, is done in our previous paper. In this work, in the framework of the Glauber multiple scattering theory, we obtain analytical expressions for the incoherent cross section of the photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons off nuclei accounting for the mesons absorption in nuclei and the Pauli suppression at forward production angles. As illustrations of the obtained formulas, we calculate the incoherent cross section for photoproduction from a closed shell nucleus, {sup 16}O, and from an unclosed shell nucleus, {sup 12}C. These calculations allow one to compare different approaches and estimate their impact on the incoherent cross section of the processes under consideration.

  5. Incoherent photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons off nuclei at forward angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Gevorkyan; A. Gasparian; L. Gan; I. Larin; M. Khandaker

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the photon tagging facilities together with the novel, high resolution fast calorimetry made possible to perform photoproduction cross section measurements of pseudoscalar mesons on nuclei with a percent level accuracy. The extraction of the radiative decay widths, needed for testing the symmetry breaking effects in QCD, from these measurements at small angles is done by the Primakoff method. This method requires theoretical treatment of all processes participating in these reactions at the same percent level. The most updated description of general processes, including the nuclear coherent amplitude, is done in our previous paper. In this work, based on the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory, we obtain analytical expressions for the incoherent cross section of the photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons off nuclei accounting for the mesons absorption in nuclei and Pauli suppression at forward production angles. As illustrations of the obtained formulas, we calculate the incoherent cross section for photoproduction from a closed shell nucleus, 16^O, and from an unclosed shell nucleus, 12^C. These calculations allow one to compare different approaches and estimate their impact on the incoherent cross section of the processes under consideration.

  6. Baryon Resonances in the Double Pion Channel at Jefferson Lab (CEBAF): Experimental and Physical Analysis Status and Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Ripani

    1999-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Decay of light quark excited baryons in the double pion channel is discussed, as a particular way of investigating poorly know baryon resonances and searching for "missing states" predicted by quark models. A possible approach to the data analysis is discussed and some preliminary data from the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory are presented.

  7. Further Evidence of Narrow Baryonic Structures with Hadronic as Well as Leptonic Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Although extracted from several experiments using hadronic probes \\cite{bor1}, narrow baryonic structures have been sometimes met with disbelief. New signatures are presented, which appear from already published data, obtained with hadronic probes as well as with leptonic probes. The authors of these results did not take into account the possibility to associate the discontinuities of their spectra with the topic of narrow baryonic low mass structures. The stability of the observed narrow structure masses, represents a confirmation of their genuine existence.

  8. SuStainability table of contentS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    SuStainability table of contentS executive Summary-Related Sustainability Options ........................................... 41 Information Technology Infrastucture #12;sustainability 2 Private Giving

  9. Near Mass Degeneracy in the Scalar Meson Sector: Implications for $B^*_{(s)0}$ and $B'_{(s)1}$ Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Yang Cheng; Fu-Sheng Yu

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The empirical observation of near degeneracy of scalar mesons above 1 GeV, namely, the mass of the strange-flavor scalar meson is similar to that of the non-strange one, is at variance with the naive expectation of the quark model. Qualitatively, the approximate mass degeneracy can be understood as a consequence of self-energy effects due to strong coupled channels which will push down the mass of the heavy scalar meson in the strange sector more than that in the non-strange partner. However, it works in the conventional model without heavy quark expansion, but not in the approach of heavy meson chiral perturbation theory as mass degeneracy and the physical masses of $D_{s0}^*$ and $D_0^*$ cannot be accounted for simultaneously. In the heavy quark limit, near mass degeneracy observed in the scalar charm sector will imply the same phenomenon in the $B$ system. We have the prediction $M_{B_0^*}\\approx M_{B_{s0}^*}\\approx 5715\\,{\\rm MeV}+\\delta\\Delta_S$ based on heavy quark symmetry and the leading-order QCD correction, where $\\delta\\Delta_S$ arises from $1/m_Q$ corrections. A crude estimate indicates that $\\delta\\Delta_S$ is of order $-35$ MeV or less. We stress that the closeness of $B_{s0}^*$ and $B_0^*$ masses implied by heavy quark symmetry is not spoiled by $1/m_Q$ or QCD corrections. The mass-shift effect on $K_0^*(1430)$ is discussed.

  10. Wave functions and decay constants of $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao-Zhi Yang

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the decay constants of $D$ and $D_s$ mesons measured in experiment recently, we revisit the study of the bound states of quark and antiquark in $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model. The relativistic bound state wave equation is solved numerically. The masses, decay constants and wave functions of $B$ and $D$ mesons are obtained. Both the masses and decay constants obtained here can be consistent with the experimental data. The wave functions can be used in the study of $B$ and $D$ meson decays.

  11. Measurement of leptonic and hadronic decays of omega- and phi-mesons at RHIC by PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Riabov

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC measured production of the \\omega- and \\phi- mesons in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 63 and 200 GeV. Particle properties were studied using hadronic and di-electron decay channels. Transverse momentum (mass) spectra measured in different decay modes are found to be in agreement with each other within the errors. Nuclear modification factors R_{AA} measured for both mesons are consistent with results previously obtained for other neutral mesons. Position of the meson mass peaks and their widths reconstructed in hadronic decay channels are in agreement with their properties measured in vacuum.

  12. Elliptic flow of $?$ and $?^{0}$ Mesons in Heavy-Ion Collisions at 2 AGeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Taranenko; A. Kugler; R. Pleskac; P. Tlusty; V. Wagner; H. Lohner; R. W. Ostendorf; R. H. Siemssen; P. H. Vogt; H. W. Wilschut; R. Averbeck; S. Hlavac; R. Holzmann; A. Schubert; R. S. Simon; R. Stratmann; F. Wissmann; Y. Charbonnier; G. Martinez; Y. Schutz; J. Diaz; A. Marin; A. Doppenschmidt; M. Appenheimer; V. Hejny; V. Metag; R. Novotny; H. Stroher; J. Weiss; A. R. Wolf; M. Wolf; TAPS Collaboration

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Azimuthal distributions of $\\eta$ and $\\pi^{0}$ mesons emitted at midrapidity in collisions of 1.9 AGeV $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and 2 AGeV $^{40}$Ca+$^{nat}$Ca are studied as a function of the number of projectile-like spectator nucleons. The observed anisotropy corresponds to a negative elliptic flow signal for $\\eta$ mesons, indicating a preferred emission perpendicular to the reaction plane. In contrast, only small azimuthal anisotropies are observed for $\\pi^{0}$ mesons. This may indicate that $\\eta$ mesons freeze out earlier from the fire ball than pions.

  13. Introduction 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organize the particles into six categories: Gauge and Higgs bosons Leptons Quarks Mesons Baryons Searches

  14. Observation of the Omega(b)- Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the Xi(b)- and Omega(b)- Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0 x 10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. In addition, for the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon they measure a mass of 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps.

  15. MIMAC-HE3: A NEW DETECTOR FOR NON-BARYONIC DARK MATTER SEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    V could be detected in the MACHe3 [3] prototype with the source emitting the 122 keV 1 #12;2 gamma rays privileged properties for direct detection [1]. These properties can be enumerated as follow: i) its for direct detection of non-baryonic dark matter is presented. The privileged properties of 3He

  16. The dE/dx method and its implementation on the search for the lambdab baryon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkoris, Michael

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine in detail the dE/dx method for particle identification in the case of the long lived secondary hadrons and we try to implement it on the search for the elusive Ab baryon using a Monte Carlo simulation. We also analyze pp collision data...

  17. The baryon vector current in the combined chiral and 1/Nc expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Goity, Jose L [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon vector current is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of colors. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference and SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. The results are compared against the available experimental data through several fits in order to extract information about the unknown parameters. The large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory predictions are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1/Nc expansion and with the experimental data. The effect of SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking for the |Delta S|=1 vector current form factors f1(0) results in a reduction by a few percent with respect to the corresponding SU(3) symmetric values.

  18. Hadron resonance gas and mean-field nuclear matter for baryon number fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an estimate for the skewness and the kurtosis of the baryon number distribution in two representative models; i.e., models for a hadron resonance gas and relativistic mean-field nuclear matter. We emphasize formal similarity between these two descriptions. The hadron resonance gas leads to a deviation from the Skellam distribution if quantum statistical correlation is taken into account at high baryon density, but this effect is not strong enough to explain fluctuation data seen in the beam-energy scan at RHIC/STAR. In the calculation of mean-field nuclear matter the density correlation with the vector \\omega-field rather than the effective mass with the scalar \\sigma-field renders the kurtosis suppressed at higher baryon density so as to account for the observed behavior of the kurtosis. We finally discuss the difference between the baryon number and the proton number fluctuations from correlation effects in isospin space. Our numerical results suggest that such effects are only minor even in the cas...

  19. The Cosmic QCD Phase Transition, Quasi-baryonic Dark Matter and Massive Compact Halo Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibaji Banerjee; Abhijit Bhattacharyya; Sanjay K. Ghosh; Sibaji Raha; Bikash Sinha; Hiroshi Toki

    2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the cold dark matter (CDM) is composed entirely of quark matter, arising from a cosmic quark-hadron transition. We denote this phase as "quasibaryonic", distinct from the usual baryons. We show that compact gravitational lenses, with masses around 0.5 (M_{\\odot}), could have evolved out of the quasibaryonic CDM.

  20. Hadron resonance gas and mean-field nuclear matter for baryon number fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an estimate for the skewness and the kurtosis of the baryon number distribution in two representative models; i.e., models of a hadron resonance gas and relativistic mean-field nuclear matter. We emphasize formal similarity between these two descriptions. The hadron resonance gas leads to a deviation from the Skellam distribution if quantum statistical correlation is taken into account at high baryon density, but this effect is not strong enough to explain fluctuation data seen in the beam-energy scan at RHIC/STAR. In the calculation of mean-field nuclear matter the density correlation with the vector \\omega-field rather than the effective mass with the scalar \\sigma-field renders the kurtosis suppressed at higher baryon density so as to account for the experimentally observed behavior of the kurtosis. We finally discuss the difference between the baryon number and the proton number fluctuations from correlation effects in isospin space. Our numerical results suggest that such effects are only minor even in the case of complete randomization of isospin.